Which Of The Following Describes The Unique Character Of Jesus

10 Character Traits of Jesus To Emulate

Both Christians and non-Christians are generally in agreement that Jesus is the finest role model one could hope to have. People perceive the finest attributes that humans can have in him, such as his faith, persistence, charity, and even intelligence, which they admire. Because the Bible encourages everyone to strive to become more like Jesus on a daily basis, it is beneficial to learn about some of the characteristics He possessed. There are 10 characteristics of Jesus that everyone should strive to mimic, and the following is a list of them.

1)Compassionate

Jesus never turned away from anyone; instead, He always looked upon them and felt compassion for them (Matthew 9:36). When individuals were in his immediate vicinity, Jesus was able to discern their true needs and made an effort to meet those requirements. Some needed physical treatment, while others needed spiritual healing because the source of the problem was spiritual. In all situations, however, Jesus took the time to genuinely observe that people were in distress—and His compassion compelled Him to intervene to alleviate their suffering.

2)Servant

Without a question, Jesus was the ideal servant in the New Testament. In spite of the fact that He had received high accolades and even had a respectable following, He made it a point to teach them the importance of serving others by actually doing it himself. Even in Mark 10:45, Jesus expresses his desire to serve by saying, “the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve.” Despite the fact that He had the ability to obtain everything he desired, receive acclaim, and be lavished with attention, He chose to do the exact opposite by humble himself and serving others.

3)Loving

Clearly, Jesus cared about the well-being of others. In the absence of compassion and service, He would not be who He claims to be. Jesus said that there is no greater love than to die for a friend, and He demonstrated this claim by dying for one of His own. Those who question His love just have to gaze to the cross and witness the anguish that He endured for their sakes to be convinced. He had to go through that horrific death in order for everyone to be saved. That, without a doubt, is the epitome of real love at its finest.

4)Forgiving

In Luke 23:34, Jesus, while hanging on the cross, says something that is both shocking and profound: “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.” This is one of the most shocking statements ever spoken in Scripture. Even when He was bleeding and in anguish, Jesus had His heart focused on forgiveness—even forgiveness for those who had placed Him in that position in the first place! In stark contrast to the usual slogan of looking out for number one and getting personal justice, this is something that should be avoided.

5)Committed

Jesus showed no signs of being uncommitted in any way. He was completely immersed in the present moment and completely devoted to his objectives, no matter where he was or who he was with. After spending hours in the Garden of Gethsemane pleading with the Father to save Him from bearing the cross and suffering all that physical anguish, He realized that it was the only way to atone for all human sin, and He remained entirely devoted to His mission.

There were obviously many difficulties He had to overcome during His mission, yet He remained focused and ended strong.

6)Prayerful

He always found time to be alone and pray, no matter how hectic his ministry became. Whether it was in the garden of Gethsemane, across a river, or on a hillside, Jesus disappeared for a period of time in order to pray to the Father. The search for Him was never in vain; He never refused to accept anyone’s invitation to come find him; yet, He made it a priority to spend time with His heavenly Father.

7)Gentleness

There were undoubtedly occasions when Jesus used strong words, but He also recognized when it was right to employ soothing words. Children seemed to enjoy coming to him, and He made certain that the disciples were aware that they were not to obstruct them when they did so. When He is speaking with His followers, mother, or other females, He may be quite compassionate and kind in his tone. In contrast, when He was rebuking someone or making a point in a debate, He recognized when it was important to turn up the heat and only did so in a strategic manner.

8)Patience

Throughout the gospels, Jesus is always shown as a guy who is extremely patient. Indeed, He was surrounded by followers who continuously questioned Him, Pharisees and Sadducees who constantly assailed Him, and vast crowds who wouldn’t leave Him alone in the face of opposition. Despite everything, He maintained His calm and answered correctly to each and every individual.

9)Self-Control

Prior to beginning His ministry, Jesus spent time in the desert, where He was tempted by the Devil and tested. Despite the fact that He was offered food, power, and a variety of other things, Jesus maintained complete control over his wants and submitted them completely to the Father’s plan. Certainly, he had wants for food and other material things, but he had a greater desire to follow the Lord and complete the task that He had set for himself.

10)Humble

Jesus spent time in the desert, being tempted by the Devil, prior to beginning His mission. While being given food, power, and a variety of other things, Jesus remained in complete control of his wants and surrendered them entirely to the Father’s plan. His needs for food and other things were strong, but his larger desire was to follow the Lord and complete the task that He had set for himself.

Final Thoughts

The world does not require more role models; rather, it requires more of Jesus, who is the ultimate role model for all people. People will not find a more positive role model than Jesus Christ, who embodies all of the characteristics that people should strive to emulate.

Guest Post By Michael Krauszer

Michael Krauszer is the owner/founder ofChristian Literature Review, a website committed to offering christian evaluations of many genres of literature–from movies to novels. He holds a bachelor’s degree in English from The College of New Jersey, which he puts to use for the evaluations he writes for Christian Literature Review. In the event that you’re an author and would like him to review your work, you may reach out to him at More information on the character may be found at:10 Awesome Traits of a Godly Woman.

Permission has been granted to use. All intellectual property rights are retained. Tagged as:Jesus,Jesus’ character traits,guest post

Introduction: The Uniqueness of Jesus

Jesus Christ is the most important person to have ever lived. His moral nature, His teachings, and his effect on history all serve to indicate that He is, in fact, the Creator of the universe. Man has never created a person who is worthy of being compared to Jesus despite two thousand years of progress in education, technology, philosophy, medicine, and scientific discovery and experimentation. His divinity and humanity are unparalleled in the history of the world. His life, death, and resurrection were required in order for mankind to be saved.

Bible Study: The Entrance of Jesus Christ Into the World

  1. According to His remark in John 17:5, where was Jesus Christ before to His entry into the world
  2. Take a look at Matthew 1:18-23. Summarize the events surrounding the birth of Jesus in your own words

According to His remark in John 17:5, where was Jesus Christ prior to His entry into the world? Look to Matthew 1:18-23 for some inspiration. Summarize the events leading up to Jesus’ birth in your own words, if possible.

The Character of Jesus

  1. Make a description of Jesus’ personality based on these scriptures. (Luke 23:33-34, John 2:13-17, John 13:1-17, Romans 5:8-1, to name a few passages.) What is the difference between Jesus’ attitude toward the following and the attitude of His contemporaries toward them? Adults (Matthew 14:15-21), children (Mark 10:13-16), and those who sin (Luke 9:51-56) are all mentioned in the Bible. What was it that made the persons listed below love Christ? The widow of Nain (Luke 7:11-15), the wicked woman (Luke 7:36-50), Mary and Martha (Luke 11:30-44), and others are mentioned in the Bible. Throughout His life, Jesus exhibited unfailing grace, incredible intelligence, and extraordinary comprehension and knowledge. He also shown unending patience. He had a continuous ability to satisfy God. Take a look at Matthew 7:28-29. Aside from astonishment, what other emotions do you believe the people had to His teachings
  2. How do you feel about Jesus and why

Make a description of Jesus’ personality based on these scriptures! The Bible (Luke 23:33-34, John 2:13-17, John 13:1-17, Romans 5:8-1, etc.) teaches that a person’s spirituality is determined by his or her behavior. When faced with the following situations, how does Jesus’ attitude differ from that of His contemporaries? Adults (Matthew 14:15-21), children (Mark 10:13-16), and those who transgress (Luke 9:51-56) are all examples of those who are offending. When asked why they loved Christ, the following individuals responded: Luke 7:11-15 tells the story of a widow from Nain, and Luke 7:36-50 tells the story of a wicked woman, as well as the story of Mary and Martha (John 11:30-44).

Throughout his life, he had pleasing God to his credit.

Aside from astonishment, what other emotions do you believe the people had to His teachings; how do you feel about Jesus and why; and

Bible Study: Jesus Christ as a teacher

  1. Create a character description for Jesus based on these scriptures. The Bible (Luke 23:33-34, John 2:13-17, John 13:1-17, Romans 5:8-1, etc.) teaches that a person’s spirituality is determined by his or her actions. What is the difference between Jesus’ attitude and the attitude of His contemporaries regarding the following? Adults (Matthew 14:15-21), children (Mark 10:13-16), and those who sin (Luke 9:51-56) are among those who will be judged. What was it about the following persons that made them love Christ? The widow of Nain (Luke 7:11-15), the wicked woman (Luke 7:36-50), Mary and Martha (John 11:30-44), and others are mentioned in the Bible. Throughout His life, Jesus exhibited unwavering grace, incredible intelligence, and extraordinary comprehension and knowledge. He had a continuous ability to satisfy God
  2. Read Matthew 7:28-29 in its entirety. Aside from astonishment, what other emotions do you believe the people had to His teachings
  3. How do you feel about Jesus and why

What was the source of his authority? (See also John 12:49-50.) Explain how Jesus’ earthly life established His Godhead in a few sentences.

Life Application

  1. What was the source of His authority? In the Bible, John 12:49-50 says, Outline the ways in which Jesus’ earthly life proved His Godhead.

So, whence did he obtain his power? (See also John 12:49-50) Explain how Jesus’ earthly life served to demonstrate His Godhead.

Attributes of Christ

What we do in our life is important, but so is who we become as a result of those actions. Jesus has paved the road for us and set the bar for all others to follow. To be invited to follow Jesus is to be invited to follow in His footsteps and to strive to become like Him. Learn about Him and make an effort to apply His characteristics into your life. You may improve your character and become more Christlike as a result of the power of His grace. When you put your confidence in Christ, you acknowledge that He is the Son of God, the Only Begotten of the Father in the flesh, and that you believe in Him as such.

  1. The atoning sacrifice of Jesus Christ has given you the confidence that your sins may be forgiven.
  2. Faith is a principle of power that may be harnessed.
  3. He operates in accordance with the faith of His followers.
  4. As you get more familiar with Jesus Christ and His teachings, your confidence in Him will continue to strengthen.
  5. The substance of things hoped for is faith, and the proof of things unseen is faith.
  6. Your self-assurance, optimism, zeal, and patience are all manifestations of this.
  7. When you have hope, you can persevere through trials and difficulties with the assurance and faith that everything will work out for your benefit in the long run (see Romans 8:28).
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The Bible frequently refers to hope in Jesus Christ as the confidence that you will be granted eternal life when you die.

In order to achieve eternal life, believers must move on, feeding on the message of Christ, and persevering to the end.

It encompasses God’s unending affection for all of His children.

Throughout your life, as you earnestly pray for the gift of charity, seek to live righteously, and serve others, you will develop a genuine care for the well-being and happiness of others.

You will make every effort to comprehend them and their points of view.

Charity is a result of action.

‘Charity endures long and is kind; charity does not envy; charity does not exalt itself, is not conceited, does not behave unseemly, seeks not her own, is not easily provoked, thinks no evil; charity rejoices not in iniquity, but rejoices in the truth; charity bears everything; charity believes everything; charity hopes everything; charity endures everything.'” “Charity is a virtue that never fails.” Corinthians 13:4–8 (New International Version) What is the best way to gain faith?

  1. Read “Therefore, faith comes through hearing, and hearing comes by hearing the word of God.” —Romans 10:17 (NIV) What do we hope to achieve?
  2. We must, however, patiently await the fulfillment of our hopes if they are not realized.
  3. “And though I have the gift of prophecy, and grasp all secrets, and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, to the point that I might move mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing.” Read more about this.
  4. “Jesus says to him, “I am the way, the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father except through me,” the passage states.
  5. Ideologically motivated cognition and action that is founded on the highest possible moral standards.
  6. Virtuous persons are spiritually clean and pure in their conduct.
  7. They are obedient to God’s commands.

They promptly repent of whatever faults or wrongdoings that they have committed.

Incorporate virtue into your faith; and virtue into knowledge; and knowledge into temperance; and temperance into patience; and patience into godliness; and godliness into brotherly kindness; and charity into brotherly kindness charity.

—2 Peter 1: 3–7 (New International Version) Patience is defined as the ability to withstand delays, difficulties, opposition, or pain without feeling angry, disappointed, or concerned about the situation.

When you are patient, you are able to maintain your composure under pressure and to face adversity calmly and optimistically.

Because of these flaws and weaknesses, you must be patient with everyone, including yourself, while you attempt to overcome them.

—Romans 5:3–5 (New International Version) Respect for God’s will and giving Him credit for what has been done are two aspects of humility that are important to understand.

In contrast to popular belief, humility is not a sign of weakness, but rather a sign of spiritual power.

Putting one’s faith in oneself rather than in God or His servants is the definition of arrogance.

You have faith that you will be able to complete whatever the Lord asks of you if you place your trust in Him.

” Ether 12:27 p.m.

“And let goodness adorn thy thoughts incessantly; then will thy trust in God’s presence become stronger.” Read more.

As he continued on his way, he sank to his knees before God, praying: “O my Father, if it be possible, take this cup away from me: however, not as I will; but according to thy will.” 26:39 (Matthew 26:39) What is the relationship between patience and faith?

“Be quiet, and know that I am God,” the passage says. —Psalm 46:10 (NIV) What kind of rewards may be derived from humility? Read this: “For if people humble themselves before me and place their trust in me, then I will make weak things powerful in their eyes.” Ether 12:27 p.m.

10 Qualities of Jesus Men Should Strive to Have

When I was a child, I used to like shooting hoops on my front driveway. I’d pretend to be Isaiah Thomas, David Robinson, Magic Johnson, or Michael Jordan, among other athletes. I’d go so far as to lower the hoop so I could slam it. When it came to basketball, I was a long way from being like any of those other players in the league. However, it was a lot of fun. We all have role models in our jobs and in our lives. There are certain individuals who have achieved success that we aspire to mimic, and there are others who have lived lives that we aspire to emulate as well.

  1. In their lives, both of these gentlemen, as well as numerous others who come to mind as I write this, have followed one example.
  2. As a theologically complicated question goes, I’ll admit that I don’t comprehend it completely, at least not to my own satisfaction.
  3. He had an emotional experience.
  4. And, throughout it all, He lived a flawless life and demonstrated the sort of guy I should aim to be.As you consider the life of Jesus, consider the following ten character characteristics He displayed that are significant for us as men today.Photo Credit: Unsplash

The Unique Purpose of Matthew: Jesus Is the Promised Messiah

Another surprise for first-time New Testament readers is the fact that the account of Jesus appears not once, but four times in the book of Acts. The “Gospels” of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John are divided into four parts. So, what is the significance of the four Gospels in the New Testament? Why not just convey the entire thing in one sitting? Throughout history, several attempts have been made to “harmonize” the Gospels into an unified tale have been made. This was done in the second century AD by the early church father Tatian, who is considered to be the father of the church.

  1. Tatian’s book achieved widespread acceptance and was utilized as the primary lectionary on the Gospels in several Christian communities for hundreds of years after his death.
  2. According to those who believe that the Bible is God’s Word, the answer should be “No!” in the strongest possible terms!
  3. Putting them together in a single gospel is like taking four Spirit-inspired masterpieces and putting them together in one un-inspired human creation.
  4. Their objectives are noble: to present the complete narrative of Jesus—but the result is wrong.
  5. Each Gospel writer has a certain tale to tell and certain theological issues to stress.

Furthermore, we run the danger of losing the Holy Spirit’s message to us in the Scripture. In this series of four short essays, we will look at the particular themes and theology of each of the four Gospels, as well as the relationship between them.

The Gospel of the Messiah

Another surprise for first-time New Testament readers is the fact that the tale of Jesus appears not once, but four times in the book of Revelation. In the order of Matthew. Mark. Luke. and John we have the “Gospels.” So, what is the significance of the four Gospels in the Bible? Why not just convey the entire thing in one sitting? Through the ages, several attempts have been made to “harmonize” the Gospels into an unified account have taken place. Early church father Tatian produced one of the oldest examples of this type of work, which dates back to the second century AD.

  • After gaining widespread acceptance, Tatian’s book was utilized as the primary lectionary on the Gospels in several Christian communities for hundreds of years.
  • The response should be an emphatic “No!” for those who think that the Bible is God’s Word.
  • Putting them together in a single gospel is like taking four Spirit-inspired masterpieces and putting them together in one un-inspired human creation.
  • Their intentions are noble: they want to present the entire narrative of Jesus—but the outcome is wrong.
  • Each Gospel writer has a certain tale to convey as well as certain theological ideas to stress in his or her writing.
  • Furthermore, we run the danger of losing the Holy Spirit’s message to us that is conveyed via the Scripture.

The Genealogy

In Matthew’s Gospel, the subject of promise and fulfillment permeates every page of the narrative. In the Gospel of Matthew, we are told that “This is the genealogy of Jesus, the Messiah, the son of David, the son of Abraham,” and then we are given a comprehensive genealogy that spans 41 generations! In contrast to Western societies, which tend to have little interest in genealogy and see them as tiresome curiosities, Matthew and his readers would have thought this announcement to be the most thrilling news that had ever happened to them.

  • God summoned Abraham to leave his home in the Mesopotamian city of Ur and travel to a location that he would reveal him.
  • Everyone on the face of the earth would be blessed as a result of the salvation made possible by the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus.
  • When Israel had been established in the Land for twelve hundred years after Abraham’s death, God signed a covenant with King David, guaranteeing him that his dynasty would be established for all time and that one of his descendants would sit on his throne for all time (2 Sam 7:11-16).
  • The picture they painted was more than simply a return to the golden days of Israel’s monarchy under David and Solomon.
  • In it, God promised that “the wolf will live with the lamb.

It is Matthew’s affirmation that Jesus is the Messiah and Savior of the world, the focal point of human history, and its ultimate destiny, as he gives a genealogy tracing Jesus’ pedigree via David and Abraham. You may learn much more about Jesus’ genealogy by visiting our blogJesusGenealogies.

The Fulfillment Formulas

In Matthew’s Gospel, the theme of promise and fulfillment permeates every page of the story. In the Gospel of Matthew, we are told that “This is the genealogy of Jesus, the Messiah, the son of David, the son of Abraham,” and then we are given a comprehensive genealogy that spans 41 generations. In contrast to Western societies, which have little interest in genealogy and see them as tiresome curiosities, Matthew and his readers would have thought this declaration to be the most thrilling news that had ever happened to them.

  • A call from God directed Abraham to leave his home in the Mesopotamian city of Ur and travel to a location that he would later reveal to him.
  • Everyone on the face of the earth would be blessed as a result of the salvation made possible by Christ’s life, death, and resurrection.
  • When Israel had been established in the Land for twelve hundred years after Abraham’s death, God signed a covenant with King David, guaranteeing him that his dynasty would be established for all time and that one of his descendants would sit on his throne for all eternity (2 Sam 7:11-16).
  • A restoration to the golden days of Israel’s monarchy under David and Solomon, as shown in their presentation, was not the only thing they were doing.
  • They will neither damage nor destroy on all my holy mountain, because the world will be filled with the knowledge of the LORD as the floods cover the sea.
  • It is Matthew’s affirmation of Jesus as the Messiah and Savior of the world, the focal point of human history, and its ultimate destiny, as he offers a genealogy tracing Jesus’ pedigree back to David and Abraham.

Typology: Jesus As the New Israel

In reality, a more careful reading of Matthew’s Gospel yields a more satisfactory explanation. When it comes to apologetics, Christians in the Western world prefer to seek to prophesy for guidance. Knowing anything ahead of time is evidence that the communication came from a higher power. Nonetheless, for Matthew, the fulfillment of Scripture is less about apologetics and more about God’s sovereign plans in the world. When “fulfillment” patterns are established, it demonstrates that all of human history is pointing in the direction of its ultimate aim and climax in Jesus Christ.

  • In the same way that God carried his “son” Israel out of Egypt, Jesus, the actual Son of God, is brought out of Egypt (Hos 11:1; Matt 2:15).
  • While Israel has constantly disobeyed God, Jesus has remained faithful and submissive to the will of the Father.
  • (1) When faced with famine, Israel neglected to put his faith in God.
  • (2) At Meribah, Israel put his faith in God to the test.
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To demonstrate his adamant opposition to worshiping Satan in return for the kingdoms of the world, Jesus quotes Deuteronomy 6:13, which states, “Worship the Lord your God and serve him alone.” Another example of a Jesus-Israel typology may be seen in Matthew’s description of Jesus as the “Servant of the Lord.” “Servant” is a phrase that appears many times in Isaiah 40-55.

  • As God’s Servant, Israel was tasked with serving as a beacon of revelation to the nations, displaying God’s splendor to all people everywhere (Isa 42:6, 49:6).
  • Jesus, on the other hand, remains true to his purpose and demonstrates that he is the real Servant of the Lord in his actions.
  • Therefore, Matthew’s use of Hosea 11:1 is not an erroneous interpretation of an Old Testament passage, but rather is a significant component of a deep typological portrayal of Jesus as the fulfillment of Israel in the Gospel of Matthew.
  • As a result, he will now carry out Israel’s Old Testament mission, which is to show God’s glory and spread the message of redemption across the world.
  • Similarly to how Moses ascended Mount Sinai to receive Israel’s first covenant, which was inscribed on stone tablets, Jesus gives his Sermon on the “Mount” to begin the new covenant, which will be written on human hearts (see Jer 31:31–34), which will be written on human hearts.
  • It’s possible that the structure of Matthew’s Gospel also points in that approach.
  • (ch.
  • Jesus is a new Moses, ushering in the new covenant and bringing the law given at Mount Sinai to its full completion and fulfillment.

He also uses titles such as Son of God, Son of Man, Son of David, and Immanuel, among others. This list contains references to Old Testament texts that all relate to the concept of fulfillment and the advent of God’s kingdom in one way or another. They are included in no particular order.

Matthew’s Identity, Audience, and Purpose in Writing

In any case, who was Matthew, and why did he write the Gospel of Matthew? All four Gospels are anonymous in the strictest sense of the word, which means that the authors do not identify themselves. Church tradition, on the other hand, holds that Matthew was the author of the first gospel, a tax collector whom Jesus chose to be one of his disciples (Matt 9:9-13, 12:3). Mark and Luke refer to him as “Levi” (Mark 2:13–17; Luke 5:27–32), which may imply that he was a member of the Levite sect (from the tribe of Levi).

  1. Who was it that Matthew was writing for?
  2. This implies that the majority of Matthew’s audience is comprised of Jews.
  3. When referring to God, the circumlocution “Heaven” is commonly used among Jews, and it is meant to express awe for the heavenly Name.
  4. A brief warning against the scribes in Mark 14:38-40 is transformed into a long rant against the teachers of the law and the Pharisees in Matthew (Matt 23:1–38), as an illustration.
  5. Strong language, to be sure!
  6. Matthew’s strong Jewish perspective, as well as his equally strong diatribe against Jewish leaders, imply that his primary audience is a Jewish-Christian group that is in conflict and dispute with the greater (unbelieving) Jewish population, according to Matthew.
  7. Both argue that the Scriptures of Israel are their inheritance.
  8. However, for Matthew’s group, the fulfillment of the predictions has occurred with the arrival of Jesus the Messiah.
  9. As a result, Matthew’s theme of promise-fulfillment acts as a strong affirmation for both the validity of the Gospel message and the authority of those who bring it.

The Teachings of Jesus

Jesus was well-known for his ability to instruct others. In the New Testament, he is referred to as a “teacher” forty-five times. Despite the fact that Jesus was not technically trained as a Rabbi, the Aramaic term “Rabbi” is used fourteen times to refer to him. The people, on the other hand, acknowledged that Jesus was, in fact, a divinely appointed teacher. Likewise, Jesus had disciples, issued divine orders, backed up his teaching with Scripture, debated with others, was interrogated about legal difficulties, and used other strategies to make his teaching more remembered, just as past instructors had done.

He gave lectures in synagogues and, on at least one occasion, from the deck of a boat.

He was frequently able to draw big crowds of people who were so entranced by his teaching that they completely forgot about their own physical needs for nourishment. Jesus’ teaching was distinct not just in terms of what he taught, but also in terms of how he taught it.

The Method of Jesus’s Teaching

Jesus employed a number of teaching tactics to make his message memorable to those who heard him. Such approaches were employed to explain his message, excite (and, at times, shock) his audience, or disclose the genuine import of God’s Word—all while ensuring that his teaching was remembered by those who heard it. Poetry, proverbs, hyperbole, and parables are only a few of the numerous forms of Jesus’ teaching that are available (such as puns, similes, metaphors, riddles, paradoxes, irony, and questions).

Poetry

Parallelism appears in the majority of the poetry Jesus utilized (as stated by his disciples) and there are around two hundred examples in the Gospels. Parallelism may be divided into four types: synonymous, antithetical, step (or climactic), and chiastic. Synonymy is the most common sort of parallelism. In synonymous parallelism, a succeeding line (or lines) communicates a notion that is comparable (synonymous) to the thought expressed in the preceding line (or lines). While the second line and the first line may be nearly synonymous, the second line can also explain or strengthen the first line.

  • Consider the following passage from the Gospel of John: “For nothing is concealed except to be made clear; nor is anything secret except to be brought to light” (Mark 4:22).
  • There are over 140 occurrences of this type of parallelism in Jesus’ teaching, making it the most prevalent type of parallelism.
  • 7:17).
  • Following an instep(or climactic)parallelism, the second line builds on and advancesthe concept of the previous one.
  • The first is, “Whoever accepts you receives me, and whoever receives me receives him who sent me.” The second is, “Whoever receives me receives him who sent me” (Matt.
  • Notice that the first sentence is repeated (“whoever welcomes me”) and then an extra element is added which develops the teaching (“receives him who sent me”).
  • In the Gospels, there are a total of 16 instances of this type of parallelism.
  • “The Sabbathwas created for man, not manfor the Sabbath” (Mark 2:27).

Proverbs

Jesus frequently makes use of proverbial expressions in his teachings. Such assertions should not be regarded as absolutes, but rather as broad concepts to be considered. When Jesus says “For those who take the sword will perish by the sword,” he is referring to the sword (Matt. 26:52). There are no exceptions to this rule, as is the case with a proverb. The remark spoken by Jesus does not imply that everyone who fights with a sword would die by a sword.

It is more intended to convey the idea that, on the whole, individuals who are accustomed to fighting with swords are more likely to be slain by a sword. Consequently, anyone who is aware of the proverb’s validity will do well to heed its advice.

Exaggeration

Exaggeration may be harmful if it is employed deceptively, especially when the audience is not expecting exaggerated language to be used against him or her. Exaggerated language, on the other hand, can be a powerful tool in ethical teachings, and it can leave a lasting impression on those who hear it (or reader). Exaggerated language can be divided into two categories: overstatement and hyperbole. Overstatement is a statement that is overstated to the point where it is possible (though not intended) to finish it.

Hyperbole, on the other hand, is a remark that is so exaggerated that it is hard to finish it.

(See Matthew 23:24.) Despite the fact that it is impossible for someone to swallow a camel, the moral lesson is clear: don’t be so concerned with the minor things that you neglect to do the important things in life.

It also serves to emphasize the gravity of a certain circumstance.

Parables

It is possible to utilize exaggeration incorrectly if it is done deceitfully, especially if the audience is not expecting exaggerated language. Exaggerated language, on the other hand, may be a strong weapon in ethical lessons, and it can make a lasting effect on those who listen to it (or reader). Extreme language may be classified into two types: overstatement and exaggeration. It is feasible to finish an overstatement, even if it was never meant to be done so in the first place. While it is possible to do the action described by Jesus in Matthew 5:29 when he says, “If your right eye leads you to sin, rip it out and throw it away,” this is not the intended result of Jesus’ words, which is to prevent sin.

When Jesus confronts the scribes and Pharisees, he calls them “blind guides” who are “straining out a gnat and eating a camel.” In Matthew 23:24, the Bible says However, even if it is impossible for someone to swallow a camel, the moral lesson is clear: don’t be so concerned with the minor details that you neglect the important ones.

Moreover, it conveys the gravity of a certain circumstance.

The Message of Jesus’s Teaching

Although not just because of how he taught but also because of what he taught, Jesus was the ultimate teacher on every level.

The next part will go through three important concepts in Jesus’ teachings: forgiveness, forgiveness, and forgiveness. (1) The actuality of the kingdom of God, (2) living in the kingdom of God, and (3) the Lord of the kingdom of God are all concepts that are used to describe the kingdom of God.

The Reality of the Kingdom of God

The kingdom of God is the overarching subject of Jesus’ preaching and teaching. According to the Gospel of Mark, Jesus’ message might be summed as follows: “The hour has come, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and believe in the gospel” (Mark 1:15; see also Matt. 4:17, 23; Luke 4:43). The Gospels contain seventy-six separate kingdom sayings of Jesus, all of which are found in the New Testament (and just over one hundred including parallels). The kingdom does not refer to a physical realm, but rather to God’s reign on earth.

  • It is possible to characterize God’s ultimate, decisive exercise of his sovereign reign as the final, decisive exercise of his sovereign reign, which was began during Jesus’ career and will be accomplished upon his return.
  • God is commonly referred to as the King of Israel as well as the King of the entire universe.
  • As a result, when Jesus came proclaiming that the kingdom of God had arrived, his Jewish audience understood that he was referring to God’s entire authority over Israel and all of the nations.
  • Thus, the kingdom of God is both a current reality (Matt.
  • 6:9–10; 7:21; 8:11–12; 14:25; Luke 21:20–21).
  • Although this kingdom is currently being challenged over the world, it will not be fully realized until every knee is bowed and every tongue proclaims Jesus as the King of the universe.
  • Essentially, the terms “kingdom of God” and “kingdom of heaven” are interchangeable and refer to the same reality.
  • 5:3) while the other text reads “kingdom ofGod” (Matt (Luke 6:20).
  • 19:23-24).

Living in the Kingdom of God

Besides coming in fulfillment of promises made by a future King David to reign over Israel and the nations, Jesus also came in the role of prophet greater than Moses, bringing salvation to everyone who believe in him (Deut. 18:18). In that capacity, he provided guidance on how kingdom citizens should conduct themselves. Despite this, Jesus never provides a systematic ethical system in his teachings. Furthermore, several of Jesus’ teachings appear to be in conflict with one another. Several passages in the Bible, for example, state that the law is eternally valid (Matt.

  • 5:31–42; Mark 7:14–23).
  • For example, he says, “You must therefore be perfect, just as your heavenly Father is perfect” in one passage (Matt.
  • And it is not only outward obedience that is required; it is also inward obedience—which includes one’s motives—that is required (Matt.
  • Finally, it’s likely that certain of Jesus’ teachings are only applicable to select individuals, rather than everyone.
  • What is the best way to comprehend Jesus’ ethical teaching in light of all of these difficulties?
  • 5:33–37, 38–42, 7:1, Mark 9:43–48, Luke 14:26).
  • Jesus orders the rich young ruler to sell all of his possessions and give the proceeds to the poor because Jesus recognizes that the young ruler’s wealth and possessions are the idol that keeps him from being accepted into the kingdom.
  • The temptation to read our own meaning into the text is strong; however, we must resist this.
  • However, despite the temptation to interpret the “poor” solely in terms of economic circumstances, the parallel passage in Matthew 5:3 (“Blessed are the poor in spirit”) forbids such a limited interpretation.
  • The bottom line is that, according to Jesus, what is required is a changed attitude (heart), rather than simply outward compliance (Matt.
  • Among the most important of the divine mandates is the requirement to love God with all of our heart, soul, mind, and strength, as well as our neighbor as ourselves (Mark 12:29–31; see also Deut.

6:5; Lev. 19:18). Christians should treat others in the same way that they would like to be treated (Matt. 7:12). According to Matthew 25:31–46, love for others should be understood primarily as actions, not affection (Luke 6:27–28; 10:25–30). This love should be extended even to our adversaries.

The Lord of the Kingdom of God

As the long-awaited King descended from the line of David, Jesus is consequently referred to as the “Lord of the Kingdom.” He is, however, no ordinary ruler. The name “Mighty God” is used to refer to him in addition to titles such as “Wonderful Counselor,” “Everlasting Father,” and “Prince of Peace” (Isa. 9:6). In the Gospels, a number of characteristics illustrate Jesus’ lordship and divine position, including (1) his titles, (2) his words, and (3) his deeds or activities.

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Jesus’s Titles

Jesus’ kingship and divinity are demonstrated through a number of titles. First and foremost, Jesus is referred to as “Messiah” or “Christ.” He was chosen and set apart as God’s anointed ambassador for a specific reason (cf. Pss. 2:2; 18:50; 2 Sam. 1:14; Dan. 9:25). Jesus does not use this phrase because of its political overtones, although he does accept the appropriateness of the title as a description of himself on multiple occasions (Mark 8:27–30; 14:61–62, for example). Second, the term “Son of God” conveys closeness to God (Mark 14:36), election to perform a specific task (Matt.

  • Third, the term “Son of Man” is the most often used title by Jesus to refer to himself in the Bible.
  • 10:23; 19:28; 25:31; Mark 8:38; 13:26; 14:62).
  • However, Jesus teaches that the Messiah is more than just a descendant of David; he is, in reality, David’s Lord and Savior (Mark 12:35, 37).
  • As a word, it might be used to gods, human monarchs or other authority figures; yet, in various situations, the title is attributed to Jesus, even though a Jew would expect it to be assigned to God (Mark 2:28).
  • Rom.
  • Some of Jesus’ other titles include “king” (Matt.
  • 12:18–21), “prophet” (Matt.
  • (John 1:1).

Jesus’s Words

Jesus’ divinity is further revealed by the words he utters on the cross. The law is under his power since he is a greater being than Moses (Matt. 5:31–32; Mark 7:17–19; Luke 5:31–32; Luke 5:33–37, 38–42; Luke 5:31–32). It is possible that if he were not divine, his remarks about himself would be improper and self-centered. According to Matthew 10:32–33; 11:6; Mark 8:34–38; Luke 12:8–9, a person’s everlasting fate is decided by his or her rejection or acceptance of Christ as Lord and Savior, among other things.

He also asserts his authority over Abraham (John 8:53), Jacob (John 4:12), Moses (Matt. 5:21–48), Jonah (Matt. 12:41), Solomon (Matt. 12:42), David (Mark 12:35–37), and the temple (Matt. 12:35–37). (Matt. 12:6).

Jesus’s Actions

Finally, Jesus’ activities (which may be seen of as a type of visual teaching) serve to illustrate his deity. He possesses unrivaled authority over the temple (by cleansing it; Mark 11:27–33), demons (by exorcising them; Mark 1:27, 32–34; 5:1–13; Luke 11:20), Satan (by plundering his house; Mark 3:27; Luke 11:21–22), disease (by healing the sick; Mark 1:29–31, 40–45; 2:10–12; 7:32–37), and the Sabbath (by being Lord This capacity to anticipate the future (his sufferings, resurrection, and the destruction of Jerusalem) as well as know what others are thinking (Mark 10:21; Luke 12:24) and pardon sins, which only God has the ability to accomplish (Mark 2:10; Luke 5:21–24), demonstrates his divinity.

The Names and Titles of Jesus

Finally, Jesus’ activities (which may be thought of as a sort of visual teaching) serve to establish his divine nature. He has unrivaled authority over the temple (by cleansing it; Mark 11:27–33), demons (by exorcising them; Mark 1:27, 32–34; 5:1–13; Luke 11:20), Satan (by plundering his house; Mark 3:27; Luke 11:21–22), disease (by healing the sick; Mark 1:29–31, 40–45; 2:10–12; 7:32–37), and the Sabbath (by being Lord over This capacity to anticipate the future (his sufferings, resurrection, and the destruction of Jerusalem) as well as know what others are thinking (Mark 10:21; Luke 12:24) and pardon sins, which only God has the ability to accomplish (Mark 2:10; Luke 5:21–24), is evidence of his divinity as well.

Jesus’s Divine Names

In addition to his given name, Jesus’ identity is revealed through the countless holy titles that have been claimed to him throughout history. The picture of Christ painted in the New Testament cannot be reduced to the names and titles that he holds. Furthermore, his divine identity is revealed via his redeeming deeds, the traits of god given to him, and the worship and devotion that he gets. The names and titles of Christ, on the other hand, serve as a starting point for understanding the biblical picture of his person and activities.

  • The word “God” (theos) is used to refer to the Father the majority of the time in the New Testament (though on a few occasions it refers to the Holy Spirit; e.g., Acts 5:4).
  • According to John’s Gospel, the Word of God is identified with God himself (John 1:1), even as the “only born God” (John 1:18).
  • Thomas confesses to Jesus at the conclusion of the Gospel of John, saying, “My Lord and my God!” (See also John 20:28.) It is recorded in the Book of Acts that the apostle Paul refers to “the church of God,” which he gained “with his own blood” (Acts 20:28).
  • In the Bible, Christ is referred to as “God blessed eternally” (Rom 9:5), “our great God and Savior” (Titus 2:13), “our God and Savior” (Titus 2:13), “our God and Savior” (Titus 2:13), and the “real God and eternal life” (Titus 1:1).
  • It is said in the book of Hebrews that Psalm 45:7–8 is applied to Jesus, and that it says: “Your throne, O God, is forever and ever” (Heb 1:8).

However, it is possible to make a compelling case that each of these texts merely refers to Jesus as “God.” The variety of circumstances (the Gospels, Acts, Pauline epistles, and general epistles) emphasizes the continuity of this early practice of referring to Jesus by the name of God, which dates back to the time of the apostles.

  1. Throughout the New Testament, Jesus is referred to as “Lord” or “Lordship.” The Greek word kurios, which is translated as “Lord,” has a number of different connotations.
  2. The term “Elohim” was also used by the translators of the Septuagint, a Greek translation of the Old Testament, to represent the divine name in the text (rendered in the Hebrew asYHWH).
  3. Take, for example, Matthew’s use of Isaiah 40:3 (“Prepare the path of the Lord”) as a reference to John’s preparation for Jesus.
  4. 5:1).
  5. Son, Son of God, and Only Begotten Son are all terms used to describe Jesus Christ.
  6. It is frequently said that Israel is the son of God (Hos 11:1), and the Davidic ruler is particularly associated with this designation (2Sam 7:14; Psa 2:7).
  7. Although these referents are included in the term, it also has a depth and extent that goes beyond them.

When it comes to becoming the Son of God, Jesus has a distinct awareness of this fact.

(Hebrews 1:1–4).

A witness to the Son has also witnessed the Father, and vice versa (John 14:9).

Son of Man, to be precise.

However, “Son of Man” was Jesus’ preferred self-designation, and it unquestionably refers to Christ’s human nature.

In the fullness of revelation in Christ, it becomes clear that the Son of Man figure is both divine and human in his attributes and characteristics.

That Jesus mixes this Danielic divine-human picture with the elements of suffering and death that are more characteristic of Isaiah’s Suffering Servant is what is most remarkable about this image (Isa 53; cf. Mark 10:45).

The Titles of Jesus

The number of titles given to Jesus in the Bible is nearly too many to count. As a result, the therapy that follows must be selected and short. The Christ, to be precise. Some people joke that Christ is not Jesus’ last name, and this is true. Christ, on the other hand, is the title that is most frequently affixed to his name. The Greek termChristos is a translation of the Hebrew termMashiach (Messiah), and it literally translates as “the anointed one.” In the Old Testament, it is a title given to the Davidic ruler, as well as a figure representing the prophesied redeemer of the people of Israel (e.g., Psa 2:2; 18:50).

Prophets, priests, and kings were the three offices in the Old Testament Israel that were at least occasionally distinguished by the anointing of oil.

As a result, this moniker for Jesus in the New Testament conveys a great deal about his character as well as his mission.

Throughout John’s Gospel, Jesus refers to himself as “I am” on seven different occasions.

  • The Bread of Life (John 6:35, 48, 51)
  • The Light of the World (John 8:12
  • 9:5)
  • The Gate for the Sheep (John 10:7, 9)
  • The Lamb of God (John 10:7, 9)
  • The Lamb of God (John 10:7)
  • The Good Shepherd (John 10:11, 14)
  • The Good Shepherd (John 10:11, 14)
  • The Resurrection and the Life (John 11:25)
  • The Resurrection and the Life (John 11:25)
  • John 14:6 refers to Jesus as “the Way, the Truth, and the Life.” The One and Only Vine (John 15:1)

Each of these names is replete with allusions to Old Testament imagery. The combination of these two passages provides a remarkable look into Jesus’ own concept of his own identity. In each case, he frames his identity in terms of his saving mission on the behalf of others: providing bread for the hungry, light for the blind, gate and shepherd for lost sheep, resurrection and life for the dying, the way, truth, and life for those who seek the Father, and a vine that gives life to its branches.

A plethora of other titles may be found here.

He is the final Adam, who gives righteousness and resurrection life to the place where the first Adam brought sin and death (Rom 5:15–19; 1Cor 15:45).

The Father is represented by him as the image of God, not just in terms of his genuine humanity, but also as the one who forever reflects the Father’s character (1Cor 11; 2Cor 4:4; Col 1:15; Col 3:10; Eph.

He serves as a mediator between God and mankind (1Tim 2:5).

He is the faithful witness, the firstborn from the dead, and the ruler of all kings on the face of the planet (Rev 1:5).

Revelation 5:5–6 describes him as “the Lion of the tribe of Judah,” “the Root of David,” and “the Lamb who was slaughtered.” He is the rider on a white horse, and he is returning to judge and save the world (Rev 19).

To paraphrase what the apostle John stated regarding Jesus’ works, if every one of them were to be explained in detail, the earth itself would not be able to hold the books that would be written, we may say that the names, titles, and descriptions of Jesus’ activity in the New Testament are as follows:

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