What Is The Difference Between Allah And Jesus Christ

Difference Between Allah and Jesus

Allah and Jesus are in a battle for supremacy. Jesus Christ is also referred to as Jesus in some circles. Christian fundamentalism is encapsulated in his person. Jesus of Nazareth is another name for him. In particular, it is vital to remember that the Old Testament refers to him as the Messiah. He has been referred to as “the Son of God.” The basic teaching of Jesus is that we should love one another no matter what. Allah is the Arabic word for God. This is the word that Muslims use to refer to God.

He is revered as the creator of the cosmos and is regarded as almighty by the majority of people.

Muslims referred to the creator of the universe as Allah, which is a term used by Meccans.

In order to understand the differences between Christianity and Judaism, it is necessary to understand that although Christians believe that Jesus was the Messiah in accordance with the Old Testament, Jews do not believe that Jesus was the Messiah.

  • The term Messiah is understood in the context of a monarch who has been anointed by God at his instruction and will reign for 1,000 years.
  • The term Allah, on the other hand, is formed from a contraction of the Arabic definite article ‘al’, which means ‘the,’ and the word ‘ilah,’ which means ‘deity.’ Thus, according to Islamic doctrine, Allah is believed to be the one deity.
  • He is the one and only reason for the creation of the cosmos, according to science.
  • He is also the solitary judge of all of humanity.
  • The Allah of Islam is a God who does not take on any form.

Is Allah of Islam the same as Yahweh of Christianity?

Allah and Jesus are at odds with one another. Jesus Also known as “Jesus,” Christ is the son of Mary. Christian fundamentalism is encapsulated in him. It has been suggested that he is also known as Jesus of Nazareth. Remember that Jesus has been identified as the Messiah in both ancient and modern times. As the Son of God, Jesus is referred to as such. It is the fundamental teaching of Jesus that we should love our neighbors as ourselves. God is referred to as Allah. Islam refers to God as “Allah” in this phrase.

  1. He is revered as the creator of the cosmos and is regarded as almighty by the majority of the population.
  2. Muslims referred to the creator of the universe as Allah, which is a Meccan word.
  3. Despite the fact that Jesus was regarded as a Messiah by the Christians according to the Old Testament, the people who follow Judaism do not believe that Jesus was the Messiah.
  4. A derivative of the Latin ‘lesus,’ the name Jesus is derived from.
  5. Briefly stated, a Messiah is anointed only when God has given his blessing.
  6. Moreover, he is the highest and all-powerful deity.
  7. As far as Islam is concerned, Allah is God’s formal name.

And he is the only one who can judge the entirety of humanity. Another significant distinction between Jesus and Allah is that Jesus, as the major character in Christianity, is represented by a physical body. According to Islam, Allah is a formless deity.

Difference Between Allah and Jesus (With Table) – Ask Any Difference

Humans are, by nature, extraordinarily sociable beings, and religion is one facet of human society in which this social propensity reveals itself. There are around 4200 faiths practiced across the globe, with Christianity, which claims Jesus Christ as its prophet, and Islam, which claims Allah as its prophet, ranking first and second, respectively, in terms of popularity.

Allah vs Jesus

Religious belief is a manifestation of the fact that humans are by nature extraordinarily sociable animals, and religion is one manner in which this social propensity presents itself. Across 4200 faiths are practiced around the globe, with Christianity, which claims Jesus Christ as its prophet, and Islam, which claims Allah as its prophet, ranking first and second, respectively, in terms of popularity.

Comparison Table Between Allah and Jesus

Parameters of Comparison Allah Jesus
Religion Allah is the God in Islam and is the supreme power in Islamic and Abrahamic religions. Jesus is the focal point ofChristianityand is the messenger of God.
Following It is the second most followed religion in the world. It is the most followed religion in the world and can be found in almost every country.
Etymology The word Allah originates from the term Al-Ilah, which has Arabic roots. The word Jesus is derived from Latin where he’s called Iesus. The word also has Greek annotations.
History Jesus is supposed to have lived from 4 BC to AD 30 when he died. Allah, in Islam, is an ever-existing, omnipotent being who is timeless.
Power Allah is the only power in Islam and is the creator and protector of everything and everyone. Jesus is a mortal who is part of a holy trinity of divine beings.

What is Allah?

Islam is founded on the teachings and word of Allah, who is the creator of the universe. Muslims believe that Allah is a powerful deity who created the cosmos and everything in it and is the force responsible for ensuring its continued existence and preservation. In contrast to anthropomorphic divine entities, he is only a force, a power that does not manifest itself in any discernible form. The teachings of Allah are contained in the Quran, which is the Islamic holy book that is revered across the world.

The Quran is divided into 114 chapters.

God is supreme and always accurate, and there are no accidents or defects in his system.

All things are known to him; he guides mankind to the straight path and maintains merciful dispositions until the Day of Resurrection, which is Allah’s last test for humanity.

What is Jesus?

The central figure in Christianity is Jesus, who is regarded as its founder. He was a mortal man who offered his life as a sacrifice for the sins of humankind, and as a result, he was elevated to the position of savior, shielding humanity from the wrath of God. It is thought that Jesus was the son of God, and that he had a portion of God’s essence. The Bible is considered to be the sacred book of Christians since it elaborates on the teachings of God. God does not have a name according to the Christian religion.

After giving his life for the sake of humanity, it is thought that Jesus ascended to heaven and recovered his life.

Furthermore, it is stated that the Holy Spirit was involved in some way in his conception.

For this reason, God was so taken with Jesus as a perfect human being, full of mercy and love, and the black and white example of a true disciple of God, and this is why God was so taken with him. The existence of Jesus is acknowledged in a variety of religious traditions.

Main Differences Between Allah and Jesus

  1. The difference between Allah and Jesus is that Allah is an all-knowing, timeless entity who is responsible for the creation of all that exists, whereas Jesus was a mortal man who gave his life for mankind. According to Islam, Allah is the sole deity, whereas Jesus is one of God’s many sons, and Christianity has a plethora of other divine entities. Allah, on the other hand, has lived longer than the earth and we are all his offspring, whereas the birth of Jesus Christ is honored as Christmas. In Christianity, Jesus is one of the three elements of God that exist, but Allah is the sole divine force in Islam
  2. In Islam, Allah is the only divine power that exists. In the same way as Allah is impervious to any accident, sickness, sin, or damage because he is flawless in every sense of the term, Jesus was very much human and hence susceptible to all of the aforementioned defects

Conclusion

Regardless of their differences, both Allah and Jesus are deities who teach kindness and charity in some form or via their teachings. Through this, Allah teaches humanity to be in connection with mercy since Allah is the source of all kindness and love. These rigorous regulations will be tested on the Day of Resurrection, and through this, Allah teaches mankind to be in connection with justice. Jesus died on the cross for the sins of the entire world while remaining completely innocent himself, serving as the ultimate example of charity and compassion.

Muslims and Arab Christians both believe in the presence of two gods: Jesus as the messenger and Allah as the supreme being.

References

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What are the differences between Allah and the God of the Christian Bible?

Q: In the Arabic translations of the Bible, the term “Allah” is used to translate the word “God.” This implies that Muslims think Allah is the same God as the Christian God, doesn’t it? A: There is no disagreement over whether Allah is the Arabic word for God or not. Yes, it is. When a Christian refers to God, he is referring to Yahweh, the God of the Bible, and when a Muslim refers to God, he is referring to Allah, the God of the Koran, respectively. The two are diametrically opposed to one another.

  • True, Christians believe God to be everlasting, whilst Arabs believe Allah to be forever.
  • This is an important distinction to keep in mind.
  • When you go to a bookshop to buy a study Bible and compare two of them, you are not looking for ways in which they are similar to one another.
  • You are looking for changes such as larger print, thumb indexing, a concordance in the back, and so on.
  • There are several significant contrasts between the God of the Bible and the God of Islam, including the following: (If you substitute the name Yahweh for the generic phrase God, the meaning will become evident.)
  • Q:In the Arabic translations of the Bible, the term “Allah” is used to translate the word “God.” This implies that Muslims believe Allah is the same God as the Christian God, don’t you think so? A: Whether Allah is the Arabic name for God or not is not up for debate. Is that correct? When a Christian refers to God, he is referring to Yahweh, the God of the Bible, but when a Muslim refers to God, he is referring to Allah, the God of the Koran, and vice versa. In many ways, they’re diametrically opposed. We believe God is supreme, but Arabs believe Allah is supreme. Although God is everlasting, the Arabs refer to Allah as such. When a Christian refers to Yahweh, he is referring to Yahweh, however when a Muslim refers to Allah, he is talking to a completely different deity than Yahweh. This is important to understand since it might be confusing. These parallels are numerous, but when it comes to determining whether two things are the same or not, similarities are not as significant as differences. It is not necessary to check for similarities between two Bibles while shopping for a study Bible at a bookshop. That both books have covers, that both books feature Genesis, and that both books have ribbons and other embellishments goes unnoticed by you. You are looking for changes such as larger print, thumb indexing, a concordance in the back, and so on. Similarly, while considering whether or not to “buy” into the notion that God and Allah are one and the same, one must weigh the pros and cons of each. When it comes to God, there are several significant distinctions between him and Allah. When you substitute the name Yahweh for the general phrase God, the picture becomes apparent.)
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This list might be expanded indefinitely, but there is no value in doing so at this time. If anything walks and quacks like a duck, it’s probably a duck, according to a local proverb. God and Allah are not the same person, nor do they walk or quack in the same way. They are not the same, and anybody who claims that they are is deafeningly ignorant of the obvious differences between them. Most Moslems, to my knowledge, do not believe that Allah and the God of the Jews and Christians are the same deity, which is a key reason why Moslems consider Christians to be “infidels,” according to my understanding.

So, if they truly felt that we were worshipping the genuine God, why would they say such a thing?

Are Allah and Jesus the Same God?

Is it true that Christians and Muslims both worship the same God? Wheaton College in Illinois has been embroiled in a debate over that subject for more than a month. Larycia Hawkins, an associate professor of political science, was placed on administrative leave in December after she wrote on Facebook that she would be wearing a head scarf during the Advent season, which is the period leading up to Christmas. The following is what she wrote: “I stand in religious solidarity with Muslims since they are, like me, a Christian, people of the book.” Following a series of discussions with Ms.

In recognition of Wheaton’s status as a Christian liberal arts university, faculty and staff members sign a declaration of faith each year, affirming their shared evangelical Protestant identity.

Hawkins’s article drew immediate attention, and Wheaton published a statement the next day highlighting the “basic contrasts” between Christianity and Islam, “including what they teach about God’s revelation to humankind, the existence of God, salvation, and the life of prayer.” The college later clarified that she was placed on administrative leave not because she was wearing the hijab, but because of her “theological remarks,” which included the argument that Christians and Muslims “worship the same God.”

Muslims love Jesus, too: 6 things you didn’t know about Jesus in Islam

We all know that Christmas is a religious holiday that honors the birth of Jesus and is a significant religious event for Christians all over the world. However, many people are unaware that Jesus is also revered in Islam, despite the fact that the majority of Muslims do not observe Christmas as a religious festival. The holiday is celebrated by certain Muslims across the world (including some in the United States). For the occasion, here are six interesting facts about the position of Jesus — and his mother, Mary — in Islam that you might not have known before:

  1. Jesus, Mary, and the angel Gabriel are all prominent characters in the Qur’an (as are Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses, and a slew of other Bible characters)
  2. Muslims believe that Jesus (referred to as “Isa” in Arabic) was a prophet of God who was born to a virgin
  3. And Muslims believe that Jesus (referred to as “Isa” in Arabic) was a prophet of God who was born to a virgin (Mary). He will also come to Earth before the Day of Judgment in order to restore justice and vanquish al-Masihad-Dajjal, or “the false messiah,” who is also known as the Antichrist, according to these believers. Many Christians will recognize a lot of this as being familiar territory. Warning: spoilers ahead: Muslims are well aware that “al-Masihad-Dajjal” is the Arabic name for the Antichrist, which has caused some, uh, unexpected problems for Netflix recently.
  4. Mary (known in Arabic as “Maryam”) has an entire chapter in the Qur’an dedicated to her — the only chapter in the Qur’an dedicated to a female figure. To be more specific, Mary is the sole woman to be named by name in the whole Qur’an. “Other female figures are recognized simply by their relationship to others, such as the wife of Adam and the mother of Moses, or by their title, such as the Queen of Sheba,” according to the Study Quran. More times in the Qur’an than in the whole New Testament of the Bible, Mary is named
  5. Just as they do with all previous prophets, including Mohammed, faithful Muslims say “peace be upon him” after every time they mention Jesus by name
  6. Muslims believe that Jesus performed miracles, including: There are numerous of Jesus’ miracles mentioned in the Qur’an. These include restoring sight to the blind, curing lepers, reviving the dead, and breathing life into clay birds
  7. Among others. It is also the tale of Jesus’ first miracle, when he spoke as a child in the crib and announced himself to be a prophet of God, according to the Qur’an, which is recounted in the book of Genesis. The plot is as follows:

And keep in mind Mary’s story in the Book, when she separated from her family and moved to an eastern location. And she kept her identity hidden from them. Then We sent Our Spirit to her, and it took on the appearance of a flawless man in order to serve her. “I seek shelter from thee in the Compassionate, if you are reverent!” she said in response. “I am only a messenger from thy Lord, sent to bestow upon thee a spotless boy,” he explained. “How am I going to have a son when no guy has ever touched me, and I have never been unchaste?” she wondered.

  • ‘It is simple for Me,’ thy Lord declares.” We did this so that he may serve as a sign to the world and as a kindness from Us.
  • As a result, she conceived him and retreated with him to a remote location.
  • “Would that I had died before this and had been a thing of the past, completely forgotten!” she said.
  • A rivulet hath been created beneath thy feet by thy Lord.
  • So eat and drink, and keep thy eyes open and cool.
  • Then they shouted, “Mary, Mary, Mary!
  • O Aaron’s sister, how I adore you!
  • “How are we to communicate with someone who is still an infant in the cradle?” they wondered.
  • He has given me the Book and elevated me to the status of prophet.
  • And He has not turned me into a bossy, horrible creature.
  • Muslim believers venerate Jesus as a prophet despite the fact that they do not think Jesus is the son of God, which is a key gap between Muslim and Christian views on him.

Merry Christmas to you! Muslims in the Indonesian city of Manado participate in the Christmas Santa Parade by donning Santa hats and mingling with Christian participants. Photograph courtesy of Ronny Adolof Buol/Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images

Differences Between the Jesus of the Qur’an & the Jesus of the Bible

Recently, I came across a lecturer who professes to be a Christian in his or her own right. The guy was ecstatic at the notion that Jesus Christ is mentioned in the Qur’an. Furthermore, they asserted that Christians and Muslims might share a measure of theological and spiritual unity since both sacred books—the Qur’an and the Bible—include Jesus as the central figure. However, this typical idea makes a significant error in its premise. It is presumptively true that the Jesus mentioned in both canonical scriptures is the same individual.

  • This, on the other hand, is a severe oversight.
  • For example, the Jesus of theMormonis and the Jesus of theJehovah Witnesses are both completely distinct persons; they are profoundly different from one another.
  • The Cripplegate has recently begun a series of articles examining the differences between the Qur’an and the Bible.
  • In the previous week, we discussed two significant contrasts between the God of the Qur’an and the God of the Bible.
  • In Qur’anic teaching, Jesus is referred to as “Isa ibn Mariam,” which literally translates as “Jesus son of Mary.” In the Qur’an, he occurs around twenty-five times.
  • However, if you tell a Qur’anic Muslim, “Trust in Jesus for salvation,” this is the Jesus who will come to mind for that person.
  • “Mary, you have done something quite dreadful,” they said.

As a result, she pointed at him.

30.

He has given me the Scriptures and elevated me to the status of prophet.

And he has blessed me wherever I may go, and he has commanded me to pray and to practice charity for the rest of my life.

He was also kind to my mother, and He did not turn me into a rebellious child.

Therefore, peace is upon me on the day of my birth, the day of my death, and the day on which I am raised alive.” 34.

wikimedia First and foremost, it is important to remember that Mary is referred to as Aaron’s sister.

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Before he can turn over, Jesus is speaking with the language of someone who has just graduated from university with a master’s in linguistics.

According to most scholars, the narrative started outside of the Qur’an, then was amended to take on its current form in Surah 19.

Surah 19 has still another major flaw, and it is this: Muhammad’s narrative of Jesus speaking as a child is similar to theArabic infancy gospel, which appears to have started somewhere around the fifth or sixth centuries and is still in use today.

The Arabic infant gospel has never been acknowledged as canonical by the church at any point in time. instead of being inspired by God, it is one of the heretical Gnostic gospels that appeared hundreds of years after the original inspired gospels of Matthew, Mark Luke, and John.

  1. The Jesus of the Qur’an is not the Son of God the Father
  2. Rather, he is the Son of God the Son.

According to the Qur’an, “It is not appropriate for the grandeur of Allah that he should have a son” (Surah 19:35). Christ is referred to be the Son of Allah by Christians.” That is a statement from their lips; (in doing so) they are only repeating what the infidels of old used to say about Islam. “May Allah’s punishment be upon them, for how they have been deceived away from the Way!” (At 9:30 a.m., Surah 9:30) Aside from the fact that the Qur’an explicitly states that Christ is the Son of God, Muslims reject the notion that Jesus is the Son of God because they believe that Jesus would have had to be the biological son of Allah and a woman.

  1. No Christian has ever expressed such a negative opinion of him.
  2. The conception of Jesus did not mark the beginning of his life; rather, it marked the beginning of his incarnation.
  3. He freely gave up his pre-incarnate splendor in order to become incarnate, despite the fact that he was completely God and entirely man.
  4. 2:5-8, Col.
  5. Imagining Jesus as the result of an intimate relationship between Allah and a woman is diametrically opposed to the Jesus who is described in the Bible as having come into existence.
  6. Luke 2:29; John 2:16, 5:17, 6:32, 40; 8:19, 38, 42, 49, 54; 10:18, 25, 29; 14:7, 20, 21, 23; 15:10, 20:17; Rev.
  7. God the Father refers to Jesus as his divine Son in addition to other titles (Matt.

The angel Gabriel, who is credited with providing Muhammad with Qur’anic revelation, also proclaimed that the Jesus of the Bible is the Son of God, according to Muslim tradition (Luke 1:35).

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God is his Father in a sense that is distinct from the way God is the Father of Christians.

1:17), was actively involved in the creation of the universe with the Father (John 1:3, Col.

(John 17:5, 24).

As a result, Jesus is the only Son of the Father who is both everlasting and divine.

Scripture, on the other hand, teaches that Jesus alone is Lord; he is the Lord of lords, who is referred to as “the name above every name” (Phil.

6:14).

One has to ask whether that was done on purpose in an attempt to discredit the notion that Jesus is the Son of God.

I recently witnessed a Muslim evangelistic effort in which the evangelist was bringing another person to become a Muslim through the recitation of the shahada. As an added challenge, they were required to say the statement “Jesus is not the son of God.”

  1. A prophet like Moses, David, Zechariah, and John the Baptist was all that the Jesus of the Qur’an was, according to the text.

The verses from Surah 6:84 read: “We gave him Isaac, and We gave him Jacob, and We led all three of them.” Before him, We directed Noah, and among Noah’s descendants were David, Solomon, Job, Joseph, Moses, and Aaron. Thus do We reward people who do good: 85. And there’s Zakariya and John, and Jesus and Elias, and they’re all in the virtuous company: 86. Furthermore, We blessed Isma’il and Elisha, as well as Jonas and Lot, and We extended favor above the nations to all of them: 87. The following is addressed to them, their fathers, and progeny as well as brethren: We picked them and led them in the right direction.

Despite the fact that Jesus served in the capacity of a prophet, he was far and away the best of them all.

3:3).

1:4).

  1. The Qur’an depicts Jesus’ return to Earth in a manner that varies from that depicted in the Bible.

The Qur’an and hadith provide a comprehensive eschatology that is supported by evidence. Muslim faith, among other things, says that Jesus will return to the Earth one day. Jesus, on the other hand, comes back as a Muslim and battles for Islam in his second coming. He will make his way down (to the earth). Identify him as follows: a medium-sized man with reddish fair skin who is dressed in two light yellow garments and who appears to be sweating despite the fact that he will not be wet. He is a man of medium height with reddish fair skin who is dressed in two light yellow garments and who appears to be sweating despite the fact that he will not be wet.

  1. He will demolish the cross, slaughter pigs, and eliminate the jizya.
  2. In addition to deposing of the Antichrist, he will live on the world for forty years until passing away in the end.
  3. This could not be further from the teachings of the Bible on the Second Coming of Christ.
  4. As a result, he will wage war against everyone who has turned their backs on him—the eternal Son of God who died on the cross for our sins and resurrected from the tomb (Rev.
  5. All who adhere to the Qur’anic teachings of God and Christ will be counted among those who will perish in the judgment.
  6. 19:14, 20:4).
  1. According to the Qur’an, Jesus is not the intercessor for mankind.

According to Sahih Al-Bukhari 6:236, a narrative is presented about persons who are tortured in hell for their sins. They go up to Adam, Noah, Abraham, and others, as well as Jesus, and ask for their intercession on their behalf. Each of them directs others who are seeking assistance away from themselves, even Christ. Muslims believe Muhammad is the only one who can properly advocate on their behalf before God. This is a significant departure from the genuine Jesus of Scripture. A fundamental fact about Christ is that he is the one and only intercessor for sinful man.

Consequently, He is also able to rescue for all time those who draw close to God through Him, because He is constantly present to intercede on their behalf” (Heb.

For the reason that he is both completely divine and completely human, and because he atoned for our sins by rising triumphant from the dead and ascending to the right hand of the Father, he acts as an intercessor between us and the Father in heaven.

He is the only one who is qualified for the position. And, if Jesus is not the intercessor, then all of mankind is bound to annihilation, because no other person in history has even the slightest chance of succeeding.

  1. The Jesus of the Qur’an was formed in the same way as any other man.

“The similitude of Jesus before Allah is like that of Adam; He formed him from dust and then said to him, “Be,” according to Surah 3:59-60. And he was right. 60. “The Truth (comes) only from Allah; therefore, do not be among those who are doubtful.” “So they would approach to Jesus and say, ‘O Jesus! You are Allah’s Apostle and His Word, which He sent to Mary, and a superior soul created by Him, and you spoke to the people when you were still a child in the cradle” (Sahih Al-Bukhari 6:236). In this regard, the Jesus of the Qur’an is significantly more similar to the fake Jesus of Mormonism and the Jehovah Witnesses than he is to the Jesus of the Bible.

The fact that Jesus is everlasting is the most crucial thing to remember about him.

Jesus is the Son of God (John 1:1-3, 8:58; Col.

  1. There is no such person as the Jesus of the Qur’an who is the leader of the church.

Regarding Christian doctrine, the Qur’an is absolutely devoid of any mention. In the Bible, Jesus is not identified as the Head of the Body or as the husband of the Bride. In the Qur’an, Christ is believed to have given his life for the sake of a unified group of people, although there is no such group. A significant discrepancy exists between this Jesus and the Jesus of the Bible. Jesus’ entire presence in the earth was motivated by his desire to fulfill his Father’s will for the redemption of his people.

  • Since his Father had predestined a people, he came to save them from their sin (Eph.
  • Christ gave his life for the sake of the church (Acts 20:28).
  • 1:22-23).
  • 12:27).
  • 5:25-30).
  1. Muhammad, the greatest prophet, surpasses the Jesus of the Qur’an in terms of prophetic significance.

According to the Qur’an, Muhammad was the culmination of all of the prophets’ efforts. He is the last and most important prophet on the planet. “There is no such thing as a father among your people; rather, Muhammad is the Messenger of God and the seal of all the prophets. “God is fully aware of all that is taking place” (Surah 33:40). The hadith teaches the same thing, documenting Muhammad’s remark that there would be no prophets after him, albeit there would be caliphs (rulers of the Muslims) (Sahih al-Bukhari, 4:56,661).

“God, after having spoken to the fathers via the prophets in various sections and in many ways long ago, has spoken to us in His Son, whom He named heir of all things and through whom He also created the world in these latter days,” the Bible says (Heb.

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When the prophetic ministry coincides with the Person and activity of Christ, there is a zenith and finality to it, which is also visible in the culmination of revelation.

The prophetic office came to an end with the conclusion of the canon and the end of the church’s foundation era, which coincided with the close of the canon. The prophetic office came to an end with the apostolic period, which occurred five centuries before Muhammad.

  1. The Jesus in the Qur’an is not the ultimate moral exemplar for humanity
  2. Rather, he is a figurative figure.

To be sure, according to Qur’anic teaching, Jesus should be held up as a moral model. Muhammad, on the other hand, is considered to be the highest moral model for humanity (Surah 33:21). This leads to the conclusion that Muhammad is superior to Jesus on both a moral and an ethical level. This, too, is a key distinction between Jesus of the Bible and the Jesus of today. Despite the fact that Muhammad is not mentioned in Scripture in order to be compared with Jesus, it is apparent that Jesus is unrivaled in terms of morality (John 8:29, Heb.

  • Because he is both entirely God and totally man, he is just as holy, moral, and righteous as God in every way (Luke 1:35).
  • In every sense, his character resembles God’s (Heb.
  • His goals, ideas, motives, words, and acts are exactly the same as God’s in every respects.
  • In terms of moral character, Jesus is a perfect replica of God.
  • In terms of virtue, no one can match him.
  • Tragically, it appears that Muhammad spoke about a Jesus who was not the same Jesus who is found in the Bible’s narrative.
  • The Qur’an directly contradicts the Bible’s most fundamental teachings about the Person and work of Jesus Christ in the most fundamental ways.
  • Next, we’ll look at the contrasts between salvation, the crucifixion, and the saving act of Christ as depicted in the Qur’an and the Bible, and how they differ from one another.

Between Allah and Jesus

What Christians may learn from Muslims about the relationship between Allah and Jesus Attempt number three in Peter Kreeft’s series to present Christians with a clear example of how to converse and establish common ground with a person of Islamic faith. In the novel, the main Muslim character, Isa (Arabic for Jesus), engages in hypothetical talks with a variety of Christian theologians, including a Catholic priest, a feminist Christian, a conservative evangelical, and a liberal academic, among others.

  1. On the most fundamental noetic level, Christians should endeavor to learn from every tribe, nation, religion, and philosophy, regardless of their religious affiliation.
  2. Two points must be made about the topic of distinctions between the two religions, which is being continued by Kreeft.
  3. In addition, Kreeft has provided us with an apologetics tool in the field of Muslim religious beliefs.
  4. As a result, this book deserves to be commended for taking on such a difficult and noble task as this.
  5. Before going into further detail about any of these cautions, it should be recognized that many of them are not specifically intended against Kreeft’s theology in and of itself.
  6. As a result, many of these cautions are expressed explicitly by the characters, but not implicitly via Kreeft’s own point of view.
  7. Nonetheless, there are a few Kreeft beliefs that are unquestionably problematic for a good Christian worldview, as will be discussed below.

Chapter 3, entitled Jesus and Muhammad, has an exchange between Fr.

Father Heerma claims on page 52 that “Jesus never warned the Jews that they were worshiping a false God,” and as a result, he will not say the same thing about Muslims, whose God is historically derived from the Jewish faith.

In John 8:19, Jesus declares to the Jews, “You do not know me nor my father; if you knew me, you would also know my Father.” It appears that the Catholic father overlooked such explicit teaching as this.

Warning number two: Chapter 7 encourages people to practice anonymous Christianity.

Isa obtains another perspective from the Catholic father who claims to be both scriptural and accepting of those who do not identify as Christians, which is important because Muslims are clearly excluded from the discussion in this context.

To put it another way, there are many individuals who have confidence in the “spirit” of Christ, but who are unaware of the historical figure and his life.

“Yes,” Father Heerema confirms.

Because it is the same God that I am familiar with, and that you are familiar with (if you are Muslim), and that the good pagan Socrates was familiar with, and the wicked pagan Nero was familiar with.” This is the lesson that Christians are meant to take away from Muslims on this issue: God is so vast and unfathomable that no single faith or “way” can encompass him.

The apostle Peter tells the Jewish leaders in Acts 4:12 that “there is no salvation in anyone else, for there has not been given to us another name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved.” Assuming that we enable Kreeft to make his point, it is only logical that we inquire as to the purpose of the discussion in the first place.

  • Warning number three: Kreeft makes the assumption that Muslims and Christians have a similar adversary in the form of sin.
  • Stating that Muslims and Christians have a similar enemy in the form of sin is to merely perceive sin as a “fact” rather than understanding it as a “character,” as is the case with Islam.
  • In other words, if no one can do good on his own initiative (Rom.
  • 14:1), and if it is only through faith in Christ that one may overcome the sins of this world (1 John 5:5), then Muslims are not contributing to our efforts to combat sin in any significant sense at all.

Failure to love a God who is not the triune God of Scripture who has condescended to rescue a people into himself is equivalent to failing to love no God at all, according to this logic.

Between Allah and Jesus: What Christians Can Learn From Muslims.

Islamic teachings on the relationship between Allah and Jesus are instructive for Christians. Attempt number three in Peter Kreeft’s series to present Christians with a clear example of how one may communicate and establish common ground with someone of the Islamic faith. The book is a compilation of hypothetical talks between the primary Muslim character, Isa (Arabic for Jesus), and different personifications of Christian theologies, including a Catholic priest, a feminist Christian, a conservative evangelical, and a liberal academic, among others.

Christians should attempt to learn from every tribe, nation, religion, and philosophy, at the most fundamental noetic level.

Two points must be made about the topic of distinctions between the two religions, which has been continued by Kreeft.

In addition, Kreeft has provided us with an apologetics tool in the field of Muslim religious beliefs and practices.

In order to properly commend this work, it must be acknowledged that it has attempted a difficult and admirable task.

Because the majority of the book is written in imaginary dialogue, it is impossible to distinguish between what Kreeft himself thinks and what his characters believe.

Theological guidance is offered in several of the talks by a Catholic father, and considering that Kreeft is himself a Catholic, it is only by implicit speculation that Kreeft most closely links himself with this person.

First and foremost, Kreeft writes this work with the assumption that Christians and Muslims ultimately worship the same God, but that they simply perceive him differently.

Heerma and Isa in which this particular question is discussed, with the conclusion being that the God of Muslims and the God of Christians are the same in essence, as is stated before.

Heerma asserts on page 52, and so he will not say the same thing about Muslims, whose God is historically descended from Jewish religion.

In John 8:19, Jesus states to the Jews, “You do not know me nor my father; if you knew me, you would also know my Father.” It appears that the Catholic father overlooked this explicit message.

Warning number two: Chapter 7 encourages people to practice anonymity in their faith.

Isa obtains another perspective from the Catholic father who claims to be both scriptural and inclusive of those who are not Christians, which is important because Muslims are definitely excluded from this.

To put it another way, there are many individuals who believe in the “spirit” of Christ without ever having met or studied the historical figure or his life.

Heerema, “Yes,” says Father Heerema.

Because it is the same God that I am familiar with, and that you are familiar with (if you are Muslim), and that the good pagan Socrates was familiar with, and the wicked pagan Nero was familiar with.

The response of an apostle of the Lord Jesus Christ to such viewpoints is not something that has to be speculated about.

If the truth has no influence on salvation, then what exactly is the goal of the discussion in the first place.

According to Kreeft’s conclusion to the book, “We cannot engage with Islam, or even discourse with Islam, until we know it, as specifically knowing about it; and we cannot know it if all we know about Islam is its ‘facts,’ and not its character, or even its personality.

Using the term “sin” to describe a common adversary between Muslims and Christians is to grasp sin just as a “fact” rather than knowing what “sin” is like in its character.

For if no one can do good on his or her own initiative (Rom.

14:1), and if the only way to overcome the evils of this world is by faith in Christ (1 John 5:5), then Muslims are not assisting us in any significant manner in our efforts to combat sin (Rom.

Failure to love a God who is not the triune God of Scripture, who has descended to save a people for himself, is equivalent to failing to love no God at all, according to this logic.

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