What Was Jesus Name Before He Came To Earth

What, Where, Who Was Jesus Before He Came to Earth?

According to Christian tradition, Jesus Christ came to earth during the historical reign of King Herod the Great and was born of the Virgin Mary in the Israeli city of Bethlehem. However, according to Catholic theology, Jesus is God, one of the three Persons of the Trinity, who has no beginning and no end and exists without beginning or end. What was Jesus doing before his incarnation during the reign of the Roman Empire, given that he has always existed? Is there any way for us to find out?

The Trinity Offers A Clue

For Christians, the Bible is our source of truth about God, and it is chock-full of information about Jesus, including what he was up to before he came to earth to save mankind. The first hint can be found in the name of the Trinity. Christianity maintains that there is only one God, but that he manifests himself in three Persons: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit (or triune God). Despite the fact that the word “trinity” is not stated in the Bible, this theory is there from the very beginning to the very conclusion of the text.

The doctrine of the Trinity must be accepted on the basis of faith.

Jesus Existed Before Creation

Each of the three Persons of the Trinity, including Jesus, is a manifestation of God. While our cosmos began at the moment of creation, Jesus existed prior to that time period. “God is love,” according to the Bible. (1 John 4:8, New International Version). In a loving connection with one another before the universe was created, the three Persons of the Trinity were in a relationship before the universe was created. There has been some misunderstanding over the terms “Father” and “Son.” In human words, a father must exist before a son, but this is not the case in the case of the Trinitarian relationship.

Jesus himself provided a nebulous hint as to what the Trinity was doing to prior to creation: As an explanation, Jesus told them that “My Father is constantly at work, even today,” and that “I, too, am working.” (John 5:17, New International Version) So we know the Trinity was constantly “at work,” but we don’t know what they were working on.

Jesus Participated in Creation

One of the things that Jesus performed before he came to earth in Bethlehem was to build the cosmos, according to tradition. Even if we have a basic picture in our minds of God the Father as the single creator through art and movies, the Bible adds more information: Beginning with the creation of the Word, and with God from the beginning of time, the Word became God. He was there with God at the beginning of time. All things were created through him, and nothing that has been created would have been possible without him.

He is the source from which all things have been made, whether they be in heaven or on earth, visible or invisible, whether they be thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created through and for him.

(NIV), emphasizing that the act of creation was a collaborative effort by the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

According to the Bible, the Trinity is such a tightly knit connection that none of the Persons ever acts on his or her own initiative.

Everyone is aware of what the others are up on, and everyone works together on every project. It was only when the Father abandoned Jesus on the cross that this triune link was severed for the first time.

Jesus in Disguise

Many Bible scholars think that Jesus arrived on earth centuries before his birth in Bethlehem, not as a man, but as an Angel of the Lord, and that he did so as the Son of God. More than 50 references to the Angel of the Lord may be found in the Bible’s Old Testament. This heavenly person, who was distinguished by the distinguishing phrase “the” angel of the Lord, was separate from the angels who had been created previously. The fact that the Angel of the Lord frequently intervened on favor of God’s chosen people, the Jews, provided an additional hint that it may have been Jesus in disguise, according to some scholars.

  • The Angel of the Lord came to Moses in the midst of a blazing bush.
  • He arrived at Gideon’s house.
  • Another piece of evidence is the fact that appearances by the Angel of the Lord ceased after the birth of Jesus.
  • These pre-incarnate manifestations were referred to as theophanies or christophanies, which refer to the appearance of God to human beings in the pre-incarnate state.

Need to Know Basis

The Bible does not go into great detail about every single subject it mentions. The Holy Spirit provided us with all of the information we require by inspiring the individuals who penned it. Many things continue to be a mystery, while others are simply beyond our comprehension. Jesus, who is God, does not alter his character. Throughout his existence, even before the creation of people, he has always been a loving and forgiving entity. While on earth, Jesus Christ was a perfect mirror of God the Father’s character and attributes.

Despite the paucity of information concerning Jesus’ pre-creation and pre-incarnate activities, we may infer from his unchanging nature that he has been and will continue to be motivated by love in all of his actions.

Sources

According to the Bible, Jesus existed before He came to earth in the form of a human being. He performed various things before He became a human being, which we may learn about through the Scriptures as well. He Is the Architect of the Universe. The cosmos was created by Jesus, who was its creator. All things were created through him, and nothing was created that was not created through him (John 1:3). Paul penned a letter. He created everything, including everything in heaven and on earth, whether it be visible or invisible, whether it be thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; everything was made by and for Him, and everything was created for Him (Colossians 1:16).

  1. Besides creating the cosmos and framing each era, Jesus was also responsible for preserving His handiwork.
  2. He is the beginning and the end of all things, and in him all things are held together (Colossians 1:17).
  3. The son is the light of God’s glory and the perfect picture of God’s essence, and he is the source of all life because of his mighty word.
  4. Summary Since the beginning of time, Jesus has been God.

According to the Bible, Jesus was the Creator of the cosmos and also the preserver of His own creation. As a result, we discover Him to be active before He arrived to earth in the form of a human being. He has maintained the continuity of the cosmos to this day.

Jesus Existed Before Coming to Earth

Watch a full presentation about Jesus’ position in the administration of heaven prior to his arrival on earth. Bible scholars frequently inquire as to whether Jesus existed before to taking on human form, and if so, what His activities were previous to His conception. Jesus did exist prior to His birth as Mary’s child, but putting the facts together on this subject will require some time and inquiry. The Bible does teach that Jesus has been alive since the beginning of time. Before anything came into being, Jesus existed as a separate and distinct God, alongside the Father and the Holy Spirit, before the beginning of time.

Jesus Speaks about Himself

On the island of Patmos, Jesus appeared to the apostle John in a vision. Consider what John overheard Jesus saying of Himself: “When I saw him, I fell at his feet as if I were dead.” Afterwards, Jesus placed his right hand on my shoulder and whispered, “Do not be scared.” I am both the first and the last person on the planet. “I am the Living One; I was dead, and lo and behold, I am alive for all time and all eternity!” (Revelation 1:17,18, italics mine) (Revelation 1:17,18) According to Jesus’ words later in the book of Revelation, “I am alpha and omega,” meaning “I am first and last,” “I am the beginning and the end,” etc.

  • The words “the First and the Last,” “the Alpha and the Omega,” and “the Beginning and the End” all refer to Jesus, and they are all descriptive of him.
  • It is important to note that Jesus refers to himself as God in the book of Revelation: “He said to me: It is finished.
  • It is my pleasure to offer freely from the spring of the water of life, to anyone desires to drink from it.
  • (Revelation 21:6, 7, insertion my) (Revelation 21:6, 7) This text teaches us that Jesus, who is referred to as “the Alpha and the Omega” and “the Beginning and the End,” reveals Himself to be God!
  • Is there a God other than myself?
  • Italics my.) (Isaiah 44:6,8 italics mine) When these verses from Isaiah are combined with the verses from Revelation that came before them, a very fascinating reality becomes apparent.
  • To put it another way, terms like as Jehovah, the Almighty, Lord God Almighty, and so on are generally used to allude to the God whom we know as Jesus.
  • Of course, Jesus was not referring to the Father or the Holy Spirit when he said this (who are separate and distinct Gods).
  • He was the one in command.
  • In the cloud and in the water, they were all baptized into Moses and became his followers.
  • The text is 1 Corinthians 10:1-4 (italics mine).

These scriptures should dispel any doubts that Jesus existed long before He was born of Mary in Bethlehem.

Did the Father Create Jesus?

Because Jesus is a separate and unique God, according to the Bible, he was with the Father before anything was created. Although the Father did not create Jesus, the three Gods have existed from the beginning of time. Pay close attention to John’s words: “That which has been from the beginning, that which we have heard, that which we have seen with our eyes, that which we have looked at and that which our hands have touched, this we declare as the Word of life.” In our sight, the life has appeared; we have witnessed and attested to it, and we declare to you the everlasting life, which was with the Father and has appeared to us.” I added the italics and the insertions in 1 John 1:1 and 2.

  • Because they are eternal creatures, the Father and Jesus had no beginning, because Jesus existed with the Father before anything else could exist.
  • All things were created through him, and nothing that has been created would have been possible without him.
  • In his splendor, the brightness of the One and Only, who came from the Father and was brimming with love and truth, we have beheld him.” (See also John 1:1-3, 14) No evidence can be found in the Bible to suggest that the Father produced Jesus or that Jesus is “a lesser God” than the Father.
  • In every sense, the three Gods are equal to one another.
  • Please study the following two paragraphs.
  • In response, the Jews worked even harder to put him to death.
  • (See also John 5:18.) It is said in the second chapter that Jesus felt himself to be on an equal footing with the Father.

Jesus Is the Creator of Everything in Heaven and on Earth

The universe, including the angels in Heaven, was created by Jesus Christ. In addition, he created the Earth and mankind in only six days. (See Exodus 20:8-11 for more information.) All things, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities, were created by Him and for Him: things in Heaven and on Earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things were created by Him and for Him.” “He is the beginning and the end of all things, and in him all things are held together.” (See Colossians 1:16,17 for more information.) This passage affirms once more that Jesus existed prior to the creation of everything.

It is for this reason that He is referred to as “the First,” “the Alpha,” and “the Beginning.”

Our Father Is Invisible

Jesus is the Father’s visible representation on this earth. “He is the image of the unseen God, the firstborn above all of creation,” says the author of the poem. (15:15) (Colossians 1:15) This passage outlines three aspects of Jesus that many people haven’t given much thought to before. First and foremost, Jesus is the image of theinvisibleFather, since the Father is constantly absent from the world. He dwells in “inaccessible light” (1 Timothy 6:16), and no one else (except from Jesus and the Holy Spirit) has ever seen Him in person!

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Even though the angels have seen His glorious form, and the saints and those who killed Jesus will see the Father’s glorious form at the Second Coming (Matthew 26:64; Revelation 6:16,17), no one has ever been able to see the Father because of His infinite glory and boundless powers, which keep Him in an unapproachable glow.

Because of this fact, we’ve come upon something else fascinating.

(Colossians 1:19; Revelation 21:5) This combination of an invisible Father and a visible Jesus may appear perplexing at first, but examine the following: In my understanding, the Bible teaches that the Father, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit are co-eternal, separate, and distinct equals who are co-eternal, separate, and different from one another.

  1. The Father (a living God) brought back to life a dead God (Jesus).
  2. (Matthew 12:31,32) The Bible says It is impossible to have fellowship with Jesus and the Father if the Holy Spirit cannot reside in our hearts and speak with us as a result of our resistance.
  3. Long ago, three celestial equals wanted to start a family and extend the cosmos, so they fell in love with each other and voluntarily relinquished many of their rights and prerogatives to them.
  4. Consider the following scenario: I think the Godhead determined that one God would sit on the throne of the cosmos and that He would demonstrate the enormous capabilities and boundless splendor that belonged to each of the three Gods.
  5. “The Father” was the name given to this God.
  6. He consented to become the “voice” of God, or more specifically, “the Word of God,” so that He might speak orally on behalf of the other two gods, whom He came to be known as Jesus.
  7. This explains why John saw Jesus’ words to be like a double-edged blade flowing from his lips.

He has the ability to cause objects to appear or disappear.

Take, for example, when Jesus came to Earth, He came to fulfill the will of the Father who had sent Him (John 6:38), but do not lose sight of the bigger picture.

What might possibly motivate co-eternal members of God to submit their wills to one another?

The Godhead concluded that their created creatures need three gods: the Father, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit; yet, the Godhead determined that the creation required just one god (the Father) to be the highest object of devotion and worship.

Finally, the three Gods recognized that creation would require one God (the Holy Spirit) to reside within each heart in order for all of creation to be able to communicate with the Father in real time and at the same time.

God was to be present in every area and heart of the cosmos, according to their hopes and dreams (this explains why the Holy Spirit is omnipresent, but the Father and Jesus are not).

It is for this reason that the Bible declares God to be love.

We find it incredible that three incredibly powerful and gorgeous Gods are restricted by nothing more than their love for one another, and their desire to work together for the pleasure and wellbeing of their family.

When it comes to the Father, Jesus is a flawless representation.

In other words, if it had been required, the Father would have sacrificed his life for us.

“Don’t you believe that I am in the Father, and that the Father is in me?” Jesus says on multiple occasions, referring to the mutual surrender between equals.

Believe me when I say that I am in the Father and that I am in the Father’s Son, or at the very least believe in the evidence provided by the miracles themselves.” I have added my own insertions to John 14:10 and 11.

People misinterpret this term to suggest that Jesus is a “made” entity or that Jesus was born before Cain, both of which are incorrect.

Consider the following verse for a moment: In fact, all things were made by him and for him; this includes everything in Heaven as well as things on Earth, both visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things were made by him and for him.

In the coming month, I shall cover the actions of Jesus prior to and following His earthly mission.

In the meanwhile, for more research on Jesus, please review chapters 1-3 of my bookJesus: The Alpha and the Omega if you have the opportunity. If you do not already have the book, you may get these chapters for free by visiting:Larry Wilson

Larry Wilson, the founder of WUAS, converted to Christianity in 1972 and became a born-again Christian. His passion in the gospel prompted him to go on a more than 40-year quest to learn more about what God has revealed to the world’s final generation of human beings. Throughout the world, the results of his study have been communicated through publications such as books, television and radio broadcasts, media interviews, and seminars that are made available to the public through a variety of media outlets (see ourChristian Bookstore).

Wake Up America Seminars, Inc.

WUAS is not a religious organization and does not support any particular denomination.

The fact that individuals of all religions are attentively using the Bible study resources supplied by WUAS is a source of great joy for us.

This Is What Jesus’ Friends And Family Actually Called Him — And No, It Wasn’t Jesus

Even among people of different religious beliefs, the name “Jesus” is almost universally recognized. It may come as a surprise, however, that the name “Jesus,” which millions of Christians all over the world are urged not to use in vain, was not in fact the name of the historical figure. Despite the fact that the assertion appears to be controversial, the truth is that it is more of a translation issue.

What Was Jesus’ Real Name?

Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons “Isous” is the Greek transcription of Jesus’ given name, whereas “Yeshua” is the late Biblical Hebrew form of Jesus’ given name. Of course, neither English nor Spanish existed in their present forms during the time when the genuine Jesus was living, nor was the New Testament written at the time that the original Jesus was alive. Jesus and his followers were all Jewish, and as a result, they all received Hebrew given names – despite the fact that they would have spoken Aramaic.

As a result, the majority of academics think that the Christian Messiah’s given name was really “Yeshua,” which was a very popular Jewish given name during Jesus’ lifetime.

This raises the question of how the name “Jesus” got to be unique in the first place, given that there were apparently so many individuals called “Yeshua” moving around at the time.

How “Yeshua” Became Lost In Translation

Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Because of this, the King James Bible was written in the “I” spelling rather than the “J” spelling. Given the fact that not every language has the same sounds, people have traditionally adopted their names in order to be able to pronounce them in a number of different languages. Even in modern languages, there are discrepancies in how Jesus is pronounced from one dialect to another. In English, the name is pronounced with a hard “J,” yet in Spanish, the name is pronounced with what would be a “H” in English, despite the fact that the spelling is the same.

The New Testament was initially written in Greek, which not only has a completely different alphabet than Hebrew, but also does not include the “sh” sound present in the Hebrew word “Yeshua,” which means “Yeshua.” After deciding to use the Greek “s” sound instead of the “sh” sound in the name Yeshua, the New Testament authors added a final “s” to the end of the name to make it more masculine in the original language.

When the Bible was translated into Latin from the original Greek, the term “Iesus” was used by the translators to refer to the person who had given the name.

For decades, this inscription has been a typical feature of portrayals of the crucifixion in Western Christianity as “INRI,” an acronym for the LatinIesus Nazarenus Rex Iudaeorum, or “Jesus the Nazarene King of the Jews,” which translates as “Jesus the Nazarene King of the Jews.” Because Latin being the main language of the Catholic Church, the Latinized form of the name “Yeshua” was used to refer to Christ across the rest of Europe and beyond.

Even the King James Bible, which was first published in 1611, utilized the “Iesus” spelling.

How “Yeshua” Eventually Became “Jesus”

It’s difficult to identify precisely where the “Jesus” spelling originated, while some historians believe that a variant of the name that originated in Switzerland is the most likely candidate. It is more common for the “J” in Swiss to be pronounced like an English “Y” or the Latin “Ie” as in “Iesus.” In 1553, when the Catholic Queen “Bloody” Mary ascended to the English throne, thousands of English Protestant intellectuals fled, with a large number eventually settling in Geneva. It was at Geneva that a group of some of the best English minds of the day collaborated to create the Geneva Bible, which was the first to utilize the Swiss spelling of the name “Jesus.” Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons A significant contribution to the popularization of the “Jesus” spelling was made by the Geneva Bible.

Eventually, it was transported to the New World on the Mayflower, which arrived in 1620.

As a result, the name used by English speakers today is an English adaption of a German translation of a Latin transliteration of a Greek transliteration of an initially Hebrew name, which was then adopted by the English language.

Then read about Jesus’ tomb being opened after it had been sealed.

Was Jesus a Common Name Back When He Was Alive?

Ary Scheffer created this painting in 1851. Image courtesy of the Walters Art Museum and shared via Wikimedia Commons. The name was used by a large number of individuals. It was extremely popular in first-century Galilee to be addressed by Christ’s given name, which is frequently romanized as Yeshua. (Jesus is derived from the transcription of Yeshua into Greek, which was subsequently translated into English.) Archaeologists have discovered the tombs of 71 Yeshuas from the time of Jesus’ death, according to the New York Times.

  1. (Ezra 2:2).
  2. The reason we refer to the Hebrew hero of Jericho as Joshua and the Christian Messiah as Jesus is not clear.
  3. Because the Greeks did not utilize the soundsh, the evangelists used anSsound in its place.
  4. Currently, the name Jesus is romanized as Iesous, which is derived from the oldest documented version of the name Jesus.
  5. It was a long time before the initial came about.
  6. Until the mid-17th century, there was no distinction between English and other languages.
  7. It was under the reign of the Catholic Queen Mary I that a group of English Protestants escaped to Switzerland and created the Geneva Bible, which was spelled in the Swiss style.
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The Old Testament, on the other hand, was translated straight from the original Hebrew into English, rather than through the medium of Greek.

During this time, the Syrian Orthodox church’s sacred book, known as the Syrian Bible, is written in the Aramaic language.

As a result, the Syriac text makes reference to Yeshua.

It wasn’t Christ, either.

(This is referred to as “Jesus, son of Joseph” or “Jesus of Nazareth.” Galileans separated themselves from others who shared the same first name by adding either “son of” and their father’s name or their place of birth to the end of their names.

Inquire with the Explainer. The explainer expresses gratitude to Joseph P. Amar of the University of Notre Dame and Paul V.M. Flesher of the University of Wyoming for their contributions.

Where Was Jesus Before the Incarnation?

Due to the approaching Easter holiday, you’ll be hearing a lot about Jesus’ life as a man on Earth – from his birth in Bethlehem to his upbringing as a carpenter, to the miracles he performed throughout his ministry, to his death and resurrection on the cross. But where did Jesus go before he became a human being?

The Preexistent Christ

The Gospel of John begins with a startling revelation from the Apostle John: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” (John 1:1) (See John 1.1.) 0Fi He reaffirmed this by saying, “That which has existed from the beginning.” This verse relates to the Genesis story, which opens with the words, “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the world.” Finally, Paul says this about Jesus: “For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him.” For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him.

In addition, he is before all things, and it is in him that all is held together.” (16f in Col.

The purpose of this work is to provide a framework for a theological construct of Christ as endless and eternal by presenting evidence of His precreation existence as the Logos, His pre-incarnational presence in the Old Testament, and finally preexistent expressions within Johannine and Pauline literature, all through the lenses of both creation and the trinitarian doctrine.

The significance of this research underscores the priority of Christ’s redeeming act as the metanarrative of God’s revelation that comes before the beginning of creation itself.

The unique divinity of Christ is revealed in both the Old and New Testaments as He works in creation and covenant to achieve His intentions throughout all of eternity, past, present, and future.

Precreation Existence as the Logos

It is described as “being in a previous condition or prior to anything else, specifically: existence of the soul prior to its union with the body” in the Oxford English Dictionary. The claim with regard to Christ is that He existed prior to His incarnation as the Son, and that He was completely God Himself at that time. His pre-existence has been a historical stance throughout Christian history, including the early church, as stated by Bramm: “It has long been common doctrine in historic Christology that the Logos, the Son, existed prior to the incarnation.” The fact that the Son lived in this manner prior to the incarnation is referred to as the “pre-existence of Christ.” The New Testament sets the theological foundation by referring to Christ as “the Logos of God,” which means “God’s Logos.” It is vital for Christians, in light of these scripture affirmations, that they worship the incarnate Logos foremost as the universal Christ rather than just as the self-sacrificing teacher of righteousness from Galilee, as is customary among other religions.

  • Throughout history, numerous definitions of the term Logos have been proposed.
  • It was used to refer to the logical matrix of creation, also known as the “soul” of the cosmos, which was sometimes personified as a quasi-divine entity in Greek philosophical philosophy.
  • 7 The almighty Logos, or Word of God, became incarnate in a human being through the process known as the Incarnation (Jn 1:14).
  • As the Logos also indicates, in his ontological existence, He is not constrained by the passage of time.
  • In the Gospel of John’s revelation of Christ as the Logos, he is revealed as “light” and as “life,” among other things.
  • The word Logos is also used by John to suggest a connection between the Word uttered at creation and Christ’s presence at the beginning of time.

For the time being, suffice it to state that the references to the Word, the creation, life, and light all point the reader back to the first few chapters of Genesis and ask him or her to interpret Jesus’ tale in the context of God’s wider intentions in creation.” The Logos, according to John, was there from the beginning.

Logos, whose matchless, indescribable, and unfathomable excellence is manifested in himself, is exalted beyond all creation and even above the concept of difference and distinction.” Prepositions are used to express the nature and existence of the Logos in the following passage: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God ( ), and the Word was God” (In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was God).

  1. (o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o (John 1.1).
  2. Jesus is revealed as the Son in John 1.14 after existent prior to his incarnation and being known as the Word.
  3. Alternatively, it might be translated as God’s uttered words that brought about creation, or as the message through which design and life came to be.
  4. “The Logos was in the presence of God,” that is, in intimate, personal fellowship with him.” The predicate ( ) provides a more fitting idea that “the Word was divine” and that the Logos was “in the presence of God,” that is, in close, personal relationship with him.

In the years leading up to this council, the Nicene Creed established Christ’s unity with the Father, as stated in the following words: “the only-begotten Son of God, begotten by the Father before all worlds; God of God, Light of Light, very God of very God; begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father, by whom all things were made.” Who, for the sake of us men and our salvation, descended from heaven.” The notion of the Son’s endless generation is a crucial tenet in the discussion of Christ’s preexistence.

In connection to the idea of the Trinity, “eternal generation serves as the foundation for both the equality of the Son with the Father and the differentiation between the Father and the Son,” according to the Catholic Encyclopedia.

During the confirmation of Christ’s divine nature, it was confirmed that the Father imparted an equal and everlasting divine essence to the Son and that, while there is a distinction between the two, there is no split or disunity between them.

XV.47, 432, italics added).

The Father did not beget a “lesser Son” who would ultimately rise to the level of his equal.rather, the Father “begottimelessly in such a way that the life which the Father gave the Son by begetting him is co-eternal with the life of the Father who gave it.”” John’s Gospel has the quotation Augustine uses: “For as the Father possesses life in Himself, so He imparted to the Son life in Himself as well” (John 5.26).

  1. In this instance, the Son possesses the same life-giving ability as the Father.
  2. In addition to possessing life within himself, Jesus has also been gifted this by the Father.
  3. The connection between the Father and the Son is shown throughout the New Testament, and it provides chances for dispute among biblical scholars.
  4. In his response to Augustine’s statement: “Before the world was created, neither we nor the mediator between God and man, the man Jesus Christ, existed,” Thomas Aquinas also addresses this issue in his response.
  5. Rather, “the man Christ Jesus did not exist before the world came into being, in his humanity,” as the Bible says.
  6. Although historical Christianity appeared to have resolved this dispute, some post-enlightenment academics have lately shown a shift away from the notion of Christ’s preexistence as a required dogma.
  7. It is necessary for a non-incarnational christology.

Frequently, the questions that arise are based on disagreements over Christ’s incarnational representation as God and His hypostatic union.

It is not necessary for a non-Trinitarian worldview to hold that Christ existed before the creation of the world, just as it is not necessary to hold that the Godhead is coeternal and coequal.

Arius’ heretical beliefs would subsequently be condemned by the Council of Constantinople for their extremism.

McCready highlights that “all aspects of Christian belief are intertwined” while discussing this issue.

“We are being attacked as well since we stated that he is from nothing,” Arius writes.

The reason why we are being persecuted is because we stated that “the Son is the beginning, whereas God is the end.” Alternative conceptions of Jesus as Logos and as pre-existent contradict the orthodox stance and provide various concepts about the nature of Christ’s identity, according to the authors.

  1. The Angel Adoptionist point of view, which holds that Jesus is human but is indwelt by a heavenly entity, is the next point of view to consider.
  2. The fourth possibility is Docetic Gnosticism, which similarly regarded Jesus as a lesser divinity, an offspring of gods but not a human being, but rather as a deluding illusion created by the Holy Spirit.
  3. Recognizing Christ’s pre-existence affirms the doctrine of His deity; to deny His nature is to deny the doctrine of His deity.
  4. His deity sets Christ and His divinity outside of the created world and identifies Him as a Co-Creator, despite the fact that the created world exists.
  5. Throughout their work, Paul and John serve as the principal proponents, and their declarative claims are discussed in greater detail later in this article.
  6. Paul explains that God’s redemptive plan, which began even before the creation of the world (Eph 1.4f), was for Christ to carry out the purposes of His will, finally bringing about God’s goal to bring all things under His control in the fullness of time.
  7. As McCready points out, “People could gain a greater understanding of the immensity of God’s love for us through the person of Jesus Christ.

Conclusion

It is defined as “existing in a former state or prior to something else, specifically: existence of the soul prior to its union with the body” in the Oxford English Dictionary. The claim with regard to Christ is that He existed prior to His incarnation as the Son, and that He was fully God Himself at the time of His conception. His pre-existence has been a historical position throughout Christian history, including the early church, as stated by Bramm: “It has long been standard teaching in historic Christology that the Logos, the Son, existed prior to the incarnation.

  • It is imperative for Christians, in light of these scriptural affirmations, that they worship the incarnate Logos foremost as the cosmic Christ rather than only as the self-sacrificing preacher of righteousness from Galilee, as is customary among non-Christians.
  • According to the definition, the word is philosophical as well as theological in nature.
  • It was used to refer to the rational matrix of creation, also known as the “soul” of the universe, which was sometimes personified as a quasi-divine entity in ancient Greek philosophical thought.
  • 7 God’s divine Logos, or Word of God, became incarnate in the form of a human being through the process known as the Incarnational Mystery (Jn 1:14).
  • As the Logos also reveals, He is not bound by the passage of time in his ontological existence.
  • John’s revelation of Christ as the Logos reveals him as “light” and as “life,” and he is described as such in other passages.
  • The term Logos is also used by John to denote a connection between the Word spoken at the beginning of time and Christ’s presence at the beginning.
  • Allow me to summarize by saying that the mentions of the Word, creation, life and light all direct the reader’s attention to the first few chapters of Genesis and invite him or her to read Jesus’ story in the context of God’s grander purposes in creation.
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Following the declaration of creation in Genesis 1.1, which states, “In the beginning, God created.”, the writer asserts in John 1.1 that all things “came into existence through Him.” In the words of St Maximus, “he is the origin and the cause of all things.by his gracious will, he created all things visible and invisible out of non-being.” It is beyond all creation and even the concept of difference and distinction that the Logos is elevated, whose excellence is unmatchable, ineffable, and unimaginable in himself.” “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, ( ) and the Word was God,” he states through the use of prepositions, revealing the nature and existence of the Logos.

  1. In the Greek language, this is pronounced as (aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa (John 1.1).
  2. Throughout the New Testament, this oneness is evident in the work of revelation, salvation, and creation that God has done for mankind.
  3. “And the Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory of a father’s only son, full of grace and truth, as we have seen his glory in the temple.” Certainly, the Greek word Logos (logos) elicits heated discussion over its proper meaning.
  4. The Logos, on the other hand, is revealed to be the Word Himself upon further investigation.

Before this council, the Nicene Creed established Christ’s unity, pre-incarnation, and preexistence with the Father, stating that he was “the only-begotten Son of God, begotten of the Father before all worlds; the God of God, Light of Light, the most High God of the Most High; begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father, by whom all things were created.” The one who came down from heaven for the sake of saving us mankind.” Regarding Christ’s preexistence, the notion of the Son’s endless generation is essential.

  • In respect to the dogma of the Trinity, “eternal generation serves as the foundation for both the equality of the Son with the Father and the differentiation between the Father and the Son,” according to theologians.
  • Theologian Augustine tackles this problem when he writes, “Through generation, the Father bestows being to the Son without any beginning in time” (De trin.
  • As a result, the Son is coeternal with the Father.the Son is born by the Father in the same manner as the Father.
  • In this instance, the Son, like the Father, has the ability to give life.
  • In addition to possessing life within himself, Jesus has been provided this by the Father as well.
  • There are several depictions of the connection between the Father and Son in Scripture that provide fodder for discussion among scholars.
  • When responding to Augustine’s statement: “Before the universe was, neither we nor the mediator between God and man, the man Jesus Christ, existed,” Aquinas likewise brings up the topic of pre-existence in his response.

“In his humanity, the man Christ Jesus did not exist before the world came into being,” says the Bible.

History seems to have resolved this dispute, but new research by post-enlightenment academics demonstrates that the dogma of Christ’s preexistence is no longer essential.

Jesus must have existed in a form other than flesh before he could take on flesh.

In many cases, the concerns that emerge are a result of disagreements over Christ’s incarnational depiction as God and His hypostatic union.

It is not necessary for a non-Trinitarian worldview to hold that Christ existed before the creation of the universe, just as it is not necessary to hold that the Godhead is coeternal and coequal.

For his heretical beliefs, Arius would subsequently be condemned by the Council of Constantinople.

As McCready points out, “all parts of Christian religion are interconnected” when it comes to this issue.

“We are also being attacked because we stated that he is a creation of nothing,” Arius adds.

For saying that “the Son has a beginning, whereas God is without origin,” we have been attacked.

Among the several points of view is the Spirit Adoptionist perspective, which believes that Christ was anointed and entirely faithful to God’s law, but that he was still still a human being.

Jesus was seen as a lesser divinity, an offspring of gods, who was simply disguised as a human being according to the Hybrid Gnosticism school of thought.

In attempting to redefine the nature of Christ, each of these points of view comes close to rejecting his actual essence as revealed in the Bible.

Through the affirmation of the Trinitarian connection, the question of Jesus’ pre-existence is rendered moot as an argument for Jesus, as God, who is not absent either from the Father or from the act of creation.

As it relates to His relationship with the Father, the New Testament authors clearly allude to Christ’s pre-existence and presuppose this assumption.

Apart from the arguments of these proponents, there is evidence that “pre-Pauline quotes within the Pauline epistles are proof that the bulk of the first Christians believed in a Logos Christology within the context of the theology of the Trinity,” as stated by one author.

(Eph.

This is the foundation of the salvific activity of the incarnated Son of God.

It will not be possible unless we recognize Jesus Christ as the pre-existent Son of God who became incarnate for the purpose of saving us and bringing us to God’s presence.” Rejecting Christ’s pre-existence invalidates the incarnation and calls into question the very legitimacy of the Son’s redemptive work on the cross as well as the covenantal work created via His death and resurrection, among other things.

What Was Jesus Doing before He Was Born in Bethlehem?

Try as we may, comprehending how Jesus Christ can be both completely God and completely man at the same time tests the limitations of our limited intellects. Even the most brilliant brains in the first several centuries of the church were unable to explain this truth. However, scriptures such as Philippians 2:6–8 make it plain that Jesus Christ is fully God and fully human at the same time. As theSon of God, he has existed since the beginning of time, but it was at a certain period in history that he came to dwell among us in human form.

  • However, while the Bible does not provide a comprehensive solution, it does provide some hints.
  • “Father, I wish that they also, whom you have given me, may be with me where I am, to see my glory that you have given me because you loved me from the foundation of the world,” Jesus prays just before his death (John 17:24).
  • Secondly, God the Son is identified as the creator of all things according to the Bible.
  • He was there with God from the beginning.
  • In Colossians 1:15–16, the apostle Paul talks about the same fact.
  • Third, prior to his incarnation, the Son of God was responsible for the upkeep of the cosmos.
  • When it says in Colossians 1:17 that Christ “is before all things, and in him all things hold together,” it is communicating the same truth as the previous verse.
  • Fourth, the Son was ready to rescue his people from their tribulations.
  • (17:6).
  • Consequently, while the Bible does not go into great detail about what Jesus was doing before to his birth in Bethlehem, it does depict him as the creator and sustainer of the universe who was receiving heavenly worship while waiting for the day when he would take on flesh and redeem mankind.

Did Isaiah Know About Jesus Christ Before He Came to Earth?

There are several details regarding the coming Messiah that may be found in the Old Testament. All of us, like sheep, have gone astray; we have each turned to his or her own path, and the Lord has placed the guilt of all of us on His shoulders. (See Isaiah 53:6 for further information). The fundamental question today is: Did Isaiah have any knowledge of Jesus Christ years before He arrived to earth? If you read the book of Isaiah, you will not be able to ignore the message of Jesus Christ. Isaiah has been dubbed the “fifth gospel” by many because of how frequently it refers to the coming Messiah and how much information is provided regarding the good news of redemption.

The prophets were given incredible knowledge from God, and it is difficult to imagine what they must have been thinking as they communicated this revelation to the people of Israel.

It was revealed to some that they had been given rare and magnificent visions, and that they were able to depict in great detail the coming kingdom that would be realized in Jesus Christ.

This is corroborated in John 12:41, where the apostle John reveals that the prophet Isaiah saw Jesus Christ when he had a vision of the Lord sitting on the throne of God in heaven, hundreds of years before the birth of Jesus.

The moment he saw himself in the light of God’s splendor, he understood his own wickedness and realized he deserved to be killed (Isaiah6:5).

We have the continuous word about the coming Savior once more from the prophet Isaiah (which is also mirrored by the other prophets).

We as a species are lost in sin, having walked away from God in a tremendous act of disobedience, yet our Savior, in the great once-for-all sacrifice, took on the iniquity that we all deserved.

It is the message of hope.

In the life and actions of Jesus Christ, we know that God’s revelation to us via his prophets has made perfect sense, and that the events promised hundreds of years ago have been both consistent and true in their message.

The message of the Bible may be summarized as the repeating ofSin, Sacrifice, and the Savior throughout the book.

The key point for today is that the prophets foresaw things with remarkable precision and constancy, even if they did not completely comprehend what they were foretelling. What to pray: express gratitude to God for His supreme power over all of history.

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