What Did Jesus Write On The Ground

What Did Jesus Write on the Ground?

God’s faithfulness to Jesus when he was on the cross gives me great peace, and Psalm 22 provides powerful evidence to this reality. This is a guarantee from God that he would not desert us when we are going through a tough moment. When life throws us a curveball after another, it may appear and feel as if God is a million miles away, but God is always right there by us. It was critical for Jesus to remain steadfast on the cross. He could have easily gotten away the night before he was taken into custody.

He walked directly to the location where he knew the troops would arrive to apprehend him.

No matter how painful it was, he knew he had to confront his task.

I’ve tried to stay away from anyone who might disagree with what God has called me to do.

  • So, this Easter, my hope is that I would tackle my issues head-on rather than avoiding or ignoring them.
  • He was well aware that the predictions needed to be fulfilled.
  • You and I may both be confident in God’s ability to free us from the world’s hate of the truth.
  • I hope you have a peaceful and reflective Easter.
  • Take in the teachings of the cross.
  • Easter blessings to you, James

Why Did Jesus Write on the Ground?

To comply with the teachings of Leviticus 20:10 and Deuteronomy 22:22-24, the scribes and Pharisees had demanded that Jesus sentence the woman to death. If Jesus had told them to stone her, they would have accused Him of hypocrisy, because He was always preaching about mercy and forgiveness. If He had replied that she should not be stoned, they would have accused Him of violating the Mosaic Law. As soon as he saw what they were up to, he bent down and scrawled something on the ground, saying: “If any among you is without sin, let him be the first to cast a stone at her.” (See also John 8:7) Later, he began writing on the ground, following which they all walked away from the area where the writing was taking place.

What Was it That Jesus Wrote on the Ground?

All who turn their backs on You, O Lord, the hope of Israel, shall be put to shame. Whoever turns away from You will have their names engraved in the dust because they have abandoned the Lord, the source of all living water. (Jeremiah 17:13; Isaiah 59:13) As an aside, this chapter appears to imply that Jesus first wrote their names in the dust, and then maybe next to their names, he wrote a sin that they had done in addition to their names. They were humiliated and frustrated as they walked away from Jesus’ presence.

(See 1 Chronicles 28:9, Matthew 12:25, Matthew 22:18, John 2:25, and 1 Corinthians 14:25 for examples.) It has been suggested by the Venerable Bede (as well as St.

Augustine) that when Jesus wrote on the ground with His finger, He was alluding to the period on Mt Sinai when He had written the Ten Commandments upon stone tablets with His finger (Exodus 32:15-16).

Jesus is the Author Who Writes and Fulfills the Law

The people of Israel will be ashamed of those who turn their backs on You, O Lord, the hope of Israel! Forsaking the Lord, who is the source of living water, those who turn away from You will be buried in the dust of eternity. Jeremiah 17:13 explains that As an aside, this chapter appears to imply that Jesus first wrote their names in the dust, and then possibly next to their names, he wrote a sin that they had done in the process. They were humiliated and frustrated after being exposed by Jesus.

See, for example, 1 Chronicles 28:9; Matthew 12:25; 22:18; John 2:25; 1 Corinthians 14.

Augustine) that when Jesus wrote on the ground with His finger, He was alluding to the period on Mt Sinai when He had inscribed the Ten Commandments on stone tablets with His finger (Exodus 32:15-16).

Jesus Is the Only One Who Can Judge Hearts

All who forsake You, O Lord, the hope of Israel, shall be put to shame. Forsaking the Lord, who is the source of life water, those who turn away from You will be buried in the dust. (Jeremiah 17:13; Isaiah 59:1) As an aside, this chapter appears to imply that Jesus first wrote their names in the dust, and then possibly next to their names, he wrote a sin that they had done in the past. They were humiliated and frustrated as they walked away from Jesus. You see, since He was Yahweh, He was aware of what was going on in their hearts.

Augustine), when Jesus wrote on the ground with His finger, He was alluding to the period on Mt Sinai when He had written the Ten Commandments on stone tablets with His finger (Exodus 32:15-16).

What Did Jesus Write on the Ground?

We were setting up a trap with this query in order to have something to accuse you of. However, Jesus knelt on the ground and began writing with His finger on the dirt. He stood up as they continued to interrogate Him and replied to them, “If any of you is without sin, let him be the first to hurl a stone at her.” He knelt on the ground and scribbled on the surface once more. —John 8:6–8 (KJV) What was it that Jesus was writing? It’s entertaining to draw messages in the sand, and it may be therapeutic as well.

  1. What was it that Jesus was writing?
  2. Because a crowd had gathered, the Pharisees “reminded” Jesus that, according to Moses’ rule, she should have been stoned, but they were interested in hearing what He had to say about it.
  3. Now, we shouldn’t overlook what Jesus stated in between his stooping — which is very important to the tale — but what exactly was He writing was something else entirely.
  4. This idea is mostly based on Jeremiah 17:13, which states: Because they have abandoned the Lord, the spring of life rivers, those who flee from Me will have their names recorded in the dirt.
  5. As a result, it’s possible that He was fulfilling a prophecy.
  6. What Jesus was writing is unknown to us, as is the identity of those who were exposed to His message.
  7. And whether He or the wind was responsible for wiping out that message, her crimes were pardoned.

Despite the fact that people may attempt to condemn me, You do not. All I have to do is come to You in order to get this gift. There is nothing else I can do to help you find salvation. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Your Turn

Have you ever wondered what Jesus wrote on the ground when he was on the cross? Consider the possibility of being one of those who are wielding a stone, ready to condemn the guilty. So, what exactly did they believe they were doing? Now put yourself in the shoes of the accused lady, who is about to be condemned and sentenced to death by hanging by her ankles. Can you imagine what it was like to be rescued from an unjust execution and to have your sins completely forgotten? Please leave a remark on our blog if you have one.

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What Did Jesus REALLY Write in the Sand?

Innumerable hypotheses have been advanced by preachers over the years. That is a question to which I believe I have a fairly definitive answer. Here are a few mediocre examples. Was Jesus doodling in order to buy some extra time as He gathered His thoughts? Please give me a break. He claimed to be the Son of God. His thoughts had obviously been gathered by this point. Was He writing in the ancient language of “sandskrit”? (Please excuse the pun.) Were the names of several prostitutes that these religious pretenders had visited in town scrawled on the cross by Jesus Christ?

One intriguing interpretation is that Jesus recorded the names of each “stone-holding accuser” on a scroll, starting with the eldest and working his way down to the youngest.

All of the accusers, from the oldest to the youngest, left the room.

According to a close preacher friend of mine, Jesus knelt on the sand because the lady was present and He wanted to be there for her during those difficult moments.

Let me remind you of a paragraph from John 8:2: “At dawn he appeared again in the temple courts, where all the people gathered around him, and he sat down to teach them.” Just to refresh your memory, here is the text: 3A woman who had been caught in adultery was brought in by the teachers of the law and the Pharisees.

  1. According to the Law of Moses, such women were to be stoned.
  2. However, Jesus knelt on the ground and began writing with his finger on the dirt.
  3. ” (8)He knelt on the ground and scribbled something down.
  4. Jesus sprang up and questioned her, “Woman, where have they disappeared to?” “Doesn’t anyone think you’re guilty?” 11 “There isn’t nobody, sir,” she responded.
  5. “Get out of here, and get out of your sinful existence.” NIV The key to understanding the “finger-writing” verse is found in Jeremiah 17:13.
  6. There was a specific procedure that would be performed in order to bring judgment if enough witnesses could be gathered to establish that adultery had truly been committed.
  7. In this case, the Oral Law of God had been violated.
  8. By doing so, Jesus demonstrated to his accusers that THEY were not abiding by the law, but that He would do so anyway.
  9. (And by whom?) The Scribes and Pharisees disregarded the law, brought only the woman, and then proceeded to level accusations against her.
  10. The accusers did not want to cast the stone because they wanted Jesus to condemn her, so they persisted in accusing her until they were expelled from the synagogue.
  11. During Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement), the Kohen HaGaddol, or High Priest, would immerse up to 11 times in aMikveh (a baptismal tank) in order to be ceremonially cleansed between each separate portion of the day’s sacrifices, a practice that has continued for centuries.
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When the party was over and it was time to go home, the High Priest would come out and say this verse: “‘Oh YAHWEH, the Mikvehof Israel.’ just as themikveh (purifying bath) cleansed me on this day, may the Holy One (Messiah), blessed be his name, cleanse all of Israel when He comes.” The High Priest would then leave the room and leave everyone in silence.

Since he was 12 years old, every religious Jewish man had heard the High Priest recite this verse, which he had heard every year since then.

(Even though Yom Kippur was not a Feast of Ascension, many Jews would come up for it anyway, due to its close proximity in time to the Feast of Booths (Tabernacles), when they were required to be present.

Jeremiah 17:13 is a Bible verse that says It reads as follows in its exact Hebrew translation: “Oh YHVH, the Immerser (BAPTIZER) of Israel, all those who depart from your ways shall be put to shame (publicly embarrassed), and those who turn aside from my ways will have their names written in the dust blotted out, for they have turned away from YHVH, the spring of life.” As a result, Jesus gave them a second chance—they could have been embarrassed and then repented in front of the Father.

  • Instead, they refused to repent, rejecting the Messiah, and as a result, their names were written in the dust as a punishment.
  • The following verse from John 8:9 is, in my opinion, the most interesting: Those who heard it were convicted by their own consciences, and they walked out one by one, beginning with the eldest and continuing until the last; and Jesus was left alone, with the lady standing in the center.
  • As they walked away, they went in order from the oldest to the youngest, with the older having heard the verse stated more frequently.
  • Jesus had recently said that He was the source of all living rivers (John 4:14).
  • Now it’s time to look at some examples of application.
  • She was well aware that what she was doing was against God’s rules and would result in death.
  • Little girls were engaged and married by the ages of twelve or thirteen, generally to an older male from the extended family, such as an uncle or grandfather.

Daughters were often kept concealed from the rest of society until they reached adulthood.

They were unable to receive an education or be taught the Torah (the Jewish Bible).

They were seen as belonging to someone else.

He must have informed her that he was displeased with her performance, at the very least.

“All I have is this useless girl!” said the mother.

Embarrassment, dread, and disgrace.

Was her spouse physically or verbally abusive?

Was she in a state of extreme distress?

What was it that Jesus saw through those tear-stained eyes?

Perhaps this man with whom she had an affair was the only one with whom she could communicate.

Possibly he confessed his feelings for her and expressed regret that she had been forced to marry someone she didn’t want to marry.

She had violated the Law of Moses, and the punishment for adultery was stoning, which she had received.

The religious officials apprehended Mary and took her into the Temple grounds, where Jesus was speaking at the time.

Jesus was well-versed in the Scriptures.

So what was it about Jesus’ response to this woman that was so compassionate and forgiving?

They might be able to be redeemed.

The religious authorities, included the Scribes and Pharisees.

The Pharisees belonged to a middle-class family.

They scrubbed their hands till they bled, they were scared of the diseased and wicked in their society, and they were afraid of being exposed to the diseased and sinful.

Their outrage was fueled by the realization that this Rabbi might provide grace-undeserved love and forgiveness to individuals rather than laboring for a hateful, demanding God.

After claiming to be the Messiah for whom they had been waiting and praying all of their lives, Jesus appeared, performing miraculous deeds and even reviving the dead, yet he did not appear or act in the manner that they had expected.

These religious leaders were ecstatic about how hard they worked to please their “inspection” God, and they were right to be so.

As a result, produce fruits worthy of repentance, and refrain from saying to yourselves, “We have Abraham as our father”” (Mat 3:7-9).

Jesus appeared to the religious leaders as the ray of hope for which they had hoped and longed.

It is impossible to comprehend all of God’s grace.

Pretenders, religious leaders included, who believed that if they were just smart enough, worked hard enough, and prayed hard enough, they would somehow earn their way into Paradise by some miracle.

She believed she was hopelessly entangled in a never-ending cycle of sin.

God would never be able to forgive her.

All three were made available by Jesus.

“Go, and don’t sin any more.” Kevin Cornette, of the Prophecy Fellowship, provided the historical knowledge.

What did Jesus write on the ground?

8Jesus ascended to the top of the Mount of Olives. 2And early in the morning he returned to the temple, and the entire congregation gathered around him, and he sat down and taught them. 3And the scribes and Pharisees brought to him a woman who had been taken in adultery; and when they had placed her in the midst of the crowd,4they said to him, “Master, this woman was taken in adultery while she was in the act of adultery.” (5)Now the law of Moses commands that such be stoned, but what sayeth thou, O thou of little faith?

  1. But Jesus leaned down and scribbled on the ground with his finger, as if he hadn’t heard them at all.
  2. 9And those who heard it, having been convinced by their own conscience, walked out one by one, beginning with the oldest and progressing to the youngest: and Jesus was left alone, with the woman standing in the center.
  3. 11She said, “No, Lord,” referring to a man.
  4. When I was little, I used to go to Sunday school and listen to the great stories about Jesus.
  5. In addition to the Virgin Mary and the stories of Mary Magdalene pouring oil on Jesus’ feet and the Samaritan woman at the well, there were the stories of the girl with an issue of blood and the woman caught in adultery as well.
  6. It was the writing on the ground that Jesus made with his finger that always perplexed me about this narrative.
  7. Why would he do such a thing?
  8. I believe Jesus heard the answer to the Pharisee’s deceptive inquiry from a source greater than himself: that it is appropriate to acknowledge that we have all sinned before passing judgment on others.

It’s safe to say that the position of women in these ancient books has been on my thoughts a lot recently. They are really beautiful and emotional stories that have a great deal to say to us. With love, Susie, and a little help from her husband.

What did Jesus write on the ground when a woman was tried for adultery

What did Jesus write on the ground during the trial of the woman who had committed adultery with a married man? Separate things were written by Jesus on the ground. Almost certainly, Jesus wrote: “Either produce the adulterer, or you will be EXECUTED as false witnesses!” (a loose paraphrase of God’s false witness law in Deuteronomy19:16-21), and “Two or three eyewitnesses are required to put someone to death” (a loose paraphrase of God’s false witness law in Deuteronomy19:16-21) (Deuteronomy17:619:15).

  • My reasoning is explained in greater detail in the following essay.
  • Please read John 8:2-11 (NIV) before continuing.
  • And, once you understand why the conventional answer cannot be correct, you will be more willing to accept what I believe to be the only possible solution to the problem.
  • Atdawnhe reappeared in the temple courts, where he was greeted by a throng of people who gathered around him to listen to him teach them.
  • They called her forward in front of the group and told Jesus, “Teacher, this woman was caught in the act of adultery.” Moses commanded us to stone such women according to the Law.
  • However, Jesus knelt on the ground and began writing with his finger on the dirt.
  • When they heard this, those who heard it began to leave one by one, starting with the older ones, until only Jesus was left, with the woman still standing where she had been.
  • “Doesn’t anyone think you’re guilty?” “There isn’t nobody, sir,” she responded.
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“Get out of here, and get out of your sinful existence.” In addition, please keep in mind that when Christ said, “Let him who is without sin cast the first stone,” he was not requiring judges to be sinless in order to sentence anyone to death, nor was Christ requiring the Jewish people themselves to be sinless in order to participate in an execution; otherwise, Christ would be invalidating more than 20 of Jehovah’s Old Testament Civil Laws, which prescribed execution for various capital crimes.

  1. ] So, what was it that Jesus was writing on the ground during the trial, exactly?
  2. There is a problem with the traditional answer from the “scholars,” in that it assumes that the Pharisees left the trial simply because they were embarrassed after reading the list of their various sins that Christ had written on the ground.
  3. For starters, it would be quite out of character for the Pharisees to leave the trial simply because they were feeling a little shame over their sins, as they did in the previous trial.
  4. Instead, the Pharisees always remained on the scene and grew enraged with the situation.
  5. Surprise of all, during the trial of the woman who had committed adultery, Christ did not mention any of the sins of the Pharisees aloud whatsoever.
  6. As a result, given that the Pharisees were unmoved by Christ’s constant public verbal rebukes, it would be quite out of character for them to be moved by something Christ wrote on the ground, especially given that Christ did not utter a single word of rebuke in this instance.
  7. Second, it is highly likely that the Pharisees had descended to such a level of evil that they were no longer capable of feeling any shame in the first instance.

Among those who were murderers (Matthew 23:34-35) and adulterers (Matthew 12:39), thieves (Matthew 21:13, Luke 19:46), and those who disobeyed their parents (Matthew 15:4), cursed their parents (Matthew 15:4), did the unpardonable sin (Matthew 12:24-32), were unrepentant (Luke 18:10-12), were covet (Matthew 23:5-7) 17.

  • and they committed a variety of other sins.
  • That Christ said, “For I tell you that unless your righteousness exceeds that of the Pharisees and the teachers of the law, you will most certainly not enter the kingdom of heaven,” is understandable.
  • The third point to note is that whenever Christ accused the Pharisees of various sins, he had to be careful to avoid the sin of slander in order to maintain his sinless status (as recorded in Leviticus 19:16).
  • He always accused them as a group, which, as I previously stated, only served to enrage them even more.

If the Father told Christ which Pharisee committed which specific sin, that does not automatically make Christ a personaleyewitnessto that sin, and God’s own laws in Deuteronomy17:619:15 state that you must be an actualeyewitnessto a specific sin in order to give testimony about that sin in a trial.

  1. Their presence at the trial and continued pressure on Christ to pass judgment on the adulteress would not have been tolerated by the defendants.
  2. Because of these three arguments, the Church’s long-held belief that “Christ wrote the sins of the Pharisees on the ground” cannot possibly be correct in its interpretation.
  3. As recorded in Luke 12:13-14, a man approached Jesus and asked, “Teacher, please tell my brother to divide the inheritance with me.” “Man, who appointed me to be a judge or an arbitrator between you?” Jesus inquired.
  4. This is exactly what occurred during the trial of the lady who was accused of adultery.
  5. “So, what are your thoughts?” As a result of the Pharisees’ query to Christ, “Now what doYOUsay?” they are effectively appointing Christ to serve as an official judge in the woman’s court case.
  6. the Pharisees and the Teachers of the Law).

However, because they did not actually catchthe adulterer while committing adultery, they could not possibly have caught the adulteress while committing adultery either, which means that their claim of catching her while committing adultery is false, and this is strong evidence that the Pharisees and Teachers of the Law are actually FALSE WITNESSES—and the punishment for being a false witness in a capital crime such as adultery is death without mercy!

For as it is written: “If a libelous witness comes forward to accuse someone of a crime, the two parties concerned in the disagreement must appear beforethe priests and judges who are now in office.” After conducting a thorough inquiry, if the witness is found to be a liar who has given false testimony against a fellow Israelite, the judges must do to the false witness what the other party had hoped the false witness would do to them.

You must eliminate the wicked from your ranks.

Show no mercy: “Life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot.” “Show no mercy: life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot.” (Deuteronomy 19:16-21, New International Version) The fact that the adulteress was brought to the trial without the adulterer was strong evidence that the Pharisees had never really caught either of them in the act of adultery in the first place, and that, as a result, the Pharisees and Teachers of the Lawwere false witnesses who deserved to be executed by the entire crowd of Christ’s followers who had gathered in the temple that morning to witness the execution of the Pharisees and Teachers of the Law.

As a result, if Christ had uttered this truth publicly, the vast gathering of Christ’s followers would have surrounded the Pharisees and Teachers of the Law, preventing them from escaping.

all the Pharisees and the Teachers of the Law that falsely claimed to have caught the woman in the act of adultery).

So, in order to avoid being forced into ordering the death of the Pharisees and Teachers of the Law, Christ merely scrawled on the ground how the application of God’s false witness law would put the lives of the Pharisees and Teachers of the Law in risk if the trial went through as planned.

Just keep in mind that only the Pharisees and Teachers of the Law who were standing up could see what Christ had actually written, whereas Christ’s followers (who were most likely sitting on the ground) would not be in the proper position to read what Christ had written.) Consider Christ standing up and saying, “Let him who is without sin throw the first stone,” perhaps even pointing to what he had just written.

They read something like, “Produce the adulterer, or you will be executed as false witnesses!” as the Pharisees and the Teachers of the Law get closer to Christ in order to see what he has written on the ground.

As a result, before the trial began, Christ scribbled something on the ground to serve as a reminder to the Pharisees about what God’s rules demanded of witnesses, giving them the opportunity to retract their allegations before the trial began.

Alternatively, if Christ had not written on the ground, “Produce the adulterer, or you will be executed as false witnesses!” and instead chose to explain out loud to his followers why the Pharisees and Teachers of the Law were indeed false witnesses, Christ (the duly appointed judge) would have been forced to insist that the false witnesses not be allowed to leave, and that they must now remain for their own execution.

In the meantime, Christ knelt on the ground and scrawled something else on the ground.

In his writing, he probably paraphrased Deuteronomy 17:6 and said something along the lines of, “Two or three eyewitnesses are required to execute someone!” In addition, because all of the false witnesses had fled the courtroom for fear of their lives, Jesus was able to address the woman with the words “Woman, where are they?” “Doesn’t anyone think you’re guilty?” “There isn’t nobody, sir,” she responded.

  1. “Then neither do I condemn you,” Jesus stated emphatically.
  2. And it is for this reason that they withdrew from the trial.
  3. Furthermore, he acted in accordance with the spirit of the Law by seeking (and ultimately discovering) a basis to extend mercy to the lady as well!
  4. During the trial, Jesus did not destroy or amend any of the Mosaic Laws of justice, as some have claimed.
  5. It is only because we are ignorant of the specifics of the Old Testament Laws that we might get the incorrect conclusion that Jesus modified the law in this text.

Rather than demonstrating how poorly the Teachers of the Law comprehended the practical applications of God’s laws in the first place, their failure to anticipate the legal paradox of this story and predict the unavoidable outcome of the trial illustrates how poorly they understood God’s laws themselves.

However, it appears that the Teachers of the Law were simply teaching their pupils how to recite the law, and not how to practice the law in a courtroom in the manner that God intended!

Simple.

on evangelism and other important issues).

(This will only occur during Christ’s future millennial reign, as prophesied in Ezekiel 44:24.) As a result, both groups are unable to comprehend how the practical application of God’s Old Testament Civil Laws would have been extremely beneficial for the courts of ancient Israel as well as modern America, and how even a basic understanding of how God’s laws function in a courtroom to eliminate false witnesses would have been extremely beneficial for the trial of the woman taken in adultery in John 8.

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What did Jesus write according to John 8?

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John 8

“Then thescribes and Phariseesbrought before Him a lady who had been caught in adultery, and He wrote on the ground.” Then, after they had placed her in the center of the group, they approached Him and said, “Teacher, this lady was caught in the act of adultery.” Now, Moses, according to the law, directed us to stone anybody who did such a thing. “However, what are your thoughts?” They stated this in order to put Him to the test and see if they could find something against Him to accuse Him of.

As a result, as they continued to question Him, He rose to His feet and said to them, “Let him who is without among you hurl the first stone at her.” Then He bent down and began to scribble on the dirt once more.

And Jesus was left alone, with only the lady standing in the middle of the crowd.

And Jesus responded to her by saying, “Neither do I condemn you; go and sin no more.” “ Once more he bent down and scribbled his thoughts on the dirt” (John 8:3-11)

What did Jesus write on the ground?

When this passage was written, Jews had brought a woman who had been caught in adultery to Jesus, pleading with him to pass judgment on her. This scenario was plainly a ruse: if Jesus stated they should stone her, the Jews would immediately report Him to the Romans, who would then prosecute Him for such an act in the courts of law. If Jesus stated that they should not stone her, the Jews would accuse Him of disobeying the law of Moses, and He would be executed. The religious authorities were hypocrites who orchestrated the entire scenario in order to try to capture Jesus in their trap.

  1. That this is one of the only written documents by Jesus is significant.
  2. In the Mishnah, the practice of writing in the sand is mentioned several times (Shabbath12.
  3. of the Talmud, p.
  4. This is most likely since, once He had finished writing on the ground, He invited those who were there to throw the first stone at Him.
  5. The fact that Jesus wrote on the ground of the woman’s accusers’ misdeeds demonstrated His divinity and His ability to discern the hearts of people.

What was Jesus writing in the dirt/sand when the Pharisees brought to Him a woman caught in adultery?

QuestionAnswer According to John 8:1–11, the narrative of the woman caught in adultery is told. According to a condensed version of the narrative, Jesus was brought before Him by the scribes and Pharisees, who, in their ongoing efforts to trap Jesus into saying anything they might use against him, brought Him a woman who had been caught in adultery. They reminded Him that the Mosaic Law required her to be stoned to death if she did not repent of her sin. “But what do you have to say?” they inquired of Him.

  1. “If any of you is without sin, let him be the first to hurl a stone at her,” He continued once he had straightened up (John 8:7).
  2. The people began to leave one by one (verses 8–9).
  3. Both parties to adultery were supposed to be stoned, according to the law (Leviticus 20:10; Deuteronomy 22:22).
  4. They would accuse Jesus of breaking Moses’ Law if he suggested that the lady should not be stoned, and they would be right.
  5. Several theories have been advanced as to what Jesus was writing, including the notion that He was jotting down a list of the crimes done by each of the Jewish leaders who were in attendance.
  6. Both of these hypotheses are plausible, but there is no way to know for certain whether one is correct.
  7. It was impossible for Jesus to be accused of breaking the law since He maintained the lawful penalty for adultery, which was stoning.

Questions about John (return to top of page) When the Pharisees brought before Jesus a woman who had been caught in adultery, what was Jesus writing in the dirt/sand?

What Words or sentences did Jesus Write on the Ground?

In fact, one of the interpretations in the ancient Church tradition that He wrote each of the presenter’s sins is theologically correct, because He demonstrated His divine feature of knowing hearts – v /Acts 1:24/ – (which feature belongs properly only to three persons: the Father, the Son (Jesus), who knows Father as Father knows Him (Matt 11:27), and the Holy Spirit who “knows the depths of God” (1 Cor.

2:10) – the epis He also forgives her, for by saying, “Neither I condemn you, go and sin no more,” he implies that the previous sin is no longer accounted to her, thus demonstrating another divine feature (again, properly belonging only to the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit) – the sovereign authority of forgiving sins, which ontologically speaking is nothing else than making a healing touch into one’s soul’s/depth, heart’s for sin is nothing but a scathing wound This power He demonstrated in other situations as well, for which He was seen as a blasphemer since He was thought to be a usurper and appropriator of something that should have been reserved exclusively for God (cf.

Mark 2:7 or Matthew 9:3).

With all of this in mind, it may be concluded that the legend of Jesus writing down each of the presenter’s crimes (most likely, it is inferred, the comparable acts of adultery for which they were ready to execute the woman) corresponds well with the Gospels’ teaching about the divine dignity of Jesus.

Whether this tradition is objectively true or not, that is to say, whether they truly looked at Jesus’ words written on the ground and their consciences were pricked already as a result of them before Jesus said those famous words out loud, is unclear, and John purposefully leaves a riddle for us so that we may be free to venture our own interpretations and read the text more attentively and creatively, thereby gaining a greater spiritual benefit for ourselves.

A proposed remedy is outlined below.

Hardly!

The possibility and likelihood is that He inscribed the sins of a small number of the most passionate and zealous among them, the very instigators and leaders of the throng, and when they read their crimes, they dropped the stones, with the others following their example.

What did Jesus write on the ground?

The Pharisees were attempting to trick Jesus into convicting the adulteress on the basis of an incomplete recitation of Leviticus 20:10 (which we now know as Leviticus 20:10). In a similar vein, we see the devil tempting Jesus in Matthew 4:6 by reciting a portion of Psalm 91:11 that was not fully completed. As a response to the Pharisees, Jesus scribbles something in the dust on the ground. For more information, consult the Jewish Encyclopedia. The severity of the Mosaic code was significantly reduced or eliminated under Talmudic law, and the laws relating to adultery came under the influence of a more lenient theory of the relationship between crime and punishment as a result.

This new perspective did no harm because the right to divorce that remained in the hands of the husband was sufficient to free him from the woman, who, despite being guilty of the crime, was not subject to legal punishment.

Indeed, Jesus tells her in verse 11 to “go and sin no more.” However, they continue to press Him, and He challenges them, after which Jesus writes something else on the ground.

“Let him who is without this sin among you be the first to throw a stone at her,” Jesus says.

So, what was the law in this case?

Because Jesus later rebukes their very character, we shouldn’t expect them to show any signs of contrition, self-examination, or a remorseful spirit.

If there is anyone among you who is not guilty of murder, let him be the first to throw a stone at her.

However, if you believe you can demonstrate that stoning her is legal, then go ahead and do it.

As a result, it’s possible that He wrote: You are not permitted to murder.

After all was said and done, they hoped to see the adulteress dead at the hands of Jesus, and Jesus dead at the hands of the Romans (see verse 37), and they were willing to twist God’s word to accomplish this, just as the devil had done in the garden (Genesis 3:4).

The tragic thing is that in John 8:39-44, Jesus reminds those who are left to act in the same way that Abraham did, who loved God and tried to obey God, despite the fact that he occasionally lost his faith.

These men, on the other hand, had not learned.

Furthermore, unlike in the case of their great patriarch, their actions were not motivated by foolishness, fear for one’s life, or a desire for children.

He has been a murderer from the beginning, and he does not stand on the side of truth because there is no truth in him at all.

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