What Does Jesus Say About Violence

What Does the Bible Say About Violence?

Elmbrook Church’s Minister at Large, Mel Lawrenz, author of Spiritual Leadership Today and Minister at Large of Elmbrook Church, offers numerous biblically based approaches and responses to the reality of violence in our society. At The Brook Network, he’s made an audio version of this post available for download. Another horrible shooting at a school raises the issue of why violence occurs among the members of the human race once again. This causes us to moan, as it should. And it makes us wonder how human beings can be so violent—as they must be—in their interactions with one another.

This isn’t only about shootings in public places.

Violence against women and children on a daily basis, as well as bullying and gang violence in our cities, among other things, demonstrates that Christians must comprehend the wicked inclinations of violence and what we may do to combat them in our lives.

I believe that persons who identify as Christians should have a better grasp of the origins of violence in society.

It focuses on gun regulation, which is an important topic, to be sure, but it is not one that addresses the underlying causes of violence.

In the hopes of seeing increased efficiency in law enforcement, they keep their fingers crossed in hopes that the next crazed shooter will not be in their school or movie theater, and they hope that more thorough background checks will prevent dangerous weapons from falling into the hands of criminals.

So what does the Bible say about violence?

The first terrible act of violence may be found early in the biblical story and does not take long to discover. One brother is responsible for the death of another in the second generation of mankind. Cain kills Abel for a motive that comes from from his heart: he is envious of him. The pattern has been established. When something as basic as envy is left uncontrolled, when it is allowed to develop and deepen and strengthen, it may manifest itself in violent behavior. God had forewarned Cain, saying, “Why are you enraged?

  1. Will you be rejected if you stand up for what is morally right?
  2. Jealousy breeds fury, and rage is a predatory vice, waiting at Cain’s door, trying to take possession of his soul.
  3. What measures may be used to combat violence?
  4. He did not, and as a result, blood was shed.
  5. The first lesson to learn is that violence is the product of a spiritual sickness.
  6. Violence is as close to us as our own emotions are to our own heads.
  7. It is really essential.
  8. As a result, each and every human life has intrinsic worth, dignity, and respect, which renders selfish or wanton violence a moral violation.
  9. The Old Testament doesn’t seem to be a very gory record of history, and God doesn’t seem to condone violence.

There are several aspects to this subject that are significant. If you read Paul Copan’s book, Is God a Moral Monster?, you will find some excellent solutions. But, in a nutshell, the following may be said:

  1. There was not always violence in the Old Testament, and some of it was necessary for protection against hostile powers and God’s judgment
  2. The nation of Israel in the Old Testament was a theocracy, and all of that had changed by the time we got to the New Testament
  3. And it is clear from reading the New Testament that an entirely different set of ethics applied from that point on, with the coming of the kingdom of God with Jesus.

Now study what the New Testament has to say about violence, specifically in the context of Jesus’ teachings on the subject.

First, Jesus models the power of non-violence

While being arrested on the night of his arrest, as a group of violent men moved in on him, Jesus commanded Peter, who was ready to fight, to “put your weapon back in its place. because everyone who draws the sword will die by the sword.” This was a declaration of philosophy, and it was compatible with the entirety of Jesus’ instruction. Jesus told Pontius Pilate at his trial that his kingdom was not of this world: “I am not of this world.” If such were the case, my servants would battle to save me from being detained by the Jewish authorities.

The Mennonites and other members of the Anabaptist tradition believe that Jesus’ teachings are nothing less than pacifism, while others believe that Jesus’ teachings do not preclude the use of force in self-defense or, as Romans 13describes, the intentional, punitive use of force in human governing: “rulers do not bear the sword for no reason.” They are God’s servants, messengers of wrath sent to punish those who have wronged the community” (Rom.

13:4).

For the most part, human history has developed according to the principle of “might makes right,” but Jesus brought a completely new way of looking at life.

Second, Jesus speaks about the source of violence

One of Jesus’ most innovative teachings is that human aggression originates from a higher level of consciousness. Before any blood is spilt or words are said that cause injury, the sin of violence has already occurred. “You have heard that it was declared to the people long ago, ‘Do not kill, and anybody who murders will be subject to judgment,'” Jesus said in the Sermon on the Mount. Nevertheless, I assure you that anyone who is enraged with his brother will face the consequences.” (See Matthew 5:21-22.) We can’t talk about murder without bringing up the subject of wrath.

  1. Also from the Sermon on the Mount comes this key teaching: “Again, Jesus drew the multitude to him and said, ‘Listen to me, everyone, and grasp what I’m saying.’ Nothing outside of a person may contaminate them by infiltrating their bodies.
  2. Due to the fact that wicked ideas emanate from within, from a person’s heart, they include immorality in sexual relationships as well as theft, murder, adultery, greed, malice, deception, lewdness and other vices as well as hubris and foolishness.
  3. 7:14-23).
  4. A person’s excellent looks do not create adultery, money does not produce greed, Mercedes dealerships do not cause enviousy, and video games and movies do not promote violence outside.
  5. I’m not claiming that Jesus’ remark provides a comprehensive analysis of the psychology of violence.

The Pharisees encouraged people to think that sin was a result of what they put into their bodies, such as the food they ate. That’s a convenient way of looking at things in general. Far more worrisome, but yet real, is the fact that everyone possesses the propensity for violence inside themselves.

Third, Jesus encourages us to live bravely in the face of violence

In his teachings, Jesus made it obvious that the world is a wicked and violent place. His disciples, on the other hand, were exhorted not to live in fear and trepidation: “Do not be afraid of those who can murder the body but cannot kill the soul” (Matt. 10:28). Additionally, he stated, “I have told you all this in order for you to find peace in me.” You will face difficulties in the world, but be courageous because I have conquered the world” (Jn. 16:33). I believe that we should all question ourselves: what really is this courage of which Jesus spoke?

How do we take this to heart so that we don’t go through life cowering in our skins.

Fourth, Jesus mandates a response to violence

So, where would we look in the Bible for guidance on how to cope with violent situations? What does Jesus want us to do in the face of violence? The beatitudes, which include the following real-life challenge: “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God,” should be the first thing that comes to mind for us. In the face of violence, what can we do? Beginning with a real dedication to the notion, “blessed are the peacemakers,” is the first step. It will not happen, though, until we move beyond wishful thinking.

  • It isn’t the most convenient option.
  • Our entertainment industry bombards us with violent images and lyrics, which we find difficult to ignore.
  • Many people are living on the verge of a nervous breakdown.
  • Somehow, the job of peacemakers must begin long before the first shots are placed into the magazines of military vehicles.
  • When he summoned them they discovered their peace, for he is their peace….
  • And to that aim they abandon all violence and tumult.” John Stott, in his commentary on the Sermon on the Mount writes, “Now peacemaking is a heavenly operation.
  • What measures may be used to combat violence?

What causes fights and quarrels among you? Don’t they come from your desires that battle within you? You desire something but don’t get it. You kill and covet, but you cannot have what you want. You quarrel and fight. You do not have, because you do not ask God.”

What can be done about violence?

If we were looking for solutions to violence in the Bible, where would we look? When it comes to violence, what does Jesus want us to do? The beatitudes, which include the following real-life challenge: “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called children of God,” should be the first thing that springs to mind. Violence is something that we can’t seem to avoid. A real commitment to the notion of “blessed are the peacemakers” must precede any other action. Sadly, that will not be possible unless we move beyond wishful thinking.

  • Certainly, it is not the most convenient solution.
  • This is a tremendous task, but it is Jesus’ unmistakable appeal to all of his disciples, regardless of the time or place.
  • A life of its own has taken hold of today’s fearsome military technologies.
  • And every time a school shooting occurs, and we have 24-hour news coverage, a thousand possible copycats—those who live in the shadows of society, individuals who are detached or outcast—have their hearts race at the prospect of their names being in the headlines.
  • When it comes to peace, Dietrich Bonhoeffer writes in his book, The Cost of Discipleship: “The disciples of Jesus have been called to peace.” They came to find their peace in him because he is their peace.

And in order to do this, they reject all violence and turmoil.” “Now, peacemaking is a heavenly job,” writes John Stott in his commentary on the Sermon on the Mount: “It is a divine work.” In the end, peace is synonymous with reconciliation, and God is the source of both peace and reconciliation.” What does “peacemaking” look like in real-world situations?

  • In the epistle of James, we find another important text that speaks about peacemaking: “Peacemakers who sow in peace reap a harvest of righteousness.
  • Don’t they stem from your own wants, which are always at war with one another?
  • You kill and covet, yet you will never be able to have what you desire.
  • “You don’t have it because you don’t ask God,” says the author.

What does the Bible say about violence?

QuestionAnswer Violence is defined as “physical force exerted for the goal of violating, hurting, or abusing another person,” and unfortunately, violence is a part of everyday life for many people. It’s in our movies and television shows, and we live in a society where violence is frequently used to build political and social authority. However, for Christians, the truth of God’s Word always triumphs over the ways of the world and vice versa. So, what does the Bible have to say about violent behavior?

  • “Do not harbor ill will toward your brother in your heart,” reads Leviticus 19:17.
  • Is it more loving to stay quiet and let hatred and animosity to grow toward them?
  • God has the ability to bring back upon him the violence he has perpetrated against another person.
  • While Exodus 20:13 has been mistranslated as “do not kill,” its precise translation is “do not murder.” Throughout the history of His people, God has permitted just battles to take place.
  • According to Romans 13:1-4, we are to submit ourselves to political authority and that countries have the right to bear the sword against evildoers, both foreign and domestic in their pursuit of evil.

When it comes to violence, males are more likely to embrace it (particularly in countries where genuine men are portrayed as those who never weep, always have a plan, and carry a gun), but the greatest man of all time stated, “Do not envy a violent man or select any of his methods” (Proverbs 3:31).

On any given day, prayer and patience triumph over violence and fury. Return to the page with the most recent Bible questions. What does the Bible have to say about violent behavior?

What Did Jesus Teach about Violence and Turning the Other Cheek?

Part of the What Did Jesus Teach? series, this essay explores the teachings of Jesus.

Nonviolence and the Sermon on the Mount

Is it necessary for Christians to follow Jesus’ teaching in the Sermon on the Mount to “turn the other cheek” and not oppose evil in order to be considered pacifists? It is critical to examine the meaning of Jesus’ teaching in the Sermon on the Mount, because the majority of Christian pacifists base their beliefs on a putative nonviolent “loving ethic” of Jesus, which is considered to be the teaching of Matthew 5:38–42, before making any conclusions about it. Matthew 5:38–42 is one of six case studies that Jesus uses to illustrate his teaching on the law (Matthew 5:17).

  1. As such, it opens with the same pattern that Jesus has previously used four times in this body of teaching—”You have heard that it was said,.
  2. However, while some students of the biblical text understand these specific phrases as referring to Mosaic law, this interpretation does not accord with the rest of the passage.
  3. It is impossible for Jesus to be contradicting himself.
  4. Taking vengeance as an example of current folly is one such example.
See also:  How To Please Jesus

Jesus and theLex Talionis

When Jesus gives the Sermon on the Mount, he is not dismissing the concept of restitution as such, nor is he dismissing the “law of the tooth” (thelex talionis) as a criterion of public justice. Instead, Jesus is urging his audience to examine their attitudes in order to respond appropriately when they are subjected to personal injustice or insult. When it is mentioned that the right cheek was struck, it suggests that insult (personal harm) rather than assault (public injury) is the problem here rather than public injury.

steal your tunic, let him have your cloak as well” (Matthew 5:40).

In reality, all four examples of nonretaliation—turning the other cheek, providing the shirt off your back, carrying someone’s luggage an extra mile, and lending to the one who asks—are examples of behavior that occurs in the private realm.

Personal Injury, Not State Policy

Consequently, Jesus’ commandment not to fight evil (Matthew 5:39) must be contextualized in the context of personal damage, rather than official policy, to be effective. Matthew 5–7 is not a declaration on the nature and jurisdiction of the state or the governing powers; rather, it is a statement on the nature and jurisdiction of the individual disciple. It has the strongest similarities with Romans 12:17–21, rather than with Romans 13:1–7. In the personal and private spheres, justice does not include the imposition of retributive measures.

Not the imagined “compromised” mentality of imperialism or Constantinianism, as some have claimed, but the unequivocal message of the New Testament.

‘Does anybody believe that our Lord’s hearers understood him to indicate that if a homicidal lunatic intending to murder a third party attempted to knock me out of the way, I should stand aside and allow him to do his job?’ he inquires.

1 Lewis chooses to accept the straightforward interpretation of this text.

By any stretch of the imagination, Jesus’ audience comprised of “private people in a disarmed nation,” and “war was not what they would have been contemplating” at the time of his appearance. 2 Lewis’s interpretation is based on a straightforward reading of the text.

Called to Resist Evil

The Christian is called, in the end, to fight evil whenever and wherever it is feasible, as saints past and present have realized throughout history. Moreover, the apostle Paul declares unequivocally that the magistrate exists solely for the purpose of performing this divinely mandated function: Because rulers are not a threat to good behavior, but rather to evil. Would you be completely unafraid of those in positions of authority? After that, do what is right, and you will gain his approval, for he is God’s servant working for your benefit.

  • Because he is God’s servant and an avenging angel, he is responsible for carrying out God’s wrath against the offender.
  • Not only that, but it also does not prohibit Christians from “carrying the sword” or acting as a magistrate in the service of society and the common good, as the Bible clearly teaches them to do.
  • “Why I Am Not a Pacifist,” in The Weight of Glory and Other Addresses, revised ed.
  • The John Jay Institute has affiliated scholar J.
  • Dr.

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25 Epic Bible Verses About Violence In The World (Powerful)

In Baltimore, there was a massive riot the day before. We live in a violent environment, and the situation is only going to get worse from here. According to many detractors, the Bible condones violence, which is untrue in this case. God despises violence in all its forms. We must recognize that war is sometimes necessary. It is important to remember that war is not always necessary. In addition, we must recognize that God is holy, and that His holy and fair judgment on sin is not the same as our sinful aggression against one another.

Violence just breeds more violence, and it will send you to hell as well, because Christians are not permitted to participate in such acts.

The act of physically injuring someone does not exclude the act of bearing evil towards someone in your heart and the act of speaking evil against someone. Put an end to the bloodshed and instead pursue peace.

Christian quotes about violence

“The use of violence is not the solution.” “There is never anything positive that emerges from violence.” “Anger is a sin in and of itself, but.it can also serve as a cause for sin. The topic of how we cope with rage lies at the heart of the issue of self-control. Anger can be expressed in a variety of immoral ways: violence, tantrums, bitterness, resentment, antagonism, and even withdrawal of quiet.” R.C. Sproul is a Christian pastor and author. In the words of Shakespeare, “Revenge. is like a rolling stone, which, after a man has forced his way up a hill, will rebound upon him with more power, and crush those bones whose sinews gave it motion.” Albert Schweitzer was an American physician and humanitarian who lived in the United States during World War I.

The Bible talks about violence in the world

Proverbs 13:2 is a good starting point. People appreciate nice things as a result of the fruit of their lips, while those who are disloyal have a voracious thirst for violence. 2. 2 Timothy 3:1–5 (New International Version) However, keep in mind that there will be periods of difficulties in the latter days of the world. As a result, people will be self-centered and materialistic, arrogant and abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy and heartless, unappeasable and slanderous, lacking self-control and brutal, not loving good, treacherous and reckless, swollen with conceit, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, putting on the appearance of godliness but denying its power.

Lastly, Matthew 26:51-52.

“Put your weapon away,” Jesus instructed him to do.

God hates the wicked

4:4 The LORD is in His holy house, and the LORD’S seat is in the heavens; His eyes observe, and his eyelids examine the children of mankind. 5The LORD puts both the righteous and the wicked to the proof, and the one who loves violence is despised by His soul. 6The wicked will be caught in snares by the Lord, and their cup will be filled with fire and brimstone and a smoldering wind from on high. 5. Psalm 5:5 The stupid shall not stand in thy sight, because thou hatest all those who do evil. 6.

Every day, he is filled with rage towards the wicked.

Don’t retaliate to violence

7. Matthew 5:39 (New International Version) But, I urge you, do not stand in the way of the evildoer. However, if someone hits you on the right cheek, turn the other cheek towards him as well. 8. 1 Peter 3:9 (New International Version) Do not repay evil for evil or reviling for reviling; on the contrary, bless, because it is to this that you have been called, in order that you may receive a blessing.

9. The book of Romans 12:17-18 There is no such thing as recompense for evil. Provide items that are honest in the eyes of all people. If at all possible, and to the extent that it is within your power, maintain peace with all mankind.

Verbal abuse and the mouth of the ungodly

7. Matthew 5:39 (King James Version). However, I advise you not to stand up to the evildoer. Whoever hits you on the right cheek, however, should also turn the opposite cheek to face him. 1. Peter 3:9 (New International Version) It is not appropriate to return evil for evil or reviling for reviling, but rather to bless, because you have been called to this in order to receive a blessing. 9. The book of Romans 12:17–18. No one should be held responsible for the actions of another. Make sure that everything is done honestly in the eyes of everyone.

God is not mocked, vengeance is for the Lord

Hebrews 10:30-32 (13th chapter) Because we are familiar with the man who declared, “Vengeance is mine; I will payback.” “The Lord will judge his people,” he says once again. It is a terrifying experience to find oneself in the hands of the living God. 14. Galatians 6:8 (Galatians 6:8 [Galatians 6:8] The harvest of those who sow in order to satisfy their flesh will be destruction; the harvest of those who sow in order to please their Spirit will be eternal life from the Spirit.

Seek peace and not violence

Psalm 34:14 is the fifteenth verse. Turn away from evil and toward virtue; seek peace and work for it relentlessly.

God’s protection from violence

Psalm 140:4 is the sixteenth verse. Keep me safe from the grasp of the wicked, O LORD. Amen. Defend me from people who are armed and dangerous, since they are planning against me. Reminders Timothy 3:2-3 (New International Version) Consequently, an overseer must be above reproach, the husband of just one wife, sober-minded, self-controlled, respectable,hospitable, and capable of teaching, and must not be a drinker, aggressive but mild, not quarrelsome, and not a lover of money, among other qualities.

  • Proverbs 16:29 (King James Version) Individuals that are violent mislead their partners, leading them down a dangerous path.
  • Proverbs 3:31-33 (KJV) Don’t be envious of violent people or try to imitate their methods.
  • The house of the wicked is cursed by the LORD, but the house of the upright is blessed by him.
  • In this day and age, the works of the flesh are plain to see.
  • They also include things like hatred and strife.
  • They include things like drunkenness and carousing, among other things.

Examples of violence in the Bible

Proverbs 4:17 is the twenty-first verse. Because they eat the bread of evil and drink the wine of violence, they are condemned. Habakkuk 2:17 (Habakkuk 22:17) You are responsible for the destruction of Lebanon’s forests. You’re going to be put down now. Because you exterminated the wild creatures, you will now be the source of their anxiety. You murdered people all across the countryside and wreaked havoc on the towns. 23. Zephaniah 1:9 (Zephaniah 1:19) Those who cross the threshold, as well as those who infuse their master’s home with violence and deception, shall be punished on that day.

Your troops, Teman, will be afraid, and everyone in Esau’s mountains will be slaughtered as a result of the slaughterhouse.

Ezekiel 45:9 (verse 25) So saith the Lord GOD: “Enough, O rulers of Israel!” declares the Lord GOD. Put an end to bloodshed and oppression, and bring justice and righteousness to fruition. I command you to stop evicting my people, declares the Lord God Almighty.

What the Bible Says About Violence

By Betty Miller Bud and Betty Miller, pastors, speak out against contemporary violence. With the horrific terrorist attack on the United States of America in 2001 still fresh in all of our minds, violence and terrorism in our country has emerged as a major concern for our government leaders, as well as for governments around the world, prompting many to inquire as to what the Bible has to say on the subject of violence. Individuals are likewise concerned and afraid about what may happen to them in a time when society is so dangerously threatening.

First and foremost, the Lord warned us that as the time of His second coming drew near, we would see these attitudes manifested across the globe.

What the Bible Says about ViolenceTerrorism

When we consider the above verse in conjunction with other passages from the Bible, there is no question that the hour in which we live is the season for the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ. The Bible says in Matthew 24:33 that “when ye see all these things, know that the kingdom of God is nigh, even at the door.” I swear to you that this generation will not pass away until all of these things have been accomplished. Despite the fact that heaven and earth will pass away, my words will not be forgotten.

  1. However, just as the days of Noah were, so too will the arrival of the Son of Man be in this world.
  2. “And they did not know it until the flood came and washed them all away; so it will be with the coming of the Son of Man.” We may look at Genesis 6:5-13 to see how our day compares to the day that Noah lived in order to make this comparison.
  3. Because of this, the LORD was sorry that he had created man on the world, and it saddened him in his heart.
  4. Noah, on the other hand, won favor in the eyes of the LORD.
  5. And Noah had three sons, who were named Shem, Ham, and Japheth.
  6. And when God looked down upon the earth, he saw that it had become corrupt; for every humanity had ruined his way upon the earth, as God had said.
  7. Genesis 6:5-13 is a biblical passage.

The state of violence that led the earth to be destroyed in Noah’s day is the same state of violence that our planet is currently experiencing.

They are calling on governments to take action against this evil, yet they are completely unaware of the root causes of the problem.

See also:  Why Did Jesus Go To The Cross?

Many of these actions have been taken by the government, and there are simply not enough laws to cover every infraction, nor are there enough men to police the system, nor are there enough jails to hold the wicked.

Throughout history, God, in His benevolence, has employed excellent governments to keep wickedness under control.

Currently, many various types of initiatives and strategies are being introduced to cope with the violence on the streets.

Hiring more police officers to monitor and arrest criminals, followed by the construction of larger prisons to house them, will not enough to deal with today’s lunacy.

Men and their programs can only trim the limbs of a bad tree; the root system, on the other hand, stays intact.

What exactly is the source of violence? It is an act of defiance against God and His commandments. Because of this, the tree will continue to develop new branches and produce more rotting fruit as long as the root structure is intact.

The Remedy for Violence of Today

To bring about a solution to our issues on the planet, we must all repent and turn to God, following His rules and commandments, and allowing Jesus to transform our bad natures into His natures of kindness and righteousness. This complete and entire collective conversion to God can only occur when God executes judgment on evil and eliminates it from the planet, and then establishes His millennium dominion on the globe. However, we must repent now in order to avert the escalation of violence that will follow.

  • We should pray and seek God with all of our hearts in order to be counted among those who will be spared the wrath of God.
  • And, as a result of the abundance of sin, the affection of many will become chilly.
  • And this gospel of the kingdom will be spread throughout the entire globe as a testimony to all peoples, and then the end will be brought to pass.
  • One of these occurrences is the escalation of violence around the world.
  • The Bible also mentions a period of judgment that takes place throughout the tribulation period leading up to the Lord’s second appearing.
  • However, the tares are the children of wickedness, and the adversary who planted them is the devil.
  • As a result, just as the tares are gathered and burnt in the fire, so it will be at the conclusion of this world.
  • And will throw them into a fiery furnace, where they will wailing and gnashing their teeth.
  • Whoever has ears to hear, let him hear.
  • Matthew 13:38-43 is a biblical passage.
  • The execution of the punishment for sin is a negative connotation associated with judgment, but it also has a good meaning associated with it.

This is defined inGalatians 6:7-9, which states that “Do not be fooled; God is not mocked: for whatever a man sows, that he will also reap.” (Matthew 6:29) Due to the fact that he who sows to his flesh will reap corruption from his flesh, but he who sows to the Spirit will harvest life everlasting from the Spirit.

  • God’s judgment on evil is manifested in the curse that is placed on wicked persons, whilst God’s judgment on the good will express itself in the gifts and rewards that He bestows on them.
  • Be diligent in your efforts to enter through the narrow gate; for many, I assure you, will strive to do so and will be unable to do so.
  • 7:14 (Matthew 7:14) Because males do not want to be constrained or confined in their actions, we are witnessing widespread devastation at this time.
  • God is incapable of doing anything bad.
  • The bad judgements that are developing in our globe, manifesting as violence, terrorist actions, wars, earthquakes, floods, fires, storms, tornadoes, and other natural disasters, are a direct outcome of spiritual laws that have been broken in our world.
  • Ezekiel 11:21 is a biblical verse.
  • In the midst of bloodshed, God promises His people a haven of peace and protection in His presence.

As Christians, the only place where we may feel secure is in our surrender and obedience to God.

It makes no difference where we are physically located since, as promised to us in Psalm 91, our protection is in Him.

A section of the Psalm should serve as an inspiration to all of us.

” Some Christians may wonder why they have been subjected to violence and suffering while God’s Word assures them of their safety.

Some examples include: going the additional mile, turning the other cheek, depriving oneself of pleasures for the sake of the gospel, suffering as a result of others’ wrongdoings toward us, and so on.

Sins of commission are accompanied with curses.

Sins of omission can also lead us to suffer as a result of our actions.

Because of this, the Bible states in James 4:17, “Whoever knows to do good, but does not do it, to him it is sin.” Many Christians are suffering not because they are outwardly disobedient, but rather because they are unaware of God’s Word and His methods, which is why they are suffering.

They do not pray as they should, nor do they read their Bibles, nor do they witness, nor do they contribute their tithes and offerings, among other things.

“He that dwelleth in the secret place of the Most High shall abide under the shadow of the Most High,” according to Psalm 91:1. It is essential that we do the following if we want to be protected under God’s protection during this violent hour:

  1. To bring about a solution to our issues on the planet, we must all repent and turn to God, obeying His laws and commandments, and allowing Jesus to transform our bad natures into His nature of kindness and righteousness. Until God executes judgment on evil and eliminates it from the globe, before establishing His millennium dominion on the planet, there will be no entire corporate conversion to God. It is necessary, however, that we repent immediately in order to avert the escalation of violence. Many innocent individuals, as well as the wicked, are killed and maimed during times of turmoil. With all of our hearts, we should pray and seek God’s forgiveness in order to be among those who will be spared the wrath of God. Our only hope for salvation is on a genuine repentance and rebirth. As a result of the abundance of evil, many people’s love will become frigid. Those, on the other hand, who persevere to the finish will be rescued And this gospel of the kingdom will be broadcast throughout the entire globe as a witness to all peoples, and then the end will be brought to a conclusion. Matthew 24:12-14 is a biblical passage. A number of events that will take place shortly prior to the time when the gospel will be spread over the entire world are prophesied in Scripture. One of these occurrences is the escalation of violence throughout the world. Due to the fact that we are currently under the shadow of the millennial kingdom, we are beginning to witness this process take place in part. Additionally, according to the Bible, there will be a time of judgment during the tribulation period before to the Lord’s second coming. Violence is addressed in the Bible. However, the tares are the children of wickedness, and the adversary who planted them is the devil. The harvest symbolizes the end of the world, with angels reaping what has been sown. Because of this, the tares are gathered and burnt in the fire, and this will be the case at the end of this age. After this, the Son of Man will send forth his angels, who will collect out of his realm everything that offends and everyone who does wickedness. There will be sobbing and gnashing of teeth when they are thrown into a fiery furnace of fire. Afterwards, in the kingdom of their Father, the righteous will shine out as the sun. Whoever has ears to hear, let him listen. Whoever has eyes to see, let him see. Matthew 13:38-43 is a passage of scripture that says Because of their bad deeds, the tares (wicked people) in this parable are being packed up for destruction, while God is also isolating His people from the world system in order to safeguard and reward them. The execution of the penalty for sin is a negative connotation associated with judgment
  2. Nevertheless, there is a good aspect to it as well. Sowing and reaping are two processes that involve judgement. Galatians 6:7-9 explains how to define it. In other words, do not be misled
  3. God is not mocked
  4. Because whatever a man sows, that he will also reap. Due to the fact that he who sows to his flesh will reap corruption from his flesh, but he who sows to the Spirit will harvest eternal life from the Spirit. Moreover, let us not become weary in doing good
  5. Because if we do not lose heart, we will reap in due season.” On the negative side of judgment, we observe that wicked seeds are planted, and the results of those seeds are devastation. On the positive side of judgment, good seeds are planted via Jesus, and the results are blessings. As seen by the curse that has been placed on wicked persons, God’s judgment on wickedness will be manifested in His gifts and rewards bestowed on those who are upright. A number of innocent people are also killed, but they will receive their recompense in heaven
  6. The Bible states that the road to the kingdom of God is strait and narrow, and that only a few will reach it. Be diligent in your efforts to gain in via the narrow gate
  7. Because many, I assure you, will want to do so and will be unable to do so.” Luke 13:24 is a biblical passage that teaches that God is a kind and forgiving God who loves us and wants us to be like him. There are few who find the route to life since it is a narrow gate and a narrow path that leads to the goal. Mt. 7:14 is a verse from the book of Matthew. Because males do not want to be constrained or restrained in their actions, we are witnessing widespread devastation at this point in time. While the curses on the world represent God’s initiation of disaster against people, it is the fruit of wickedness showing itself in the form of destruction that we are seeing. The will of God is perfect. He is righteous and pure in heart and spirit. A direct effect of spiritual rules being violated are the bad judgements that are appearing in our reality in the form of violence and terrorist activities as well as war and natural disasters such as earthquakes, flooding and fires as well as storms and tornadoes. The Lord GOD, however, declares that those whose hearts follow the hearts of their abominable things and abominations shall bear the consequences of their actions on their own heads. 11.21 in the book of Ezekiel As God’s people living in the midst of a corrupt and wicked generation, we are called to be lights that reflect His love and glory to those who see them. In the midst of conflict, God promises His people a haven of peace and security. Noah and his family were protected from the flood waters by the ark, and we are protected from the flood of violence by the spiritual ark that is Jesus Christ. When it comes to becoming Christians, the only place we can feel secure is in our surrender and obedience to the Lord. Following God’s will, on the other hand, provides security. Our protection, as guaranteed to us by the Lord in Psalm 91, is not dependent on our geographical location. These passages are invoked and prayed for on a daily basis by us. A section of that Psalm should serve as an inspiration to all of us, I believe. Psalm 91:5-7 (KJV) – It says, “Thou must not be terrified of the horror at night
  8. For the arrowflies at day
  9. For the plague walks in the dark
  10. For the destructionwastes at noonday.” “A thousand will die by thy side, and ten thousand will fall by thy right hand
  11. Yet it will not get near you.” If God’s Word offers them safety, some Christians may wonder why they have been subjected to violence and hardship. We must first identify the two types of pain in order to provide a response to this. The type of suffering we go through for the cause of Christ is the type of pain we go through when we are persecuted for our righteousness. For example, going the additional mile, turning the other cheek, foregoing pleasures for the sake of the gospel, suffering as a result of others’ wrongdoings toward us, and so on and so forth. Secondly, we suffer as a result of our own misdeeds and the faults of others. Curses are brought on by sins committed in the first place. These are intentional sins committed in defiance of God’s will. Omissions can also lead us to suffer as a result of our sins. It is a sin if you do not regularly pray for God’s blessings, contribute generously, obey, and spend time learning about God’s ways. Therefore, according to James 4:17, “Whoever knows to do right but does not do it, that person commits sin.” It is not so much that many Christians are suffering because they are openly disobedient as it is because they are unaware of God’s Word and His methods. The biblical passage Hosea 4:6a states, “My people have been destroyed because they have not known.” It is because of their laziness and complacency that some Christians are enduring hardship. There is a lack of prayer and Bible reading on their part, as well as a failure to donate their tithes and offerings, among other things. Our friendship with Jesus assures us of God’s protection. A passage from Psalm 91:1 declares, “He who dwelleth in God’s secret chamber will dwell under the shade of the Almighty.” To be shielded by God’s protection during this turbulent time, we must do the following.
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To bring about a solution to our issues on the planet, we must all repent and turn to God, following His rules and commandments, and allowing Jesus to transform our bad natures into His natures of kindness and mercy. This complete and total corporate turning to God can only occur when God executes judgment on evil and removes it from the earth, and then establishes His millennium kingdom on the earth. However, we must repent immediately in order to avoid the escalation of violence. Many innocent people, as well as the wicked, are killed or maimed during a time of violence.

  1. Only a genuine repentance and revival will be able to save us.
  2. But he who endures to the end will be saved.
  3. Jesus says in Matthew 24:12-14, The Bible foretells the events that will take place just prior to the time when the gospel will be preached throughout the entire world.
  4. Due to the fact that we are currently in the shadow of the millennium kingdom, we are beginning to see some of this process take place.
  5. What does the Bible say about violence.
  6. The harvest symbolizes the end of the world, with angels reaping what has been sown in good seed.
  7. After this, the Son of Man will send forth his angels, who will collect out of his realm all things that offend and those who do wickedness.

Then, in the kingdom of their Father, the righteous will shine out as the sun.

Matthew 13:38-43 (NASB) This parable describes the tares (bad people) being bundled together for destruction because of their wickedness, but God is also isolating His people from the world system in order to safeguard and reward them.

The process of sowing and reaping is governed by judgment.

“Do not be misled; God is not mocked: for whatever a man sows, that will he also reap.” (Proverbs 3:5-6) Because he who sows to his body will reap corruption from his flesh, but he who sows to the Spirit will harvest life everlasting from the Spirit.

As seen by the curse that has been placed on wicked individuals, God’s judgment on wickedness will reveal itself in His benefits and rewards for the virtuous.

Make every effort to enter through the narrow gate; because many, I assure you, will strive to do so and will be unable to do so.

Because it is a narrow gate and a narrow path that leads to life, and there are few who discover it.

While the curses on the world represent God’s initiation of disaster against people, it is the fruit of wickedness revealing itself in destruction that is the cause of the destruction.

He is a man of righteousness and purity.

But whoever’s heart follows after the heart of their abhorrent things and abominations, I will punish them on their own heads, declares the Lord GOD.

In the midst of conflict, God promises His people a haven of peace and protection.

As Christians, the only place where we may feel secure is in our surrender and obedience to God.

It makes no difference where we are physically located; our protection is in Him, as guaranteed to us in Psalm 91.

A section of that Psalm should serve as inspiration for all of us.

To begin answering this question, we must first identify the two types of suffering: The type of suffering we go through for the cause of Christ is the kind of pain we go through when we are persecuted for being virtuous.

The other is (2) Suffering as a result of our crimes or the faults of others: Curses are brought on by sins of commission.

Sins of omission can also cause us to suffer as a result of their consequences.

“Therefore, to anyone who knows to do right, but does not do it, to him it is sin,” James 4:17 explains.

Hosea 4:6a states, “My people have been destroyed because of a lack of wisdom.” Some Christians are suffering as a result of their laziness and complacency.

Our relationship with Jesus ensures that we are secure in God’s eyes. “He who dwelleth in the hidden chamber of the Most High shall stay under the shade of the Most High,” says Psalm 91:1. If we wish to be sheltered beneath God’s wing during this horrific time, we must do the following:

The End of the Article

Images of a peace-loving, compassionate pacifist come to mind when we think of Jesus, at least that’s what Howard Yoder had in mind when he thought of Jesus. When we assert that Jesus was a pacifist, we are reading our own ideology into the scriptural text. As much as I wish to subscribe to nonviolence, intellectual honesty compels me to acknowledge that Jesus was not a pacifist in his teachings. How would my Christian ethical response to tyranny fare in the event that this is shown to be true?

  • A angry Jesus who uses a whip to violently push moneychangers (bankers) out of the Temple, knocking their tables over in the process (John 3:15).
  • However, they are now required to have a money belt and a purse, and if they do not have a sword, they are required to “sell their cloak and buy one” (Luke 22:35-36).
  • It would be as if he were recommending the purchase of a firearm today.
  • Instead of peace, a sword is drawn.
  • Even a person’s adversary will be a part of one’s own family at some point (Matt.
  • On the night he was captured, Peter pulled his sword and slashed the ear of the high priest’s slave, causing him to lose his life (John 18:10).
  • 26:52).

Indeed, it was Jesus who instructed his followers to sell their cloaks in order to purchase a sword.

As a result, he must have intended his remarks for people who were sympathetic to the colonizer who had come to arrest him.

We can argue that Jesus despises violence, but it would be oversimplified to claim that he was a pacifist in his beliefs.

Violent resistance will never be embraced as a necessary evil, as some revolutionaries believe, or condemned as contradictory to Jesus’ teachings, as some pacifists believe.

Let me be clear: this violent Jesus makes me uncomfortable.

Despite the fact that I am not a pacifist, I believe the words of César Chávez to be representative of my position: “I am not a nonviolent guy.” “I am a violent man who is attempting to live a peaceful lifestyle.” Those of us who did not grow up in so-called “nice communities,” like me, rapidly learn that pacifism does not always work in the classroom.

  • Not all forms of violence are created equal.
  • At the absolute least, unconditional love may inspire the selfless act of standing in solidarity with those who are oppressed in their struggle for self preservation.
  • The oppressor has a strong interest in advocating that nonviolent resistance be used exclusively as the only ethically acceptable approach adopted by those he oppresses.
  • Because the use of violence all too frequently serves as a pretext for the oppressor to unleash even larger acts of violence in reprisal, it is necessary to be as smart as serpents while being as peaceful as doves.
  • What are some examples of ethical acts?
  • Tojoder is a Spanish verb that means “to screw with,” and is not a term that would be used in polite speech.
  • Those who find themselves confronted with the enormity of dominance have few ethical options.
  • When it comes to dissent, Tojoder refuses to follow the norms set out by those who create an environment for orderly dissent, satiating the desire for venting but without attempting to alter the power connections within current societal institutions.
  • When it comes to protesting police brutality, this is an ethics that does not go to the police department, does not ask for a permit from the police department, and does not provide permission to protest the police department.

When Jesus overturned the tables in the Temple on that particular day, I contend that he was participating in an ethicalpara joder of sorts.

Violence in the New Testament

Images of a peace-loving, compassionate pacifist spring to mind when we think of Jesus, at least that is how Howard Yoder perceived him when he thought of him. Whenever we assert that Jesus was a pacifist, we are imposing our specific ideology on the scriptural text. I want to believe in nonviolence, but intellectual honesty leads me to admit that Jesus was not a believer in nonviolence. How will my Christian ethical response to oppression fare in the face of this reality? When it came to creating discord and disintegrating togetherness, Jesus was a troublemaker.

  • Previously, his students would leave the house without a money belt, a bag, or sandals, and they would come back with everything they required.
  • Instructing his people to purchase a weapon, Jesus the so-called pacifist?
  • In this passage, Jesus tells his disciples that he did not come to bring peace to the globe, but rather division and conflict (Luke 12:51).
  • Son will turn against father, daughter against mother, and daughter-in-law will turn against mother-in-law as a result of his presence in the family.
  • 10:34-36).
  • “All those who take the sword must fall by the sword,” Jesus said in response to this terrible act of violence (Matt.
  • However, it is not clear if Jesus is speaking to Peter or to someone else.

“Look, Lord, we already have two swords,” several of the disciples said, pointing to their weapons.

22:38 in the Gospel of Luke According to the context of Jesus’ words, he is in direct conflict with his previous commands.

Those who take up swords to protect the empire will perish with the sword, just as the empire itself will perish with it.

He invites his disciples to become the victims of violence, and he encourages them to radical solidarity with a bloodied cross as a sign of solidarity.

Remember that the Day of Judgment, according to Jesus’ prophecy, will be marked by bloodshed and carnage.

In defiance of Jesus’ command, I do not possess a gun and am actively involved in gun control advocacy.

I am a man who uses violence.” As a violent man, I am attempting to be nonviolent,” says the author.

The same cannot be said for all forms of violent conduct.

A minimum of unconditional love could lead to an act of unselfishness, such as standing in solidarity with oppressed people in their struggle for survival.

The oppressor has a strong interest in urging that nonviolent resistance be used exclusively as the only ethically acceptable tactic adopted by those who are oppressed.

A requirement for being as clever as serpents yet delicate as doves is essential because the use of violence all too frequently becomes the oppressor’s justification for unleashing even more brutal vengeance.

What are some examples of such acts?

Basically, “tojoder” is a Spanish verb that means “to screw with,” and it is not a term that would be used in polite speech.

In the face of the enormity of control, those who are confronted with ethical alternatives have few options available.

As a result, Tojoderrefuse to follow the guidelines set out by those who provide an environment for orderly dissent, satiating the urge to express oneself but not intended to alter power dynamics within current societal institutions.

When it comes to protesting police brutality, this is an ethics that does not go to the police department, does not ask for a permit from the police department, and does not provide permission to protest from the police department.

When Jesus overturned the tables in the Temple that day, I contend that he was taking part in an ethicspara joder of some sort.

The Violent Take It by Force by David Briones

1 Minute to Read “From the days of John the Baptist until now, the kingdom of heaven has been subjected to violence, and the violent have taken it by force,” Jesus declared (Matt. 11:12). Two problems have left readers scratching their heads: first, what does it mean when the kingdom is subjected to violence, and second, who is responsible for seizing control of the kingdom by force. Let’s start with the second question and work our way backwards to the first in order to acquire some understanding on this situation.

Who are “the violent”?

As a result, it cannot be used to express a positive action, such as “excited guys are shoving their way into it” (J.B.

It must be referring to people who were in opposition to the kingdom.

In addition to Herod Antipas, who imprisoned John the Baptist (Matt.

What what does it mean for the kingdom to be “suffering violence”?

For those choosing the first choice, they believe that the kingdom is under attack by the powers of evil (Herod Antipas, Jewish leaders, and so on).

Even though each option highlights an important aspect of the kingdom of heaven, option one is more persuasive.

The kingdom experienced enmity then, as it faces hostility now.

“I know that you are able to achieve all things, and that no plan of yours can be defeated,” Job declares to the Lord, no matter what opposition the kingdom and its citizens may encounter (Job 42:2).

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