Who Did Jesus Pray To

If Jesus was God, how could He pray to God? Was Jesus praying to Himself?

QuestionAnswer It is necessary to recognize that the eternal Father and the eternal Son had an everlasting relationship before Jesus took on the form of a man in order to understand Jesus as God on earth praying to His Father in heaven. Please read John 5:19-27, especially verse 23, in which Jesus teaches that the Father sent the Son to save the world from sin (also see John 15:10). When Jesus was born in Bethlehem, He did not automatically become the Son of God. He has always been and will continue to be the Son of God from all eternity, and he will continue to be the Son of God indefinitely.

Jesus, along with the Holy Spirit, was always considered to be a member of the trinity.

John 10:30 is the passage in which Jesus teaches that He and His Father are one, which means that He and His Father are of the same substance and have the same essence (John 10:30).

These three people have had, and continue to have, an enduring connection.

  • While He was tempted by Satan, wrongly accused by mankind, rejected by His own people, and finally executed, He had to learn obedience (Hebrews 5:8) to His Father.
  • (Mark 1:35, 6:46).
  • It was through his prayers that He proved that He eventually surrendered to His Father’s will, which was for Him to die on the cross in order to pay the penalty (death) for our transgression of God’s rule (Matthew 26:31-46).
  • No one has an issue with God the Son praying to God the Father or conversing with God the Father.
  • In the Gospels, we see how the Son of God, in His humanity, carried out His Father’s purpose and in doing so, paid salvation for His people (John 6:38).
  • It is our responsibility to follow Christ’s example of prayer.
  • To execute His Father’s will, even in immaculate humanity, it is crucial to have a strong prayer life, as He demonstrated in this parable of the prodigal son.

Since Christ, as the God-man, required a thriving prayer life, so too should the disciple of Christ today, according to the Bible. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) Is it possible for Jesus, who is God, to pray to God? Was Jesus addressing himself in prayer?

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Prayers of Jesus – Wikipedia

Josef Untersberger’s painting Christ on the Mount of Olives is a masterpiece. In the canonical gospels, Jesus Christ is described as praying to God on a number of different occasions.

Recorded prayers

The following are the phrases that Jesus uttered in prayer, according to the gospels:

  • We express our gratitude to God for his revelation (Matthew 11:25
  • Luke 10:21)
  • Before reviving Lazarus from the dead (John 11:41-42), Jesus said, “Father, exalt your name” (John 12:28). In John 17, he prays for us. Threeprayers in the Garden of Gethsemane
  • Threeprayers on the Cross
  • Threeprayers in the Garden of Gethsemane
  • They do not understand what they are doing, so “Father forgive them,” Jesus says (Luke 23:34), and “My God, My God, why have thou deserted me?” (Luke 23:37). “Father, into thy hands I surrender my spirit” (Luke 23:46)
  • “Father, into thine hands I commit my spirit” (Matt 27:46, Mark 15:34)

Other references to Jesus praying

Other passages that mention Jesus praying include:

  • After healing people in the evening (Matt 1:35), before walking on water (Matt 14:23, Mark 6:46, John 6:15), before Peter’s confession (Luke 9:18), before teaching his disciples the Lord’s Prayer (Luke 11:1), before the Transfiguration (Luke 9:29), before teaching his disciples the Lord’s Prayer (Luke 11:1), before teaching his disciples the Lord’s Prayer (Luke 11:1), before In Luke 22:32, Jesus declares that he has prayed for Peter’s faith.

In addition, Jesus said grace before the feeding miracles, at the Last Supper, and at the Supper at Emmaus, among other places. R. A. Torrey observes that Jesus prayed early in the morning as well as all night, that he prayed before and after the main events of his life, and that he prayed “when life was especially hectic,” according to Torrey.

See also

  • In the New and Old Testaments, there is mention of prayer as a Christian practice.

References

Do you ever find yourself unable to comprehend God’s ways? Or do you get the impression, every now and again, that Jesus had no understanding what it was like to be in your position? You may be confident that Jesus coped with sentiments that were far more alone and agonizing than you will ever experience if you are going through a tough moment, whatever it is. He was not only tortured and slain because of His connection with and devotion to God, but he was also aware that this was going to happen and marched freely toward it with the aim of being faithful even to death.

“Father, if You are willing, take this cup from Me; but not My will, but Yours be done,” He said.

Even though He interrupted His prayer time twice to come back to the huddle and ask them to continue praying for Him, three of His closest friends, whom He had brought along with Him that evening for His prayer support, were unable to stay awake to pray for Him a few yards away, despite His repeated requests.

  1. Yet, in the end, he desired God’s will rather than his own.
  2. His struggle in prayer that night in the Garden is proof that we have a High Priest who understands our shortcomings, our temptations, and our troubles (Hebrews 4:15-16), and as a result, we may come near to Him with confidence when we are in need of assistance.
  3. It was also through Him that we saw what it looked like to set aside His own comfort and convenience, as well as His very life, and place Himself completely and completely in the hands of His Father.
  4. Lord God, assist me in prioritizing Your will over my own so that You will eventually be praised in everything I say and do.

I pray that even when I don’t comprehend the road You have put out before me, you would let me surrender to You in the same way that Jesus did by declaring, “Not my will; but Your will be done.” Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/Martin Barraud

10 Prayers of Jesus in the Bible [+Audio]

One of the greatest advantages of being a disciple of Jesus is the knowledge that He is now interceding on their behalf before the Father on their behalf (Roman 8:34; Hebrews 7:25). While we do not know what Jesus speaks to the Father in his prayers, we do have instances of many of Jesus’ prayers from the Bible, which we might use as a guide. As an illustration, in John 17:

First, Jesus prays that the Father would protect His church.

He not only prays for physical security, but he also prays for spiritual protection, namely that the church’s faith would remain strong after Jesus has returned to His Father (17:11).

Second, Jesus prays for His church to be sanctified…

That they would be purified; that they would come to understand the truth of God; and that they would reflect the glory of God on earth (17:17,19).

Third, Jesus prays for those who will believe through the message of that disciples (17:20).

Jesus prays for the expansion of his church and the conversion of a large number of people across the entire world as a result of the loyal work of all of His disciples. How incredible it is for believers today to be able to read this prayer and know that Jesus was, and continues to be, interceding directly and personally on their behalf before the Father. The following is an extract from The Jesus Bible.

There are at least 10 of Jesus’ prayers recorded in the Gospels:

Here’s a sample clip from The Bible Experience Complete Audio Bible: The Prayers of Jesus, narrated by Blair Underwood in the role of Jesus, and taken from the book of Matthew.

Jesus’ three prayers in the Garden of Gethsemane

  • Jesus prays for the glory of God (John 17:1-5)
  • Jesus prays for His followers (John 17:6-19)
  • Jesus prays for all believers (John 17:20-26)
  • Jesus prays for the salvation of the world (John 17:27-28)

Jesus’ three prayers on the Cross:

  • “Father, pardon them, for they are unaware of what they are doing.” “My God, My God, why hast thou deserted me?” says Jesus in Luke 23:34. “Father, into thy hands I surrender my spirit” (Luke 23:46)
  • “Father, into thine hands I commit my spirit” (Matt 27:46, Mark 15:34)

Jesus’ prayer of thanks

It is because of your gracious will that these things have been concealed from the wise and knowing and shown to young children; yes, Father, for such was your generous purpose.” (Matthew 11:25-26, New International Version)

Jesus’ prayer before the raising of Lazarus (John 11:41-42)

“Father, I am grateful that you have heard my prayer. I was aware that you were constantly aware of my presence, but I stated this for the benefit of the individuals there, so that they would believe that you had sent me.”

Jesus’ prayer after entering Jerusalem

Father, I thank you for listening to me and for your forgiveness.” I was aware that you were always aware of my presence, but I stated this for the benefit of the people gathered here, so that they would believe that you had sent me.

When Jesus teaches us how to pray – The Lord’s Prayer

“Our heavenly Father.”, we say. (Matthew 6:9-13; Luke 6:9-13) When you pray, however, retire into your room, lock the door, and focus your thoughts on your heavenly Father, who is unseen. Then your Father, who sees everything that is done in secret, will reward you for your efforts. In addition, while you pray, refrain from talking incessantly like pagans, who believe that their numerous words will make them more noticeable. Do not be like them, for your Father already knows what you require before you ever ask.

We beg you to forgive us our debts, just as we have forgiven our creditors.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Your Turn

Do any of Jesus’ prayers stick out to you as particularly meaningful? Why is it important to study Jesus’ examples of prayer?

What does studying Jesus’ examples of prayer teach you about the way He prayed, why He prayed, and what He prayed for? Which one do you identify with the most? Please leave a comment and share your opinions on the subject of Jesus’ prayers with us!

What Did Jesus Pray?

Jesus’ public career lasted only three and a half years, yet his intercessory ministry will have an indelible imprint on the church for all time. What method did he use to pray? What was it that he prayed for? Who was it that he prayed for? These are the kinds of questions that believers should be asking themselves in order to figure out the best approach to interact with our heavenly Father. Let us consider the kind of prayers that Jesus gave up to God in the heavenly realm.

1. Prayers to Resist Temptation

Before beginning his public ministry, Jesus journeyed into the desert, a location that would serve as his spiritual boot camp (Matthew 4:1-11). You could believe that Jesus didn’t require any type of instruction, but keep in mind that He was demonstrating to us how to put our confidence in God no matter what the situation. Yes, he was totally God, but he also took on the shape of a man and relinquished His divine abilities in order to survive the test of time as a simple mortal being. During this 40-day period, He fasted, and as anybody who has gone a few days without eating will attest, the frailty that results from a lack of food makes one more susceptible to temptation.

Despite the grumbling of his empty stomach, Jesus stood on the words of Scripture to warn Satan that “man does not live on food alone” (Matthew 4:4).

Although it is not strictly a prayer, when we pray, He serves as a model for how to combat temptation using God’s word.

2. Prayers ofForgiveness

Jesus had to forgive people who came into contact with him an undetermined number of times. Daily or perhaps hourly, as the priests and Pharisees repeatedly attempted to test Jesus and trip him up, it’s likely that they were doing so. One of the most powerful prayers the Son of God ever prayed took place at the foot of the cross, while Roman soldiers gambled for his clothing. “Forgive them since they are aware of what they are doing,” he says in his prayer for them (Luke 23:34). Jesus prayed for people who had trivialized his mission and insulted his suffering when he was nailed on a cross, writhing in agony.

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3. Prayers of Praise

In Luke 10:21, Jesus expresses gratitude to God for concealing wisdom from the wise and revealing truth to tiny children. He also opened the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:9-13) with the words “Hallowed be thy name,” which means “Hallowed be thy name.” There aren’t many recorded examples of Jesus extolling the virtues of his heavenly Father in the Scriptures, to be sure. The opening line of the Lord’s Prayer, on the other hand, serves as an example of praise. “Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name,” Jesus says at the outset of his prayer (Matthew 6:9).

As defined by Dictionary.com, the term “hallowed” refers to the act of making something holy, sanctifying it, consecrating it, honoring it as holy, considering it sacred, or venerate it: to hallow a battlefield.

4. Prayers of Submission

In the Garden of Gethsemane, Jesus prayed a prayer of surrender that is considered to be one of the finest instances of prayer in history. He was well aware that his time on this planet was drawing to a conclusion. And, as a human being, he recognized that the end would be unpleasant. “Going a little further, he fell to the ground with his face to the ground and prayed, ‘My Father, if it is possible, may this cup be taken away from me.'” Matthew 26:39 says, “Going a little further, he fell with his face to the ground and prayed, ‘My Father, if it is possible, may this cup be taken away from me.'” ‘However, not as I will, but as you will’.” Jesus might have adopted a stoic attitude, allowing grief to pass him by.

Instead, we saw His humanity as He grappled with the reality of His imminent death.

5. Prayers of Intercession

If you want to witness Jesus’ Fatherly love for his people, go no farther than John 17. In a moving prayer, Jesus brings his people closer together, preparing them for a day when they will be without Him. “I say a prayer for them. I am not praying for the entire world, but rather for those whom you have given me, for they are yours to keep and cherish. Everything I have is yours, and everything you have is mine. And it is through them that I have received honor. I shall no longer be present in the world, but they will continue to be present in the world, and I will come to you.

  • Knowing that his time on earth was limited, Jesus prayed for his followers.
  • One was impetuous and afraid, while the other was driven by ambition to establish himself as a successful businessman.
  • In this prayer, Jesus prepared his tiny band of men for the task of spreading the gospel throughout the globe.
  • “I say a prayer for them.
  • Everything I have is yours, and everything you have is mine.
  • I shall no longer be present in the world, but they will continue to be present in the world, and I will come to you.
  • Because Jesus was the only real representation of God on earth, it makes sense to model our prayers after His as we seek to speak with the Almighty God in our own lives.
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She enjoys boosting the confidence of new authors and readers who have recently relocated. Connect with her at her website, CarolGStratton.com, as well as on social media platforms Twitter and Facebook. Photo courtesy of Aaron Burden via Unsplash.

If Jesus is God, who/where does Jesus pray to?

The Westminster Shorter Catechism provides the basis for most of what follows. The Holy Trinity The three distinct Persons of the Trinity are the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit (each have their own consciousness, will etc). They are all connected by a common essence (that is what makes each Person to be God). The substance of God must never be confused with the three Persons, each of whom is God in their own right. God’s essence is not a person; otherwise, we’d have four distinct individuals who are God, each with their own essence.

  • The Bible teaches that there is only one essence and three persons.
  • It’s similar to the concept of a definition.
  • For instance, what exactly is a chair?
  • What do you think about four legs and a square top?
  • and so on till the end of time.
  • So, let us move on from chairs and consider what a rock is.
  • What exactly is a human being?

Is it necessary for a person to be three feet tall?

As you can see, in all of these cases, we are attempting to determine which collection of qualities constitutes the entity we are attempting to describe.

You will discover that defining the essence of anything, even a chair, is incredibly difficult.

If you take away a portion of the definition (the essence), you get something completely different.

God As a result, apply this to God.

As far as being a Spirit is concerned, it means to be a Spirit who is infinite and everlasting in His being, intelligence and power as well as holiness, justice, goodness and truth in a very little way.

However, scanning the Bible yields at the very least the summary that has been provided.

And it is just these three individuals that possess these attributes.

These attributes are at the heart of what it is to be God, and they are the core of who he is.

In the same way that if any item possesses ALL of the features of a chair, we declare that object to be a chair.

And it is for this reason that I can state unequivocally that neither you nor I am God.

However, the Father, Son, and Spirit are individually endowed with every one of the attributes listed above.

They are on an equal footing in terms of power and glory.

When Calvin taught what the Bible has to say about the matter (see hisInstitutes, Book 1 Ch13), it was revolutionary at the time. Today, you can find the same response in any decent Systematic Theology (egCharles Hodge, Louis Berkhoff).

If Jesus Is God, Why Did He Pray?

What was the purpose of Jesus’ prayer? As with any solution to a question of this nature, there are a plethora of compelling arguments to explain why the God-man, Jesus Christ, interceded. This is an issue that has been debated by many theologians throughout the history of the church. I believe the answer to this issue is rather straightforward: Jesus prayed because he felt a need to pray at the time.

1. Jesus prayed because God infused in him a spirit of prayer.

In Psalm 22, we see glimpses of numerous aspects of Christ’s life, not simply his crucifixion, which takes up a significant portion of the Psalm’s content. The beginning of Christ’s life of prayer began with his conception. Psalm 22 finds its ultimate completion in Christ, despite the fact that David is the protagonist of the tale. The Father prepared a body for Christ, which was fashioned in the womb of the Virgin Mary by the power of the Holy Spirit. It is apparent that, due to the natural limitations of his humanity, Christ’s early prayer practice was not as developed as it would be towards the conclusion of his life.

  1. The more the amount of experience he had, the more his prayers would evolve in the light of his lessons learned, problems faced, and struggles faced.
  2. His actions of reason were united with the holy ideals developed in his heart by the Holy Spirit, which constituted the basis of his marriage.
  3. From conception, he had cultivated a faith habit that would later manifest itself in specific acts of faith when the circumstances demanded it in response to God and his Word.
  4. 22:9).
  5. But the Father provided him with the means to maintain his religious commitment from the time of his conception till his death.
  6. Because you are the one who stole me from the womb of my mother, I have relied on you since before I was born.
  7. (6:5–6) (Ps.
  8. Christ not only trusted in God from a young age, but he also relied on God before he was born.
  9. It is not just Psalm 22 that speaks of the actuality of Christ’s religious life beginning in the womb, but also Psalm 8: “Out of the mouth of newborns and infants, you have built power because of your opponents, to stop the adversary and the avenger” (Ps.

8:2). God the Father and his people have been able to have a highly personal discussion because of Christ’s person and activity in bringing us to this point in our spiritual journey.

2. Jesus prayed because of who he is in relation to the Father.

When Jesus talks of his Father’s business in his Father’s house in Luke 2, his first recorded words express his devotion to his Father and his commitment to him. “‘Father, into your hands I submit my spirit!'” are the last documented words of Jesus, which express his faith in his heavenly Father. He died after saying this, says Luke, “having breathed his last” (Luke 23:46). Anyone conducting research on Jesus’ prayer life must take into consideration the fact that he prayed to his Father in heaven on an ongoing and ardent basis, something that is particularly evident in the Gospel narratives.

  1. When it came to praying to God, addressing him as “my Father” was nearly unheard of during the time of Christ.
  2. “At that moment, Jesus exclaimed, ‘I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth.'” The words of Christ take precedence above all else.
  3. Given the lack of precedent for loyal Jews addressing God as “Father” in prayer, the extraordinarily devoted Jew addressed to God as “Father” almost entirely in his recorded petitions, a phenomenon that has been seen before.
  4. The Aramaic wordabba alludes to a bond between a father and a kid.
  5. Jews, on the other hand, would have considered addressing God asabba to be insulting.

In the event that Jesus were not who he claimed to be, we would have good reason to join the Jews in accusing him of blasphemy: “This was why the Jews were seeking all the more to kill him, because not only was he breaking the Sabbath, but he was even calling God his own Father, making himself equal with God” (John 5:18).

The Prayers of Jesus

Based on the substance and form of Jesus’ prayers throughout his earthly ministry, this book instructs readers on the reasons for praying and the types of prayers they should say. Because of the uniqueness of the eternal relationship between the three persons of the Trinity, Christ addressed God as Father in virtually all circumstances, including the most dire: “‘My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will'” (Matthew 26:39). (Matt. 26:39).

Meanwhile, the physical manifestation of the Son opened up a whole new manner of communicating with the Father.

Finally, Jesus prayed to God because God had imbued him with a spirit of prayer, and also because of Christ’s position in connection to his Father, namely, that of being the Son of God, Jesus prayed to God.

There are other reasons as well, but they are the most important in terms of comprehending our Lord’s petitions.

On Christology and the Christian life, he has written several books and given numerous talks all over the world, including in China.

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Based on the substance and form of Jesus’ prayers throughout his earthly ministry, this book instructs readers on the reasons for praying and the types of prayers they should offer. Because of the uniqueness of the eternal relationship between the three persons of the Trinity, Christ addressed God as Father in virtually all circumstances, including the most dire: “‘My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will'” (Matthew 26:39). (Matt. 26:39).

  1. Meanwhile, the physical manifestation of the Son opened up a whole new manner of communicating with the Father in the Spirit.
  2. After everything is said and done, Jesus prayed to God because God had given him a spirit of prayer, as well as because of Christ’s position in regard to his Father, namely, that Christ is the Son of God.
  3. It is true that there are other factors at play, but they are the most important in comprehending our Lord’s plea.
  4. On Christology and the Christian life, he has written many books and given lectures across the world.
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How many times did Jesus pray in the Bible?

A: The Bible urges us in 1 Timothy 5:17 to “pray without stopping,” which means “continually.” However, while I do not believe that this technically implies that one should never cease praying, I believe that Jesus got closer to this than any other individual who has ever lived on this earth to doing so. He was perpetually in the state of prayer. In many places, he is seen to pray: alone (Mt 14:23)(Mk 1:35)(Lk 9:18)(Lk 22:39-41), in public (Jn 11:41-42)(Jn 12:27-30), before meals (Mt 26:26)(Mk 8:6)(Lk 24:30)(Jn 6:11), before making critical choices (Lk 6:12-13), before healing (Mk 7:34-35), after Moreover, Jesus taught on the significance of prayer (Mt 21:22), (Mk 11:24-26), (Mt 7:7-11), (Lk 11:9-13), (Jn 14:13-14), (Jn 15:7,16), and (Jn 16:23-24), (Mt 5:44), (Lk 6:27-28), (Mt 6:5-15: includes the Lord’s Prayer), and (Mt 11:2-4).

  1. (Mt 18:19-20).
  2. The following are all of the passages from the Gospels that I could uncover that depict Jesus praying.
  3. Early in the morning, just before leaving for Galilee.
  4. The Lord prayed all night before picking His twelve disciples (Lk 6:12-13).
  5. (See also Matthew 14:19, Mark 6:41, and Luke 9:16.) (Mt 14:23) Before going out on the water, (See also Mark 6:46 and John 6:15.) While healing a man who was deaf and mute, Jesus said the following.
  6. Mark 8:6-7 (as well as other passages) (Lk 9:18) This was before Peter spoke to Jesus as “the Christ.” (Matthew 9:28-29) At the time of the Transfiguration.
  7. He said this before teaching His followers the Lord’s Prayer (Lk 11:1).

(See also Mk 10:13-16 and Lk 18:15-17 for further information.) (Jn 12:27-28) He is pleading with the Father to exalt His name.

(See also Mk 14:22-23 and Lk 22:19 for further information.) (Lk 22:31-32) (Lk 22:31-32) When Satan begged to “sift” Peter, I prayed for him to have faith.

(Matthew 26:36–46) In the Garden of Gethsemane, just before His betrayal.

(Matthew 27:46) At the time of his death on the cross, Jesus cried out in anguish, “My God, My God, why have you left me?” (See also Mk 15:34 for further information.) Towards the conclusion of His life, Jesus said, “Father, into Your hands I surrender my spirit,” according to Luke 23:46.

He blessed the disciples just before His ascension, according to Luke 24:50-53.

In contrast, I do not understand these passages in this manner. Additional Questions and Answers

To whom and why did Jesus pray?

1 Timothy 5:17 urges us to “pray without stopping,” and this is exactly what we should do. While I do not think this to be a precise translation of “never stop praying,” I believe that Jesus got closer to this than any other individual who has ever lived on the face of the earth. He was perpetually in a state of meditation or prayerfulness. In many places, he is seen to pray: alone (Mt 14:23)(Mk 1:35)(Lk 9:18)(Lk 22:39-41), in public (Jn 11:41-42)(Jn 12:27-30), before meals (Mt 26:26)(Mk 8:6)(Lk 24:30)(Jn 6:11), before significant choices (Lk 6:12-13), before healing (Mk 7:34-35), after healing Moreover, Jesus taught on the significance of prayer (Mt 21:22), (Mk 11:24-26), (Mt 7:7-11), (Lk 11:9-13), (Jn 14:13-14), (Jn 15:7,16), and (Jn 16:23-24), (Mt 5:44), (Lk 6:27-28), (Mt 6:5-15: includes the Lord’s Prayer), and (Lk 11:2-4).

  1. (Mt 18:19-20).
  2. All of the texts in the Gospels that I could discover that showed Jesus praying are listed here in chronological order.
  3. Immediately following the healing of the sick.
  4. Speaking to the Jewish leaders (Mt 11:25-26), Jesus said the following: Greeting the Father before feeding a crowd of 5000 people (John 6:11).
  5. Prior to feeding 4000 people, Christ expresses gratitude to the Father (Mt 15:36).
  6. Peter named Jesus “the Christ” (Lk 9:18) before anybody else did.
  7. At the time of the seventy’s return (Lk 10:21), He said this before teaching His followers the Lord’s Prayer in Luke 11:1.

Jesus lays his hands on tiny children and prays for them (Mt 19:13–15).

At the Lord’s Supper, according to Matthew 26:26 Mk 14:22-23 and Lk 22:19 are examples of passages that apply.

(17:1–26) John the Baptist Just before entering Gethsemane, Jesus prayed for Himself, His disciples, and all Christians.

(He prayed three times in succession.

In the Gospel of Luke (Lk 23:34), Jesus says “Father, pardon them, for they know not what they do,” Jesus pleaded immediately after being nailed to the cross.

Mark 15:34 (as well as other passages).

(Lk 23:46) In the Gospel of Luke 24:30, Jesus says, Prior to sharing His meal with the disciples following His resurrection, He said a blessing over the bread.

In addition, some think that there are scriptures outside of the Gospels which demonstrate that Jesus is still praying (making intercession) on our behalf (Rom 8:34)(Heb 7:25)(Heb 9:24)(1 Jn 2:1), despite the fact that He has ascended to the throne of glory.

However, this is not my interpretation of the passages. Questions and Answers on a variety of topics

Bible Answer:

Yes, as stated in the declaration of faith, Jesus and God are made of the same material as one another. The Creed of Athanasius (A.D. 325) We worship one God in three Persons, and three Persons in one Trinity; we do not confuse the Persons, nor do we divide the Substance. Because there are three distinct persons in the Trinity: one of the Father, one of the Son, and one of the Holy Spirit. However, the Godhead of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are all one: the glory is equal, the majesty is coeternal, and the power is limitless.

  • The Father uncreated, the Son uncreated, and the Holy Spirit uncreated before the beginning of time.
  • The everlasting Father, the eternal Son, and the eternal Holy Spirit are all mentioned in the Bible.
  • Furthermore, there are neither three uncreated, nor are there three incomprehensibles; rather, there is only one uncreated and one incomprehensible.
  • Despite this, they are not three Almightys, but rather one Almighty.
  • Despite this, they are not three gods, but rather one God.
  • And yet, there are only one Lord, not three Lords.
  • The three Persons, on the other hand, are coeternal and coequal.

The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are all one God, which indicates that they are all three persons in one being.

However, when Jesus came to earth, He likewise assumed the form of a man and drank from the cup of human flesh.

It is referred to as Jesus Our Savior.

The paradox is that Jesus was both God and man at the same time.

Despite the fact that Jesus was God, he prayed to God in the form of a man.

Jesus, upon witnessing their faith, spoke to the paralyzed, “My son, your sins are forgiven you.” “Why does this man speak in such a threatening manner?” several of the scribes wondered aloud in their hearts as they watched the scene unfold.

What a riddle to solve! Jesus was both God and man at the same time. He went about life like any other human being would, which included praying. He forgiven sins because He is God.

Conclusion:

There have been a number of previous questions and answers that have explored the enigma of Jesus as the God-man in greater depth. For example, the first question is “How could the Son of Man die?” and the answer explains how Christ could die while still being God. The second addresses the issue of why Jesus said, “Father, why have you deserted Me?” in the Gospel of Matthew. The final question reveals how Jesus can be God despite the fact that He did not know when the end would come. In conclusion, He was capable of dying for our sins because He was a man.

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What kind of death may the Son of Man suffer? When Jesus was hanging on the cross, he cried out to his Father, “Father, why have you abandoned Me?” How can Jesus be God if He does not know when the world will come to an end?

If Jesus is God why did He pray to theIf Jesus is God why did He pray to the Father to let this cup pass? Father to let this cup pass?

Considering that Jesus is God, why would He beg the Father to remove this cup from His hands?

Bible Answer:

The question “Why did Jesus pray to God the Father?” is one that many people have asked. As a result, it should come as no surprise that the following issue is also raised: “If Jesus is God, why would He beg the Father to let this cup pass?” Alternatively, we may rephrase the issue as follows: “If Jesus is God, why did He petition to the Father to remove this cup off His shoulders?” The information that follows provides answers to all three queries.

God Hides Himself

The majority of individuals are intrigued by mysteries, the uncommon, the strange, and the unknown. For this reason, mystery books, science fiction, the occult, and documentaries about the unknown are all extremely popular genres. However, when the subject of God is brought up, some individuals avoid discussing this enigma. A small number of individuals are convinced that God does not exist, despite the fact that they have not toured the entire universe in search of God. Do you suppose they didn’t take into consideration the fact that God cannot be seen?

  • You are, without a doubt, a God who conceals Himself.
  • It is not feasible to assert objectively that God does not exist in the universe.
  • Because if someone did see God, they would not be living to tell anyone about it, that is the explanation.
  • This means that we will never be able to fully comprehend our God.
  • God exists in three distinct persons: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.
  • This mystery is complicated by the fact that Christ Himself revealed that He is God, and the Jewish leaders recognized His claim.

According to the verse, the Jews responded, “We do not stone You for doing a good work, but for blasphemy; and we stone You because You, being a man, make yourself out to be God.” 10:33 (John 10:33) (NASB) The Bible’s message is that there is only one God, and no other gods exist (Deuteronomy 6:4; Isaiah 43:10; 44:6-8; 45:6; James 2:19).

God, on the other hand, exists in three distinct persons: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. They are the creators of the universe. That is a riddle in and of itself.

Why Did Jesus Pray to God the Father?

Now, if Jesus was God, why would He pray to God in the first place? The fact that Jesus Christ was both a man and a divine being is the key to unlocking the door to understanding why Jesus prayed to God the Father. Jesus was both God and a human being at the same time. When it comes to His Son, who was born of a descendant of David according to flesh and blood, and who was confirmed the Son of God with authority by his resurrection from the dead, Romans 1:3-4 says, Romans 1:3-4 is a biblical passage (NASB) The same principle is expressed in Philippians 2:6-8.

  • The same reality is communicated in Hebrews 2:9-14 as well.
  • According to Hebrews 2:14, He had a physical body made of flesh and blood.
  • During His time among us, He went through the motions of daily life just like any other human being.
  • Christ gained an understanding of what it was like to be a human being.
  • “Why did Jesus pray to God the Father?” we must question ourselves now.
  • He had a praying experience similar to that of a human.
  • Scripture makes it very apparent that God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit are in constant communication with one another (Genesis 1:26).
  • It is a wonder how God, who is one, can converse with the other members of the Trinity while remaining one.
  • He was also a guy, for this reason.
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Why Did Jesus Ask the Father to Let This Cup Pass?

Now, what was Jesus’ reasoning for requesting that the cup be removed from him? According to Matthew 26:39, this is exactly what He accomplished. And after a little distance, he dropped to his knees and pleaded, saying, “My Father, if it is possible, please take this cup away from me; nevertheless, not according to my desire, but according to yours.” Matthew 26:39 (KJV) (NASB) His thoughts appear to be on the severe suffering He would soon be experiencing as a result of the tortures and crucifixion He was about to undergo.

He had come to die on the cross in our place, and that is exactly what He accomplished.

Conclusion:

If Jesus is God, why would He petition to the Father to allow this cup to be removed from Him? He prayed because it is the only way for men to speak with their Creator. If Christ had not prayed, then He would not have been a genuine human being in the first place.

Another indication that He was a genuine man is the fact that He requested permission from the Father to let this cup pass. It was His body that perished on the cross when He died. However, when He rose from the dead, the resurrection demonstrated that He was God (Romans 1:4).

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If Jesus is God, why would He appeal to the Father to allow this cup to be removed off His shoulders? He prayed because it is the only way for men to speak with their creator, the Almighty. Were Christ to have died without having prayed, He would not have been a genuine human being. Another indication that He was a real man is the fact that He prayed the Father to allow this cup to pass. When He died on the cross, His body perished as well as His soul. When He rose from the dead, His resurrection demonstrated that He was indeed God, according to the Bible (Romans 1:4).

How could Jesus pray to God if He is God? Was Jesus praying to Himself?

One of the most important passages in the Bible, Hebrews 2:17, explains how Jesus could pray to God the Father. “As a result, he had to be treated the same as his siblings in every way.” Praying is one of the most essential responsibilities that everyone has. The fact that Jesus was both completely human and completely divine meant that it was only natural that He should pray to His heavenly Father. There are a variety of reasons why Jesus prayed to the Father while still a human being. First and foremost, everyone is called to worship God.

  1. Jesus, in his capacity as our high priest, intercedes on our behalf on behalf of God’s people (Hebrews 2:17).
  2. It is recorded in John 11:41-42 that Jesus was praying to God the Father for yet another reason.
  3. I was aware that you were constantly aware of my presence, but I stated this in order for the others who were standing about to think that you had sent me.” As a result, one of the reasons Jesus prayed to the Father was for the benefit of people who were in His immediate vicinity.
  4. Sometimes the Bible says little more than “Jesus prayed,” but other times we get a glimpse of something more significant.
  5. Within the framework of a prayer, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are all revealed in perfect communion with one another.
  6. He prayed to God the Father because it was the right thing to do.
  7. Truths that are related: Is Jesus Christ the Son of God?

What is the theological idea of the hypostatic union and how does it manifest itself? What is the kenosis and how does it manifest itself? What do you think are the most compelling arguments supporting the deity of Jesus Christ? Return to the page: The Truth About Jesus Christ.

The Last Great Prayer of Jesus

Consider the possibility of eating supper with Jesus tonight, and the meal ending with Him lifting His eyes to the heavens and beginning to pray. I’d be listening intently to every word! Following the Last Supper, the disciples were privy to Jesus’ final big prayer, which they heard aloud. Jesus knew they would miss his bodily presence and want for them (and us) to be comforted and loved as He had done for them. It was, in a sense, his final opportunity to inform them of his goals and objectives for their life.

We have been given a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to peek into the heart and thoughts of Jesus, which demonstrates to us the unique significance we have in his eyes as he prays for us.

Jesus Prays for Himself

1-5: “After saying all of this, Jesus looked up to heaven and exclaimed, ‘Father, the hour is arrived.'” Give glory to your Son so that he might return the glory to you. Because you have delegated authority to him over everyone. He grants eternal life to each and every one of the people you have given him. In order to have eternal life, one must come to know you, the one and only real God, as well as Jesus Christ, the one you sent to earth. I brought honor to you on this planet by fulfilling the task you assigned me to complete for you.

  • Our Father and His Son have worked together since the beginning of time to grant His Son absolute sovereignty over all humanity.
  • Jesus didn’t just stare about aimlessly; He was looking at His Father, who was seated on His throne.
  • Jesus uses the term “glory” a number of times.
  • We can have everlasting life with Jesus if we KNOW the Father and the redemptive work of his Son, Jesus, as Jesus describes plainly in the Gospel of John.
  • The sheep of Jesus are AWARE of His voice.
  • (See also John 17:14-15.) By studying God’s Word, we may get to know him better, which increases our confidence in him and his promises.

Jesus’ Prayer for His Disciples

Verse 6-10: “I have exposed you to them whom you gave me out of the world, and they have seen your glory.” They belonged to you; you entrusted them to me, and they have remained true to your word. They are now aware that everything I have received has been provided by you. Because I delivered the words you provided me, and they were well received. They were confident that I was sent by you, and they thought that you were the source of my message. I will say a prayer for them. I am not praying for the entire world, but rather for those whom you have given me, for they are yours to keep and cherish.

And it is through them that I have received honor.” We, his beloved ones, are in Jesus’ prayers just as much as he was for the disciples.

He respects, loves, and embraces each and every one of us. When we display Jesus’ character (and hence his splendor) to individuals in our immediate vicinity, we bring honor to him. Jesus is alive and well in the world today because of our efforts!

Jesus Prays for Unity

The following are the verses 11-19: “Now I am going from the world; they are remaining in this world, but I am coming to you.” As you have given me your name, Holy Father, please protect them with the power of your name so that they will be joined in the same way that we are. They were protected by the power of the name you gave me while I was in this place with them. I kept watch over them, making sure that none of them went missing, with the exception of the one who was bound for disaster, as the Scriptures said.

  1. As long as I was with them in this world, I told them numerous things in order for them to be filled with my happiness.
  2. Furthermore, they are despised by the world because they do not belong to it, in the same way that I do not belong to the world.
  3. They are not a part of this world any more than I am a part of it.
  4. In the same way that you sent me into the world, I am now sending them into the world as well.
  5. I think I didn’t really comprehend or appreciate just how safe and secure we were being kept and protected until now.
  6. He desires for us to be united in a way that is as strong as the link that exists between the Father and the Son.
  7. His message transforms us into “holy” people who are dedicated and devoted to God.
  8. In related news, “The Light of the World” was released.

The Joy of the Lord

As Jesus explains in verse 13, he taught his followers “many things” in order for them to be “full” with his pleasure. He prays for you and me in the same way. Jesus desires for us to be filled with the overflowing joy that comes from a genuine relationship with him. Being able to experience the delight of his presence is not dependent on our current circumstances. He desires more than the satisfaction that his surroundings provide. Happiness is a fleeting emotion. His happiness will always be with us.

Jesus Praying for Us

“I am praying not just for these disciples, but also for everybody who will ever believe in me as a result of their message,” says the author in verses 20-26. I hope that they will all become one, just as you and I are one—as you are in me, Father, and I am in you—and that they will all be one in Christ. We pray for them to be present in us so that the world would believe you sent me. I have given them the honor you have given me, so that they may be one with us as we are with them. It is I who is in them, and it is you who is in me.

  • Father, I want these people who you have given me to be with me wherever I am at this time.
  • O righteous Father, the world does not know who you are, but I do; and these disciples are aware that you sent me to them.
  • Then your feelings for me will be reflected in them, and I will be reflected in them.” We, as well as future believers and followers, are included in Jesus’ prayer as a result of our participation.
  • He desires for us to be bound together in His love, as witnesses to his life, love, and sacrifice on the cross.
  • His greatest goal is for us to be with him in Heaven, where we will be able to witness the entire grandeur of God for all time.
  • When he speaks his last words, they reverberate with the intensity of his longing: “Then your love for me will be in them, and I will be in them.” His immense love for us motivated him to make the ultimate sacrifice for us.

He desired for us to remain with him indefinitely. While we are on this planet, he wants us to feel safe and secure, and to put our whole faith in his plan and purpose.

John 17- Prayer of Intercession

This prayer provides us with an up-close and personal glimpse into his thoughts: He is on his way to the cross and is frantically praying for us; for those whom he loves. Jesus was well aware that the crucifixion lay ahead of him, and he prayed publicly to his Father in the midst of his followers, demonstrating his compassion. He made certain that his statements were captured so that we could hear what was going through his head and heart. Isn’t it difficult to grasp what’s going on? He was thinking about me at the time.

I’m sure it helped to strengthen the disciples, and I hope to feel the same love, protection, comfort, and strength every day of my life as they did.

Reflections: As we get closer to Easter, I’d want to spend some time thinking about Jesus’ final prayer.

We should ask ourselves the following questions: What is my strategy for getting to KNOW Jesus better?

Is it possible for me to truly comprehend and embrace the great value that Jesus placed on my life?

In order to live a life in harmony with my fellow Christians, what actions may I take?

Blessings, AnnMarie Photo courtesy of Pixabay

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