Where Did Jesus Ascend

Where did Jesus’ ascension into Heaven take place?

You may learn more about the history and present expressions of antisemitism by reading Antisemitism Uncovered, which is a resource guide. The next stage is to determine what to do. Don’t be afraid to get involved! Here, in the Antisemitism Uncovered Toolkit, we’ve compiled all of our most practical resources—the skills and methods you’ll need to engage in that fight—all in one spot. Information and resources to help you speak up, share facts, and demonstrate your strength in the face of hatred and discrimination.

Where Did Jesus Ascension Take Place?

According to the Bible, Jesus ascended from a chamber (Mark 16:19), in Bethany (Luke 24:50-51) or from the Mount of Olives (Luke 24:50-51), among other places (Matt. 28:16-20; Acts 1:12).

Answer

28:16-20 (Matthew 28:16-20) The eleven disciples then traveled to Galilee, where they arrived at the mountain that Jesus had instructed them to visit. When they first saw Jesus, they bowed their heads in reverence; yet, others were skeptical. After then, Jesus appeared to them and stated, “Everything in heaven and on earth has been handed to me as a result of this revelation. As a result, go and make disciples of all countries, baptizing them in the name of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, and instructing them to follow everything I have instructed you to do in the first place.

  1. Luke 24:50-51 (KJV) As soon as he had brought them out to the neighborhood of Bethany, he blessed them by raising his hands in the air.
  2. Acts 1:12 is a biblical passage.
  3. Matthew does not mention the ascension, but he does say that the words of Matthew 28:18-20 were uttered at the “mountain where he had commanded them to go” (probably Mount Tabor, the probable site of the Transfiguration).
  4. The words of Mark, on the other hand, provide a very condensed version of what actually happened (compare Mark 16:12-19 to Luke 24:13-52).
  5. The ascension at the Mount of Olives, according to Luke’s enlarged narrative, is congruent with the historical record.
  6. As a result, Luke, who is also the author of Acts, is consistent when he refers to “the region of Bethany,” which includes the Mount of Olives, as being in the same location.

This is in accordance with Biblical prophecy (Zech.14:3-9). As a result, there are no inconsistencies between the various accounts.

How Did Jesus Leave the Earth? (The Ascension)

The ascension of Christ into heaven was one of the most momentous occasions in the life of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, Jesus ascended into heaven both visually and physically forty days after His resurrection, according to the Bible. Luke Luke was the only New Testament author to recount the event of the ascension. He was separated from them and lifted up into the heavens as he was extending his blessings to them. In return, they returned to Jerusalem with great excitement, and they spent the rest of their time in the temple praying to God and praising and blessing him.

Luke describes Jesus’ separation from them in a way that suggests they are already familiar with the tale of Jesus’ ascension to the Father.

After giving commands to the apostles whom he had selected via the Holy Spirit, I gave you a previous account of everything Jesus began to do and teach until the day in which he was taken up, which I gave you in the previous account, O Theophilus (Acts 1:1, 2).

The Bible confirms that Jesus ascended into heaven in plain view of His followers, as recorded in the Gospels.

Meanwhile, while they continued to stare upward as he rose, two men in white clothing appeared beside them and inquired of them, saying, ‘Men of Galilee, why are you standing here looking up into the heavens?’ This same Jesus, who was carried away from you into heaven, will return in the same manner in which you witnessed him ascend into heaven’ (Acts 1:9-11).

  • Stephen was the first Christian to be executed because of his faith in Jesus Christ.
  • However, because he was filled with the Holy Spirit, he looked up into the skies and saw the glory of God, as well as Jesus standing on the right hand of God, and exclaimed, ‘Look!
  • This proved that Jesus had risen to heaven and had remained there.
  • You will see the Son of Man seated at the right hand of the Father’s throne and ascending on the clouds of heaven in the days to come (Matthew 26:64) Mark Although the lengthy conclusion to Mark’s gospel may not be entirely original, it does represent an ancient belief.
  • When the Lord Jesus finished speaking to them, he was taken up into heaven and seated at the right hand of God, where he continues to sit today (Mark 16:19).

‘Stop clinging to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father; instead, go to my brothers and tell them, ‘I climb to my Father and your Father, and my God and your God,’ Jesus replied to her.” (See also John 20:17.) In addition, Christ predicts His ascension in the Gospel of John, asking, “What if you should view the Son of Man rising where he was previously?” ” (John 6:62).

1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 “And without controversy great is the mystery of godliness,” says the ancient Christian confession of First Timothy 3:16, which includes the phrase “He who was manifested in the flesh, justified in the Spirit, seen by angels, preached among the Gentiles, believed on in the world, received up in glory” (1 Timothy 3:16).

The verb “taken up” is the same as the verb “taken up” that appears in Acts 1:2.

It is also true that he who descended is also the one who soared far beyond all the heavens, in order to fill all things with himself (Ephesians 4:10).

In Christ, which he accomplished by raising him from the grave and putting him at his right hand in the celestial realms (Ephesians 1:20) Without some type of ascension, this exaltation would not have been possible, and the one recounted by Luke appears to be the one that was comprehended by the disciples.

  • The ascension, according to Luke, was completed theologically, as Paul describes in his letter.
  • He is speaking about Jesus Christ, who is at the right hand of God, having ascended into heaven after having subdued angels, authorities, and powers to his will and authority (1 Peter 3:22).
  • Hebrews The writer to the Hebrews has a clear understanding of what Christ’s ascension has achieved for the world.
  • Furthermore, in Hebrews 7:26, our high priest is praised for having been elevated above the sky, a reference to his position of authority.
  • Beginning with the factual tale of Jesus’ ascension into heaven from the Mount of Olives, there is a spiritual dimension to the story.
  • As a bonus, the other two gospel writers make allusions to Jesus’ ascension as well.

As a result, the ascension of Jesus is mentioned in a number of distinct places in the New Testament, including the Gospels. The Holy Bible, New King James Version, (Nashville, Tennessee: Thomas Nelson, Inc., 1982), is a translation of the Bible.

Where did Jesus ascend to Heaven?

Photographs by Lito Zulueta of the Chapel of the Ascension Ascension Sunday will be celebrated on May 24, and because the coronavirus outbreak in the Holy Land has forced the cancellation of all pilgrimages, anticipate the two locations linked with the Lord’s Ascension in Jerusalem to be devoid of pilgrims on that day as well. The Chapel of the Ascension and the neighboring Church of the Pater Noster, both located on the Mount of Olives, are the two locations to visit. Depending on whoever you speak with, the two websites are either competitors or complementary to one another.

  • Furthermore, it is located on land that the French Republic claims as its own.
  • Later on, it will be discussed how the two sites may be complementary to one another.
  • In its previous life, the chapel or edicule served as the centerpiece of a larger structure.
  • From the Mount of Olives, a view of Jerusalem may be seen.

As early as the 7th century, the Frankish monk-bishop Arculf described the complex as having a “central edicule bearing the footprints of Christ, plainly and clearly stamped in the dust, behind a railing,” with the footprints of Christ “clearly and plainly impressed in the dust.” When this writer visited the edicule in 2017, he was told that the footprints of the Ascending Christ had been imprinted on a slab of stone, which visitors may then hold in their hands.

The Church of the Ascension is referred to as the “Mosque of the Ascension” by Fr.

It is important to remember that the Muslim Ottoman Turks dominated the Holy Land until the contemporary era, and they either replaced existing Christian monuments with Muslim landmarks or left the Christian sites in place while opening them to pilgrimage.

Disputed sites

Ascension Rock or Hill, as the landmark is sometimes referred to due to its location on a ridge, is a part of the Status Quo, a more than quarter-millennium-old decree by the Ottoman empire and affirmed by the Treaty of Paris in 1857 that embodies the understanding among religious communities—Jewish, Muslim, Latin Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Armenian Christians, and others—regarding nine shared religious sites in Jerusalem and Bethlehem.

The status The Catholic Church and other Christian groups are at odds about the ownership of the majority of the sites.

The fact that the other purported Ascension site—a grotto in the Church of the Pater Noster—is under Islamic administration, which charges a modest fee from pilgrims, as well as the fact that it is under Islamic administration, has led some Christian groups, particularly the Evangelicals, to visit the other purported Ascension site.

The Church of the Pater Noster, which is located quite close to the Ascension edicule, is a Catholic church, and as such, may be less offensive to Evangelicals and other “Christians.” In addition, it is dedicated to the location where Christ is said to have taught the Apostles the Universal Prayer (the Lord’s Prayer).

See also:  When Jesus Steps Out Lyrics

The Pater Noster, which is considered a French realm, is managed by Carmelite nuns from France.

A number of ceramic plaques, each with the Lord’s Prayer in a different language, are strategically placed throughout the garden and glisten in the sunlight.

There are about 140 different versions of the Our Father, which is really the Universal Prayer.

During my stay, I was able to see Pampango, Cebuano, Ilonggo, and Waray dialects. Other Filipino pilgrims claimed to have heard other indigenous Philippine languages.

Grotto or cave

In the Pater Noster church, where is the Ascension place located? It is located within the Pater Noster complex, in the grotto or cave known as “the Lord’s instruction.” According to legend, this was the location where the earliest Christians would congregate in the face of Roman persecution. According to their beliefs, this was “the specific point” in Luke’s narrative where Jesus prayed alone before instructing the apostles or proceeding with his ministry. The early Christians were able to identify the location where Christ ascended into Heaven from this location.

  • When Constantine, in the early fourth century, issued the Edict of Milan, which abolished the ban on Christianity, Christians were able to begin freely practicing their religion.
  • It was dubbed the “Imbomon” or “hillock” by the locals.
  • The Church of the Pater Noster was constructed in the late nineteenth century on the ruins of the Byzantine church of Eleona, which had been destroyed by fire.
  • One source of ambiguity is from the fact that the New Testament appears to provide two competing narratives of Christ’s ascension.
  • He then withdrew from them and was lifted up to Heaven,” according to the Gospel of Luke (24:50-51).
  • Following a brief description of Pentecost, or the 50th day after Easter, she wrote of the early Christians: “(I)mmediately after breakfast, they ascend to Eleona, which is to say, to the Mount of Olives.
  • In that place, lessons are read, hymns are interwoven, and antiphons are sung as well.

Once all is completed.

“Pater Noster” in Tagalog, meaning “Lord’s Cave.” Egeria’s account is particularly eye-catching.

Also on Pentecost, the two stories of the Ascension in Luke and the Acts of the Apostles were read one after the other, without any interpolation or ambiguity.

Do all of these memorials to Christ’s Ascension work in concert with one another to commemorate the event?

Almost certainly.

And on the Mount of Olives, where Christ taught the Apostles the Our Father, he said that everyone had a divine birthright that is universally recognized. Ascension Day marked the fulfillment of a lifelong dream as he was reunited with the Father for the first time. INQ

Where Exactly Did Jesus’ Ascension Take Place?

Throughout the first book, Theophilus, I dealt with all that Jesus accomplished and taught up to the day he was lifted up into heaven, after giving instructions to the apostles whom he had selected by the Holy Spirit. He demonstrated to them that he was still alive via several evidence after he had suffered, coming to them over the course of forty days and preaching about the kingdom of God. Then, as they were meeting with him, he admonished them to not leave Jerusalem until they had received “the promise of the Father about which you have heard me speak; because John baptized with water, but you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit in a few days.” As soon as they had collected, they approached him and inquired, “Lord, are you planning to return the kingdom to Israel at this time?” When they asked him about the times and seasons, he said, “It is not your responsibility to know the times and seasons that the Father has set by his own power.” But when the Holy Spirit descends upon you, you will be anointed with authority, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, throughout Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the world.” When he had finished speaking, he was lifted up and carried away by a cloud, out of sight of the audience.

While they were staring up at the sky, closely watching where he was heading, two guys clad in white clothes appeared beside them.

It is the same Jesus who has been taken up from you into heaven who will come back in the same manner in which you have witnessed him ascending into heaven.”

EPHESIANS 1:17 – 23

After delivering instructions to the apostles whom he had selected by the Holy Spirit, I dealt with everything Jesus did and taught until the day he was carried up into heaven in my first book, Theophilus. He demonstrated to them that he was still alive via several evidence after he had suffered, coming to them over the course of forty days and preaching about the kingdom of God in his speeches. In his encounter with them, Jesus advised them not to leave Jerusalem until they had received “the promise of the Father, about which you have heard me speak; because John baptized with water, but you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit within a few days.” “Lord, are you going to return the kingdom to Israel at this time?” they inquired after they had joined together in a group.

Suddenly, two guys clad in white robes appeared beside them, and they were both staring carefully at the sky as he was passing.

Men of Galilee, what are you doing standing there staring at the sky?” they inquired. It is the same Jesus who has been taken up from you into heaven who will come back in the same manner in which you have witnessed him ascend into heaven.”

MARK 16:15 – 20

According to Jesus, his disciples were to “go throughout the entire world and preach the gospel to every creature.” Those who believe and are baptized will be saved, but those who do not believe will be condemned to eternal damnation. These signs will accompany those who believe: in my name, they will expel devils from their midst, and they will learn to talk in new tongues. They will be able to pick up serpents with their hands, and if they drink anything poisonous, it will have no effect on them.

However, they went out and preached everywhere, while the Lord worked with them and verified the message via accompanying signs and wonders.

When did Jesus ascend to heaven?

Gramps, This last year, I’ve been studying the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ. I’m attempting to figure out when Jesus was exalted to the highest point in the sky. Christina

Answer

Greetings, Christina I’m presuming your inquiry is about the time period following Christ’s resurrection when he ascended to his Father. If this is the case, please accept my apologies for any confusion. Even while we don’t have a certain date, we do have the following details: In the first place, we know that there was a period of time on the morning of Christ’s resurrection when he had not yet risen to heaven (see John 20:17): 17 To Mary, Jesus says, “Do not touch me, for I have not yet ascended to my Father.” Instead, go to my brethren and tell them, “I climb unto my Father, as well as your Father; as well as my God, as well as your God.” Christ may have risen to heaven for a period of time before returning to earth to continue teaching his followers, according to this passage of scripture.

  1. Following that, we read in Luke 24:51 that Christ ascended to heaven after meeting with the apostles: 51 In the midst of his blessing them, he was separated from them and lifted into the presence of the Father in the air.
  2. In conclusion, we read the following from the institution handbook for Luke 24: Jesus Christ’s real ascension into heaven to be with His Father, according to Elder Bruce R.
  3. It is literally true that Christ has ascended into heaven in the broadest and most complete sense of the word.
  4. … Jesus, who had been raised from the dead, ascensioned from the earth and proceeded to the realm where his Father resides.

20:24) The Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, 1:872, states that That Christ had not been to heaven prior to this and after the resurrection is not necessarily true; we know that Christ has returned to the earth since; however, this event is commonly referred to as “The Ascension,” and it can be considered the point at which Christ’s primary location was with his Father rather than on the earth in the presence of men.

This response may also be of interest to you: What are the events that transpired following Christ’s crucifixion? I hope this has provided an answer to your inquiry, and I urge you to continue your research into the life and teachings of our Lord!

Gramps

Answer In the days following his resurrection from the dead, Jesus “presented Himself alive” (Acts 1:3) to the women who had gathered around the tomb (Matthew 28:9-10), to His disciples (Luke 24:36-43), and to a crowd of more than 500 people (1 Corinthians 15:6). During the days after His resurrection, Jesus instructed His followers about the nature of God’s kingdom (Acts 1:3). Jesus and His followers traveled to Mount Olivet, which is located near Jerusalem, forty days after the resurrection.

  1. Jesus then blessed them and proceeded to climb into the heavens as soon as he finished blessing them.
  2. The Scriptures make it clear that Jesus’ ascension was a genuine, physical return to the presence of the Father.
  3. A cloud obscured Jesus from the disciples’ vision as they strained to catch a last sight of Him, then two angels arrived and vowed that Christ would return “in exactly the same way that you have watched Him leave” (Acts 1:11).
  4. After sending His Son into the world at Bethlehem out of love, God the Father was bringing the Son back home to be with the Father.
  5. 2) It represented the completion of His earthly mission.
  6. The return of His celestial splendour was symbolized by this event.
  7. 4) It represented His elevation to the right hand of the Father (Ephesians 1:20-23).
  8. 5) It provided Him with the opportunity to provide a place for us (John 14:2).
  9. 7) It established a precedent for His return.
  10. At the moment, the Lord Jesus is in the presence of the Father.

God the Father is the Head of the Church (Colossians 1:18), the provider of spiritual gifts (Ephesians 4:7-8), and the One who fills everything in everything (Colossians 1:26-27). (Ephesians 4:9-10).

Apostle Bartholomew Witnesses The Ascension of Jesus

Kelly Wise Valdes contributed to this article. The apostle Bartholomew, who was born in the Galilee town of Cana, just outside of Jerusalem, is said to have witnessed Jesus Christ’s ascension on the third day. Some have questioned the authenticity of the ascension; nonetheless, it has been stated that Bartholomew was present on the site as a recorded eyewitness throughout the incident. Bartholomew is a character about whom little is known at this time. His origins are unknown, however it has been suggested that he hailed from a long family of farmers, and it was via farming that he met Disciple Philip during a commodities exchange.

  1. Bartholomew’s first reaction to Jesus was one of skepticism, as it is widely believed that individuals from Nazareth are unsuited for God’s job.
  2. “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” Philip urged Bartholomew to come and see for himself what he was talking about.
  3. Some stories even claim that Bartholomew witnessed Jesus’ resurrection after He had been raised from the dead.
  4. His close friends also allege that he left behind a handwritten copy of the Gospel of Matthew, which they believe to be true.
  5. Fishermen, a tax collector, and a rebel were among those who joined the movement as new adherents.
  6. In order to discover more about how God transformed each man from ordinary to remarkable, this series will highlight one of the disciples every month in a lighthearted and entertaining manner.
See also:  Garry Wills What Jesus Meant

‘Is Jesus’ body in space?’ And other Ascension questions you didn’t know you had

Kelly Wise Valdes contributed to this report. As a native of Cana in Galilee outside of Jerusalem, the apostle Bartholomew is said to have witnessed Jesus Christ’s ascension to the right hand of the Father. There has been considerable doubt about the ascension; nonetheless, it has been stated that Bartholomew was present on the site as a recorded eyewitness throughout the incident. In terms of his background, not much is known at this time. As claimed, he came from a long history of farmers and it was via farming that he met Disciple Philip during a commodities deal, which was the beginning of their relationship.

  1. Due to the widespread belief that individuals from Nazareth are unsuited for God’s job, Bartholomew’s immediate reaction to Jesus was sceptical.
  2. Bartholomew was asked to come and see for himself what Philip was talking about.
  3. Even after Jesus’ resurrection, some stories claim that Bartholomew saw Him again after He rose from the dead.
  4. He also left behind a hand-written copy of the Gospel of Matthew, according to his closest associates.
  5. Fishermen, a tax collector, and a revolutionary were among those who joined the cause.

Each of these twelve men who followed Jesus had their own set of flaws, challenges, and fears, which the Gospels document. In order to discover more about how God transformed each man from ordinary to remarkable, this series will profile one of the disciples every month in a lighthearted fashion.

Subscribe to our daily newsletter

Our team at Catholic News Agency is dedicated to reporting the truth with courage, integrity, and a strong commitment to our religious beliefs. News about the Church and the world, as seen through the lens of Catholic teaching, is provided by us. When you sign up for the CNA UPDATE, we’ll send you a daily email with links to the news you need to know about, as well as breaking news when it happens, if any. Because you are receiving this free service, you may receive occasional offers from EWTN News and EWTN.

In addition, he believes “we shouldn’t expect to be able fly to where Jesus is with a rocketship,” though it is possible that heaven, and therefore Jesus’ body, exists in a dimension that humans are unable to access.

Quantum physics will speculate about the possibility of alternate space-time continuums to our own.

One must always remember: ‘We have to think about this in some way, but we should not pretend that our way of thinking about it is the only way.’ That is something on which we can place a great deal of weight.” So, if the bodies of Jesus and Mary can be found in heaven, why must the rest of humanity wait until the end of time to be reunited with their glorified bodies as well?

Theologian William Barber stated, “We are fellow heirs with Christ provided we suffer with him.” “With the exception of Good Friday, you cannot get to Easter Sunday.” Without also participating in Jesus’ death and resurrection, it is impossible to have a resurrected body or to share in his resurrection.” According to Barber, this imitation of Christ, even to the point of death, is the “ultimate expression of faithfulness” that one can achieve.

  1. The church is Christ’s mystical body, and he wishes to accomplish in it what he accomplished in his personal body.
  2. That involves learning obedience, it means exhibiting faithfulness by embracing our cross and picking up our cross,” he said.
  3. A lot of people want to imagine that Mary’s assumption means that she was glorified without her death, but John Paul II doesn’t really go in that direction.
  4. Because of the fall (of man), death is a curse.
  5. “Part of getting our bodies back, so to speak, will be the transformation of all matter.
  6. I’d like a better one, one where my knees don’t hurt, other such things.
  7. In a way, he said, that transformation has already occurred in Jesus and Mary, who are already reunited with their glorified bodies in heaven.
  8. “From thence he will come again to judge the living and the dead”: How is the Final Judgment different from the judgment of each person’s soul at their death?
  9. “That’s a really important question, and it’s a helpful thing to reflect on,” Barber said.
  10. It seems like there’s just these different beliefs that crop up and they don’t really fit together.

“When you die, you stand before the throne of God and you need to make a given account,” Barber said, a belief which can be found in Hebrews Chapter 9: “It is appointed for men to die once and after that comes the judgment.” “So we know that there’s a judgment at the moment of our deaths,” Barber said.

Jesus talks about this in Matthew 25.

We don’t see, even in our lifetime, how the decisions we make affect future generations,” he noted.

“Jesus says that nothing is covered up that will not be revealed.

What you’ve heard whispered in private rooms will be proclaimed upon the housetops.” In other words: “There are going to be no more secrets.” What the Final Judgment does *not* mean, Root said, is that a soul’s personal judgment – whether they go to heaven, hell, or purgatory – can somehow be reversed.

  1. It’s not like that,” he said.
  2. “History as a whole has a final destiny with God.
  3. we will all see the glory of God, including his judgment, together.
  4. And we will see that cruelty, oppression was always wrong.
  5. So, the stress has often been on the sort of public character of the last judgment,” he said.

“Our body participated in our good and bad deeds, and so the body must in the end participate in the judgment.” Mary Farrow worked as a staff writer for Catholic News Agency until 2020. She has a degree in journalism and English education from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Why Does the Ascension of Jesus Matter?

Written byShara Drimalla for the BibleProject Team 2 months have passed since The account of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection receives a great deal of well-deserved attention, but there is another essential and intriguing episode in the narrative that we frequently forget about. Immediately after his resurrection, we’re informed that Jesus is “taken up” (Greek, eprtha) into the sky and disappears behind the clouds, which is how the book of Acts opens (Acts 1:9). Here’s what’s going on in the background.

When they asked him about the timing, He replied, “It is not for you to know the times or epochs that the Father has fixed by His own authority; but when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, you will receive power, and you will be My witnesses both in Jerusalem and throughout Judea and Samaria, and even to the farthest reaches of the earth.” And after He had spoken these things, He was raised up while they were gazing on, and He was taken away by a cloud and out of sight.

And while they were staring closely into the sky as He was leaving, two men in white garments appeared near them and stood there.

It will be in the same way that you have witnessed Him ascend into heaven that this Jesus, who has been taken from you into heaven, will return.” The concept that Jesus “ascended” into Heaven, which is commonly referred to as the ascension, has been significant to followers of Jesus for about two thousand years (e.g.

The phrase “Jesus climbed into Heaven” means something different.

Is the meaning of the ascension just that Jesus ascended into the heavens, or is there anything else at stake?

We must take a step back and begin with the major biblical conceptions of Heaven and Earth—space God’s and human space—in order to address these issues and properly grasp Jesus’ spectacular ascension.

God’s Space and Humanity’s Space

Scripture Project Team / ByShara Drimalla 2 months have passed since the last update The tale of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection receives a great deal of well-deserved attention, but there is another significant and puzzling episode in the narrative that we frequently ignore. Immediately after his resurrection, we’re informed that Jesus is “taken up” (Greek, eprtha) into the sky and disappears behind the clouds, which is how the book of Acts gets its beginning (Acts 1:9). In this section, you will find the background information.

See also:  Why Did Jesus Have To Go Through Samaria

When they asked him about the timing, He replied, “It is not for you to know the times or epochs that the Father has fixed by His own authority; but when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, you will receive power, and you will be My witnesses both in Jerusalem and throughout Judea and Samaria, and even to the farthest reaches of the world.” And after He had spoken these things, He was raised up while they were gazing on, and He was taken away by a cloud out of their sight.

  • Then, while they were looking closely into the sky as He was departing, two men in white attire appeared beside them.
  • This Jesus, who has been taken up from you into heaven, will return in the very same manner in which you have witnessed Him ascend into heaven.
  • The Nicene Creed, 325 A.D.).
  • Is the significance of the ascension just that Jesus ascended into the heavens, or is there anything more to it than just that?

This inquiry, as well as a clearer understanding of Jesus’ spectacular ascension, require us to take a step back and begin with the major biblical conceptions of Heaven and Earth—space God’s and human space, respectively. Look at what we’ve got here.

The Garden Temple and Ascension

God’s fingerprints may be found throughout creation. Moreover, God constructs another temple in the midst of this cosmic habitation, which is the garden indicated above, which is known as Eden. The first blog in The Royal Priest series was titled “Were Adam and Eve Priests in Eden?” for additional information on this topic. It is revealed in Genesis 3:24 that the garden of Eden’s entrance faced east, and it is revealed in Ezekiel that it was situated on a mountain (Ezek. 28:14,16). Consider the biblical authors’ use of geography to show a transcending reality in order to convey a message of hope.

  • It’s perched above a mountain.
  • Adam and Eve were figuratively ascending or descending this cosmic mountain temple in order to be in God’s presence, just as God’s royal priests had done before them.
  • When Adam and Eve reach the summit of the mountain, they are entirely linked with God and integrated with his will, and they receive God’s creative word as well as his wonderful life.
  • It is important to note that their ascension does not remove them from God’s physical creation, and that their “going down” to the rest of the world does not remove them from God’s divine realm.
  • And, if that’s the case, how may it affect our understanding of Jesus’ ascension?

The Priests and Ascension

When we read the story of the Exodus, we see God ordering Moses and his fellow leaders to “come up” to a mountain, where they would partake of a meal in God’s presence, and then be given instructions for the Israelites (Exod. 24). Moses and the elders of Israel climb into the cloud of heavenly glory, where they will meet with God face to face. We perceive human and divine in a mystical oneness at this area, where the author depicts God as sitting on a glittering, “blue as the sky,” clean, stone floor (Exod.

God’s space and humanity’s space are interwoven as one.

The priest enters into God’s presence in order to shepherd others in the same route, all the way to the throne of grace.

Moses’ priestly ascent is a reenactment of the Eden ideal, which depicts mankind as reclining in God’s presence on a cosmic mountain temple, as seen in Genesis.

The Day of Atonement

Another priestly example may be found in the book of Leviticus, which addresses the method in which God permits Israel to grow up to completely dwell in his presence via the priestly service of the people. The Day of Atonement is described in detail in Leviticus 16-17, which is the heart of the book of Leviticus (Yom Kippur). When the high priest came to offer a specific, yearly sacrifice on this day, he would be covering the sins of the whole community of Israel, and most significantly, he would be providing a means for people to live in God’s presence.

It’s interesting to note that the Day of Atonement is the only day of the year on which the high priest would symbolically climb to God’s presence in the temple.

24:5-8), and the high priest offered a sacrifice before ascending to heaven as well (Exod (Lev.

In addition, like Moses, the high priest is the only one who is permitted to enter into the presence of God in order to speak and pray to God on behalf of the people.

In this way, we see the earliest humans, Adam and Eve, and later Moses, and the priests, all participating in this type of climbing into the presence of God, as well as the rest of humanity. What about the typical Israeli? What is their situation?

The People and Ascension

Soon after becoming king, David travels up into the high hills in the middle of Israel’s tribes and creates a capital city, Jerusalem, which is also known as Zion or the City of David, to serve as Israel’s administrative center (2 Sam. 6). The temple will be built here, and it will be styled after the Garden of Eden, with images of gold and flowers adorning the walls, with each picture leading back to the Edenic mountain garden temple (1 Kgs. 8:29-32). As a result, the temple serves as a model for the new Heaven and Earth, which will be infused with God’s presence and where mankind will once again live in connection with his way of life and his desire for all of creation.

The temple was dedicated in the year 70 CE (Gen.

Notice how, whenever the Israelites travel to Jerusalem for festivals, or when they are going to sacrifice in the temple, or when they are going to worship, the biblical authors always write that they are “going up” (or ascending) to Jerusalem, regardless of whether they are going to sacrifice or worship (e.g.

12:27; Ps.

4:2; Isa.

Regardless of whether or whether the people were truly ascending in elevation or traveling north, the biblical authors utilize the geographic concept of ascending to describe their journey.

The Great High Priest

After reading the New Testament, we learn about Jesus’ journey to Jerusalem, where he is placed on trial (Mark 10:33). After being sentenced to death, Jesus ascends to Golgotha, where he is nailed on a cross and hangs there until his death (John 3:14, 8:28, 12:32, 19:17; Matt. 27:33; Mark 15:22). Furthermore, Jesus is risen from the dead three days after he died (Luke 24:7). With all of this flamboyant rhetoric, the biblical authors are trying to communicate something. Luke narrates an event in the book of Acts in which Jesus is “lifted up” and “received by a cloud,” which we may read about here.

As an alternative, he is purposely employing geographic and spatial-relationship language of ascending in order to communicate transcendent meaning.

It’s important to remember that both Moses and the high priests made major sacrifices prior to ascending into the presence of the Most High God.

7:27, 10:12), Jesus, the royal priest, was exalted into the heavenly realm.

He was then exalted into the heavenly realm. In the same way as Adam and Eve, Moses, the priests, and even the Israelites ascended to the temple, Jesus ascended to the heavens, uniting the divine and human realms in a magnificent, eternal integration of two worlds.

Jesus the Royal Priest

After reading the New Testament, we discover that Jesus journeys to Jerusalem, where he is placed on trial (Mark 10:33). As a result of his death sentence, Jesus ascends to the hill of Golgotha, where he is nailed to the crucifixion (John 3:14, 8:28, 12:32, 19:17; Matt. 27:33; Mark 15:22). And three days later, Jesus is resurrected from his grave (Luke 24:7). There’s a message in all of this florid rhetoric from the biblical authors. Toward the end of the book of Acts, Luke depicts an event in which Jesus is “lifted up” and “received by a cloud.” Acts 1:9 explains the meaning of the phrase When it comes to the events of that day, Luke will not provide video camera footage to his readers.

Luke uses the same imagery as the enthronement of the Son of Man in Daniel 7:13-14 and the elevation of the suffering servant in Isaiah 52:13-15 in order for his audience to connect the underlying concepts: His death, resurrection, and ascension are all part of the process of establishing his throne in the celestial sanctuary.

When the last and ultimate sacrifice was made (i.e., “it is completed,” John 19:30; Heb.

He was the ultimate sacrifice because he was the only one who could offer it (John 1:19).

On Earth as in Heaven

When we get to the New Testament, we read that Jesus journeys up to Jerusalem, where he is placed on trial (Mark 10:33). After being sentenced to death, Jesus ascends to the hill of Golgotha, where he is nailed on a cross (John 3:14, 8:28, 12:32, 19:17; Matt. 27:33; Mark 15:22). And three days later, Jesus is risen from the dead (Luke 24:7). With all of this flowery verbiage, the biblical authors are trying to communicate something. The book of Acts has a description of a moment in which Jesus is “lifted up” and “received by a cloud.” Acts 1:9 explains that Because of this, Luke is not providing his readers with video camera footage of what transpired that day.

Luke uses the same imagery as Daniel 7:13-14, as well as the elevation of the suffering servant in Isaiah 52:13-15, to help his readers connect the underlying ideas: His death, resurrection, and ascension are all part of his preparation for his enthronement in the celestial temple.

When the final and ultimate sacrifice was made (i.e., “it is done,” John 19:30; Heb.

7:27, 10:12), Jesus, the royal priest, was exalted into the celestial kingdom. In the same way as Adam and Eve, Moses, the priests, and even the Israelites ascended to the temple, Jesus ascended to the heavens, uniting the divine and human realms in a magnificent and eternal unification.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.