When A Woman Meets Jesus

When a Woman Meets Jesus: Finding The Love Every Woman Longs For: Valcarcel, Dorothy: 9780800733797: Amazon.com: Books

Meet the man who has the ability to satisfy your darkest desires. Despite the fact that they lived thousands of years ago, the ladies of the New Testament shared many of our anxieties and wants. They, too, were ambitious, concerned, broken, lonely, insecure, and unsatisfied with their lives and with themselves. They may have been perplexed as to how a strange stranger from Galilee could possibly comprehend their predicament. Then they came across him. It is in this book, When a Woman Meets Jesus, that eighteen stunning tales of women are told who have been transformed by the flawless, unconditional love of Jesus.

He instilled a sense of worth in them and helped them to improve their past, present, and future.

Allow this captivating novel to expose you to the man who loves you more than anybody else.

That effort, along with her own personal fight to overcome life-altering impairments, served as the impetus for the creation of TransformationGarden.com, a global website dedicated to encouraging women in their relationship with Christ.

About the Author

Dorothy Valcarcel has spent the better part of her professional life working with philanthropic groups all around the world. In her travels, she has been to ghettos, orphanages, domestic violence shelters, and food kitchens, among other places. In addition to her own personal fight to overcome difficult impairments experienced in a life-threatening accident, she was inspired to create Transformation Garden, a website dedicated to encouraging women in their walk with Christ. Crosswalk.com features Valcarcel’s daily devotionals, which are written by him.

When a Woman Meets Jesus – by Dorothy Valcárcel (Paperback)

Mrs. Dorothy Valcarcel has spent the better part of her professional life working with humanitarian organizations all around the world. In her travels, she has been to ghettos, orphanages, domestic violence shelters, and food distribution centers. This revelation, together with her own personal fight to overcome difficult limitations experienced in a life-threatening accident, served as the inspiration for Transformation Garden, a website dedicated to encouraging women in their walk with Jesus.

Living in the Arizona town of Sedona, she enjoys the outdoors.

When a Woman Meets Jesus: Finding the Love Every Woman Longs For

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We would much appreciate it if you could assist us. Please tell us what you think about When a Woman Meets Jesus by Dorothy Valcarcel. We’ll fix it as soon as possible. Please accept our sincere thanks for informing us about the situation. Start your review of When a Woman Meets Jesus: Finding the Love Every Woman Desperately Seeks on Thursday, March 11, 2017. Jan Stewart gave it a rating of 5 out of 5. I’m really enjoying this book. Each narrative provides a fresh perspective on Jesus’ affection for women.

  • I’m really enjoying this book.
  • I’m confident that this book will live up to my expectations after I’ve finished it.
  • I thought it was a nice book, a good solid devotional, however there were some concerns with the presenting style and language that I had with it.
  • I would and will continue to strongly suggest it to others, and I would most likely attempt anything else by this author in the future.
  • I had a hard time deciding how to rate this book; it definitely deserves a 3.75 instead of a 3.5.
  • I believe that this would have had a larger resonance for me if I had read it when I was younger in my religion, when I was still healing from a lot of the challenges and struggles that I was experiencing at the time.
  • I used it as a night devotional, reading a chapter every night or every few nights, depending on how much fiction I was reading at the same time and how I was feeling at the time of reading.

The chapters also came together nicely for a chapter-at-a-time reading experience, as well as for the overall sense of the book coming together as a whole.

As well as gathering quotes from various religious and secular sources to illustrate and support her thesis, she has also done an excellent job of breaking up some of the parts.

While I understand that this is the area in which she is most familiar, I felt there could have been more stories from others.

This is a book that I would recommend to a sister who is struggling, new to the religion, or a sister who is younger than myself.

more I questioned God as to why there wasn’t more in the Bible about his affection for women.

18 women accompanied Jesus on his earthly journey, walking beside him and his followers all the way to his resurrection.

You may see yourself in more than one of these women – and they were not without flaws either.

When Jesus encounters women, he does not condemn them; thus, I questioned God as to why there was not more in the Bible about his love for women.

18 women accompanied Jesus on his earthly journey, walking beside him and his followers all the way to his resurrection.

You may see yourself in more than one of these women – and they were not without flaws either.

When Jesus comes into contact with women, he does not criticize, degrade, or disparage them in any manner.

He believes in them and provides them with someone in whom to place their trust.

The author takes significant liberties with Scripture, infusing it with all kinds of thoughts and experiences that may or may not be accurate representations of what actually occurred in the Bible.

In addition, the personal anecdotes and little values aren’t really uplifting or motivating.

The underlying ideas of God’s love, healing, and caring are appealing, but the writing might have been stronger.

The author takes significant liberties with Scripture, infusing it with all kinds of thoughts and experiences that may or may not be accurate representations of what actually occurred in the Bible.

In addition, the personal anecdotes and little values aren’t really uplifting or motivating.

While I like the fundamental principles of God’s love, healing, and caring, I believe the writing might have been stronger.

This is one book that I keep on my nightstand because I know it is one that I will read over and over again for the rest of my days.

This did not fail to impress.

It will be uploaded at a later time.

Are you looking for something epic, magnificent, or out of this world? Isn’t it a little dystopian? Then these are the writers you should read next, according to your preferences! We inquired. Thank you for returning. For the moment, please wait while we sign you in to YourGoodreading Account.

5 Times Jesus Demonstrated His Care for Women

Thank you for considering assisting us. Please read our brief review of When a Woman Meets Jesus by Dorothy Valcarcel and let us know what you think of this book. Sincerely, we appreciate you informing us about the issue. Start your review of When a Woman Meets Jesus: Finding the Love Every Woman Desperately Seeks on Thursday, March 11. This book was regarded as outstanding by Jan Stewart. This book is just fantastic. Jesus’ affection for women is seen in unexpected ways in each of these stories.

  • This book is just fantastic.
  • Even before I finish reading it, I have a feeling that it will live up to my expectations.
  • I thought it was an excellent book, a good solid devotional, but there were some difficulties with the presenting style and language that I didn’t like.
  • If you are interested in reading this book, I would suggest it to you.
  • This was something I did as a devotional at nighttime.
  • I thought it was an excellent book, a good solid devotional, but there were some difficulties with the presenting style and language that I didn’t like.
  • If you are interested in reading this book, I would suggest it to you.

I used it as a night devotional, reading a chapter every night or every few nights, depending on how much fiction I was reading at the same time and how I was feeling at that time.

For readers who like to read chapters at a time, the chapters were also well-rounded, and they carried over to create an overall feeling of the book coming together.

As well as gathering quotes from various religious and secular sources to illustrate and support her thesis, she has also done an excellent job of breaking up some of the parts into smaller portions.

While I understand that this is the area in which she is most familiar, I felt there could have been more stories from other people included in the book.

All in all, this is a book I would recommend to a sister who is suffering, is new to the religion, or is younger in age than myself.

In my questioning of God, I wondered why there wasn’t more in the Bible about his love for women?

Jesus roamed the world with 18 women from the time of his birth to the time of his resurrection, with his followers following in his wake.

You may see yourself in more than one of these ladies – and they weren’t all flawless, either!

When Jesus encounters women, he does not condemn them; thus, I questioned God as to why there was not more information in the Bible about his love for women.

Jesus roamed the world with 18 women from the time of his birth to the time of his resurrection, with his followers following in his wake.

You may see yourself in more than one of these ladies – and they weren’t all flawless, either!

Jesus does not criticize, denigrate, or humiliate women in any manner when he comes face to face with them.

Because he believes in them, he provides them with someone in whom they may place their trust and confidence.

In my opinion, this is a mediocre novel.

Nothing erroneous has been discovered thus far; but, it is irritating to read a Bible narrative as if it were a book or something, rather than as actual historical documentation.

Fluff that is insipid and emotional.

In my opinion, this is a mediocre novel.

Nothing erroneous has been discovered thus far; but, it is irritating to read a Bible narrative as if it were a book or something, rather than as actual historical documentation.

Fluff that is insipid and emotional.

Changing my connection with Jesus as a result of reading this book One book that I have on my bedside and know I will return to time and time again for the rest of my life is The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins.

Thankfully, this did not let them down.

Discover the joys of encouragement, empowerment, and love now!

Searching for something spectacular, outstanding, or out of the ordinary?

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1. The wedding at Cana (John 2:1–12)

A wedding was being held in Cana, and Jesus and His new followers were asked to attend. Given that the bridal party ran out of wine, it was clear that it was a low-key affair—something that would have been unthinkable for a more wealthy family. Mary, Jesus’ mother, approaches Him in an attempt to remedy the situation. In this letter, He expresses his reluctance to get engaged since He does not believe the moment is suitable to begin His public ministry at this time. She doesn’t fight since she knows her son.

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At this moment, Jesus is around 30 years old.

After initially refusing to do so, Jesus goes on to execute His first miracle, allowing the newlyweds to keep their dignity.

Throughout Jesus’ mission, it would serve as a symbol of the caring respect he will have for women.

2. The female followers He amasses

The fact that Jesus had female disciples does not appear weird to us in the twenty-first century; yet, it would have seemed strange to those who lived during Jesus’ time period. Women were discouraged from coming out in public, and when they did, they were required to be escorted by a male companion. By having female disciples, Jesus not only destroys this societal norm, but He also permits them to financially fund His ministry: “After that, Jesus went from town to town and village to village, delivering the good news of God’s kingdom to the people.

“These women were contributing to their support by using their own resources” (Luke 8:1–3, NIV).

3. The woman subjected to bleeding (Luke 8:43–48)

The fact that Jesus had female disciples does not appear weird to us in the twenty-first century; yet, it would have seemed strange to those who lived during Jesus’ time. If a woman was seen walking down the street alone, she was expected to have a male chaperone accompany her. In addition to having female followers, Jesus lets them to financially fund His work, thereby undermining this social norm. In the following weeks, Jesus journeyed from one town or village to another in order to spread the good news of God’s kingdom.” Along with him were some ladies who had been cured of evil spirits and ailments, including Mary (known as Magdalene), from whom seven devils had been expelled, Joanna the wife of Chuza, the household manager of Herod, Susanna, and a number of other people.

4. The woman caught in adultery (John 8:1–11)

Jesus is sitting down to teach in the temple courts when certain professors of the law and Pharisees drag a woman who has been caught in adultery before Him, according to the Gospel of John. They approach Him and inquire about what should be done with the lady, with the purpose of trapping Him. If He urges them to release her, he is in violation of the Law; nevertheless, if He orders her to be stoned, He is in violation of all He has spoken about mercy and compassion. However, it is crucial to observe that her male counterpart in this offense has been conspicuously absent, despite the fact that the Law would have charged them both: “If a man is discovered sleeping with another man’s wife, both the man who slept with her and the woman must die.” “You must purify Israel of the wickedness that exists.” If a man happens to come across a virgin pledged to be married while traveling through a town and sleeps with her, you must bring both of them to the town’s gate and stone them to death—the young woman because she was in a town and did not scream for help, and the man because he violated another man’s wife.

  • “You must cleanse the wicked from among you,” says Deuteronomy 22:22–24 in the New International Version.
  • Her life didn’t matter nearly as much as the potential to capture Jesus in the first place.
  • His next words are “Let any one of you who is without guilt be the first to hurl a stone at her.” He then rises to his feet and adds, They leave one by one, starting with the oldest and progressing to the youngest.
  • “Woman, where have they gone?” he inquires.

Can you fathom how that compassion must have felt? Not only had she been forgiven, but she had also been granted freedom. Jesus humanized her and treated her as if she were valuable and deserving of respect.

5. The women He appears to at the resurrection (Matthew 28)

Females were among the first persons to whom Jesus appeared following his resurrection. Consider the implications of it. This is the single most important event in the history of mankind, and God has chosen to disclose it to women in this particular instance. If there is one moment in the gospel that strikes home the significance of women in God’s economy, it is this one. In order to put an exclamation point on this reality, He directs the ladies to inform His followers that He is, in fact, still alive.

Jesus chooses these women to be witnesses to the most significant event in human history.

The tip of the iceberg

This is only a small selection of the stories that demonstrate Jesus’ concern for women and girls. When it comes to His interactions with women, the reality is that Jesus defied conventional conventions in practically every single one of them. He was a true disruptor of the existing quo. Regardless of gender, Jesus’ mission was to bring us all free. Find out more about tactics and resources for women’s ministry, and how you can assist in bringing the narrative of Jesus to women!

Samaritan woman at the well – Wikipedia

The Good Samaritan lady at the well is a person from the Gospel of John, who appears in John 4:4–26. She is revered as a saint in the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic faiths, and is known by the name Photine(v), which means “luminous” in Greek.

Biblical account

Saint Photine, an Eastern Orthodox saint, and Christ are shown in this icon. According to John 4:4–42, the lady appears; below is John 4:4–26: However, he was had to pass through Samaria. As a result, he traveled to a Samaritan city known as Sychar, which was close to the tract of land that Jacob had bequeathed to his son Joseph. Jesus had stopped at Jacob’s well after a long trek and was resting his weary body there. It was around 12 o’clock. A Samaritan lady approached Jesus while he was drawing water, and Jesus asked her to “give me a drink.” ‘His disciples had gone into the city in order to purchase food.’ “How is it that you, a Jew, come to me, a woman of Samaria, and beg for a drink?” the Samaritan woman questioned him.

  • Who or what is providing you with this life-giving water?
  • Are you greater than Jacob?” Jesus addressed her by saying, “All of those who drink this water will experience thirst again, but those who drink the water that I will give them will never experience thirst once again.
  • “Go, summon your husband, and then come back,” Jesus instructed her to do.
  • Jesus addressed her by stating, “You are correct in asserting that you have no husband; after all, you have had five husbands, and the guy with whom you are currently living is not your husband.

Our forefathers and foremothers worshipped on this mountain, yet you claim that the only location where people should worship is in the Holy Land.” Jesus addressed her by saying, “Woman, trust me when I say that the hour is approaching when you will no longer worship the Father on this mountain or in Jerusalem.

  1. True worshipers, on the other hand, will worship the Father in spirit and truth at a time that has come and is now here, for the Father is looking for people like these to come and worship him.
  2. He will “proclaim all things to us” when he arrives, according to the Bible.
  3. “I am the one who is speaking to you.” This incident takes place prior to Jesus’ return to Galilee in the gospels.
  4. During the post-exilic period, it appears that the two communities have drifted apart.

The Gospel of John, like the Gospel of Luke, is generally favorable to the Samaritans throughout, and while the Matthaean Gospel quotes Jesus at one point in his ministry telling his followers not to evangelize any of the Samaritan cities at that time, this restriction had clearly been lifted by the time of Matthew 28:19, indicating that Jesus had changed his mind.

The actual Jesus had no interaction with Samaritans, according to one interpretation; another holds that the narratives date back to Jesus himself. When Jesus promises the apostles that they will be witnesses to the Samaritans in Acts 1:8, they take him seriously.

Interpretations

Researchers have remarked that the plot of this narrative appears to be based on a standardbetrothal-type event’ from Hebrew scripture, namely that of Jacob Genesis 29. It is this norm that follows on from a previous episode in which John the Baptist compares his connection with Jesus to that of a buddy of a bridegroom, which would have been recognizable to Jewish readers. Following Jacob’s well, literary scholar Jo-Ann A. Brant writes that “there is nearly unanimous agreement among literary critics that the scene at Jacob’s well adheres to the norms of the betrothal type-scene prevalent in Hebrew storytelling.” Several other scholars have pointed out substantial contrasts between John 4 and the betrothal type-scenes seen in the Hebrew Scriptures.

  • Lee, there are a number of differences between the Hebrew betrothal scenes and the events of John 4:25-27.
  • 12:3); and Jesus is not depicted as a bridegroom, but rather as a provider of live water.” Throughout the Roman Curiabook, the Gospelepisode is referred to as “aparadigmfor our relationship with truth,” and this episode is no exception.
  • Despite the fact that she was afterwards christened “Photine,” the woman’s name at the time of her encounter with Jesus remains unknown in Eastern Christian tradition.
  • John 4:28–30 and John 4:39–42 relate how she was fast to share the story of her encounter with Jesus, and how many others came to believe in him as a result of her actions.
  • The Emperor Nero eventually saw her and she was hauled before him to account for her beliefs, where she suffered numerous tortures before dying as a martyr after being thrown down an empty well.
  • The custom of the day is for churches, schools, and businesses to hand out free fruit drinks to everyone who pass them by.

A Lesser Feaston was added to the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America to commemorate Photini, The Samaritan Woman, who died Day February 26th.

Cultural references

  • Jesus and the Samaritan Woman at the Well
  • Samaritan woman at the well, 1651 by Gervais Drouet
  • Jesus and the Samaritan Woman at the Well, by Guercino
  • Jesus and the Samaritan Woman at the Well, by Gervais Drouet

In music

  • Jesus Met the Woman at the Well, an agospelsong dating from 1949 or earlier (the oldest known recording by The Fairfield Four)
  • Jesus Met the Woman at the Well, an agospelsong dating from 1949 or earlier (the earliest known recording by The Fairfield Four)
  • One of the most well-known gospel songs, Lift Him Up That’s All, has been recorded by Washington Phillips since 1927 or before (the first known recording is dated 1927). William Sterndale Bennett’s holy cantata The Woman of Samaria was composed in 1867. Other works by Bennett include The Maid and the Palmer, also known as The Well Below The Valley (Roud2335,Child ballad21), and “Woman at the Well,” by Olivia Lane
  • And “Woman at the Well,” by Olivia Lane.
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In film and television

In 1949 or before, The Fairfield Four recorded Jesus Met the Woman at the Well, an agospelsong that is the first known recording of their work; In 1949 or earlier, The Fairfield Four recorded Jesus Met the Woman at the Well, an agospelsong that is the first known recording of their work. a gospel song from 1927 or before (the first recorded recording is by Washington Phillips); Lift Him Up That’s All, a gospel song from 1927 or earlier; William Sterndale Bennett’s holy cantata The Woman of Samaria was composed in 1867.

See also

  • Theology of Asian feminists
  • Domnina (Nero’s daughter)
  • Domnina (Nero’s granddaughter)
  • Interactions between Jesus and women
  • A list of names for those who have no names in the Bible
  • It is the Parable of the Good Samaritan that we are talking about.

Notes

  1. In Current Greek, it is pronounced Fotini, while in Doric Greek and certain modern dialects, it is pronounced Photini, and it means “the shining one” from the word “light.” A few examples of diminutives in Modren Greek are the words for “photo” and “faye”: “fotoula,” “foteinoula,” “fori,” “fofi,” “foto,” “faye,” and “fotoula.”

References

  1. P.M. Fraser and E. Matthews are the editors of this volume (1987). “v.”An alphabetical list of Greek personal names. Vol. 1 is the first volume of the series. The Aegean Islands are a group of islands in the Mediterranean Sea. Cyprus, sometimes known as Cyrenaica, is a Mediterranean island in the Mediterranean Sea. Oxford University Press is a publishing house based in Oxford, England. A Greek–English Lexicon at the Perseus Project
  2. AbLincoln 2005, pp. 170–171
  3. AbCrown, DaveySixdenier 1995, p. 134
  4. AbBourgel 2018
  5. AbLincoln 2005, pp. 100–101 (2 March 2003). This article is a Christian perspective on the “New Age” and the person of Jesus Christ, the Bearer of Life’s Water. Vatican City: Internet Office of the Holy See
  6. Barrett 1978, p. 12
  7. “Sunday of the Samaritan Woman” (Sunday of the Samaritan Woman). The Archdiocese of the Greek Orthodox Church in North America. “La Samaritana 2011 en Oaxaca,” which was published on February 3, 2020, was retrieved (in Spanish). Oaxaca is alive and well. Archived from the original on 3 June 2013
  8. “Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018”.:CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. “Photini”.satucket.com. On IMDB, you can find “The Maid and the Palmer” by Francis James Child, English and Scottish Popular Ballads”The Maid and the Palmer”
  10. And “The Chosen” by IMDB. IMDB. CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. CS1 maint: url-status (link)

Sources

  • Barrett, C. K. (2001). (1978). The Gospel of St. John: An Introduction with Commentary and Notes on the Greek Text (The Gospel According to St. John) (2nd ed.). 978-0-664-22180-5
  • Bourgel, Jonathan
  • Westminster John Knox Press
  • ISBN 978-0-664-22180-5
  • (2018). “John 4:4–42: Defining a Modus Vivendi Between Jews and Samaritans.” “John 4:4–42: Defining a Modus Vivendi Between Jews and Samaritans.” Jo-Ann A. Brant, The Journal of Theological Studies, Volume 69, Number 1, pages 39–65, doi: 10.1093/jts/flx215, ISSN0022-5185
  • Brant, Jo-Ann A. (1996). Characterization and Narrative Art in the Gospel of John: “Husband Hunting” is the title of the paper. 205–223, doi: 10.1163/156851596X00194.ISSN0927-2569
  • Crown, Alan David
  • Davey, Lucy
  • Sixdenier, Guy Dominique, eds. Biblical Interpretation, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 205–223, doi: 10.1163/156851596X00194.ISSN0927-2569 (1995), “Essays in Honour of GD Sexdenier: New Samaritan Studies of the Société d’études samaritaines,” Studies in Judaica 5, Sydney: Mandelbaum / University of Sydney
  • Ferguson, Everett, “Essays in Honour of GD Sexdenier: New Samaritan Studies of the Société d’études samaritaines,” Studies in Judaica 5, Sydney: Mandelbaum / (2003). Early Christianity’s historical contexts. Wm. B. Eerdmans, ISBN 978-0-8028-2221-5
  • Lee, Dorothy A., ISBN 978-0-8028-2221-5 (1994). The Interplay of Form and Meaning in the Symbolic Narratives of the Fourth Gospel. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, ISBN 978-1-85075-468-8
  • Lincoln, Andrew T. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, ISBN 978-1-85075-468-8
  • (2005). The Gospel of Saint John is a collection of writings by the apostle John. Hendrickson Publishers, ISBN 978-1-56563-401-5, OCLC61129929
  • Okure, Teresa, Hendrickson Publishers, ISBN 978-1-56563-401-5, OCLC61129929
  • Hendrickson Publishers, ISBN 978-1-56563-401-5, OCLC61129929
  • Hendrickson (1988). A contextual analysis of John 4:1-42 to understand the Johannine attitude to mission. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr, ISBN 978-3-16-145049-5
  • Kevin Quast, ISBN 978-3-16-145049-5 (1991). Introduction to the Gospel of John: A Guide to Reading. Samkutty, V. J., Samkutty, V. J., Samkutty, V. J., Samkutty, V. J., Samkutty, V. J., Samkutty, V. J., Samkutty, V. J., Samkutty, V. J., Samkutty, V. J., Samkutty, V. J., Samkutty, V. J., Samkutty, V. J., Samkutty, V (2006). In the book of Acts, the Samaritan Mission is described. A C Black, ISBN 978-0-567-04464-8
  • A C Black, ISBN 978-0-567-04464-8
  • A

External links

  • At orthodoxwiki.org, you may read about Photine of Samaria
  • At Wikimedia Commons, you can see images of a Samaritan lady at the well.

The Woman at the Well: It’s Significance and What We Can Learn

As recorded in John 4:4-30 (ESV), Jesus, who is on his journey to Galilee, comes face to face with a woman at a well. This narrative, which is also known as “Jesus and the Samaritan woman,” captures the imaginations of those who read the Gospels. What, though, is the importance of the woman at the watering hole? What lessons can we take away from this historic meeting? What is the relevance of the narrative of the woman at the well in the Bible? The interaction between Jesus and the Samaritan woman is not a chance meeting between two strangers.

The woman at the well, who is desperate for a fulfilling life and eternal grace, is permanently changed by Jesus’ love for her and his sacrifice for her.

John 4:4-9, The Samaritan Woman

As recorded in John 4:4-30 (ESV), Jesus, who is on his journey to Galilee, comes face to face with the woman at the well. In the Gospels, this narrative is referred regarded as Jesus and the Samaritan woman, and it has a powerful effect on those who read it. What, though, is the meaning of the lady by the water source? Is there anything we can take away from this historic meeting? In the Bible, the tale of the woman at the well is significant. When Jesus and the Samaritan lady cross paths, it is not a coincidental occurrence.

Jesus’ compassion for her transforms the woman at the well, who is desperate for a fulfilling life and an endless supply of grace.

Verses 10-15, Living Water

She requested for a drink, and Jesus said, “If you had known the gift of God and who it is that is saying to you, ‘Give me a drink,’ you would have asked him, and he would have provided you with live water.” We know that this live water is the salvation that Jesus provides for us because He states that it is a gift from God in His teachings. There is little doubt that the woman at the well picked up on this, and I’m sure she wondered whether there was more to Jesus, and perhaps even more to her own existence.

  1. Whatever you ask in my name, I will accomplish so that the Father’s glory may be revealed through the Son’s sacrifice.
  2. ESV translation of John 14:13-14 The Samaritan lady, on the other hand, had no idea who Jesus was at the time.
  3. “Sir, you have nothing to draw water with, and the well is deep,” the woman explained to him.
  4. Are you more powerful than our ancestor Jacob?
  5. Everyone who drinks this water will get thirsty again, but whoever drinks the water that I will give him will never become thirsty again, replied Jesus to her.
  6. After making the connection, Jesus gets right to the point, declaring that even the prophets and people of the old covenant are unable to complete or satisfy us in our needs.

When Jesus mentions the new covenant, he is alluding to the one in which we may put our confidence in Him and be entirely pleased, both in eternity and on this planet.

Verses 16-20 “Go, Call Your Husband”

“Go, summon your husband, and come here,” Jesus instructed her to do. “I don’t have a spouse,” the woman said to him. “You are correct in claiming that you have no husband; because you have had five husbands, and the one you are currently with is not your husband,” Jesus said to her. “Everything you’ve mentioned is correct.” Wow, he brought up the most uncomfortable subject matter possible. In the absence of any prior awareness of Jesus’ identity, it appears that Jesus is teasing her or adopting an accusing tone.

  • It appears like Jesus is attempting to reach her heart, to the core of what she requires, which is love and forgiveness.
  • He brought this up for a lot of reasons, to be honest.
  • He is not some stalker who has been lurking behind a bush watching her life unfold; rather, He is the Messiah, the Son of God, who has come to save the world.
  • Second, Jesus anticipated that when He presented her with the promise of God, the promise that she would be able to get this living water, the first thing she would think about was how all of her sins prohibit her from receiving it.
  • Consider what might have happened if Jesus had chosen to disregard this aspect of her tale and instead responded with grace.
  • He was greeted by a woman who remarked, ‘Sir, I believe you to be a prophet.’ Despite the fact that our forefathers worshipped on this mountain, you claim that Jerusalem is the proper location for people to worship.
  • And, since God is the one who can answer her questions via Jesus, why wouldn’t she approach Him with whatever questions she could have about anything?
  • The fact that she didn’t know what to make of this God she didn’t know yet, this God she might have wanted to worship but didn’t know how to do, made me think she was a little perplexed.

Think about it: she was already detested in her own town; now image travelling to a country where no one welcomed you because of your ethnicity and attempting to practice your religion freely. It appeared as though she couldn’t catch a break. With the exception of Jesus, who did accept her.

Verses 21-26, Worship in Truth and Spirit

Despite the fact that she shifted the subject, Jesus does not become enraged or condemn the woman at the well; instead, He responds to her query with the same fervor as he did in his earlier words. “Woman, trust me when I say that the hour is coming when neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem will you worship the Father,” Jesus stated. You worship what you do not understand, but we worship what we understand, since salvation comes from the Jews. However, the hour is approaching, and it is already here, when real worshippers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for the Father is seeking such people to worship him in this manner.

  • Because of Jesus, we no longer need to gather in a certain location to worship.
  • This is fantastic news for the Samaritan woman, who would have otherwise been excluded from the redemptive drama.
  • Now, worship does not have to be restricted to a tabernacle or temple.
  • We have the Holy Spirit, and as a result, we are able to feel the love of the Father without having to follow all of the regulations set down in the Old Testament.
  • Why not incorporate spirit and peace?
  • Returning to the sense of shame or guilt that the Samaritan lady was likely experiencing, Jesus saw that the situation had not yet been resolved.
  • She was under no need to lie in order to conceal her guilt and humiliation.
  • Nonetheless, Mary is unwilling to believe this until Jesus explicitly states that He is, in fact, the Messiah.
  • “When he comes, he will tell us everything,” she says.
  • Even now, I can imagine the chills that the Samaritan woman was probably experiencing.
  • There are just a few instances in which Jesus explicitly declares who He is throughout the gospels.
See also:  The Manger Where Jesus Was Born

Verses 27-30, “Can This Be the Christ?”

Just as he was about to go, his followers returned. They were all taken aback by the fact that he was conversing with a woman, but no one asked, “What are you looking for?” Alternatively, “What are you talking about with her?” And so she went away from the well, into town, and announced to the people, “Come see a guy who told me all that I ever done. “Does this look like the Christ?” They had driven out of town and were on their way to him. The disciples were completely perplexed by what Jesus was doing.

  1. The Samaritan lady, on the other hand, didn’t need to wait long because she recognized the stirrings of love, grace, and adoration that were boiling up in her heart.
  2. What a surreal sensation it was.
  3. A tale on a paper isn’t all that Jesus is, and a weak Hebrew promise isn’t all that Jesus is, either.
  4. Jesus is here, and He is very close to us.
  5. The woman at the well realized, just as you do now, that there was more to it than meets the eye.

Moreover, she was not interested in finding out how nice Jesus is after she reached paradise. You don’t have to wait until you get to paradise to realize how wonderful Jesus is. And you are under no obligation to wait to tell people about Him.

Many Samaritans Believe

His disciples returned at that very moment. Although everyone was intrigued by the fact that he was conversing with a lady, nobody inquired as to what he was looking for. “Can you tell me the reason why you’re talking to her?” And so she went away from the well, into town, and said to the people, “Come see a guy who has told me everything I’ve done.” Are you sure that he’s not Jesus?” They had driven out of town and were on their way to see him in person. It was beyond the comprehension of the disciples to comprehend what Jesus was up to.

  • Although it took her a while to realize it, the Samaritan lady realized that the shift of love, grace, and adoration that was rising up in her heart was a sign from God.
  • This is a surreal sensation.
  • A tale on a paper isn’t enough for Jesus, and a vague Hebrew promise isn’t enough for him, either.
  • We can see that Jesus is here and that He is close to us.
  • Similarly to how you now realize there is more, the woman at the well understood.
  • If you want to know how good Jesus truly is, you don’t have to wait until you get to paradise.

Forever Changed

The experience of meeting Jesus and being transformed by His love is not something we can keep to ourselves. We may share it with others. We will be transformed for the rest of our lives. He will pour down living water into our hearts via the power of His Holy Spirit, causing His kindness to overflow in us as we live out His promises. It was His promise to the Jews that brought redemption, and He continued to extend that promise to the Samaritan lady and to us as a result. In order to enter the temple, we don’t have to wait until after the next sacrifice; we don’t have to wait until after the next sacrifice in order to come into His presence and realize how genuinely good He is.

We should be thankful for Jesus’ gift of fulfilling love, grace, and presence, and we should worship Him in the spirit and the truth as a result of his gift to us.

The Women Who Met Jesus: New Testament Stories of Lives Transformed by the Savior

Following her desire to find eternal love—”a love that rises with you to the peak and doesn’t take off when you encounter a valley”—authorDorothy Valcárcel embarked on a journey to learn about Jesus’ life. Women were drawn to Jesus, and when the males abandoned him, the women remained with him, according to her observations of Jesus. As she contemplated the explanation for this, she began to take note of how Jesus handled the ladies around him. The end result is this instructive book, which contains portraits of 18 women who had a relationship with Jesus.

Think of the widow with two pennies who Jesus watched donating whatever she had to the temple treasury, or the Canaanite lady residing in the vicinity of Tyre and Sidon who begged Jesus to cure her daughter, to name a few examples.

A common difficulty for all of the women Valcárcel profiles is that they were not regarded deserving of respect and had no legal status in their societies.

Valerie Valcárcel shares insights that are relevant for today’s women as they walk with Jesus, drawing on Scripture, historical narratives, her own life-altering difficulties, and her creative imagination.

While it appears that the book is best suited for individual study, it might also be utilized in a group context in which participants have a high degree of trust and involvement with one another. (Revell)

About the Author

Sonya VanderVeen Feddema is a freelance writer and a member of Covenant CRC in St. Catharines, Ontario. She lives in St. Catharines with her family.

The Samaritan Woman at the Well: Disciple and Evangelist

God, you were the one who met the Samaritan lady at the well on that particular day. Meet us in this narrative from the Bible, as well as in our own lives on this day. Amen.

Key Scripture

Thank you, God, for being the one who encountered the Samaritan lady at the well on that particular day. Please come and join us in this narrative from Scripture as well as in our own daily lives. Amen.

Who Was the Samaritan Woman at the Well?

Despite the fact that we are not informed what this woman’s name is, she had the longest dialogue with Jesus of any character in the Gospel of John. Despite this, she has been mistreated or misunderstood on several occasions throughout the years as a result of her sexual history. This component of her past frequently influences our interpretation of this incident, so before we go on to the rest of her talk with Jesus, let’s take a closer look at this aspect. Five weddings is a significant amount, to say the least.

  1. In a society where women were married at an early age, becoming a widow was a regular experience for women.
  2. As a consequence, it appears that her numerous marriages were not the result of her choosing to do so.
  3. Concubineship was a legal arrangement with a lower social rank than marriage, but it was an option she might pursue.
  4. Another position for her was that of a second wife, a function that was socially acceptable but not thought to be of equal importance to the role of the first wife.

Digging Deeper

Despite the fact that we are not informed her name, this woman had the longest dialogue with Jesus of any character in the book of John. Despite this, she has been criticized or misunderstood on several occasions throughout the years as a result of her sexuality. Considering this part of her life frequently influences our interpretation of this narrative, so let’s take a closer look at it before moving on to the remainder of her interaction with Jesus. With five marriages under her belt, she certainly has a lot of experience!

  • In a culture where women were married at an early age, widowhood was a typical occurrence.
  • Her several marriages appear to have been the outcome of circumstance rather than choice.
  • Concubineship was a legal arrangement with a lower status than marriage, but it was still an option for her.
  • Another position for her was that of a second wife, a function that was socially acceptable but was not thought to be of equal importance to the first wife.

It is crucial to note that Jesus does not criticize her situation, but rather simply admits that “what you have stated is accurate” (4:18) as he proceeds to engage her in theological debate, which we will now shift our attention to.

She Is Called and We Are Called

The Samaritan lady asks Jesus questions about her faith and hope, and he responds to her inquiries with open attention and open heart. The more time she spends with him, the more her comprehension of the situation deepens until she realizes the whole truth: Jesus is the Christ. Her posture of discipleship, learning from Jesus, is evident throughout this dialogue, and she is now being called to be an evangelist by the Holy Spirit. She leaves her water jar behind, just as the disciples abandoned their fishing nets, as a symbol of her entire acceptance of Jesus’ request to join him on the road to Emmaus.

“Many Samaritans from that city believed in him as a result of the woman’s testimony,” the Bible says at the conclusion (John 4:39, NRSV).

Her acts encourage us to remain connected to Jesus and to ask questions about our religion in order to gain a more complete knowledge of it, as she has done in the past.

However, just as our faith development is not just for our personal benefit, the Samaritan lady uses her newfound knowledge and is spurred into action in the context of her calling.

She reminds us that our callings are chances to put our own development in faith into action for the sake of others, whether we feel called to evangelize in the same manner she does or if we are called to utilize our abilities in other ways.

Conclusion

Jesus did not pass judgment on this woman’s past, despite the fact that many Christian interpretations have done so. Instead, via her dialogue with Jesus, we learn about a form of discipleship that is open to learning more about God’s work in the world and becoming a more complete knowledge of God. Our understanding of what it is to be a follower of Jesus is reinforced by her reaction to him as an evangelist, which reminds us that being a follower of Jesus requires us to put our abilities into action for the sake of others.

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