Oh How I Love Jesus Because He First Loved Me

Oh, How I Love Jesus

We don’t give much thought to what a simple name might convey to us. For example, Jesus: “. you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins” (Matthew 1:21 ESV); “Jesus” is derived from the Hebrew for “The Lord Saves.” There is also the literal meaning of the word, which is often in another language. There are several examples of this in the Bible, such as: Another definition of a name is the things that are psychologically associated with the name in some way or another.

Text:

Frederick Whitfield, an English priest, wrote the first stanzas of this hymn in 1855, and the rest is history. Whitfield’s Sacred Poems and Prosein London, published in 1861, was the first publication of the work, which was first written in hymn sheets and booklets. It was initially published in the United States in 1864, making it the earliest known edition. Despite the fact that the refrain is anonymous, it was used in conjunction with many other hymns written by John Newton and Isaac Watts in the second half of the nineteenth century, including “Amazing Grace” and “Alas!

Only four of Whitfield’s nine original stanzas are still in frequent usage today; they are the first, second, fourth, and fifth stanzas, respectively.

It is the topic of the stanzas that the numerous pleasant connotations and promises that the name of Jesus holds for a devoted Christian believer are the focus of the poem.

Tune:

The origins of the song O HOW I LOVE JESUS may be traced back to the camp meetings of nineteenth-century America. It’s possible that the melodies for the stanzas and the refrain were composed separately. Despite the fact that they blend nicely together, the stanza music starts with an upbeat and has a constant long-short rhythm, whilst the refrain tune accentuates the primary beats of each measure. All of the songs have a lovely, almost dance-like air to them, and they are all simple to sing.

When/Why/How:

This hymn is appropriate for use as a devotional song at any time of the year and is suitable for all ages. Two Scripture passages that might be used in conjunction with the song are I John 4:19, which is quoted in the refrain, and Hebrews 4:15-16, which is hinted to in the last stanza. In addition, there is the general topic of Jesus’ love, which may be used in a medley with other hymns on the same theme, as in the long choral medley “More Love to Thee,” or the piano medley in “Prayludes for Summer.” Tiffany Shomsky, Hymnary.org Tiffany Shomsky, Hymnary.org FlexScores are available for download in the Mediasection on the right.

MuseScore is a free music notation application that can open and edit MusicXML scores. It is available for download here.

Cedarmont Kids – Oh, How I Love Jesus Lyrics

Oh, Jesus, how I adore you. Oh, Jesus, how I adore you. Oh, how I adore Jesus because He first cherished and adored me. There is a name I enjoy hearing and singing, and it is well worth mentioning. It has the appearance of music in my ear. The finest given name on the face of the planet Oh, Jesus, how I adore you. Oh, Jesus, how I adore you. Oh, how I adore Jesus because He first cherished and adored me. It reminds me of the love of a Saviour who died in order to set me free. It reminds me of His precious blood.

  1. Oh, Jesus, how I adore you.
  2. He is a good person in my opinion.
  3. I adore him because he is so nice to me, and I adore him because he initially adored me!
  4. Oh, Jesus, how I adore you.

Become A Better SingerIn Only 30 Days , WithEasyVideo Lessons!

THOMAS ANTHONY WHITFIELDL is the author of this piece. Textures courtesy of Universal Music Publishing Group Lyrics provided by LyricFind under license.

Citation

  • 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 12, 15, 17, 23, and 25, 51, 52, 53, 54, 58, 59, 62, 64, 65, and 66, 119, 120, 128, 126, 129, 132, 133, 134, 162, 163, and 164Oh, How I Love Jesus
  • 165, 166, and 167, and 160, 162, 163, and 164Oh, How I Love Jesus

Quiz

  • Kate McRae, Camila Cabello, C Bea Miller, and Billie Eilish are some of the most well-known artists in the world.

Cedarmont Kids’ recordings are available for purchase.

On Radio Right Now

OnRad.io is the technology behind this website. Do you consider yourself a music expert? Here’s where you can put your MusicIQ to the test!

Hymn: There is a name I love to hear

The song cannot be played because your browser does not support it.

1 There is a name I love to hear,I love to sing its worth; It sounds like music in mine ear,The sweetest name on earth.
Oh, how I love Jesus, Oh, how I love Jesus, Oh, how I love Jesus,Because He first loved me!
2 It tells me of a Savior’s love,Who died to set me free; It tells me of His precious blood,The sinner’s perfect plea.
Oh, how I love Jesus, Oh, how I love Jesus, Oh, how I love Jesus,Because He first loved me!
3 It tells me what my Father hath,In store for every day, And though I tread a darksome path,Yields sunshine all the way.
Oh, how I love Jesus, Oh, how I love Jesus, Oh, how I love Jesus,Because He first loved me!
4 It tells of One whose loving heartCan feel my deepest woe, Who in each sorrow bears a partThat none can bear below.
Oh, how I love Jesus, Oh, how I love Jesus, Oh, how I love Jesus,Because He first loved me!

Oh How I Love Jesus by LaShun Pace

I’m Aware That I’ve Been Changed (Album) (verse) There is a name I enjoy hearing, and I enjoy singing its worth; it is like music to my ears, and it is the loveliest name on the planet. It informs me of the Savior’s love, which made Him so glad that He died to set me free; it tells me of His precious blood, which He poured on the cross; and it tells me of His sacrifice. The reason I love Jesus is because He first loved me. Because He first loved me, I love Jesus is because He first loved me. (chorus) Oh, how I love Jesus is because He first loved me (repeat) It is with all of my heart and soul that I adore Him; He is the one who has made me complete (2x) I’m in love with Him!

Related Video from YouTube

Newsboys on standby On October 1, 2021, the film will be released. By Martha Munizzi, author of “Best Days” On August 27, 2021, the film will be released. Canyon was written by Ellie Holcomb. On April 25, 2021, the film will be released. Mac Powell has made a new creation. The date of release is October 15, 2021. Bethel Music performs a live performance of “Homecoming.” The date of release is September 24, 2021.

See also:  How Did Judas Betray Jesus

Oh, How I Love Jesus > Lyrics

Frederick Whitfield, 1855copyright status isPublic Domain


Subjects: Love, Jesus/SaviorScripture:1 John 4:19Oh, How I Love JesusAmerican melodycopyright status isPublic Domain


Key:A♭Meter:8.6.8.6.6.6.6.6


Learn about music formats.viewsheet musicplaymidiThis song in other languages:.pdfDeutsch (German).pdfPусский (Russian)

  1. There is a Name I enjoy hearing, and I enjoy singing about its importance
  2. It’s like music to my ears, the finest name on the face of the planet
  • Oh, how I love Jesus, Oh, how I love Jesus, Oh, how I love Jesus, Oh, how I love Jesus, Because He first loved me
  • Reprise
  1. It reminds me of the love of a Savior who died in order to set me free
  2. It reminds me of His precious blood, which serves as the sinner’s perfect appeal
  3. And A grin of a Father beaming upon His child comes to mind when I hear this song. It keeps me going throughout this brief period of time, through desert, waste, and wilderness. It informs me of the plans my Father has for me on a daily basis. And, despite the fact that I am walking down a gloomy route, the trail is filled with brightness the entire way
  4. A caring heart that can sense my deepest sorrow is depicted in the story. Each grief has a bearer, who carries a part that no one else can endure
  5. It makes my trembling heart sing with joy
  6. It dries each new tear that forms. It speaks to me in a “still quiet voice,” telling me to trust and never be afraid
  7. Jesus, whose name I adore and whose name I adore to hear: “Jesus, you are my everything.” No saint on earth can express how valuable it is, and no heart can comprehend how precious it is
  8. This is a name that will continue to exude its aroma. Along this treacherous path, Shall pleasantly soften the rocky incline that takes me to God’s presence
  9. It will be in that place, with all the blood-bought throng, free from sin and sorrow, that I will sing the new eternal song of Jesus’ love for me

O How I Love Jesus

(From a photograph by Frederick Whitfield) “Oh, how I adore JESUS.” “We love Him because He first loved us,” says the author. (II John 4:19) Introduction: “O How I Love Jesus” is a song that communicates both praise and love to Jesus because He first loved us, and it is one of the most popular Christian songs ( 414 inHymns for Worship Revised,273 inHymns for Worship Revised). Frederick Whitfield, who was born on January 7, 1829, in the English town of Threapwood in the county of Shropshire, wrote the book.

  1. A.
  2. Following that, he worked at Kirby-Ravensworth, Greenwich, and St.
  3. This piece, which was originally written in nine stanzas, first appeared in print in 1855.
  4. In addition to “I Saw the Cross of Jesus,” another well-known hymn by Whitfield is “I Saw the Cross of Jesus,” which was written in 1861 and is frequently put to a folk melody known as “Calcutta.” Whitfield began his ministry at St.
  5. He published more than thirty volumes of prose and poetry during his lifetime before passing away on September 13, 1904, in Croyden, England.

The words of the chorus of “O How I Love Jesus” were not included in the original hymn, but they may be found with this tune, which was used as a setting for a variety of texts in nineteenth-century American camp-meeting song collections, including “O How I Love Jesus.” A few of examples are the John Newton hymn “Amazing Grace” and Isaac Watts’ “Alas!

  • However, it is typically described as an unnamed traditional American folk hymn melody, similar to those heard in campground meetings in the nineteenth century.
  • Originally published in the 1864Devotional Hymn and Melody Book edited by William Batchelder Bradbury, the tune and chorus were the first known publishing of the song (1816-1868).
  • 2edited by E.
  • Jorgensonand the 1940/1944New Wonderful Songsedited to Thomas S.
  • Fillmore; the hymn also appears in the1935Great Songs As the song points out, some of the blessings that individuals who love Jesus can have as a result of His love for us are discussed.

Stanza 1 declares that we have the sweet name of Jesus to sing, saying, “There is a name I love to hear, I love to speak its worth; It sounds like music in my ear, The sweetest name on earth.” There is a name I love to hear, I love to speak its worth; It sounds like music in mine ear, The sweetest name on earth.

  1. The name Jesus signifies “salvation” (Matt. 1:21), and the name Jesus means “salvation” (Matt. 1:22). As a result, it is pleasant since redemption can only be obtained via the name of Jesus: Acts 4:12
  2. Acts 4:13
  3. As a result, we should express thanks to God and worship His name as follows: Heb. 13:15
  4. 14:15

The second stanza states that we have the blood of Christ spilt for our sins at our disposal. It tells me of a Savior’s love, who died to set me free; it tells me of His precious blood, which is the sinner’s perfect plea; it tells me of His precious blood, which is the sinner’s perfect plea

  1. Jesus cared about us enough to give His life in our place: In 1 John 3:16, the Bible says, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “It is written, “I In order for us to be set free from sin and made righteous, Jesus died on the cross and bore our sins. As a result, it is through His precious blood that we have been redeemed: 1 Peter 2:24-25. 1 Thess. 1:7

The third stanza (which does not appear in HFWR) states that we are guided by a loving Father. It informs me of what my Father has in store for me on a daily basis, and even if I travel down a dark and difficult route, it provides brightness the entire way.

  1. Only our Father can see into the future, and He only gives us what He thinks we are capable of bearing: 1 Corinthians 10:13
  2. Because of difficulties, we may find ourselves on a perilous path: Job 14:1
  3. Job 14:2
  4. People who are in Christ, on the other hand, have sunshine all the way to guide them since Jesus is the light of the world: 8:12
  5. Jn. 8:12

IV. Stanza 4 (3 inHFWR) states that God is concerned about our plight in our times of sadness. That person has a loving heart that can sense my deepest pain; who in my sadness bears a portion that no one else can carry.

  1. It is because of this knowledge that we adore the Lord: He is aware of our deepest distress and will hear our cries: (Psalms 116:1-2) As long as we continue to exist on this planet, we will experience heartbreak: Psalm 13:1–2
  2. However, for the Christian, the Lord bears a portion of the burden, allowing us to lay our anxieties upon Him: 5:7 in 1 Peter 5:7 in

We have purpose in our lives because of Christ’s worth, according to Stanza 5 of the poem. Jesus, whose name I adore, whose name I adore to be reminded of! No saint on earth can convey how valuable it is, and no heart can comprehend how precious it is.

  1. We, on the other hand, love Jesus because of what His name represents: 1 Peter 1:7-8
  2. His worth to us is extremely valuable: 1 Pet. 1:7-8 1 Peter 2:4-7
  3. 2:4-7
  4. When a result, as we sanctify Him in our hearts, He brings significance to our lives: 3:15
  5. 1 Pet. 3:15

Sixth stanza indicates that we have the hope of entering the kingdom of God. This is a name that will continue to exude its aroma. Those who walk this thorny path,Shall pleasantly soften the rocky slope that goes up to God.

  1. When you hear the name of Jesus, it is like inhaling a beautiful fragrance: 1-2
  2. Eph. 5:1-2
  3. Despite the fact that we are traveling on a rocky route, it will soften the harsh hill: 40:1-4
  4. Isa. 40:5
  5. The ultimate goal for which Christ came and performed these deeds was to return us to the presence of God: Heb. 6:19-20
  6. 7:19

The chorus expresses the appropriate response of the soul as it comes to comprehend the magnitude of its own benefits. What a wonderful reason to love Jesus: He first loved me! What a wonderful reason to love Jesus: He first loved me! In the majority of our publications, only stanzas 1, 2, and 4 are included; a handful include stanza 3. Other stanzas that are nearly typically removed include: Beaming upon His child;It comforts me through this brief period of time, through desert, waste, and wilderness.

Now that I’ve been set free from sin and grief, I’ll sing a fresh and eternal song of Jesus’ love for me.

History of Hymns: “O How I Love Jesus”

“How Much I Love Jesus” is a popular song. Frederick Whitfield was a British soldier who fought in the First World War. Hymn No. 170 from the United Methodist Hymnal There is a name that I like hearing, and I adore singing its praises; it is like music to my ears, and it is the nicest name on the planet. Oh, how I adore Jesus, since he first cherished and loved me. An English poem from the nineteenth century is combined with an American music, which is most likely from the camp-meeting era. Over the course of more than 150 years, Christian congregations have enjoyed a lovely melody created by this mix of elements.

While the idea of the power of Jesus’ name may be found in many places in the Bible, there is possibly none more significant than the kenosis (self-emptying) song found in Philippians 2:5-11: Have this attitude among yourselves that is yours in Christ Jesus” (verse five), and it finishes with the command “that at the name of Jesus every knee should bend, in heaven and on earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord” (verse ten) (verses 10-11).

  • This motif is repeated in a number of hymns.
  • Among the hymns are “Jesus, the name above all names” by Gloria and William Gaither (171), “Jesus, the name above all names” by Charles Wesley (193), and “At the name of Jesus, every knee shall bow” by Caroline Noel (194).
  • A powerful name is assigned to Jesus in Stanza three of Wesley’s “O for a thousand tongues to sing” (57), which begins: “Jesus!
  • A collection of poems and prose by its author, Frederick Whitfield, was published in 1861, and this poem was included in it (1829-1904).
  • Reynolds, is the source of this text’s earliest known occurrence (1864).
  • The gospel hymns written by Ira Sankey (the pianist for the famed preacher Dwight Moody) are set to a different melody from those written by other composers (1896).
  • Whitfield was born in the English county of Shropshire in 1829.

He served as curate of Otley, vicar of Kirkby Ravensworth, senior curate of Greenwich, and vicar of St.

His appointment as rector of St.

He was a prolific writer who left behind around 30 books of poetry and prose.

When it came to revival songs throughout the nineteenth century, the insertion of a refrain was a typical strategy adopted.

If you sing the melody of the first stanza to the texts of John Newton’s “Amazing grace!

and did my Savior bleed,” and then add the refrain, you’ll see how a traveling refrain could be attached to a number of “mother hymns”—a term coined by Ellen Jane Lorenz, a scholar of 19th-century camp-meeting tunes—including “Amazing grace!

The third stanza gives a personal touch to the name of Jesus, who “feels greatest grief.” Sacred music is Dr. Hawn’s area of expertise at the Perkins School of Theology.

I Want to Love Jesus, But I Don’t Know How

Image courtesy of Wikipedia Recently, I’ve been singing a lot of Carey Landry songs to Julianna, which she seems to enjoy. If God hasn’t yet created the “and if the Devil doesn’t like it, he can sit on a tack—ouch!” he’ll do it as soon as he can. This is reserved for things she despises (such as having her hair combed) since the prospect of hearing that verse keeps her happy until we are finished with the activity at hand. It’s a small token of appreciation for completing her “tasks.” The other song I sing to her is “Oh, how I adore Jesus,” which is one of my favorites.

  • Oh, absolutely, I am a huge fan of Jesus.
  • Yes, I am a huge fan of Jesus!
  • This is why I adore Jesus: he loved me first, and I love him because he first loved me.
  • Oh, Jesus, how I adore you.
  • Because he was the one who originally fell in love with me.
  • And it brought something to the forefront of my mind that I hadn’t really wanted to see in the light of day until now.

I believe in God; I pray to the Holy Spirit or to the triune deity throughout the day; I understand the significance of Christ’s sacrifice; and I recognize that Holy Week is the focal point of the entire year (although, this year, because we aren’t participating in Triduum liturgies, I feel a little adrift and disconnected from the rest of the world).

  • In response to fundamentalism, it’s a knee-jerk reaction, similar to how fundamentalists respond when Catholics speak of the Eucharist.
  • However, I have never been able to pull it off.
  • Until lately, that is.
  • Hearing these four women speak about their devotion to Jesus and to Mary made me realize that I had something lacking in my own life.
  • My issue, I believe, is that the Jesus of the Bible is a figure who has not been fully developed.
  • What you don’t know is how he was feeling at the time, or how his psychology altered through the years.
  • In a book, you have to figure it out for yourself from the text.

I can only extrapolate about Jesus; I can only project myself onto him in order to understand him better.

During this point, some individuals begin to reinterpret God in their own image, while others believe they are obligated to be cruel at military funerals.

Everyone has a strong emotional attachment to her.

In other words, we are familiar with her.

You can’t understand what he’s thinking, and you never will.

When I see Jesus in the people around me, I attempt to love him more by caring for the least of these in any way I am able.

Was this, in fact, the end of the discussion? Is it possible that those who brag about how much they adore Jesus have a spiritual direct access to Heaven that I’m not aware of? And, if so, what is the best way to connect to it?

1 John 4:19 We love because He first loved us.

New International Version (New International Version) We are in love because he initially fell in love with us. New Living Translation (New Living Translation) We are in love with each other because he initially loved us. Version standardized in English We are in love because he initially fell in love with us. Berean Study Bible (also known as the Berean Study Bible) Because He first loved us, we love because He first loved us. The Literal Bible of the Bereans Because He first loved us, we love because He first loved us.

The New King James Version (sometimes known as the New King James Version) was published in 1611.

The New American Standard Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.

NASB (National Association of School Boards) 1995 We love because He first loved us, and we love because He first loved us.

The Bible with an amplification system We love because He first loved us, and we love because He first loved us.

We are in love because he initially fell in love with us.

Because He first loved us, we love because He first loved us.

We are in love because he initially fell in love with us.

Version in the Present Tense of the English Language We love because God first loved us, and we love because God first loved us.

Translation of the Good News We love because God first loved us, and we love because God first loved us.

We love Him because He first loved us, according to the Literal Standard Version; the New American Bible We are in love because he initially fell in love with us.

We are in love because he initially fell in love with us.

The New Heart English Bible is a translation of the New Heart Bible.

The New Testament of Weymouth We love because God first loved us, and we love because God first loved us.

Young’s Literal Translation of the Text Additionally, because He first loved us, we love him as well;Additional Translations.

18 When one is in love, there is no room for fear, but perfect love drives away fear since fear entails punishment, and the one who worries has not reached the pinnacle of love perfection.

20 If someone claims to love God while harboring animosity toward his brother, he is lying.

… References to Other Sources 1 John 4:10 (KJV) What constitutes true love is not so much the fact that we loved God as the fact that He loved us enough to send His Son to be the atoning sacrifice for our sins.

A person cannot love God, whom he has not seen, if he does not love his or her brother, whom they have personally witnessed.

We love him because he initially loved us, and we want to repay the favor.

John 4:10 (KJV) Love consists not in our loving God, but in the fact that he loves us and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our transgressions.

John 3:16 is a biblical passage that teaches that God is love.

Verse 19: We are in love.

“We have this principle of love,” says the author.

John declares as fact what needs to be considered as fact.

However, this does not reflect well on us.

Greek Personal / Possessive Pronoun – Nominative – We (Hmeis) 1st Person Pronoun PluralStrong’s 1473:I is the pronoun in the first person.

Perhaps it comes from agan, which means “to love.” becauseὅτι(hoti) Strong’s 3754:Neuter of hostis as a conjunction; demonstrative, that; causative, since Heαὐτὸς(autos) A personal or possessive pronoun that is Nominative Masculine in nature.

The reflexive pronoun self, which is used in the third person as well as the other persons, is derived from the particle au.

The contracted superlative of a pro; the first in line.

Perhaps it comes from agan, which means “to love.” personal pronoun (hmas) Possessive pronoun (accusative) us.

An I main pronoun that refers to the first person singular.

John 4:19 NIV1 John 4:19 NLT1 John 4:19 ESV1 John 4:19 NASB1 John 4:19 KJV John 4:19 NIV1 John 4:19 NLT1 John 4:19 ESV1 According to 1 John 4:19BibleApps.com 1 Biblia del Evangelio de Jesu 4:19 Paralela1 John 4:19 Chinese Bible1 John 4:19 French Bible1 John 4:19 Greek Bible 1 John 4:19 (New International Version) Letters of the New Testament in the Catholic Bible: 1 4:19 (John 4:19) We love Him because he was the first to love us (1J iJ 1Jn I jn 1 jo)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.