How To Follow Jesus In The Real World

Following Jesus in the “Real World”: Discipleship for the Post-College Years – Kindle edition by Lamb, Richard C., Jr. Religion & Spirituality Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.

What does it mean to continue to follow Jesus after graduation? If it was once simple to graduate from college, select a career path, and move on with one’s life, it isn’t so simple now. The terrain is uncharted, the goal is unknown, and the stakes are extremely high. Christians frequently find themselves nostalgically recalling their schooldays, which adds to the pressure. Afterward, they were part of a true community, made time to pray, and weren’t concerned with money. The “real world” that they were promised (or threatened with) throughout college turns out to be a confusing maze in the fog of memory.

To give sensible guidance and practical encouragement during a challenging period, Richard Lamb masterfully weaves together biblical ideas, anecdotes of recent graduates, and his own life experience.

Whatever your age, whether you’re just starting your degree or finished a decade ago, if you crave for the spirituality of your college years and wonder how you may reclaim it, this is the book for you.

Following Jesus in the “Real World”

When you graduate from college, what does it mean to continue your Christian walk? If graduating from college, choosing a career path, and moving on in life was ever simple, it is not so anymore. The terrain is uncharted, the goal is unknown, and the stakes are extremely high. Christians frequently find themselves reflecting fondly on their schooldays, which adds to the stress level. That was the period when people understood true community, made time to pray, and weren’t consumed by money concerns.

So, where does God come into it all?

In his numerous demonstrations, he demonstrates that discipleship may continue after graduation, whether in the realm of employment or ministry.

How to Follow Jesus in the Real World

Photo courtesy of Jon Tyson on Unsplash ** The following disclaimer applies: I’m writing this essay from the perspective of someone who has only been in the workforce for a little more than a year. As a college student, I have a lot to learn, a lot to experience, and I’m sure I’ll look back on these lines in a few years and laugh at my youthful naivete — but I have a strong desire for college students to graduate and enter the real world with confidence, so I continue to type. Having recently graduated from college in the spring of 2020, I was invited to participate on a panel of other graduates to provide advice to students about how to make the transition from college to the “real world.” I accepted the invitation and participated in the panel.

Since I was a child, I’ve lived just south of the Denver metropolitan area, and I attended college at the University of Colorado in Boulder, which is only an hour away from my hometown.

When I received a job offer that would send me to Tempe, Arizona, I realized that God had answered my request.

For a number of “firsts,” I had to prepare myself.

It is my aim that this post will serve as a reflection on my first year out of college and a sobering yet optimistic image of how young professional followers of Jesus might make the transition from college to the real world.

Helped

JON TYSON’S PHOTO ON UNISPLAY ** Disclaimer: I’m writing this essay from the perspective of someone who has just been in the workforce for a little over a year and is still learning the ropes. As a college student, I have a lot to learn, a lot to experience, and I’m sure I’ll look back on these lines in a few years and laugh at my youthful naivete — but I have a strong desire for college students to graduate and enter the real world with confidence, so I continue to write. Having recently graduated from college in the spring of 2020, I was invited to participate in a panel of other graduates to provide advice to students about how to make the transition from college to the “real world.” I accepted the invitation.

  1. In Colorado, I grew up my entire childhood just south of the city of Denver, and I attended college at the University of Colorado in Boulder, which was about an hour away from my hometown.
  2. When I received a job opportunity that would send me to Tempe, Arizona, I realized that God had heard my prayer and answered it!
  3. For a number of “firsts,” I needed to prepare.
  4. It is my hope that this post will serve as a reflection on my first year out of college and a sobering yet optimistic image of how young professional followers of Jesus might make the transition from college to the real world!
  • Serving in a local church
  • Praying thepsalms
  • Observing a weekly sabbath
  • And other such activities

Hindered

The following are the key factors that I’ve observed as impeding my walk with God in the actual world:

  • Having a constant rhythm that works for my spiritual practices (whether it’s prayer or Bible reading or community or a sabbath or service, or anything else
  • You have to find a consistent rhythm that works for you, even if you’re one of those people who despises structure)
  • With the exception of pandemic quarantines, much of my isolation has been caused by my sloth and worship of comfort – establishing company requires effort and can be painful, but it is vital in order to live and survive in the real world)
  • Selfishness (withholding your time, resources, and energy from God and others is an excellent method to sabotage your spiritual life — you discover your life when you lay it down)
  • Apathy (apathy is a great way to sabotage your spiritual life — you discover your life when you lay it down).

Prayer

Finding community was my most persistent prayer leading up to the relocation, and it has unsurprisingly turned out to be the most significant answered prayer I’ve witnessed to yet. If I could go back in time and do it all over again, I would spend even more time praying for community. God appeared and provided in a totally magnificent manner. In the first month of my relocation, I asked for leadership opportunities in the local church, and God fulfilled that request within a month. I prayed for deep connections with individuals who had different life experiences than mine, and God has been faithfully answering that request over the course of the last year and a half.

It’s no surprise that He enjoys answering prayers that are focused on seeking community!

Intentionality

It is true that God will supply fellowship in miraculous ways, but it is also true that God cannot offer fellowship if you spend your day sitting on your hands and expecting a lively community of Jesus followers to come knocking on your door. You must take immediate action! Beintentional. Invest a significant amount of time in a local church. Make it a point to meet at least one new person every Sunday. Get their phone number right away and set up a meeting for lunch or coffee with them right then and there.

Take a step outside of your comfort zone!

For all of my introverted friends out there, I want you to know that being introverted is not an excuse to live a life isolated from others.

Don’t exhaust yourself – it’s fine to be introverted, but you shouldn’t use it as an excuse to withdraw altogether from society. You have to come out and be a part of God’s Family, or else you’ll find yourself floundering in your loneliness.

Relational Evangelism

In its most basic form, this is engaging in deep and long-lasting relationships with nonbelievers, where trust may be formed, while also seeking chances to engage gospel dialogues with them in the context of their everyday lives. While this approach can go wrong when it leads to complacency or is used to avoid sharing one’s faith, I’ve seen it grow my patience, my ability to ask questions, and my ability to listen, all of which have slowly begun to provide incredible opportunities for rich gospel conversations.

We should joyously contribute our time, talents, expertise, funds, and friendship to love our neighbors in Jesus’ footsteps, as he poured himself out on the cross for us.” One of the ways we show our affection for them is by taking the time to get to know them and listen to their stories.

What do you think of the things you’ve discovered about their family?

Maintain strong connections with non-believers and pray for opportunities to communicate your religion in a purposeful manner with them.

Disciple-Making Teamwork

Making disciples is a difficult task. It necessitates not just sharing the gospel with others, but also sharing your entire life with them (1 Thessalonians 2:8). You’ll need accountability and encouragement from others in order to truly put this into action. Bob McNabb, author of Spiritual Multiplication in the Real World, introduced me to the notion of “disciple-making cooperation.” I was immediately intrigued. We simply will not be able to develop disciples over the long term without the help of a team, as Bob describes in detail in his book.

Find 2–3 other people in your local church who are similarly enthusiastic about discipleship and join them in this endeavor.

The most important thing I wish I had realized earlier is how monotonous your days and weeks can get if you allow them.

Here are two points to consider:

  • Converting people to Christ is difficult job. It necessitates not just sharing the gospel with others, but also sharing your complete life with them (1 Thessalonians 2:8). If you want to genuinely live this out, you’ll need accountability and support from others. Bob McNabb, author of Spiritual Multiplication in the Real World, was the one who introduced me to the notion of “disciple-making cooperation.” We simply will not be able to develop disciples over the long term without the help of a team, according to Bob in his book. According to Mark 6:7, Jesus Himself was in the business of disciple-making collaboration. Look for 2–3 additional people in your local church who are equally enthusiastic about discipleship. As a group, hold each other responsible to purposefully sharing the gospel, baptizing new believers, and sharing your life with them while teaching them to do what Jesus instructed (Matthew 28:19–20). When I look back, the one thing I wish I had realized is how monotonous your days and weeks can become if you let them to be. It is possible to become really bored when working a standard 9–5 job very rapidly. In this case, I have two points to make.

Begin to construct a positive theology of labor that is both healthy and productive. You were designed to be productive (Gen. 2:15). Work is a fantastic experience! We have the opportunity to bring God’s image into the world around us via our labor. In order to avoid having a too-low perspective of work (seeing it as just an end in itself/a means to put bread on the table), or a too-high view of work (having it become an idol in your life/having the hustle overtake you), look for the creative potential in your job.

Think of your work as a mirror of the great Creator, who is the God who created the cosmos, if you are a creative person.

In real estate, consider your profession as a chance to place people in homes and to build physical environments that foster hospitality and family love for those who live in those houses. Here are a few excellent books to read to help you enhance your understanding about theology of work:

  • Garden City was written by John Mark Comer, while The Symphony of Mission was written by Michael Goheen. Tim Keller’s Every Good Endeavor is based on the novel by Jim Mullins.

As you read these words, please know that I am praying for you! You will have faith and trust in the Lord when you step into the “real world,” I am praying for you right now. Throughout the difficulties of transition, He is faithful to take your hand and guide you into a place of belonging in the Family of God, and He will pour forth grace on you as you go through it all.

Five Practical Ways a Leader Can Follow Jesus in the Real World

When I was growing up, my father owned and ran a number of junkyards across the Bay Area. My first job was putting tire sizes on worn tires with a yellow marker by the time I was old enough to read and write, and I had to dismiss someone before I was allowed to drive. (I’m referring to driving lawfully.) What I learned about myself and the world back then has had a significant impact on how I conduct my business now. Despite the fact that my present workplace is neither soiled with grease or polluted with secondhand smoke, I continue to view decisions through that lens.

In fact, if you aren’t immersed in the real world, it’s possible that you aren’t truly live the life you believe you are.

1. Work with the people already on your bus.

“Get the appropriate people on the bus,” according to leadership guru Jim Collins, is a phrase you may be familiar with. Except that it’s not always feasible to do so. Because of a variety of variables, including a shortage of qualified candidates, financial constraints, and even labor restrictions, you are unable to shift employees on and off your organizational “bus” at will. That is true whether you have four college students working in a coffee shop or four hundred lineworkers in a manufacturing plant on your payroll.

  • This is especially crucial because no leader is flawless, which is also true of themselves!
  • ), and invest my time and resources into their lives.
  • In ten years, I should care less about the organization and more about the individuals God has placed in my life, and I should care less about the organization today.
  • But consider the group that Jesus was a part of: That’s quite the collection of blunders!
See also:  Who Was The First To Hear That Jesus Had Risen From The Dead?

2. Being loving is better than being right.

If you’re working with folks who are already on your bus, you should be less focused with winning debates and more interested with caring for those around you, according to the CDC. The desire to be correct is a strong temptation. However, when being accurate comes at the price of interpersonal connections, things typically don’t work out well. What happens when you are correct, but your insistence on demonstrating it causes people to tune you out. or worse yet, to ignore you? Instead, get comfortable with being vulnerable.

Acknowledging your shortcomings is a wonderful approach to show others you care about them.

The narrative of a father who begs Jesus to heal his kid is told in Mark 9.

It is a wonderful story. Whenever Jesus shifts the dialogue from one of doubt to one of trust and belief, the father shouts, “I believe; help my unbelief!” The esv. version of verse 24 says: There is a vulnerability in this that we should all be drawn to and embrace.

3. Honor coworkers in all places.

Caring for the team you have necessitates caring for the whole team you have at your disposal. The temptation for leaders to focus on friends in very high positions might be strong, but friends in supposedly low positions can be just as important—and they can make all the difference. If you remember, I once came close to being beaten by three older boys when “Insane Dwayne” came up on his motorbike and saved me from being beaten. The value of someone is sometimes misunderstood in relation to their job title or vocation.

  1. Your whole team is important—as are the members of your team’s family, your vendors, your customers, and so on and so forth.
  2. Do you know what they all look like?
  3. Do you know the name of your UPS driver if you work in an environment where delivery workers arrive and depart frequently?
  4. Moreover, if you still don’t believe me, read the account of Rahab in the books of Joshua 2 and 6.

4. Real leaders aren’t afraid to follow.

You’re attempting to lead and care for your complete team, from the top to the bottom, but who is in charge of your team? The most effective leaders are also those that actively follow their directions. We all need somebody to guide us into a better and healthier state of being, whether we are company owners and operators, pastors in churches and other religious organizations, stay-at-home spouses and writers tucked away in corners of coffee shops and other places of refuge. Discovering individuals who are not immersed in your everyday work tasks is critical, since those are the people who will have enough perspective to love and push you while also collaborating with you on your projects.

This is referred to as the Paul-Barnabas-Timothy model: If you want to succeed, you need a Paul to push you forward, a Barnabas to encourage you, and a Timothy to whom you can push and encourage you.

5.Acta Non Verba.

If everything I’ve said thus far has resonated with you—if you want to be authentic enough to lead your whole team while also being led yourself—then you’ll appreciate this point: Acta Non Verba is a Latin phrase that means “without words.” Actions, not words, are required. The slogan of my father’s life is one that I want to embody in my own life. The actual world application of Jesus’ teachings is that your deeds count more than your words. Who has the most effect on you: those who speak or those who act?

  • What you do, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, will always be more influential than what you say.
  • To out-serve, out-care, and out-love one’s counterpart.
  • Because, if you do fail, you will have the opportunity to be really authentic and vulnerable in your leadership of your team as a result.
  • However, we can all put these five suggestions into practice, and we will almost surely see benefits if we do.
  • I’d appreciate it if you could contact me [email protected].
  • Continue to take the initiative.
  • His thoughts on the consequences of following Jesus for business leaders and wealth builders have continued to occupy his thoughts since then.
  • Photograph courtesy of Thinkstock

Following Jesus in the “real World”

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We would much appreciate it if you could assist us. If there is something wrong with this preview of Following Jesus in the “actual World” by Richard W. Lamb, please let us know. Please accept our sincere thanks for informing us about the situation. You may be the first to pose a question about Following Jesus in the “actual World” by clicking here. Begin your review ofFollowing Jesus in the “real World”: Discipleship for the Post-College Years by clicking on the title of the book. The 28th of May, 2007 Patrick gave it a high rating and said he enjoyed it.

  • This book was given to me by a brother in Christ who was the IVCF leader at Yale during my senior year.
  • The book is a treasure trove of inspiration and practical information on what it means to be a follower of Christ outside of the context of a traditional school setting.
  • This book was given to me by a brother in Christ who was the IVCF leader at Yale during my senior year.
  • The book is a treasure trove of inspiration and practical information on what it means to be a follower of Christ outside of the context of a traditional school setting.
  • This is not a book that can be read in a single sitting, as I have attempted to do in this instance.
  • Additionally, each chapter closes with a “reflection” part that is loaded with pertinent questions, followed by a “further reading” section that includes related sources.
  • To be quite honest, some of the superficial aspects of this book bothered me at first.
  • In addition, the author tries a little too hard in the first couple of pages to keep the tone conversational.
  • It’s things like the fact that the edition I read was so out of date, down to the ’80s-fabulous cover () that Goodreads is apparently too embarrassed to reveal despite the fact that the book was released in 1995.

Moreover, although this is entirely my fault (and I was forewarned that this would be the case), the first couple of chapters are clearly intended for those just starting out in their post-college years, and will seem completely irrelevant to those who have been out of college for more than a year or two at this point.

  • I’m relieved that I didn’t.
  • Many of his proposals are quite detailed, which may be useful in visualizing exactly what he has in mind, yet they might create the impression that this is the only way to live life and that all other variants are harmful.
  • 30th of December, 2013 It received a perfect score because it was outstanding.
  • Last summer, one of my pastors recommended this book to me, and I am eternally thankful to him for doing so.
  • The questions for introspection at the end of each chapter were very good.
  • Last summer, one of my pastors recommended this book to me, and I am eternally thankful to him for doing so.
  • The questions for introspection at the end of each chapter were very good.

More.

It is recommended for post-college young people, according to the author.

As Christians, we are called to a life that is genuinely out of this world, and I often question if I am up to the challenge.

It was a little tedious for me.

I thought it to be quite monotonous.

I recently rediscovered it and was taken aback by how current it still seemed to be.

10th of June, 2015 It was incredible, according to Anna Tanrated.

LOLI think I should classify this as a “read” for this year because I essentially re-read the entire thing and made discussion notes for cell group discussion purposes.

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Following Jesus in the “Real World”

Is it difficult for you to reconcile your vocation with your call to follow Jesus in the “Real World”? Let’s have a discussion about it. They are particularly interested in hearing from and interacting with Emerging Scholars who have contributed to Faithful is Successful, Notes to a Driven Pilgrimar. In order to do so, they are distributing their materials to a volunteer ESN writing team, who will examine and comment to the content through an ESN blog series. Andy Walsh began the series with a response to “The Difficulty Discerning Calling,” which you may recall was the first episode.

  • Thomas B.
  • – I’m experiencing an unanticipated emotional reaction to the chapters of the book project, Faithful is Successful: Notes to the Driven Pilgrim, that I’ve read so far.
  • This is an emotional response, not a logical one, as I’ve stated previously.
  • But I do, for reasons that I’m not really clear on.
  • I thought it sounded like a fantastic idea.
  • Following the leading of the Holy Spirit.
  • Supporting Christians who work in fields where there is little or no evidence of their Christian faith.

But, to be really honest, while I’m going through the table of contents and the first few chapters (I’ve already seen revisions of the first two chapters in their entirety), I’m feeling a little uneasy.

When Bryan McGraw was younger, he had visions of adventure, but he decided to follow God into academia instead.

“Young, goal-oriented, somewhat successful, type-A male,” Dano Jukanovich, who penned the second chapter, was also a recipient of the Harvey Fellowship, which is granted to Christian graduate students at prestigious schools in the hopes that they will make a difference in their profession.

I was taught to look up to men like them, and I’ve tried to conduct my life in the same manner as they have.

(Please bear with me while I attempt to think this out.) It’s possible that I’ll alter my mind.) These are precisely the types of people that are seen as role models by the evangelical middle-class subculture in the United States—my subculture.

He and his colleagues are prosperous, well-educated, middle-class white guys who are married with children and well-respected in their professions.

Furthermore, they placed their faith in God to the point that they were willing to give up wonderful careers in order to pursue His calling on their life.

In fact, it was precisely for this reason that they were chosen to contribute to this book: In the words of the book project’s website, “We reached out to a diverse collection of ambitious, motivated individuals—professors, scientists, artists, investment bankers, and others—and asked them to share their tales.” I’m not trying to come across as cynical.

The fact that it is promoting an ideal that I know I will never reach hurts a little.

(I cringed when he said that a job at Wheaton would restrict his ability to influence others, considering the large number of Christian leaders Wheaton develops.) As a youngster, I wished to do what Jukanovich does now: work abroad for social justice and poverty eradication, perhaps even adopting children from other countries, as he has done.

While I enjoy my present employment, I was saddened by the loss of a dream when I accepted the job offer, and I felt like a failure for having “settled.” It was never my intention to achieve worldly success; instead, I wanted to be out in the world working with the poor, fighting for justice, and educating the next generation of Christian leaders, like those who had been given to me as examples of a genuine Christian life.

  • My narrative doesn’t come to a close there.
  • My perspective of my calling has evolved over time, just as it did for these authors.
  • I haven’t come close to fulfilling the Christian ideal.
  • (Because the list of contributors to the book only includes last names, I am unable to determine how many women are involved.) And if I’m feeling this way despite the fact that I’ve achieved some kind of success, what does it say about people who haven’t gotten as far as I have?
  • What about my former student, a devout Christian who was rejected down for ministry opportunities due to his sexual orientation?
  • What about the large number of kids who will graduate this spring who will have nothing more than worldly prosperity to look forward to in the near future?
  • Or the vast majority of the world’s population, which does not attend college at all?

What does God consider to be success?

It was requested of each contributor that they explain how they “follow Jesus in the actual world,” according to the book project website.

I am quite aware of the hypocrisy of my reaction.

Obviously, I do not speak for a large proportion of the general public.

I also don’t think they should be criticized for their desire or achievement.

See also:  Who Named Jesus Christ

Is it possible that I’m jealous?

Is it my own lack of self-confidence?

That doesn’t upset me so much as the content of the chapters I’ve read; the stories are heartwarming, and their theological insights are good.

When “professors, scientists, artists, and investment bankers” write about following God in the “real world,” kindergarten teachers, accountants, nurses, office managers, journalists, and stay-at-home parents are left out (not to mention the careers available to those without a college education), what message are they sending?

Why aren’t there more female writers contributing to the magazine?

) (Even the chapter on failure is written by a medical professional!) But what about individuals who are unemployed or have impairments, those who are struggling with their sexuality, and those who are struggling with their religious beliefs?

When it comes to being a successful middle-class Christian guy with good education and a wife (if that is what God has called you to be), there is nothing wrong with saying that this is the “real world.” However, we should be cautious of pronouncing this to be the “real world.” By communicating to our pupils (or our children) that we expect them to behave in this manner, we are doing them a disservice.

Or, even worse, that God has something to do with it. What did Christ mean when He declared that those who seek Him will one day inherit the earth, rather than those who are ambitious, motivated, prominent, or successful? Matthew 5:5 (Matthew 5:5)

About the author:

The author (pseudonym) is an associate professor of humanities at a Christian institution of higher learning.

How to Follow Jesus in Everyday Life

What is the best way to follow Jesus? No, seriously.how do we include life for Christ into our everyday routine? As Christians, we must follow Jesus every day of our lives, not only when we attend church services on Sundays. We may take practical efforts to follow Him in whatever we do and to reflect His goodness to others by modeling our actions after His. The following are ten practical ways we might follow Christ in our everyday lives that come directly from the lips of Jesus.

1. Love your enemies

“But I say unto you, love your enemies, bless those who curse you, do good to those who dislike you, and pray for those who despitefully use you and persecute you,” Jesus says. 5:44 (Matthew 5:44) Not everyone is going to be a fan of yours. But how many times do we wish ill will on our adversaries before we give up? Praying for those who detest us is one method to demonstrate our commitment to Jesus. Demonstrate Jesus’ love to those who are hostile against you. Despite the fact that you will never receive anything in return, be courteous to them.

2. Love your neighbor

This second commandment follows the first: “Love your neighbor as yourself” (Luke 10:27). Matthew 22:39 (KJV) Jesus was constantly instructing His disciples on how to love one another. Our responsibility as Christians is to love not simply the people who live next door to us, but to love and offer compassion to everyone with whom we come into contact. One aspect of becoming a follower of Jesus is demonstrating His love to everyone we come into contact with.

3. Don’t judge others

In other words, “do not judge, and you will not be judged; do not condemn, and you will not be condemned; do not forgive, and you will be forgiven:” Luke 6:37 (KJV) When we look at people, we might form snap judgments about them based on what we observe in them. We may criticise and condemn them as a result of the terrible decisions they’ve made in their lives. However, according to the Bible, only God knows what is in a person’s heart (1 Samuel 16:7). On a daily basis, we may practice following Jesus by avoiding to pass judgment on others around us.

4.Be humble

“And whoever exalts himself will be abased, and whoever humbles himself will be exalted,” the Bible says. Matthew 23:12 (KJV) If we want to follow Jesus’ example, we must first learn to be humble. Christ’s humility is one of his defining features. The Lord will raise us up if we humble ourselves before Him and exhibit meekness in our relationships with others.

5. Don’t worry

“Therefore, do not be concerned about tomorrow, since tomorrow will take care of itself.” “Each day brings enough difficulties on its own.” 6:34 (Matthew 6:34) According to a famous Christian children’s hymn, “Why worry when you can pray?” God has promised to provide for our needs. Always keep in mind that God has your back when you are feeling stressed or anxious.

6.Follow the Golden Rule

For this is the summation of the Law and the Prophets: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you in all circumstances.

” Matthew 7:12 (New International Version) Don’t do to others what you wouldn’t want them to do to you. In Jesus’ words, we should treat others the way we would want to be treated ourselves.

7. Worship God whole-heartedly

“God is a Spirit, and those who worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth,” according to the Bible. 4:24 (John 4:24) It is important for Christians to include worship, praise, and gratitude into their daily lives. When we pray to God, we should remember to thank Him for everything that He has done for us and to express our gratitude to Him. Always and forever, I will bless the LORD; the song of his praise will perpetually remain in my mouth. Verse 1 of Psalm 34:1

8. Show Jesus in everything you do

‘Allow your light to so shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father who is in heaven,’ says the Bible. 5:16 (Matthew 5:16) We are citizens of the kingdom of God. As a result, we must reflect Christ in all that we do and say. Others will be able to see Jesus’ light shining through us when we are actively following Him, and they will be drawn closer to Him as a result.

9.Seek God First

“But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added unto you,” the Bible says. Matthew 6:33 (KJV) Prioritize God in all of your decision-making. We must examine God’s will for our life and then strive to carry it out to the best of our abilities.

10.Deny Self

After he had summoned the people to him, along with his disciples, he told them, “Whoever will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. ” 8:34 (Matthew 8:34) Last but not least, following Jesus implies that we must deny ourselves on a regular basis.

Prayer for Today:

Greetings, Jesus. Please assist me in becoming more like you. Please assist me in following you in all I do. Amen. Is it possible that you were benefited by today’s devotion? Please forward this to a friend, a family member, or a colleague, or use the sharing tools provided below.

Following Jesus in the “Real World”

What does it mean to continue to follow Jesus after graduation? If it was once simple to graduate from college, select a career path, and move on with one’s life, it isn’t so simple now. The terrain is uncharted, the goal is unknown, and the stakes are extremely high. Christians frequently find themselves nostalgically recalling their schooldays, which adds to the pressure. Afterward, they were part of a true community, made time to pray, and weren’t concerned with money. The “real world” that they were promised (or threatened with) throughout college turns out to be a confusing maze in the fog of memory.

To give sensible guidance and practical encouragement during a challenging period, Richard Lamb masterfully weaves together biblical ideas, anecdotes of recent graduates, and his own life experience.

Whatever your age, whether you’re just starting your degree or finished a decade ago, if you crave for the spirituality of your college years and wonder how you may reclaim it, this is the book for you.

Worldview

Pastor Matthew brought our series to a close this week with the message “Relax in Jesus.” It was James 4:8 that served as his basis, which states that when we come near to God, He will draw near to us. We are living in a period when problems are escalating one after another. The United States is more politicized than it has ever been; we are divided and crumbling under the weight of covid-19, political ideologies, mental health difficulties, loneliness, addictions, and stress to name a few things.

  • In our world, anxiety is like electricity, and we as Christians must be the circuit breakers that stop it from going amok.
  • In John 6, Jesus’ followers inquire of Him, “What must we do in order to carry out the tasks that God requires?” “The work of God is this: to believe in the one he has sent,” Jesus explained to them.
  • In two respects, Jesus serves as a model for us in terms of rest and contentment: first, he recognized the Father’s sovereignty.
  • We must take comfort in the knowledge that God is in complete command.
  • We pay attention to our body.
  • We are conscious of the beauty that surrounds us.

We have a strong sense of security in the knowledge that we stand to gain and stand to lose nothing. We take pleasure in a profound sense of “I’m OK.” We are aware of our limitations. Our first and most important task is to arrive to a point where we may rest in Jesus.

Racial Justice | Week Six | How To Follow Jesus Into Today’s World

This week, Pastor Jermaine resumed our study on “how to follow Jesus into today’s society” with the theme of “the cost of Racial Justice,” which was introduced last week. He used Paul and 1 Corinthians 9: 19-23 as a springboard for his sermon, which he divided into three sections: The price was too expensive. The following is an illustration: The moral of the story “I have become,” Jesus says when asked about the cost of following Him, and Paul describes that sacrifice as “I have become.” The Greek term for becoming is ginomai, which literally translates as “to come into existence.” We must transform into something completely different, to become a new creation in Christ.

  • The process of becoming more difficult than the process of doing is because doing costs you something, whilst becoming costs you someone.
  • It has the potential to cost us our lives.
  • We will not be able to become who we want to be if we continue to be who we are.
  • The world is looking for butterfly results while yet maintaining caterpillar comfort.
  • Rather than arriving at a goal, becoming is a process.
  • The following are the seven keys to becoming: Make a buddy from a different ethnic background.
  • Spend some quality time with them.

Find someone of a different ethnicity to serve as a mentor or to keep you accountable in a certain area, and then submit them completely.

Read novels by writers you wouldn’t ordinarily read or by people who hold opposing views to your own.

Learn about the history of African-Americans.

Confront racial prejudice and stereotypes in a humble, compassionate, and brave manner (as the Holy Spirit directs).

Prayer and fasting are recommended.

We must battle for common ground, even if it means sacrificing our personal preferences.

If we make a commitment to becoming, we will eventually succeed.

When Jesus invited people to come and follow him, he was inviting them to become something in their own right.

We are the solution, we rely on one another, and we serve the only one who has the power to transform us. We must not only express our dissatisfaction with what is wrong, but also beg God to work inside us in order for us to represent what is good.

Justice and Righteousness | Week Five | How To Follow Jesus Into Today’s World

With the theme of fairness and righteousness, Bec Isaacson resumed our series on “how to follow Jesus into today’s world,” which began last week. Justice and justice do not have universally accepted meanings in our culture, which is why we must turn to the Word of God for guidance and direction. The term for justice in Hebrew is mishpat, which means “righteousness.” It entails treating people fairly and giving them what they are owed in exchange for their efforts. It had a lot to do with the care of vulnerable individuals in the Old Testament, notably orphans, widows, immigrants, and the destitute, among other things.

  • The Hebrew word for righteousness is tzadeqah, which means “righteousness.” It describes a person’s conduct not just internally, but also externally, particularly in the context of their interactions with other people, as well.
  • Living one’s daily life in the service of the Lord.
  • In the Scriptures, justice and righteousness are frequently associated with one another, and God designed Israelite society in such a manner that if the people accepted His rules and did what He instructed, the underclass and the impoverished would have almost disappeared.
  • An approach that entails comprehending mutual brokenness, living in partnership, and offering not just financial help but also time, friendliness, shelter, advocacy, support, and care is a lifestyle to be considered.
See also:  Who Sings Falling In Love With Jesus

Following Jesus in the “Real World” by Richard Lamb

Throughout this guidebook for the post-college generation, author Richard Lamb masterfully blends scriptural insights, anecdotes of recent graduates, and his own life experience to provide excellent guidance and practical encouragement at a confusing period in their lives. He demonstrates how spiritual growth may continue after you leave the collegiate environment, in anything from careers to relationships to the ministry. – The author is a publisher. What does it mean to continue to follow Jesus after graduation?

  • The terrain is uncharted, the goal is unknown, and the stakes are extremely high.
  • Afterward, they were part of a true community, made time to pray, and weren’t concerned with money.
  • Where does God fit into all of this?
  • As he has demonstrated time and time again on a variety of topics ranging from careers to ministry, discipleship can continue beyond graduation.

Whatever your age, whether you’re just starting your degree or finished a decade ago, if you crave for the spirituality of your college years and wonder how you may reclaim it, this is the book for you. – The author is a publisher.

Richard Lamb

Lamb is a distinguished historian. During World War II, he was a member of the British Eighth Army stationed in Italy.

  • A Watershed Moment
  • 1. What Should You Expect
  • 4. Meaningless labor and fruitful labor
  • 5. The King and the Kingdom
  • 6. Productivity and Prayer. 5. Participation in the Community After College
  • 6. Strategies for Involvement in the Church
  • Seventh, Embracing a Mobilized Lifestyle for the Kingdom
  • Eighth, Embracing a Ministry-Oriented Lifestyle
  • And ninth, Discovering God’s Will for Your Life 10. The Pleasure of Obedience
  • Notes and Acknowledgements
  • And Conclusion

Check Out These Real-Life Testimonies – Unfolding Faith Blog

Many individuals feel that the most engaging tales about Jesus come from Christians they already know, which they find to be true while on their spiritual journey with Jesus. To find evidence of Jesus’ capacity, talk to your friends and family about their own spiritual experience with Christ. When it comes to demonstrating the love of Jesus and demonstrating how He has transformed you, your personal narrative may be just as captivating and is the most powerful instrument you have at your disposal.

  1. We all have one, and some of us have more than one.
  2. As you progress through your trip, you’ll notice that more and more instances occur in which God is clearly visible.
  3. Various types of testimonies are available.
  4. I understand it!’ moments, to being considerably less dramatic and building gradually, yet they are no less captivating.
  5. Some may entail a number of separate situations that, after being discussed with God, make a great deal more sense to the believer than they did before.
  6. You’ll find other people’s testimony to be intriguing, hope-filled, and a wonderful opportunity to learn to know God and the power of faith on your own journey.
  7. Do you want to hear them speak about their personal experiences?

Play these episodes from our Unfolding Stories podcast to learn more about them: Andrew–iTunes Streaming from Google Play Leanne–iTunes Streaming from Google Play Leanne’s story of a faith that was tried and finally redeemed through depression: I grew raised in a Christian environment with a Christian father and Christian mother.

  1. The Christian Reformed Church was where we worshipped.
  2. I don’t recall having any reservations when I was younger.
  3. I saw that my sisters, who are twelve and ten years older than I am, were frequently in disagreement with my mother, and I decided to investigate.
  4. When he went to high school, my brother, who is four years older than me, avoided my mother, despite the fact that he was the favorite child since he was the son of the family.
  5. I was a really busy child when I was little.
  6. We lived at the end of a dead end street.
  7. My vision was blurred as I accelerated down the driveway and into my wheelie, and the last thing I saw was a speck out of the corner of my eye as I accelerated.

I had been hit by a pickup vehicle, which caused me to fly into the air, perform a summersault, and land on my back with a slight skid.

I was in the hospital for five days because my spleen had been injured and they wanted to make sure it didn’t rupture, but other than that, I merely had a concussion and needed stitches on one leg.

The doctors couldn’t believe I was still alive; it was truly a miracle.

— Do you enjoy reading testimonies?

To learn more, click on the following link: Tyndale House Publishers was the site of the testimony.

As I entered my adolescence, my mood began to shift dramatically, and I began to display symptoms of sadness.

It appeared to be quite hypocritical.

My parents’ generation seldom talks about their difficulties because they have to maintain a positive front on the outside—anything negative that occurs in the family would make the parents appear negative.

It irritated me.

My older sister had taken on the role of youth leader at my church, primarily for my own benefit.

She also attempted to exert control over the communication between myself and my brothers, as well as between us and our father, by threatening us.

It was entertaining, but when I returned home, Mom interrogated me about what we had discussed, and she always imagined the worst about what may have been said about her.

However, spiritually, everything was going well.

Sports have always been a part of my life.

My fall activities included marching band, winter activities included being on the basketball team, and spring activities included being on the softball team.

However, I did not do well in the political game that was necessary to achieve success in the sports world.

By junior year, I was very fed up with it and decided to drop out.

The disagreement just grew worse, and I found myself sinking deeper and farther into sadness.

I was still in high school at the time.

And I didn’t cut too deeply—just enough to cause a little bleeding and allow the wound to heal in a week or two.

I had it all planned out to a T.

Because they had experienced depression themselves, they were aware of the indicators to watch for and encouraged my mother to get help for me.

My mother discovered that I had been cutting myself while there.

She also attributed my mood swings to a childhood bike accident that she had witnessed.

I fell into a manic state almost immediately.

As soon as my psychiatrist realized what had happened, he and my psychologist determined that I should be hospitalized while they altered my medication.

Music was also very important to me, and I was unable to compete in a state music competition because of my illness.

After high school, I decided to give college a go without using any prescription medications.

During my first week there, I made some wonderful new acquaintances, but I was also displaying indications of sadness.

It was yet another method of reaching out for assistance, to check if anyone was paying attention or caring.

I didn’t give a damn anymore, and I didn’t believe God would want me around.

After all, my friend Christi was a pastor’s daughter who struggled from melancholy and anxiety, which was not surprising given her family background.

Fortunately, my friends were concerned enough to clarify that sadness is not a spiritual condition and that God truly does care about me and my well-being.

Christi was taking medicine, which was beneficial to her.

It is not an issue that God is unable to resolve.

This time, I was correctly diagnosed with Bipolar 2, which has its ups and downs in energy levels but is characterized by a depressive mood throughout the course of the illness.

I started going to church on a regular basis again, and my connection with God improved as a result.

I wanted to help youngsters who were depressed and needed someone who knew what they were going through.

I have been through many dark and hopeless situations, but God has always been by my side.

— Do you enjoy reading testimonies?

To learn more, click on the following link: Evidence presented at Tyndale House Publishers.— Andrew’s testimony of how he came to religion through both success and adversity is as follows: It is important to note that I came from modest origins, and my parents did everything they could to ensure that I had every opportunity to achieve.

We would go to church, say grace before supper, and pray before bed; God was there in my life, but I didn’t know who he was or what he looked like.

I took part in sports, played games in the yard, and had sleepovers with my friends throughout my childhood.

When I graduated from high school, I received a bumper sticker declaring my achievement, which I still have to this day.

My freshman year, I was the team’s leading rushing back, and by my junior year, I had established myself as a star on the football team.

My difficulties began in the midst of what I assume was a life that many children would want for.

In addition to my accomplishments in football and the academics, I had my first true romantic love.

However, in truth, I was losing touch with my identity and allowing damaging things to infiltrate my world.

I thought I had a public image to uphold: I was a popular child, and popular kids go to parties, so I felt I had a responsibility.

I experimented with sex and betrayed my relationship with my partner.

I had no idea who I was in my true self.

Nonetheless, to be really honest, I want a larger school not for its academics, but for its parties and female students.

I went to school with the goal of becoming a doctor when I graduated.

I was hanging out at bars and parties with my fraternity, meeting new females, and skipping school to go out and have a good time.

I’d have a good semester, followed by a bad semester, and so on.

It started to have an effect on me, and things started to get worse before they started to get better.

I was well aware that I had issues, yet my life was completely devoid of meaning.

There is no God I can put my faith in to help me through this.

However, I was plunging even farther.

As soon as I graduated from college, I began working on getting my life in order.

This was the location where I saw myself spending the remainder of my professional life.

I had goals to move up the corporate ladder and was now focused on being the company’s top-producing sales executive, which I believed I would achieve.

The presence of Christianity may be found throughout the organization.

The folks were just amazing.

However, none of this was enough to get me into a church, which resulted in yet another setback.

We have a large selection of incredible testimonial books available!

— At work, I was having a great time.

I was overjoyed and, more importantly, overwhelmed.

I had a great time with my coworkers and partied till the wee hours of the morning.

I was given the opportunity to travel to Florence, Italy, as part of the award.

And, of course, there was yet another setback.

I was overjoyed.

I fell into a statue that was worth $3,000 and broke it.

At this time, I believed I had learned my lesson and was fully committed to altering my conduct going forward.

A few of my colleagues and I were riding in an Afghan taxi with our driver when the conversation turned to me.

After that, one of my friends made a remark that seemed to annoy our driver.

We had arrived at our hotel, and the driver yelled at us as he stepped out of the car and went into his jacket pocket for some change.

When I took a swing at him, I was under the impression that I was defending us.

He said that we had terrified him, and that he intended to contact the authorities.

In the hotel lobby, there were several members of my company present, and by the next morning, everyone was aware of what had happened.

I knew I needed aid, and I could hear God’s voice calling out for assistance.

Because my mother had been visiting on a regular basis, I eventually agreed to accompany her after having been asked several times previously.

This church was a very warm and welcoming place.

They looked just like the Christians I had met while working at my previous job.

I began to open my heart to God via prayer and the reading of Scripture.

Not that my life has completely altered, but I now have a clear direction.

An inner sense of calm.

Without prayer, the center of my existence will begin to veer away from its original course.

God has placed me on this planet, and I’m still trying to figure out what I’m supposed to be doing here.

They assist you in reaching new heights.

I never learned how to maintain or respond to success because I never learned those abilities.

Despite how wonderful they all were, I began to feel uneasy.

I was wrong.

Instead of embracing them, I’d use the rewind button on my computer.

I now have God in my life, as well as my faith.

Now, I believe that once I have achieved success, I will be able to move forward with confidence.

But, as this new chapter in my life begins to take shape, I have no need to be fearful.

— We’ll be posting more content like this in the near future.

— Do you enjoy reading testimonies? We have a large selection of incredible testimonial books available! To learn more, click on the following link: Tyndale House Publishers was the site of the testimony. —♥110

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