What Year Did Jesus Die

In what year did Jesus die?

QuestionAnswer The death of Jesus and the subsequent resurrection of Jesus are the most significant events in human history since the beginning of time. God used the death of Christ to reconcile people who had been “alienated” from Him because of sin and “presentedholy in his sight, without blemish and free from accusation” (Colossians 1:21–22) those who had been “alienated” from Him because of sin. And God has compassionately “given us new birth into a live hope” as a result of Christ’s resurrection (1 Peter 1:3).

We can, however, figure it out with a reasonable degree of precision.

It is believed that Herod the Great died in 4 BC, which corresponds to the death of Herod the Great, who served as procurator of Judaea from 47 BC to 4 BC.

It is possible to identify the year in which Jesus died based on a variety of different criteria.

  • In the year AD 14, Tiberius was proclaimed emperor.
  • Pontius Pilate is believed to have governed Judea between AD 26 and AD 36.
  • There is also an argument for a more recent date (April 7, AD 30), which is based on the fact that John the Baptist’s ministry began more recently (and an assumed co-regency of Tiberias and Augustus).
  • Even while a great deal has transpired on the international stage since Christ’s time, nothing has ever surpassed the scope and significance of what occurred in AD 33—the death and resurrection of the Savior of the world.

April 3, AD 33: Why We Believe We Can Know the Exact Date Jesus Died

In our book, The Final Days of Jesus: The Most Important Week of the Most Important Person Who Ever Lived, Justin Taylor and I make an educated guess as to the date of Jesus’ crucifixion, but we do not argue for or against it. For a variety of factors, virtually all academics think that Jesus was executed in the spring of either AD 30 or AD 33, with the majority preferring the former. As a result of the astronomical data, the alternatives are reduced to AD 27, 30, 33, or 34). However, we would want to present our case for the date of Friday, April 3, AD 33, as the precise day on which Christ died in our place as atonement for our sins.

However, this does not rule out the possibility of understanding or importance.

No one makes this argument more forcefully than Luke, the Gentile physician who became a historian and inspired recorder of early Christianity. No other Gospel writer makes this point more forcefully than Luke.

The Year John the Baptist’s Ministry Began

In Luke’s account, John the Baptist began his public ministry soon before Jesus did, and the author provides us with a historical reference point for when the Baptist’s ministry began: “in the fifteenth year of Tiberius Caesar’s reign.” (See Luke 3:16). It is known from ancient Roman history that Tiberius succeeded Augustus as emperor on August 19, AD 14 and was approved by the Roman Senate on the same day. He reigned until the year AD 37. “The fifteenth year of Tiberius Caesar’s reign” appears to be a straightforward date, but there are some ambiguities, beginning with when one begins the calculation.

Most likely, Tiberius’ reign was measured from the day he assumed office in AD 14 or from the first day of January of the following year, AD 15 (whichever came first).

So John the Baptist’s ministry began anywhere between the middle of AD 28 and the beginning of AD 29.

The Year Jesus’s Ministry Began

Because the Gospels appear to suggest that Jesus began his ministry not long after John, the most likely date for Jesus’ baptism would be late in AD 28 at the absolute earliest, according to the calculations above. Nevertheless, it seems more likely that it occurred somewhere around the first half of the year AD 29, because a few months had probably gone between the beginning of John’s career and the beginning of Jesus’ ministry (and the year AD 30 is the latest possible date). As a result, Jesus’ career must have began somewhere between the end of AD 28 and the beginning of AD 30 at the earliest.

The most plausible dates for Jesus’ birth are 6 or 5 BC, which means he would have been roughly thirty-two to thirty-four years old in late AD 28 to early AD 30.

The Length of Jesus’s Ministry

To determine how long Jesus’ public ministry lasted, we must first determine how long Jesus’ public ministry lasted. If Jesus’ public ministry lasted two or more years, it appears that the spring of AD 30 cannot be considered as a plausible date for the crucifixion. The Gospel of John records that Jesus attended at least three (perhaps four) Passovers, which were held once a year in the spring and were as follows:

  • In Jerusalem, at the beginning of his public ministry (John 2:13–23)
  • In Galilee, during the midpoint of his public career (John 6:4)
  • And in Bethlehem, at the end of his public ministry (John 6:4). In Jerusalem, at the conclusion of his public ministry, that is, at the time of his crucifixion (John 11:55
  • 12:1), there was a final Passover celebration. And it’s possible that Jesus attended another Passover that wasn’t reported in the Gospel of John, but was documented in one or more of the Synoptic Gospels (i.e., Matthew, Mark, and Luke)

This would make a date of a.d. 30 all but impossible as the date of Jesus’ crucifixion, even if there were only three Passovers in all. As previously stated, the earliest possible date for the beginning of Jesus’ career, according to Luke 3:1, is late in the first century AD. The first of these Passovers (which occurred at the beginning of Jesus’ ministry; John 2:13) would happen on Nisan 15 in the year 29 (since Nisan is in March/April, around the beginning of a year), which would be the first of these Passovers in the year 29.

If Jesus’ ministry corresponded with at least three Passovers, and if the first Passover occurred in AD 29, this suggests that he could not have been executed in ad 30, as previously thought.

Assuming, however, that John the Baptist began his career in AD 29, it is reasonable to assume that Jesus began his mission in late AD 29 or early ad 30. The Passovers in the book of John would thus take place on the following dates:

Nisan 15 AD 30 John 2:13
Nisan 15 AD 31 Either the unnamed feast in John 5:1 or else a Passover that John does not mention (but that may be implied in the Synoptics)
Nisan 15 AD 32 John 6:4
Nisan 15 AD 33 John 11:55, the Passover at which Jesus was crucified

Jesus Was Crucified on the Day of Preparation for the Passover

It is also mentioned by the apostle John that Jesus was crucified on “the day of Preparation” (John 19:31), which corresponds to the Friday before the Sabbath of the Passover week (Mark 15:42). Earlier in the day, on Thursday evening, Jesus had a Passover meal with the Twelve (Mark 14:12), which is referred to as his “Last Supper.” Passover always falls on the fifteenth day of Nisan (Exodus 12:6), according to the Pharisaic-rabbinic calendar that was generally used in Jesus’ day. According to this calendar, Passover begins on Thursday after sundown and finishes on Friday after nightfall.

33, the year in which the crucifixion is most likely to have occurred, the most likely date for Jesus’ crucifixion is April 3 in the year a.d.

Accordingly, we created the following chart in The Final Days of Jesus to indicate the dates for Jesus’ final week in the year a.d.

April 2 Nissan 14 Thursday (Wednesday nightfall to Thursday nightfall) Day of Passover preparation Last Supper
April 3 Nissan 15 Friday (Thursday nightfall to Friday nightfall) Passover; Feast of Unleavened Bread, begins Crucifixion
April 4 Nissan 16 Saturday (Friday nightfall to Saturday nightfall) Sabbath
April 5 Nissan 17 Sunday (Saturday nightfall to Sunday nightfall) First day of the week Resurrection

Conclusion

The computations in the preceding section may look difficult, but in a nutshell, the reasoning goes as follows:

HISTORICAL INFORMATION YEAR
Beginning of Tiberius’s reign AD 14
Fifteenth year of Tiberius’s reign:Beginning of John the Baptist’s ministry AD 28
A few months later:Beginning of Jesus’s ministry AD 29
Minimum three-year duration of Jesus’ ministry:Most likely date of Jesus’s crucifixion AD 33 (April 3)

While this is, in our opinion, the most likely scenario, it should be noted that many people believe Jesus was crucified in the year AD 30, rather than the year AD 33, as we have stated. If, on the other hand, the beginning of Tiberius’ reign is set at the year AD 14, it becomes virtually impossible to accommodate fifteen years of Tiberius’ reign and three years of Jesus’ ministry between AD 14 and AD 30, as is the case. As a result, some have speculated that Tiberius and Augustus shared co-regency (joint rule) during the last few years of Augustus’ reign.

As a result, we believe that Jesus was most likely crucified on April 3, AD 33, as previously stated.

Because of this, as we celebrate Easter and walk with Jesus every day of the year, we can be confident that our faith is founded not only on subjective personal assurance, but also on reliable historical data, which makes our faith an eminently reasonable faith.

Crossway’s executive vice president and publisher for books, Justin Taylor, holds this position.

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However, although the Bible does not specify the date of Jesus’ birth or death, we can infer this information from other historical data. From 47 BC until his death in 4 BC, Herod the Great ruled over the kingdom of Judaea. In the aftermath of Herod’s death, Joseph and Mary were visited by an angel, who assured them that it was safe for them to return to the region (Matthew 2:19–23). In light of these dates, we may estimate that Jesus was born between 6 and 4 BC (for additional information on BC and AD, please visit our article “What do BC and AD (Bc and AD) represent?”).

  1. Tiberius began governing in AD 12 as co-regent with Augustus Caesar, however he was not officially recognized as emperor until AD 14 when he was designated as such.
  2. As a result, Jesus’ earthly career came to an end about AD 29 or 30.
  3. (Mark 14:12).
  4. After putting all of this material together, we arrive at either April 7 AD 30 or April 3 AD 33 as the date of Jesus’ crucifixion.
  5. According to the most conservative estimates, Jesus would have died in AD 33, making his mission more than three and a half years lengthy and beginning at least a year after John the Baptist began his preaching.
  6. It is true that the event of God becoming a man on earth, leading a blameless life, dying on the cross as a sacrifice for our sins, and rising from the dead is the defining moment in history and the turning point in human history.
  7. What matters is that each individual comprehends the importance of Jesus’ death on the cross for their sins and subsequent resurrection in power over all things, including death (Colossians 1:21–22).
  8. To be saved, all we must do is place our trust in Jesus Christ as our Savior and Lord (John 3:16–18; Romans 10:9; Ephesians 2:8–9), and we shall be saved.
  9. Who has responsibility for the killing of Jesus Christ?

What year did Jesus Christ come into the world? What do we know about the historical Jesus, the one who lived and died? Who exactly is Jesus? Is it true that Jesus rose from the dead? Was Jesus Christ truly raised from the dead? Return to the page: The Truth About Jesus Christ.

When Did Jesus Die? The Year, Day & Time

There has been much speculation concerning the day and year of Christ’s crucifixion and death, owing to the absence of clear day-to-day linkage in the stories of the four Gospels. We know that Jesus died on Preparation Day because it is mentioned in each of the four Gospel narratives. But was it a Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday when that happened? In addition, what hour did Jesus die? There has even been discussion over the year in which he passed away. To figure out the day of Jesus’ death on the cross, we must piece together the evidence from his four Gospels and our understanding of his historical period and cultural context.

Cultural Information to Keep in Mind

1. The gospel writers were more concerned with depicting Jesus as a person than they were with the precise chronology of his appearance. Dates have become increasingly important in today’s environment in order to provide proper news coverage. However, the Gospel authors were more concerned with the events themselves than they were with the precise date of the occurrences. They were attempting to introduce Jesus to a variety of audiences rather than providing a thorough biography. It was the day before the Sabbath that was designated as the Day of Preparation.

This is the day on which Jews prepared meals and completed all of the tasks that were prohibited from being completed on the Sabbath but that still needed to be completed.

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What the Gospels Say about Jesus’ Burial

The Gospel of Matthew contains the most detailed account of Jesus’ death and burial (Matthew 27:31-62). In this tale, we learn about Joseph, a wealthy man from Arimathea “who had himself become a follower of Jesus,” according to one piece (Matthew 27:57 b). In Matthew 27:58-61, it is said that Joseph approached Pilate and begged for permission to bury Jesus’ body. “The next day, the day after Preparation Day, the chief priests and the Pharisees went to Pilate,” we are told in Matthew 27:62. Joseph followed out this plan on Preparation Day.

See also:  When Will Jesus Rise Again

In the Jewish calendar, it was Preparation Day (i.e., the day before the Sabbath).” (Matthew 15:42 a.) … Consequently, Joseph purchased some linen material, brought the corpse down from the casket, wrapped it in the linen, and buried it in a tomb dug into the rock.

Jesus died on the Day of Preparation, as confirmed by Luke and John: “Then he carried it down, wrapped it in linen fabric, and buried it in a tomb cut into the rock, in which no one had yet been lain.” As it happened, it was Preparation Day, and the Sabbath was about to begin” (Luke 23:54).

As it happened, they placed Jesus there since it was the Jewish day of Preparation and because the tomb was close by (John 19:42).

What Day Did Jesus Die? Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday?

Over the years, academics have developed a variety of hypotheses about what occurred during the days of the week preceding up to Jesus’ death on the cross. These versions each offer a different day for Christ’s death, such as Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday.

  • Wednesday The fact that Jesus was crucified on a Wednesday permits for Him to have been buried for three full days and nights
  • Nevertheless, this also means that He resurrected on the fourth day. Furthermore, the Triumphal Entry would have taken place on Saturday, the day of Sabbath rest
  • Instead, it took place on Thursday. With a Thursday crucifixion, the Triumphal Entry is moved to Sunday, which makes more sense and removes the necessity for a “quiet day” (a day during thePassion Weekwhen no events were recorded). On the other hand, we know that the Pharisees hurried to put Jesus in the tomb on The Day of Preparation (John 19:34-42), which is Friday, and before the Sabbath began at nightfall (the Jews timed days from the beginning of the nightfall to the beginning of the nightfall). Upon closer examination of the facts, we find that Friday is the most consistent with the Gospel narratives and the historical context. According to the New Testament, Jesus rose from the grave on the third day—not necessarily after three complete, literal days—and was buried on the third day (e.g.,Matthew 16:21
  • Acts 10:40). As previously stated, Jesus had to be hustled inside the tomb on the day of preparation because of the crowds. In contrast to a Friday crucifixion, which would demand a “quiet day” (most likely Wednesday), this day gives the Sanhedrin the opportunity to make plans for Jesus’s arrest and following trials. As a result, the day is just “quiet” since we haven’t documented anything significant

What Time Did Jesus Die?

According to Matthew Henry’s interpretation, Jesus was nailed to the crucifixion between the third and sixth hours, which corresponds between nine and twelve o’clock in the morning. After then, he died shortly after the ninth hour, which was sometime between three and four o’clock in the afternoon. Commensurate with the aforementioned practice, the Jews throughout the time of Christ measured days from dusk to nightfall. The Matthew 27:46 KJV, which is the “ninth hour,” can be translated into the Matthew 27:46 NIV, which is the “three o’clock in the afternoon,” according to Bible experts.

Timing of Jesus Death in Mark, Luke, and John

  • Jesus was nailed on the cross between the third and sixth hour, which corresponds to nine o’clock and twelve o’clock, as Matthew Henry writes in his commentary. That is to say, between three and four o’clock in the afternoon, shortly after the ninth hour, he passed away. It has already been revealed that the Jews at the time of Christ timed days from dusk to nightfall, but there is more to it than that. The Matthew 27:46 KJV, which is the “ninth hour,” may be translated into the Matthew 27:46 NIV, which is “three o’clock in the afternoon,” by Bible experts.

What Year Did Jesus Die?

During this video, Doug Bookman, a New Testament professor at Shepherds Theological Seminary, shows why biblical academics have reached an agreement about the year Jesus died. “It all boils down to this. Pilate served as prefect of Judea and Samaria from 26 A.D. to 36 A.D., according to the evidence we have. So that’s our view out the window. The following question is: On what day of the week did Passover occur during the year that Jesus died? In the opinion of the majority, it occurred on Thursday or Friday.

Given all of this, the vast majority of researchers will agree that it leads to one of two conclusions: ” Theory 1: Jesus died about the year 30 A.D.

“At this point, the argument becomes pretty technical,” says Bookman of the situation.

I am convinced that the year 33 A.D.

3 Significant Events Shortly After Jesus’ Death

Matthew 27:51-54, Matthew 27:51-54 As a result of this, the temple’s curtain was split in half, from top to bottom. The ground trembled, the rocks cracked, and the tombs burst into flames. Many pious persons who had died were brought back to life by the power of the Holy Spirit. They emerged from the graves following Jesus’ resurrection and proceeded to the holy city, where they appeared to a large number of people. They were startled and cried, “Surely he was the Son of God!” when the centurion and others with him who were guarding Jesus witnessed the earthquake and everything that had transpired.

  • The temple curtain had been ripped in half.
  • We know from the laws of the Old Testament that entering God’s presence was a severe matter.
  • The fact that this curtain was destroyed represented the completion of Jesus Christ’s accomplished work on the cross, which eliminated the barrier between sinful humans and holy God by becoming the ultimate High Priest and the ultimate sacrifice on behalf of all people.
  • 2.
  • John Gill’s remark on the event states that “this was a demonstration of Christ’s authority over death and the tomb.” When Jesus rose from the dead on the third day after his death, he demonstrated that he had destroyed both the power of death and the permanence of the grave.
  • In addition to its grandiose claims, this event is noteworthy because it is a narrative predicting Christ’s second coming to collect the remainder of his people.
  • 3.

Jesus is brought back to life from the dead. This text in Matthew glosses over such a remarkable occurrence, but Christ’s resurrection is told in greater detail in Matthew 28, which is the gospel of Matthew (as well as inMark 16,Luke 24, andJohn 20). Photograph courtesy of Joshua Earle via Unsplash.

7 Clues Tell Us *Precisely* When Jesus Died (the Year, Month, Day, and Hour Revealed)

Chapters 51-54 of Matthew 27:51-54 When it happened, the temple’s curtain was ripped in half from top to bottom. Suddenly, the earth began to tremble. The rocks split up, and the tombs were opened. It was possible to bring back to life the bodies of many saintly persons who had perished. In the aftermath of Jesus’ resurrection, they emerged from the tombs and entered the holy city, where they appeared before a large crowd. They were startled and cried, “Surely he was the Son of God!” when the centurion and others with him who were guarding Jesus noticed the earthquake and everything that had transpired.

  • The temple curtain had been split in half.
  • Only the High Priest would meet with God once a year to offer an atonement sacrifice, and this curtain separated worshippers in the temple from theArk of the Covenant and its top – the Mercy seat.
  • After two men perished trying to approach the Lord in the wrong way, the Lord provided Moses precise instructions in Leviticus 16on how to approach him safely and avoid death.
  • The fact that the curtain was torn “from top to bottom” represented that it was torn by God himself, rather than by the efforts of any human being.
  • ‘This was a demonstration of Christ’s authority over death and the grave,’ according to John Gill’s interpretation.

“These saints, I believe, remained on earth until our Lord’s ascension, and then, joining the entourage of angels, proceeded gloriously with him to heaven, as trophies of his victory over sin, Satan, death, and the tomb.” Gill went on to say: This event is notable not just because of its audacious claims, but also because it is a narrative that foreshadows Christ’s second coming to collect the remainder of his people in his kingdom.

Isaiah 26:19 says, “But your dead will live, LORD; their bodies will rise— let those who dwell in the dust awaken and cry for joy— your dew is like the dew of dawn; the earth will give birth to her dead.” This incident recounted in Matthew also fulfills that promise.

Jesus is raised from the dead.

(as well as inMark 16,Luke 24, andJohn 20).

Clue1: The High Priesthood of Caiaphas

According to the gospels, Jesus was executed at the behest of Caiaphas, a high priest from the first century who was known for his ruthlessness (Matthew 26:3-4,John 11:49-53).

Based on previous accounts, we know that he served as high priest from 18 to 36 A.D., which places Jesus’ death at that time period. However, we may be a little more particular. There’s a lot more.

Clue2: The Governorship of Pontius Pilate

All four gospels agree that Jesus was killed on Pontius Pilate’s orders, according to the New Testament (Matthew 27:24-26,Mark 15:15,Luke 23:24,John 19:15-16). Due to information from other sources, we know when he served as governor of Judea — from A.D. 26 to 36 — and hence can restrict the time period down by several years. Nevertheless, how are we going to narrow the scope to a single day and year?

Clue3: After “the Fifteenth Year of Tiberius Caesar”

All four gospels agree that Jesus was executed on Pontius Pilate’s orders, according to the Bible (Matthew 27:24-26,Mark 15:15,Luke 23:24,John 19:15-16). Due to information from other sources, we know when he served as governor of Judea — from A.D. 26 to 36 — and hence can reduce the time frame down by several years. We’ll need to narrow it down to a precise day and year, though.

Clue4: Crucified on a Friday

There is unanimous agreement among the four gospels that Jesus was crucified on a Friday (Matthew 27:62, Mark 15:42, Luke 23:54, and John 19:42), immediately before a Sabbath, which was just before the first day of the week (Luke 23:54; John 19:42). (Matthew 28:1,Mark 16:2,Luke 24:1,John 20:1). Due to the fact that Friday was designated as “the day of preparation,” we know it was a Friday. This means that it was the day on which Jews made the preparations they required for the Sabbath, as they were not permitted to work on that day.

  • According to the Jewish Encyclopedia: Friday is referred to as ‘Ereb Shabbat’ since it is the day before Shabbat (The Eve of Sabbath).
  • In Josephus’ Antiquitiesxvi.
  • The day is referred to as “Yoma da-‘Arubta” in Yer.
  • 1 of the Jewish calendar (Day of Preparation).
  • 29 and 36, despite the fact that six days of the week were eliminated.

Clue5: A Friday at Passover

It is also agreed upon by the gospel writers that Jesus was crucified in connection with the yearly festival of Passover (Matthew 26:2,Mark 14:1,Luke 22:1,John 18:39). We get into a slight snag here since the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke characterize the Last Supper on Holy Thursday as a Passover feast (Matthew 26:19,Mark 14:14,Luke 22:15). That would imply that Good Friday occurred the day after Passover was observed. On the other hand, while recounting the morning of Good Friday, John makes it clear that the Jewish rulers had not yet eaten the Passover meal.

  1. It was still early in the morning.
  2. As a result, Pilate walked out to meet them.
  3. There are a variety of options for dealing with this situation.
  4. Another possibility is that Jesus simply moved the date of the Passover celebration for him and his disciples forward a few days.
  5. In the event that he announces, “We’re celebrating Passover today,” and it happens to be a day earlier than most people are used to, they would just accept it.
  6. No matter what Jesus’ movement did, we may use John’s remark about the kidnappers of Jesus to determine what the Jewish authorities or mainstream Judaism were like in those days: They were beginning their Passover celebrations on Friday evening, which is what we would call Friday.

Because of this, we can reduce the range of probable dates down to only a handful. The following is a comprehensive list of the days between A.D. 29 and 36 on which Passover began in the evening:

  • Monday, April 18, the year 29
  • Friday, April 7, the year 30
  • Tuesday, March 27, the year 31
  • Monday, April 14, the year 32
  • Friday, April 3, the year 33
  • Wednesday, March 24, the year 34
  • Tuesday, April 12, the year 35
  • And Saturday, March 31, the year 36

Monday, April 18, the year 29; Friday, April 7, the year 30; Tuesday, March 27, the year 31; Monday, April 14, the year 32; Friday, April 3, the year 33; Wednesday, March 24, the year 34; Tuesday, April 12, the year 35; and Saturday, March 31, the year 36; and

Clue6: John’s Three Passovers

During Jesus’ career, the Gospel of John mentions three separate Passovers: the first, the second, and the third.

  • Jesus’ first public appearance was during the Passover Seder, which was described in John 2:13, towards the beginning of his career. 2nd Passover: This event is mentioned in John 6:4 and takes place in the midst of Jesus’ career. Passover3: This is mentioned in John 11:55 (and has been referenced several times thereafter), and it occurs near the conclusion of Jesus’ career.

That implies that Jesus’ ministry had to have lasted at least a couple of years longer than that. An in-depth examination would disclose that it lasted around three and a half years; yet, even if we believe that it began immediately before Passover1, the inclusion of two additional Passovers demonstrates that it lasted at the very least more than two years. That indicates the A.D. 30 deadline has passed. A ministry of at least two years cannot be accommodated in the period available between the fifteenth year of Tiberius Caesar (A.D.

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The numbers don’t add up in this case.

Is it possible to be any more specific?

Clue7: “The Ninth Hour”

Jesus died about “the ninth hour,” according to the gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke (Matthew 27:45-50,Mark 15:34-37,Luke 23:44-46). The “ninth hour” is what we would regard to as 3:00 p.m. in our modern day. This allows us to narrow down the time of Jesus’ death to a very specific point in history: around 3:00 p.m. on Friday, April 3, A.D. 33, on the third day of the first month of the first century. Of course, there are a slew of thorough counter-arguments that I haven’t had time to address in this article.

This is the exact moment it occurred.

What Now?

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The original version of this item published on April 10, 2013, at the Register.

When Was Jesus Born, and When Did He Die?

While Christians commemorate Christmas and Easter on an annual basis, few are aware of the dates on which Jesus was born and when he was crucified. Not that any significant theology is founded on the calculations presented here, but it is comforting to know that we may have fair confidence in the dates of Jesus’ birth and death, which can be determined from a mix of biblical and extrabiblical historical facts, as demonstrated below. I may not be prepared to put my life on the line for the accuracy of the information provided below, but I am confident enough in my calculations to have my van’s license plate displayed as follows: 5BC–AD33.

(the most authoritative treatment of this topic that I am aware of is Paul L.

Maier, “The Date of the Nativity and the Chronology of Jesus’ Life,” in As a side note, this would give Herod (who died in 4 B.C.) ample time to prepare his campaign to have all the boys two years old and younger in Bethlehem and the surrounding area slaughtered, as well as for Jesus to be born (see Matt 2:16, 19).

33.

14 is the date given by both Tacitus (Annales4 4) and Suetonius (Tiberius73) as the beginning of Tiberius’ reign.

However, this date is inaccurate (the correct date being August 19, which is the day of Emperor Augustus’ death). As a result, dating from August 19, A.D. 14, the 15th year of Tiberius’ rule gets us to the year A.D. 29 (14 plus 15 = 29).

According to the Gospels

The Bible states that Jesus was “around 30 years old” when he began his public ministry in Luke 3:23. If Jesus was born in 5 B.C. (as argued above) and began his public ministry shortly after the death of John the Baptist (that is, in the latter part of the year A.D. 29), as indicated by all four Gospels, this would mean that Jesus was approximately 33 years old when he began his public ministry (see H. W. Hoehner, Chronological Aspects of the Life of Christ, 31–37; and B. Messner, “‘In the Fifteenth According to John’s Gospel, Jesus appeared during at least three Passovers: (1) in Jerusalem (2:13, 23); (2) in Galilee (6:4); and (3) once again in Jerusalem (2:13, 23).

  1. There’s also a good chance he went to a fourth Passover that wasn’t documented in John but was recorded in the Synoptics (Matt 12:1 pars.?
  2. If Jesus began his preaching in late A.D.
  3. 33, according to the calendar.
  4. 30 and 33 are the only possible dates for Jesus’ crucifixion in terms of the date of Passover in these two years (for more information on the dating of the four Passovers in question, see, for example, C.
  5. Humphreys and W.
  6. Waddington, “The Jewish Calendar, a Lunar Eclipse, and the Date of Christ’s Crucifixion,” Tyndale Bulletin After all is said and done, John 2:20 states that the temple was completed 46 years ago (for this translation see A.
  7. Köstenberger, John, pages 109–10).

(Antiquities15.11.1 380), Josephus records that the temple structure itself was renovated, with the work completed 18 months later, in 18/17 B.C (Antiquities15.11.6 421).

and adding 46 years leads us to A.D.

To learn more about Johannine chronology, check the chart in A.

Köstenberger, John (BECNT; Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004), 11–13, and the commentary at 1:19 and 2:20, as well as the prior post on Johannine chronology here.

W.

J B Green, S McKnight, and I H Marshall; Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1992), pgs.

Also,.

Quake Reveals Day of Jesus’ Crucifixion

According to the New Testament, Jesus was most likely crucified on Friday, April 3, 33 A.D., according to the historical record. The most recent analysis, which was published in the journal International Geology Review, was focused on earthquake activity near the Dead Sea, which is located 13 miles from the Israeli capital of Jerusalem. The earthquake that occurred at the crucifixion is mentioned in the Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 27: “And after Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit.” The temple’s curtain was split in half from top to bottom at that same time.

To better understand earthquake activity in the region, geologists Jefferson Williams of Supersonic Geophysical and Markus Schwab and Achim Brauer of the German Research Center for Geosciences examined three cores taken from the beach of the Ein Gedi Spa, which is located adjacent to the Dead Sea.

In the sediments, varves, which are annual layers of deposition, reveal that the core was affected by at least two major earthquakes: a widespread earthquake that occurred in 31 B.C.

Specifically, Williams noted that the latter time happened during “the years when Pontius Pilate was procurator of Judea and during the era when the earthquake in the Gospel of Matthew is factually restricted.” It is known with a good degree of clarity when the crucifixion (also known as Good Friday) took place, according to him.

However, the year has been a source of contention. In terms of textual indications concerning the date of the crucifixion, Williams cited a Nature research written by Colin Humphreys and Graeme Waddington that was published in 2011. Williams provided the following summary of their work:

  • All four gospels, as well as Tacitus’ Annals (XV,44), agree that the crucifixion took place during Pontius Pilate’s tenure as procurator of Judea, which lasted from 26 to 36 AD. Every one of the four gospels claims that Jesus was crucified on a Friday. Each of the four gospels agrees that Jesus died a few hours before sunset on Friday, marking the beginning of the Jewish Sabbath. It appears that Jesus died before nightfall on the 14th day of Nisan
  • This would have been just in time to begin serving the Passover meal. John’s gospel, however, differs from the synoptic accounts, apparently indicating that Jesus died before nightfall on the 15th day of Nisan
  • This would have been just in time to begin serving the Passover meal.

Taking into account information from the Jewish calendar and astronomical calculations, the researchers were able to come up with a number of plausible dates, with Friday, April 3, 33 AD, being the most accurate match, according to the researchers. For the sake of simplicity, Williams and his team acknowledge that the seismic activity associated with the crucifixion could refer to “an earthquake that occurred sometime before or after the crucifixion and was in effect ‘borrowed’ by the author of the Gospel of Matthew, and a local earthquake between 26 and 36 A.D.

Williams is looking at another another natural occurrence that might be connected with the crucifixion – the occurrence of darkness.

Such darkness, according to him, may have been brought on by a dust storm.

Discovery News contributed the information for this article.

Verse by Verse Ministry International

On the basis of the biblical text, we can guesstimate the day of Jesus’ death as follows: 1. According to Matthew, Jesus was born during the reign of Herod the Great. Herod died around 4 BC, according to historical records, which means that Jesus was born around or before 4 BC. Jesus Christ (Matthew 2:1) As previously stated, Jesus was born around two years before Herod’s death (see Matthew 2:13-16), which means that Jesus was born around 6 BC. Three, according to Luke, Jesus began his career when he was 30 years old (Luke 3:23), which means that Jesus began His ministry between AD 24 and 25.

  • Because Jesus’ mission on earth spanned three years (including the Passover feasts in the Gospels), he died at the age of 33, which implies His death must have occurred between AD 27 and AD 28, according to the Bible.
  • Several accounts in the Gospels claim that Jesus was risen before sunrise on Sunday morning (Luke 24:1), after having been in the tomb for three days and three nights (Matthew 28:1–3).
  • Counting backwards from Sunday, we discover that Jesus died during the daytime hours of a Thursday afternoon in the year 30.
  • Passover begins each year at dusk on the 14th day of the Jewish month of Nisan, which is the first day of the month of Nisan (new days begin at sundown by Jewish reckoning).
  • When we look at the astronomical records, we find that there was just one year in which Passover came inside the window of opportunity specified by Scripture.
  • on Wednesday, April 9th, in the year AD 27.

In accordance with the Jewish calendar, the 2,000th anniversary of Jesus’ death will occur on Thursday, April 22, 2027, which will be the second Thursday in April. For further details, please refer to our Gospel of Matthew teaching in this issue.

When Did Jesus Die? What Do We Know About the Timeline of Jesus’ Death and Resurrection

One of the most dramatic events in the Bible, if one were to choose one time to characterize as the climax, would be the death, burial, and resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ. It is the culmination of the Old Testament’s promises and predictions, the apex of history, and the pivotal event around which all subsequent sections of the Bible are defined and organized. The death of the Lord Jesus was a watershed point in history that changed and reshaped the course of history. Understanding it helps us understand why Easter is essential, as well as why the transition from the law to the grace of Christ occurred.

Here’s where you can get your FREE Easter Guide.

Photograph courtesy of Unsplash/Alicia Quan

When Did Jesus Die?

The Gospels each provide a portion of a timeline that illustrates not just what happened to the Lord during the period of what is now known as Good Friday, but also when these events took place in historical time. They all believe that Pontius Pilate was the governor of Roman Judaea – the one who presided over that part of the Roman Empire as a satellite for Caesar – and that he was the man who executed Julius Caesar. He appears in the following books: Matthew 27, Mark 15, Luke 23, and John 19.

Tiberius was the second emperor after Augustus, and he governed from 14 to 37 AD.

Historically, historians and theologians have agreed that Jesus was roughly thirty-three years old when He was crucified.

Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/toeytoey2530.

What Was the Hour of Jesus’ Death?

The New Testament provides a detailed timeline of Christ’s arrest, trial, and execution, all of which take place on the same night. Jesus had traveled to Jerusalem in order to participate in the Passover celebrations. The Lord made His triumphal entry into the city on the Sunday before He was arrested, which is known as the triumphant entry. In response, both those who went before and those who followed cried out: “Hosanna! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!” (Matthew 11:9) The conspiracy to capture Jesus came to fruition after several days of preparation in the capital city.

  1. In the morning, His crucifixion started at Golgotha, a skull-shaped hill outside the city gates, where He had been tried the previous evening.
  2. The third hour, the sixth hour, and the ninth hour are all mentioned in the Gospels.
  3. “And it was the third hour when they crucified him,” according to Mark 15:25.
  4. on the third hour if it had occurred.

” It was dark from noon until three in the afternoon, according to the third hour of the day, which was nine o’clock in the morning. Credit: Unsplash/Veri Ivanova for the photo.

What Happened When Jesus Died?

The Crucifixion of Jesus appears to have elicited a response from the entire world. There was darkness for three hours in the midst of the day, in the middle of the day. Additionally, the Gospels state, “And behold, the curtain of the temple had been ripped in two, from top to bottom.” There was an earthquake, and the rocks were split,” he said (Matthew 27:51). Many people were taken by surprise by these momentous events. The veil hung in the temple and was particularly designed to divide the innermost area – the Holy of Holies – from the rest of the building, so that God’s presence could be kept hidden from the public.

  1. There was no longer a need for the veil after Jesus paid the penalty for mankind’s sin since man may now approach God directly in repentance as a result of his atonement.
  2. Psalm 22:17-18 was fulfilled when the Roman soldiers separated Jesus’ clothing and cast lots (John 19:23), as recorded by both sources in the Gospel of John.
  3. Even the manner of the Lord’s death did not quite conform to the traditional Roman crucifixion, but it did fulfill the prophecies of the Old Testament in this regard.
  4. However, according to John 19, Roman troops shattered the bones of the men who were standing close to Jesus, but the Lord had already given up the ghost and was dead at the time.
  5. This acted as a portent for the Lord Jesus, and as a result, His body had to be completely restored as well.
  6. Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/Robertiez
See also:  Where Is The Jordan River Where Jesus Was Baptized

When Was Jesus Resurrected?

Joseph of Arimathea, a religious leader who thought that Jesus was the Messiah, had his tomb built outside of Jerusalem, and it was there that Jesus was put to rest. After his death, which happened on a Friday afternoon, Jesus was promptly taken down from the cross and buried with his cousin Joseph in the tomb of Joseph of Arimathea. According to Jewish law and custom, nothing could be done with or to the body on the Sabbath – Saturday – and as a result, the body was buried as soon as possible.

They requested that the Romans guard the tomb of Jesus in order to prevent His disciples from stealing the corpse.

Saturday was the Jewish Sabbath, as well as the second day of the week. This was the third day, which was the day of the Resurrection, which is commemorated by Christians as Easter Sunday. Featured image courtesy of Getty Images/Alessandro Photo

Why Do We Celebrate Easter When We Do?

Following the Sabbath, a group of ladies who had been following Jesus’ ministry made their way to the tomb. Some aspects of Jewish burial were unable to be completed because of the speed with which Jesus was laid to rest, and the women were called in to complete some of those processes. An angel, on the other hand, met and welcomed them. In response, the angel assured them, ‘Do not be afraid; I know that you are seeking Jesus, who was crucified.'” He is not present because, as he stated, he has risen from the dead.

Christians celebrate the miraculous resurrection of Jesus Christ on the same day as the Jewish holiday of Passover, in accordance with the traditions of Passover week, and in recognition of the fact that Jesus died the day before the Sabbath and that the women discovered the empty tomb the day after the Sabbath.

However, some sects and denominations, particularly in Orthodox communities, dispute Sunday as the date of the resurrection, arguing that it should be celebrated on Monday.

Easter brings believers together in worship, joy, and excitement as they look forward to the resurrection.

The miracle is carefully recounted in the Gospels, with the promise of redemption being passed down through the generations – the promise of Easter Sunday.

Sources:

Alfred Edersheim’s work is a good example of how to combine a formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formal The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah are detailed in this book.

  1. Wm.
  2. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, 1953.
  3. Crossway Publishing Company, Wheaton, IL, 2014.
  4. Dwight.
  5. Dwight.” Jesus Christ’s Words and Deeds are the foundation of the Christian faith.
  6. Walvoord, John F., and Roy B.
  7. The Bible Knowledge Commentary is a resource for Bible knowledge.
  8. Photograph courtesy of Getty Images /jordachelr

Bethany Verretti is a writer and editor who works as a freelancer. She writes a religion and lifestyle blog, graceandgrowing.com, where she ponders the Lord, life, culture, and ministry, as well as other topics.

Bethany Verretti is a writer and editor who works as a freelancer. She writes a religion and lifestyle blog, graceandgrowing.com, where she ponders the Lord, life, culture, and ministry, as well as other topics.

How Old Was Jesus When He Died?

As Easter approaches, many people may begin to wonder about some of the less well-known details of Jesus’ life and ministry. We’re curious in his appearance, what clothes he wore, how tall he was, and what kind of food he ate. While contemplating Jesus’ humanity, we can’t help but ask ourselves these kinds of questions, especially as the day of his death draws closer. One question comes up rather frequently because we want to know how valuable it is in comparison to our own lives. What was Jesus’ age at the time of his death?

  1. Was he of a certain age?
  2. Was he weakened by his advanced age and the responsibilities of a long life?
  3. As we contemplate our own mortality, his humanity screams out to us from the threshold of death.
  4. In addition to you, it is also yours.
  5. Here’s where you can get your FREE Holy Week Guide.

How Do We Determine Jesus’ Age?

There are no scriptures in the Bible that tell us how old Jesus was when he died. What we do have are passages that tell us how old he was when he did specific tasks, as well as the cultural expectations of hisfaithcommunity regarding significant anniversaries in a person’s life at certain points in his life. The dates when he began his ministry and the length of time he spent in ministry up to his death are the ones to keep an eye out for since they are related to his death. But first and foremost, we need to know when he was born.

According to Luke 3:23, Jesus was roughly thirty years old when he began his career (26-30 AD) and remained in service for three years, putting Jesus’ death between 29 and 33 AD.

What Were Some Milestones in Jesus’ Childhood?

When attempting to calculate the age of Jesus, we must take into consideration anything that is described in Hebrews 4:15. He was completely free of sin. As a result of his Jewish background, he was raised to believe that he was flawless in accordance with the Law of Moses. Whether or not he was perfect according to the Law of Moses indicates that the expectations of the communal life guided by the Law were satisfied in a satisfactory manner. This implies that if we look closely, we can track some of his life milestones and use that information to construct a rough chronology of his existence.

  1. The Mosaic Law stipulated that all men were compelled to do so.
  2. A kid cannot become a member of this religious society unless he has undergone ceremonial circumcision.
  3. This was done during the cleansing rite forty days following the birth of the child.
  4. As a kid (Jesus) was in contact with his mother’s blood at birthing, the ritual declared him to be clean.
  5. Due to the fact that Jesus was the firstborn male, this was also the ceremonial of redemption.
  6. Teaching at the Temple when I was twelve years old (Luke 2:41-51).
  7. At a time when Jesus was still considered a kid and when his father was still held accountable for his moral acts, Jesus stands alongside and educates the instructors in the Temple.
  8. When the Magi came to visit, I was only two years old (Matthew 2:16).
  9. Using the information provided by the Gospel of Matthew, we may establish the ages of additional individuals associated with Jesus’ life.
  10. As a result, we know that Jesus was two years old when the Magi came to honor him.

We can also infer that Jesus’ family remained in Bethlehem for a period of two years following the birth of their son. While it is possible that Jesus was born in a stable, it is more likely that his family had relocated to a more permanent residence.

Do We Know What Jesus Was Doing as a Young Adult?

The Bible does not provide us a detailed account of Jesus’ life from the age of twelve until he reached full manhood, but it does provide us with some indications of what he was up to during that period. Despite the fact that the individuals who wrote the passage contained in Mark 6:3 were not depicting Jesus in a good manner, the verse did represent something that they knew about him. These are the folks who have grown up with him and who refer to him as “the carpenter.” The fact that his father Joseph was a carpenter by profession is also known from other scriptures, and it would have been expected in the culture that Jesus would have learnt his father’s craft and carried on the family business.

  1. It is not impossible that Jesus may have worked on some of these projects while he was a young man because they required a considerable quantity of labor to be completed successfully.
  2. Dr.
  3. Joseph goes into much detail about this here.
  4. The Essenes are not particularly mentioned by name in the Bible at any point in time.
  5. As a result, Jesus’ teachings on the latter days and communal life are consistent with some of the themes that the Essene community was intensely concerned about at the time of his death.
  6. A further point in favor of the thesis is the fact that Jesus did not marry.
  7. Carrying water was considered a woman’s responsibility in Jesus’ day.
  8. If a household possessed slaves, the slaves may be assigned to this work, although this was typically a female-only responsibility.
  9. According to this report from the Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Essenes were known to be present in Jerusalem at the time, and they were known to dwell in houses that were divided according to gender.
  10. In this chapter, there is also the question of what Jesus instructs his disciples to say to one another.
  11. The “Teacher of Righteousness” was the title given to the leader of the Essene society in ancient times.

While we cannot be certain that Jesus was a member of the Essene community, it appears that he was at the very least aware of the Essene sect’s Jerusalem branch, its practices, and its teachings, according to the evidence.

How Old Was Jesus When He Began His Ministry?

When Jesus reached the age of thirty, he would have been eligible to begin serving in the ministry. According to Luke 3:23, Jesus was around thirty years old when he began his preaching. For him to be permitted to teach in the Temple area of Jerusalem, he would have needed to come from a lineage that authorized him to do so. When Elizabeth was revealed to be the daughter of Aaron in Luke 1:5, Mary, Aaron’s mother, was a relative of Elizabeth. The fact that Jesus is descended from Abraham gives him the authority to function in the teaching capacity that he assumed when he visited the Temple.

  • A number of incidents are depicted in the Gospel of Luke to mark Jesus’ initiation into the ministry.
  • The significance of this sequence of milestones and occurrences may be understood on a number of different levels.
  • There are spiritual causes for Jesus’ confrontations with both temporal and spiritual powers throughout his lifetime, according to this passage.
  • This puts his age at the time of his death on the cross at thirty-three years old.
  • The typical lifespan in Jesus’ day, according to several sources, was thirty-five years old, which would make Jesus appear to be a much older man at the time of his death.
  • I would have to agree that Jesus died very young when compared to his contemporaries.
  • When he tallied up the expenses, he concluded that we were worth it.

What Does This Mean for Believers?

When Jesus became thirty years old, he would have begun his public ministry. According to Luke 3:23, he began his ministry when he was around thirty years old. It would have been necessary for him to have a pedigree that permitted him to teach in the Temple region of Jerusalem. When Elizabeth was revealed to be the daughter of Aaron inLuke 1:5, his mother, Mary, was a relative of Elizabeth. The fact that Jesus is descended from Abraham gives him the authority to teach in the Temple, which he did when he entered the temple.

Following this announcement, a series of events are recorded in the Gospel of Luke.

(Luke 4:16-22).

Firstly, it shows us that Jesus not only has royal power via David, but also has jurisdiction over the priesthood through Aaron, which proves to us that he is descended from Aaron and so has a claim to the post of High Priest.

Two more points are relevant to our discussion: we know how old Jesus was when he began his ministry, and we know that he was in ministry for approximately three years as a result of this information.

Using this information, we may compare Jesus’ age to our own and determine whether or not he was reflective of his civilization.

As JP Griffin of the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine points out, when the enormous statistical weighting associated with infant mortality is removed, we can observe that, among persons who reached the age of five, the average life expectancy was 56 years (+/- 15.5 years), according to the data.

I believe he honestly sacrificed his life, not taking into consideration how much of it he still had left on this planet. Having calculated the financial implications, he concluded that we were worthwhile investing his time and resources.

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