Why Did They Cast Lots For Jesus Clothes

Why did they cast lots for Jesus’ clothes?

What was the reason for the Roman soldiers tossing lots for the clothing of Jesus? There are other instances in Scripture where people have cast lots for things other than Jesus’ garments (Leviticus 16:8, Proverbs 16:33, 18:18, Acts 1:24 – 26), which are not related to Jesus’ clothing. Its primary function was to provide a decision that was neither prejudiced or dependent on human choice, but instead relied on God to judge the situation (e.g. the selection of a replacement for Judas through casting lots, see Acts 1:24 – 26).

The rest of the apostles were also chosen from among the eleven apostles (Acts 1:24, 26, HBFV throughout) By utilizing a public casting process, however, an unbiased judgment based on time and chance might be made.

They were frequently encountered in games and gambling.

A large number of people voted for Jesus’ garments.

Immediately before to the splitting up of Jesus’ clothing and the subsequent casting of lots for them, Herod’s soldiers compelled him to wear a beautiful robe in order to humiliate him.” Then Herod and his men treated Him with disrespect, and after ridiculing Him, he clothed Him in a magnificent gown and returned Him to Pilate’s court ” (Luke 23:8 – 11).

It is unclear from the Bible whether or not this was the same clothing that had been used to insult him earlier.

Four Roman soldiers attempted to split the high-quality clothing Christ wore by lot after he had been nailed on the cross, but were unsuccessful.

In addition to the coat, (the Roman soldiers) divided His clothes into four portions, one for each soldier and one for themselves.

In order to avoid tearing it apart, they murmured to one another, “Let us not pull it apart.” It was they who split up my clothes, and it was they who drew lots for my vesture (John 19:23 – 24) When the soldiers attempted to split Jesus’ coat or tunic, they discovered that it was not a patchwork of parts that had been sewed together.

  1. In order to ensure that just one of the troops received this “gift,” lots were drawn to determine who would receive it.
  2. “Antiquities (History) of the Jews,” written by the Jewish historian Josephus in the first century CE, reported that the temple’s high priest was required to dress in blue garments (a vestment) during worship.
  3. It was a single long vestment that was divided down the middle of the breast and back.
  4. Furthermore, the effort of attempting to split such a seamless garment would very certainly result in any portions being torn and unusable.

The troops were aware of these realities, and as a result, they decided to cast lots in order to allow time and opportunity to select who would receive the full outfit.

Is there significance to Jesus’ tunic being kept intact while the Temple veil was torn apart?

This element of the crucifixion is described in more detail by John than by either Mark or Matthew: And they crucify Him and divide His clothing between themselves, deciding who should take what by casting a lot to determine who should take what. (DLNT) Mark 15:24 DLNT Then, after they had crucified Him, they divided His clothes between themselves by casting lots. (Deuteronomy 27:35 DLNT) The soldiers then divided Jesus’ clothing into four sections, one for each soldier, including the tunic, after he had been crucified.

So they said to one another, “Let us not tear it, but let us cast lots for it to decide who will have it”— in order that the Scripture, which says, “They divided My garments among themselves, and they cast lots for My clothing,” might be fulfilled.

(2 Chronicles 19:23-24 DLNT).

This narrative has been written with the intention of include three pieces of information:

  1. The scripture from the Old Testament was fulfilled
  2. Number of garments (five)
  3. The size of the wardrobe A tunic (v) was identified as the piece of clothing that had not been ripped.

John makes the point that both portions of Psalm 22:18 were fulfilled, as pointed out by User34445, namely that the clothing was split and that lots were cast for the garments. In addition, there is a discrepancy between the Masoretic Text (MT) and the version of John that is cited, which is as follows: Those who divide my clothing among themselves cast lots for them, according to Psalm 22:18. They split My clothes among themselves and then cast lots for My apparel, according to the JPS translation.

According to John, only one lot was drawn.

The single casting of a lot has no significant impact on the fulfillment of the Psalm’s requirements.

The specific article of clothing that has been preserved in its entirety is a tunic, which has been discovered at several key locations.

  • According to Genesis 3:21, this was the article of clothing that God crafted to accompany the first man and wife when they departed the Garden of Eden.
  • In the same way that the LORD God gave the first man a tunic, one of the Roman soldiers received a tunic from the Lord Jesus.
  • (See, for example, Hebrews 10:21) Jesus is the genuine High Priest.

As a result of the emphasis on avoiding ripping the garment, a connection may be made with the clothes of the High Priest, which is not intended to be torn: The priest who is the most important among his brethren, upon whose head the anointing oil is poured, and who has been sanctified to wear the garments, should not allow his hair to go loose or his robes to be torn. (Leviticus 21:10, English Standard Version) 1On the Day of Atonement, in particular, there is a relationship to the High Priest, as follows: In addition to putting on the holy linen coat and wearing the holy linen undergarment, he must wrap the holy linen scarf around his waist and wear the sacred linen turban; these are the holy clothes.

(Leviticus 16:4 English Standard Version) If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

One way to meet this criteria is by the use of a crown of thorns.

Matthew 27:35 When they had crucified Him, they divided up His garments by casting lots.

New International Version (New International Version) After Jesus had been nailed to the cross, they divided his clothing by drawing lots for it. New Living Translation (New Living Translation) They bet with dice for his garments after nailing him on the cross, and the soldiers won his clothes in the end. Version standardized in English And when Jesus had been crucified, they divided his clothing among themselves by drawing lots to determine who would get what. Berean Study Bible (also known as the Berean Study Bible) When they had crucified Him, they divided up His clothing by drawing lots among themselves.

The King James Version of the Bible And they crucified him and divided his clothing among themselves, casting lots, in order to bring about the fulfillment of the prophecy of the prophet, who said, They divided my garments among themselves, and upon my vesture did they cast lots.

Then they crucified Him and divided His garments among themselves by casting lots, in order to bring about the fulfillment of the prophecy of the prophet: “They divided My garments among them, and for My clothing they threw lots.” The New American Standard Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.

  1. NASB (National Association of School Boards) 1995 As soon as they had nailed Him to the cross, they divided His clothing among themselves by drawing lots.
  2. The Bible with an amplification system Then, when He had been crucified, they divided His clothing among themselves by drawing lots for them.
  3. After Jesus was crucified, his clothing were divided by lot among the assembled crowd.
  4. When they executed Him, they divided His clothing by drawing lots among themselves.
  5. After Jesus had been crucified, they divided his clothing among themselves by lot; The Aramaic Bible in Plain English And after they had nailed him to the cross, they divided his clothing by drawing lots.
  6. The Bible of Douay-Rheims And when he had been crucified, they divided his clothing among themselves by casting lots, in order to bring about the fulfillment of the prophecy of the prophet, who said: They divided my garments among themselves, and upon my vesture they threw lots.

The International Standard Version (ISO) is a formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized After they had nailed him to the cross, they decided who would get his garments by having them each cast a die.

  • Standard Version in its literal sense And after they had crucified Him, they divided His clothing by lot,]] The New American Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.
  • NET Bible is an abbreviation for Networked Information Technology.
  • Revised Standard Version (New Revised Standard Version) And after they had nailed him to the cross, they divided his clothing among themselves by drawing lots; and The New Heart English Bible is a translation of the New Heart Bible.
  • The English Bible for the Whole World When they had nailed him to the cross, they divided his garments among themselves by drawing lots.
  • Context The Crucifixion was a terrible event.
  • 35 When they had nailed Him to the cross, they split His clothes into castinglots.
  • … References to Other Sources Psalm 22:16 (KJV) For dogs have surrounded me, and a gang of bad guys has encircled me, piercing my hands and feet in the process.
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John 19:23 (NIV) When the soldiers finished crucifying Jesus, they separated His clothing into four parts, one for each soldier, with the tunic remaining as the only piece left.

John 19:24 (NIV) As a result, they murmured to one other, “Let’s not rip it apart.

2:23 (Acts 2:23) Because of God’s predetermined plan and foreknowledge, Jesus was handed up to be crucified and you, through the hands of the lawless, put him to death by nailing Him on the cross.

And they crucified him and divided his garments among themselves, casting lots on his clothing, in order to bring about the fulfillment of the prophecy of the prophet, who said, They divided my garments among themselves, and on my clothing did they throw lots.

They wounded my hands and my feet because I was surrounded by hounds and surrounded by the assembly of the wicked, according to Psalm 22:16.

When the disciples finally saw the Lord, they were overjoyed.

separated.

23:34 (Luke 23:34) Then Jesus replied, “Father, forgive them; for they are unaware of what they are doing.” They then divided his clothing and divided it by lot.

and that was the end of it.

(35)They nailed him to a cross.

Andrew’s cross), and sometimes taking the form of the Latin cross, which we are all familiar with from Christian art.

It was necessary to carry out the death sentence by crucifixion by laying the cross on the ground and then stripping and laying the condemned man on it.

The clothing of the culprit were the typical perquisites of the executioners, and in this case contained (as we can see from John 19:23) both the tunic worn next to the body and the outer garment draped over the top of it.

They divided my clothes amongst themselves.

John (John 19:24) is even more emphatic in his recording than was St.

By our Lord’s recitation of the opening lines of Psalm 22:18 (Matthew 27:46), it is possible that the thoughts of both disciples were drawn to the passage and prompted them to reflect on the numerous parallels between the language of the passage and the events of the Passion.

– They nailed him on a cross.

Neither capital punishment nor any other modern kind of retribution can be compared to the abhorred ignominy that was associated with the execution of Jesus Christ, and we must go back eighteen centuries and enter into the sentiments of both Jews and Romans if we are to see it in its true light.

  1. The writer allows it reverently to speak for itself, with no attempt at sensational adjuncts or rhetorical amplification on the part of the reader.
  2. There is no need for words since the unadorned details are more than adequate to position the reader by Jesus’ side and let him experience every agony, sympathize with the anguish, the shame, and the horror that ripped through Jesus’ heart.
  3. At the time, this heinous penalty was too well known to require more explanation, and they saw no reason to linger on its heinous specifics.
  4. The former was the approach that was most regularly used.
  5. 54) He divided his clothes and drew lots for them.
  6. They split these among the four, assigning them according to a lottery system to decide what each should get.
  7. John (John 19:23, 24).

They drew lots to determine who would get what.

As an interpolation from the parallel passage in St.

There can be no doubt, however, that they represent the truth, regardless of whether they are genuine or not in this context.

Commentaries that run in parallel.

Σταυρώσαvτες(Staurōsantes) Verb – Aorist Participle Active – Nominative Masculine Verb – Aorist Participle Active – Nominative Masculine PluralStrong’s 4717 is as follows: From the Latin stauros, which means to impale on a cross; metaphorically, to kill passion or self-centeredness.

3rd Person Pronoun Singular Strong’s 846: “He, she, it, they, them, the same” (he, she, it, they, them, the same).

They were separated.

From dia and merizo, to completely divide and conquer.

The reflexive pronoun self, which is used in the third person as well as the other persons, is derived from the particle au.

A clothing made from a putative derivation of the word ennumi (ballontes) Present Participle of the Verb Masculine – Nominative Active – Nominative Masculine PluralStrong’s 906 is as follows: (a) I cast, toss, and rush; (b) I place, put, and drop frequently, but in a lesser sense.

lots.

Return to the previous page AmongstCastCastingChanceClothesClothingCrossCrucifiedCrucifyingDecisionDividedDivisionFulfilledGarmentsLotsPartedProphetThemselvesVesture Continue to Next Page AmongstCastCastingChanceClothesClothingCrossCrucifiedCrucifyingDecisionDividedDivisionFulfilledGarments LotsPartedProphetThemselvesVestureLinks Matthew 27:35 (New International Version) Matthew 27:35 New International Version Matthew 27:35 (New International Version) Matthew 27:35 (New American Standard Bible) Matthew 27:35 King James Version BibleApps.com has a translation of Matthew 27:35.

Biblia Matthew 27:35 et cetera Paralela Chinese Version of Matthew 27:35 French translation of Matthew 27:35. Matthew 27:35, according to the Catholic Bible NT Gospels: Matthew 27:35 (KJV) When they had nailed Jesus to the cross, they separated him (Matt. Mat Mt)

‘They Parted My Garments Among Them’

There are allusions to the casting of lots in all four Gospels, and what is said in each of the first three is roughly similar while yet being somewhat different from the other two. According to Matthew 27:35, “And they crucified him, and divided his clothing among them, casting lots,” in order to fulfill the prophecy of the prophet, “They divided my garments among them, and upon my vesture did they cast lots.” According to Mark 15:24, “And when they had crucified him, they separated his clothing, casting lots upon them, and they determined what each man should receive.” In the Synoptic Gospels, Luke 23:34 has the most telegraphic passage: ‘And they divided his raiment and cast lots.’.

In John 19:23–24, it is told that when Jesus was crucified, the soldiers divided his clothing into four pieces, giving one portion to each soldier, as well as his coat: now the coat had no seam, since it had been sewn from the top down throughout the entire garment.

An interpretation of Mark and Luke that is literal would lead one to believe that there was an unequal distribution of clothing, and that the casting of lots was intended to decide who would receive the largest portion.

As opposed to this, the Gospel of John plainly reveals that Jesus’ clothing were divided and that only then were lots cast for the seamless coat in a winner-takes-all situation.

There is a significant difference in the clothing that Jesus wears on his way to the place Luke simply calls ‘The Skull’ (Kranion in the Latin Vulgate, translatedCalvaria in the Greek), and as a result, there is a significant difference in the clothing that Christ wears on his way to the place Luke simply calls ‘The Skull,’ which as a result is confounded by the fact that the Greek word for skull is kranion, which is translatedcal Both Matthew and Mark clearly indicate that Christ’s scarlet or purple raiment was removed after his mocking and that he was reclothed in his own clothing, while Luke and John do not, allowing us to presume that he is wearing his finery when he bears the cross to Golgotha.

  • We can’t help but be taken by the painters’ strikingly varied interpretations of both the robe and the soldiers who were drawn to wear it in the three paintings on display here.
  • It is a luxurious clothing, which explains in no uncertain terms why the warriors are so interested in it.
  • It is a vibrant element in a broader dramatic situation, and it is worth watching for.
  • A few of the troops are on their way back to Jerusalem, which can be seen in the distance, but others are enjoying the peaceful atmosphere of the area.
  • When Bernardino Luini depicts a furious fight for the priest’s garment, he is not being introspective.
  • In this case, too, dicing has taken place on a shield, but the dice have been thrown away, indicating that this method of dispute settlement has failed.

According to this interpretation, the robe represents Christ’s physical body, and it is soon to be subjected to a same level of brutality as in Vanni’s depiction of it.

Did the Roman soldiers divide up Jesus’ clothing in fulfillment of Psalms 22:19 (or Psalms 29:18)

According to Psalms 22:19, “They divide my garments among themselves, and for my garment they cast lots.” Is it Jesus who is being alluded to in this passage? Is it possible that the Roman soldiers divided up Jesus’ clothing? Learn more about it in this post.

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Did the Roman soldiers divide up Jesus’ clothing in fulfillment of Psalms 22:19 (18 in some versions)?

They divide my clothing among themselves, and they cast lots for my garment, according to Psalm 22, verse 19 (or verse 18 in other translations). The author of the Gospel of John’s application of this passage to his rendition of the episode involving the dividing of the garments was affected by a misunderstanding on his part (John 19:24; cf. Matthew 27:35, Mark 15:24, Luke 23:34). The author of John mistook the Hebrew parallelism for a reference to two distinct deeds, which was not the case. The repeating of a concept in biblical poetry, which is built on a parallel structure, does not imply that the notion has been duplicated in actual life (cf.

The soldiers divided Jesus’ outer garment among themselves, but they were unable to divide the inner garment because it was seamless, so they cast lots for it, in order to bring the crucifixion story into harmony with the psalm.

It was in this way that the crucifixion tradition was completed and brought into agreement with the prophetic message of this psalm, according to John’s interpretation.

But, what is the truth of the New Testament claims?

The soldiers would have no reason to wish to split up Jesus’ blood-soaked clothing if he had been scourged as part of the crucifixion process and then his cloths were once again placed on his injured and bleeding body (Matthew 27:26, 31; Mark 15:15, 20, John 19:1) The garments of Jesus would be reduced to nothing more than bloody rags, which would be of little use to the soldiers if the scourging were to continue on the way to the cross.

For one reason, it is debatable whether the soldiers would have draped a purple robe over the scourged corpse of Jesus in the first place.

It is most likely because of this that the legend of his being clothed in a purple robe, the color associated with royalty, began to circulate.

Gerald Sigal is a well-known author.

The Soldiers Divide Jesus’ Clothes (19:23-24) – IVP New Testament Commentary Series

New International Version (New International Version) (NIV) IVP Series of New Testament Commentaries – A group of soldiers divides Jesus’ clothing (19:23-24) A group of soldiers divides Jesus’ clothing (19:23-24) Normally, the victim would be stripped nude and carried to the site of the crucifixion. In light of the fact that Jesus’ cloths were not taken from him until the moment of crucifixion, it is possible that he was permitted to maintain some type of covering while on the cross itself (Brown 1994:2:953), perhaps as a gesture of respect for Jewish objections to nakedness.

  1. 23; Brown 1970:902), it is possible that he was completely nude throughout this time.
  2. Brown 1994:2:953).
  3. The troops decide to draw lots for it since it is seamless, and they want to protect it from being broken apart (v.
  4. The fact that it is seamless does not necessarily imply that it was an unique or luxurious item (Brown 1970:903).
  5. Brown 1994:2:955-58).
  6. Such considerations are valid and enlightening, but they are not the major focus of John’s attention.
  7. 24).
  8. 28, 36-37).

Underlying the concept of fulfillment is the concept of God’s sovereign control, which creates a pattern that repeats itself: Scripture expresses God’s will, and Jesus is subordinate to God’s will, so his activity fulfills the Scripture because it comes from the same source and is controlled by the same Father as the Scripture.

  1. According to John, the title over Jesus’ head proclaims him to be king of the Jews, and he believes that Jesus is following in the footsteps of the greatest ruler Israel has ever known.
  2. In this perspective, the fulfillment of Scripture is the replication of a pattern, and Jesus is the ultimate fulfillment, the center of all the patterns, and hence the center of the universe.
  3. Mk 15:24 par.
  4. Mk 15:34), which is a quotation from Psalm 22:1.

If the opponents had a greater understanding of King David, they may have been able to recognize King Jesus. The generosity of InterVarsity Press allows us to make the IVP New Testament Commentaries available to you.

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Matthew 27:35 – Bible Gateway

New International Version (New International Version) (NIV) And they crucified Him and divided His clothing among themselves, casting lots, in order to bring about the fulfillment of the prophecy of the prophet: “They divided My garments among themselves, and upon My vesture did they cast lots.” And after he had been crucified, they divided his clothing among themselves by drawing lots. After He had been crucified, they divided His garments among themselves by drawing lots. So, after he was nailed on the cross, they separated and distributed His clothing by casting lots, thereby fulfilling the prophet’s prophecy, “They divided and dispersed My garments among themselves, and over My attire they threw lots.” And they crucified him and divided his clothing among themselves, casting lots, in order to bring about the fulfillment of the prophecy of the prophet, who said, They divided my garments among themselves, and upon my vesture did they cast lots.

  1. After Jesus was crucified, his clothing were divided by lot among the assembled crowd.
  2. Then, once they had nailed him to the stake, they divided his clothing among themselves by tossing dice.
  3. After Jesus had been crucified, they divided his clothing among themselves by drawing lots.
  4. And when he had been crucified, they divided his clothing among themselves by casting lots, in order to bring about the fulfillment of the prophecy of the prophet, who said: They divided my garments among themselves, and upon my vesture they threw lots.
  5. After that, they divided his garments among themselves by rolling dice.
  6. And when Jesus had been crucified, they divided his clothing among themselves by drawing lots to determine who would get what.
  7. After the soldiers nailed Jesus to the cross, they drew lots to determine who would receive his clothing.

They nailed him on the cross and then divided his clothing among themselves by tossing dice.

Jesus was nailed on a cross by the soldiers.

After they had nailed him to the cross, they decided who would get his garments by having them each cast a die.

Following his nailing to the cross, they divided up his clothing by drawing lots between themselves.

And they crucified him and divided his clothing among themselves, casting lots, in order to bring about the fulfillment of the prophecy of the prophet, who said, They divided my garments among themselves, and upon my vesture did they cast lots.

After that, they divided up my clothes among themselves and divided up my vesture according to who wanted it.

Following the crucifixion, the soldiers divided up his clothing according to the results of a dice roll.

They had put the criminal charge against him over his head: “this is jesus, the king of the jews,” they had said.

“You said that you could demolish the Temple and then reconstruct it in three days—so show us your stuff!” said a group of onlookers, shaking their heads in mock pity.

Come down off that crucifixion, if you’re indeed God’s Son,” says the crowd.

Then, when Jesus had been nailed to the cross, they divided his clothing among themselves by playing dice.

After He had been crucified, they divided His garments among themselves by drawing lots.

As soon as they executed him, they divided his clothing among themselves by drawing lots to determine who would get what.

When they had nailed Jesus on the cross, they divided his clothing by tossing dice at them.

After Jesus had been nailed to the cross, they divided his clothing by drawing lots for it.

Then they crucified Him and divided His garments among themselves by casting lots, in order to bring about the fulfillment of the prophecy of the prophet: “They divided My garments among them, and for My clothing they threw lots.” As soon as they had nailed Him to the cross, they divided His clothing by writing names on the linens.

  • “They split my clothing among themselves by drawing names to determine who would get My coat,” he explained.
  • As soon as they had nailed him on the cross, they split his clothing and cast lots for his vesture, in order to fulfill the prophecy of the prophet: They divided my garments among them, and for my vesture they threw lots.
  • In order to split up Moshiach’s clothing among themselves, they cast lots after he had been hung on HAETZ, according to Rebbe Melech HaMoshiach.
  • As a result, they executed Him by crucifixion.
  • When they had nailed him to the cross, they divided his garments among themselves by drawing lots.
  • They bet on how they would split Jesus’ clothing in order to find out how they would win.
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Parting Garment and Casting Lots

Yesterday, I read about the Roman soldiers who were tasked with selecting the attire for Jesus. It is said in John 19:23, 24: “Then the soldiers, when they had crucified Jesus, divided His clothing into four parts, giving one portion to each soldier, as well as the tunic.” The tunic was now seamless, having been woven from the top down in a single piece. They then agreed among themselves, “Let us not shred it, but rather cast lots for it, to determine whose it should be,” in order to fulfill the Scripture, which says, “They divided My clothes among themselves, and for My clothing they cast lots.” (Matthew 25:31) As a result, the soldiers carried out these actions.

  1. In John 19:17-24, it is noteworthy to note that the headline for the chapter states, “King on the Cross.” Earlier in this chapter, the soldiers made fun of Jesus’ appearance.
  2. His subjects greeted Him with, “Hail, King of the Jews!” Then they smacked Him in the face with their hands.
  3. What is it about Jesus’ robe that these soldiers are interested in?
  4. It’s surprising that they didn’t want to rip it apart completely.
  5. John provided us a detailed description of what it was.
  6. I understand that they were unable to pull it down because they were required to follow the scriptures.
  7. As Jesus hung on the cross, he witnessed prophesy come true as the soldiers rolled dice to choose who would get His garments.

Those actions by the soldiers provided further proof that, no matter how terrible His trial, no matter how dreadful the suffering, prophecy was being fulfilled, His earthly ministry was nearing its grand climax, and the provision would be made that would provide salvation to any human being who claimed it through faith.

The soldiers who insulted Jesus, as well as those who gambled for His clothing, were all acting in the absence of knowledge.

The Reverend Ellen G.

They thought to themselves that they would no longer quiver under the power of His presence.

The soldiers were unfeeling and divided Jesus’ clothes among themselves.

“For wolves have surrounded me; the assembly of the wicked has enclosed me; they have wounded my hands and my feet.

Psalms 22:16 and 18.” Pages 223, 224 of Ellen G. White’s book, The Story of Redemption Is the fact that these troops were unaware of what they were doing a justification for their actions? Should they be penalized for anything they did even if they had no idea what they were doing?

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