Who Poured Perfume On Jesus

The Woman who Anoints Jesus

Andrea Solario is a freelance writer and editor based in New York City (c.1524) Mary Magdalene (also known as Mary Magdalene) is a Christian saint who lived during the time of Jesus Christ. What she has done will be told in her memory whenever the gospel is proclaimed throughout the world,’ says the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Matthew 14:9) Despite the fact that the lady who pours perfume on Jesus in the days before his death is mentioned in the gospels, it is difficult to learn anything about her beyond the broad strokes provided by the gospel accounts.

According to Mark’s account (usually regarded to be the first of the gospels to have been written down, and to be the simplest in terms of language and organization), these are the first words of Jesus: “I am the Christ, the Son of the living God.” He was in Bethany at the time, lying at the table at the home of Simon the Leper when a lady approached him with an alabaster jar filled with a very costly perfume made entirely of nard.

She shattered the container and sprayed the perfume all over his face.

This property might have been sold for more than a year’s earnings, and the proceeds distributed to the less fortunate.

  1. ‘Leave her alone,’ Jesus instructed.
  2. She has done something very wonderful for me.
  3. However, you will not always have me at your disposal.
  4. She prepared my body for burial by sprinkling perfume on it the night before.
  5. The passage in Luke 7:36-50 mentions that the lady had led a wicked life, and the widespread consensus is that this means that she was involved in prostitution.
  6. Jesus takes use of the situation to make a point about sin and forgiveness, as well as about the hospitality of his host.
  7. Throughout John 12:1-8, the lady is named as Mary of Bethany, the sister of Martha and Lazarus, and she is not depicted as having committed a sin.

There are further variances in the four narratives in terms of whether the perfume is spilled on Jesus’ head or feet, whether she rips his feet with her tears and dries them with her hair, and the importance that Jesus attaches to the incident (giving to the poor; forgiveness and hospitality; foreshadowing his death).

  • Matthew and Mark’s reports of the woman do not give her a name, and they provide no other information about her past.
  • According to John 11:2, this Mary, whose brother Lazarus is now ailing, was the same one who poured perfume on the Lord’s feet and cleaned his feet with her hair earlier in the day.
  • According to a long-standing belief, this Mary is also Mary Magdalene, out of whom Jesus had banished seven devils as previously said (Luke 8:2; Mark 16:9).
  • In biblical times, Mary was a fairly common given name, and various variations appear in the gospels and the New Testament (the mother of Jesus, Mary from Bethany, Mary Magdalene, Mary the wife of Cleophas, and Mary the mother of James and Joseph, amongst others).
  • What exactly is in a nard?
  • This is clearly intended to emphasize the great importance of the document.
  • A plant native to the Himalayas, nard or spikenard oil has been used as a perfume, incense, and medicinal for millennia.

Beyond its mention in the gospels, the Song of Solomon makes reference to it as well (1:12 and 4:13).

A denarius was a coin that held 3.9 grams of silver around the time of Jesus.

An other measure of its worth is that the denarius was the usual payment for a day’s salary during Jesus’ lifetime (see Matthew 20:2).

In today’s money, this would be nearly equivalent to the median pay of around £25,000.

(By contrast, the most expensive perfume currently available for retail purchase is Clive Christian’s Imperial Majesty, which retails for $215,000 for a 16-ounce bottle adorned with a 5-carat diamond cluster.

Is it one of her tools of the trade, presuming she has not been misrepresented by the comments, or is it a family relic that she has passed down through generations?

What ever the source of the extravagance,’some of those present’ lament that the money should have been put to greater use (it’s easy to blow money that doesn’t belong to you).

‘There will always be impoverished people among you,’ says the prophet.

Even if we venture deeper into the area of conjecture, there is a subtext to this story.

What are you doing with yours?

‘He did not say this because he cared for the poor, but because he was a thief; as keeper of the money bag, he used to help himself to what was placed into it,’ John 12:6 explains further.

In all seriousness, Judas, I appreciate your worry about my impending demise.

Application A wide range of implications may be drawn from this paragraph, which serves as an unsettling reminder to everyone who has ever taken a superior-than-thou attitude toward someone or something else.

While it would have been a nice gesture to sell the perfume and donate the proceeds to the needy, the extravagance of ‘spending’ it by pouring it on Jesus was an even better gift in honor of Jesus.

The immediate priorities of a situation may take precedence over the long-term ‘big picture,’ as they do in this situation.

It’s easy to pass judgment on people based on their financial decisions.

What level of generosity do we demonstrate with what we have?

Finally, there is a glimpse into the workings of the human mind itself.

‘A person’s methods may appear clean to them, but the Lord considers the intentions behind their actions.’ Proverbs 16:2 explains how to be wise.

His rage was not directed at the fact that he had missed an opportunity to feed starving people, but rather at his own personal loss.

Even understanding our own feelings may necessitate prayer, reflection, and assistance from God and others.

‘The desires of a person’s heart are deep waters, but a person who has insight pulls them to the surface.” Proverbs 20:5 explains how to be wise. This article was originally published in our Engage Newsletter, which was published in January 2018.

Anointing of Jesus – Wikipedia

Andrea Solario is a freelance writer and editor based in Milan, Italy (c.1524) Mary Magdalene (also known as Mary Magdalene) is a Christian saint who lived at the time of the apostles and the apostles’ martyrdom. What she has done will be repeated in her memory whenever the gospel is spread throughout the world,’ says the Pope. (See Mark 14:9 for further information.) The presence of her tale in the gospels confirms Jesus’ comments about the lady who pours perfume on him in the days before his death, although it is difficult to learn anything about her beyond the broad strokes.

According to Mark’s account (which is usually believed to be the first of the gospels to have been written down and to be the simplest in terms of language and organization), these are the first words of Jesus: “I am the Christ, the Son of the living God.” He was in Bethany at the time, resting at the table at the home of Simon the Leper when a woman approached him with an alabaster jar filled with a very expensive perfume made entirely of nard, which she placed on his table.

  1. As she put perfume on his head, she smashed the jar against the counter.
  2. A year’s pay might have been obtained by selling it, with the proceeds going to the impoverished.’ And they were really severe in their criticism of her.
  3. To my surprise, she’s done something quite wonderful for me!
  4. I’m sorry, but I’m not going to be there forever.
  5. Indeed, I assure you, wherever the gospel is taught throughout the world, what she has done will be mentioned as well, in her memory.’ The Gospel of Mark (Mark 14:3-9) In other gospels, more details are included to either clarify or confound what is taking place.

There has been widespread agreement over the centuries that a woman’s imagination is limited to sexual immorality, which may be due to a fixation on the part of predominantly male commentators over time, or perhaps a lack of confidence on their part in the opposite genital, but this has been the consensus for a long time now.

(It should be noted that in this instance, Simon is referred to be a Pharisee rather than a leper, though it is conceivable to be both at the same time).

Throughout John 12:1-8, the lady is named as Mary of Bethany, the sister of Martha and Lazarus, and she is not depicted as immoral in any way.

There are also variances in the four narratives in terms of whether the perfume is spilled on Jesus’ head or feet, whether she rips his feet with her tears and dries them with her hair, and the importance that Jesus attaches to the scene (giving to the poor; forgiveness and hospitality; foreshadowing his death).

  1. If so, which one did it happen to be.
  2. ‘Sinful lady’, according to Luke, whereas Mary of Bethany is identified as such by John.
  3. In addition to not naming the lady, Matthew and Mark identify the location as Bethany’s house of Simon the Leper, however they do not identify the woman by name.
  4. Apparently, nothing more than the fact that they both share the same name appears to be the basis of this identification.
  5. But there is nothing in the Bible that suggests Mary Magdalene was either a prostitute or a Mary from Bethany, and her reputation appears to be based on nothing more than the fact that it is a handy way to limit the number of individuals who have the same name as she does.
  6. A pure nard perfume with an alabaster container is described in the gospels as being produced.
  7. It was most likely brought from Greece, and it was a tiny jar often made of alabaster or glass.

Nard oil is extracted from the flowers of the spikenard plant.

The bottle of perfume, according to those in attendance, is worth more than 300 denari.

In today’s money, 300 denarii would be equivalent to little more than a kilo of silver and would be worth around £480 at face value.

For most people, 300 denarii would have been the equivalent of a year’s salary.

The woman’s saladabastronof nard was undoubtedly a rare and expensive import from France.

Due to its distinctive fragrance, which includes notes of jasmine, carnation, lemon, bergamot, and benzoin (a balsamic resin extracted from the bark of plants in the family Styrax), it is considered a highly costly variety of herbal tea.) The reason for her possession is unclear.

Or is it something that has been passed down down the generations?

No of where it comes from, this luxury raises eyebrows, and’some of those present’ remark that the money might have been better spent (it’s easy to squander money that isn’t your own).

Inevitably, there will be impoverished people living among you.” They’ve missed the point, he argues, since the good has always stood in opposition to the great.

According to Jesus, ‘you will always have the poor with you, and you will be able to assist them at any moment you choose.’ Is there a second implication here?

Do you have any ideas on how you’re going to use it?

‘He did not say this because he cared for the poor, but because he was a thief; as keeper of the money bag, he used to help himself to whatever was placed into it,’ John 12:6 explains further.

In all seriousness, Judas, I appreciate your worry about my impending demise.

Application A wide range of implications may be drawn from this paragraph, which serves as an unsettling reminder to anybody who has ever taken a superior-than-thou attitude toward other people or things.

While it would have been a wonderful gesture to sell the perfume and donate the proceeds to the needy, the extravagance of ‘spending’ it by pouring it on Jesus was an even better gesture to make in honor of him.

As is the case in this case, immediate priorities may take precedence over the long-term ‘big picture.’ The way we spend our money, as well as our reactions to other people spending theirs as they see fit, are all connected to this.

See also:  What Does The Bible Say About When Jesus Returns?

What standards do we hold ourselves to?

Is it possible to be overly generous with what we possess?

Finally, there is a glimpse into the workings of the human brain.

Our ability to fool ourselves, as well as others, is unquestionably high; we are particularly skilled at deceiving and deceiving others.

Proverbs 16:2 explains how to be successful.

The source of his rage was not a missed opportunity to feed the needy, but rather a personal disappointment.

Even understanding our own sentiments may need prayer, thought, and assistance from God and others in order to be successful.

A person’s heart’s desires are like deep seas, but one who has insight may pull them out.’ According to the Book of Proverbs (20:5). Original version of this story appeared in our Engage Newsletter, which was published in January of 2018.

Gospel accounts

According to Matthew 26, Mark 14, Luke 7, and John 12, an event (or series of events – see debate below) took place. Matthew and Mark are remarkably similar in their personalities: Matthew 26:6–13 (NASB) An alabaster container of extremely expensive perfume was brought to Jesus’ attention when he was in the home of Simon the Leper, and she lavished it on his head as he was reclined at the table. When the disciples realized what had happened, they were furious. “What is the point of this waste?” they inquired.

Jesus, who was well aware of this, remarked to them, “What are you doing harassing this lady?

Poor people are something you’ll always have on your side, but I won’t always be there for you.

Truly, I assure you, everywhere this gospel is taught throughout the world, the story of what she has done will be shared as well, in her honor and remembrance.” Mark 14:3–9 (KJV) While he was at Bethany, resting at the table in the home of Simon the Leper, a woman approached him and presented him with an alabaster jar containing an extremely costly perfume made of purenard, which he accepted.

  • One or two of those in attendance were muttering angrily to one another “What is the point of wasting perfume?
  • “Leave her alone,” Jesus instructed.
  • She has done something very wonderful for me.
  • However, you will not always have me at your disposal.
  • She prepared my body for burial by sprinkling perfume on it the night before.
  • When a wicked lady in that town discovered that Jesus was eating at the Pharisee’s house, she made her way there with an alabaster jar of perfume in her hand.
  • Afterwards, she cleaned their faces with her hair, kissed them, and sprayed them with perfume.

“Tell me, teacher,” he demanded emphatically.

One owing him five hundred denarii, while the other owed him fifty denarii.

Which of them will be the one who will love him the most now?” “I presume the one who had the larger loan forgiven,” Simon responded.

Afterwards, he turned to face the lady and addressed Simon as follows: “Do you happen to observe this woman?

Despite the fact that you did not provide me with any water for my feet, she soaked my feet with tears and wiped them with her hair instead.

Even if you did not apply oil on my head, she has sprayed perfume all on my feet.

However, whomever has been forgiven little, loves little as a result of their forgiveness.” Afterwards, Jesus told her, “Your sins have been forgiven.” “Who is this person who even forgives sins?” the other guests began to speculate among themselves.

12:1–8 (John 12:1–8) Approximately six days before the Passover holiday, Jesus traveled to Bethany, where Lazarus resided, whom Jesus had resurrected from the grave six days before the holiday.

Meanwhile, Lazarus was among those seated around the table with him, serving as his server.

Furthermore, the perfume enveloped the entire house with its scent.

It was worth the equivalent of a year’s earnings.” Not because he was concerned about the needy, but rather because he was a con artist who used to take advantage of the situation by taking what was put into the money bag and putting it in his own pocket.

“Leave her alone,” Jesus said in response. “That she should keep this perfume until the day of my funeral was the intention of the gift. Although the impoverished will always be a part of your community, you will not always have me.”

Description

Locations where women are claimed to have anointed Jesus in some fashion, according to legend The events in the Gospels of Mark, Matthew, and John all take place at Bethany, a hamlet in Judea. The Gospels of Mark and Matthew specifically mention that it took place at the home of Simon the Leper. As recorded in Luke 7:36, Jesus had been invited to supper at the home of Simon the Pharisee, who had invited him. Thispolis (which may be rendered in English as ‘town’ or ‘city’) was Nain, according to the preceding tale of theRaising of the Son of the Widow of Nain (Luke 7:11–17), which makes it apparent that this wicked woman was residing in the town/city (Greek: v têi pólei) where Jesus was staying.

The nameless location where Mary and Martha dwell in Luke 10:38–42, on the other hand, is referred to as a ‘village’ (Greek: kómé) in verse 10 of the same chapter.

As a result, most modern scholars agree that the sinful woman in Luke 7 lived in Nain, while Luke 10’s Mary lived in a village somewhere else in Galilee, and John 11–12’s Mary lived in Bethany, Judea.

In conclusion, the hosts who welcome Jesus into their home appear to be four distinct persons in each of the four stories: Simon the Leper is a fictional character created by author Simon the Leper.

Mary of Bethany

The city of Bethany is mentioned as the setting for the accounts in Matthew 26, Mark 14, and John 12. The lady is referred to as Mary in John’s gospel, and she is the sister of Martha and Lazarus. The criticism levelled at Mary for carrying out the activity is that she used an expensive ointment that might have been sold and the earnings donated to the needy instead of utilizing it. According to the Gospels in Matthew, Mark, and John, Jesus associates the anointing with preparations for his burial, since he will be killed not many days later.

The sinful woman

Mary, the sister of Martha and Lazarus, is identified as the lady in John. In the Gospels of Mark and Matthew, she is not identified. The wicked lady in Luke’s account is an unknown character. Since Luke 7 reveals that Jesus was ministering in the northern districts of Nain and Capernaum, it is reasonable to assume that this event took place in that region. The woman employs tears, as well as perfume, to make her point.

The criticism thrown against Jesus in this tale is that he allowed a sinner to come close to him. Throughout the Gospel of Luke, Jesus makes a connection between the deed and the woman’s faults, his forgiveness, and the lack of hospitality shown by his host.

Conflation

Because of confusing or missing details between the authors’ versions of numerous events in the Gospels, readers and academics have come up with a variety of alternate interpretations. Generally speaking, the tales are believed to be separate occurrences, yet they have been jumbled in some instances, leading to the belief that Mary is a prostitute. A contributing factor to this is the existence of a number of women named Mary in the New Testament, which has resulted in the interpretation of Mary of Bethany as Mary Magdalene.

At all four, there is a setting in a house for a supper, a woman, and costly perfume being put on Jesus, to which someone takes exception.

In Matthew and Mark, the house belongs to Simon the Leper, however in Luke, the house belongs to a Pharisee called Simon.

There are just a few small changes in the basic messages conveyed by the accounts in Matthew, Mark, and John, such as “The poor will always be with you” and “She put perfume on my corpse beforehand to prepare for my burial.” In Luke, however, statements on hospitality and forgiveness of sins are recorded that are not seen in the other gospel narratives.

Debate

The gospels of John and Luke diverge from Matthew and Mark in that they report that the anointing is applied to the feet rather than the head. It has been suggested that Luke is speaking about an altogether separate occurrence as a result of this, according to some. According to J.K. Elliott, “it is largely acknowledged among academics that all four narratives refer to the same occurrence.” All four evangelists adapted the tale to their own “.theological, and dramatic purpose.”, utilizing oral and written traditions to express their “.own apologetic purposes.”, according to him, explaining the discrepancies.

When her tears began to fall on Jesus’ feet, she wiped them with her hair, according to the gospel writer.

It is possible to argue that this tale could not have taken place only a few days before the crucifixion because of the various events that followed in Luke’s gospel, but this cannot be proven.

The woman’s conduct has historically been connected with Mary Magdalene, despite the fact that there is no biblical source that identifies her as such (she is mentioned by name for the first time, immediately following this episode, at the beginning of Luke chapter 8).

Another point of contention is the meaning of “the poor you always have with you.” While some have criticized Jesus’ response as indicating a lack of morality, others have argued that, given his impending crucifixion, he is simply explaining that what was done was not a choice between two moral acts, but a necessity, and would be no more criticized in Jesus’ day than a modern man purchasing a coffin for a loved one, even though there are poor who could be fed instead of According to author Kurt Vonnegut in his autobiographical novelPalm Sunday, he had been called to preach onPalm Sundayin 1980, and he chose the Gospel of John’s versionof the anointing as his text.

It was because he had “seen so much un-Christian irritation with the poor spurred by the citation” that he decided to do so; he questioned the translation, claiming it lacked the mercifulness of the Sermon on the Mount, and used the occasion to give his own translation of the passage.

When Mark has Jesus anticipate that this narrative would always be recounted in remembrance of a lady whose name escapes him, it must be an accidental irony on his part.”

In art

  • Christ’s feet are anointed by Mary Magdalene. The Ointment of the Magdalene, an illuminated book from around 1500. (Le parfum de Madeleine). James Tissot, about 1900
  • James Tissot, ca.

See also

  • Foot washing, Chrism, and the life of Jesus in the New Testament are all included.

References

  1. Hornsby, 339-342
  2. “Jesus’ anointing of the sick” TextExcavation.com, accessed April 21, 2009. The original version of this article was published on February 8, 2012. Retrieved2012-02-03
  3. s^ There will always be poor people in the country, according to Deuteronomy 15:11. As a result, I command you to be kind toward your fellow Israelites who are poor and in need in your land
  4. Three hundred denarii in Greek
  5. A denarius was the standard daily salary for a day worker in ancient Rome
  6. J. K. Elliott’s “The Anointing of Jesus” is a classic novel. Journal of the Expository Times, vol. 85, no. 4, January 1974, pp. 105–107 “Luke 7:11 translations comparison”.Biblehub.com. Retrieved27 January2021
  7. “Luke 7 Study Bible”.Biblehub.com. Retrieved27 January2021
  8. “Luke 10 Study Bible”.Biblehub.com. Retrieved27 January2021
  9. “Luke 10 abEsler, Philip Francis
  10. Piper, Ronald Allen
  11. Piper, Ronald Allen (2006). Social-scientific approaches to the Gospel of John’s accounts of Lazarus, Mary, and Martha. It is available from Minneapolis: Fortress Press with the ISBN 9780800638306 and may be obtained on 9 December 2020. Liz Curtis Higgs is a writer and actress (2004). Unveiling Mary Magdalene: Discover the Truth On a Not-So-Bad Girl from the Bible is a book about the life and times of Mary Magdalene. Title page 144. ISBN 9780307552112. Colorado Springs: Crown Publishing Group. Retrieved on January 27, 2021
  12. Losch, Richard R., et al (2008). All the People in the Bible: An A-Z Guide to the Saints, Scoundrels, and Other Characters in Scripture is an A-Z guide to the saints, scoundrels, and other characters in the Bible. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ISBN 9780802824547. 3 September 2021
  13. Retrieved 3 September 2021
  14. Take a look at all of the points 339
  15. Hornsby, 339
  16. Burton, Mack, and others L.Vernon Patterns of Persuasion in the Gospels (K. Robbins, Patterns of Persuasion in the Gospels, 2008), pp. 85-106ISBN1-60608-220-5
  17. 12:1–8
  18. John 12:1–8
  19. Kurt Vonnegut is a writer who lives in New York City (1981). Dell Publishing, pp.324–330, ISBN 0-440-57163-4. Palm Sunday Anything that Jesus truly said to Judas was, of course, uttered in Aramaic and has passed down to us through the ages through the mediums of Hebrew, Greek, Latin, and ancient English. “The poor you always have with you, but you do not always have Me,” He may have added, or something along those lines. Perhaps a small nuance has been lost in the process of translation. I’d like to reclaim what has been taken away from me. Why? Due to the fact that I, as a Christ-worshiping agnostic, have witnessed so much un-Christian frustration with the poor, which has been fostered by the phrase “For the poor always you have with you.” If Jesus really did say it, it was a divine joke that was perfectly timed for the moment. It expresses everything about hypocrisy while saying nothing about the plight of the impoverished. Judas’ hypocrisy is a Christian jest, which permits Jesus to maintain civility with him while still chastising him for it. ‘Don’t be concerned about it, Judas. It seems likely that there will be lots of impoverished people around long when I am no longer alive.’ My own translation does not do any harm to the original language of Scripture. I’ve rearranged them a bit, not just to make them more amusing given the circumstances, but also to bring them more in tune with the Sermon on the Mount, which I’ve included below. The Sermon on the Mount depicts a mercifulness that is impervious to change or deterioration.
See also:  When Was Jesus Crucified Year

Works cited

  • Teresa J. Hornsby, “Anointing Traditions,” in The Historical Jesus in Context, edited by Amy-Jill Levine, Dale C. Allison Jr., and John Dominic Crossan, Princeton University Press, 2009, ISBN 140082737X, 9781400827374, google books
  • Hornsby, Teresa J., “Anointing Traditions,” in The Historical Jesus in Context, edited by Amy-Jill Levine, Dale C. Allison Jr., and John Dominic

General references

And then Mary took approximately one pint of pure nard, a very expensive perfume; she poured it on Jesus’ feet and rubbed them with her hair. Moreover, the scent of the perfume enveloped the entire home” (John 12:3). A scene of great hospitality and personal fellowship has been set in the aftermath of Lazarus’ resurrection, as Jesus, Mary, Martha, and Lazarus meet in the light of Lazarus’ resurrection (John 12:1-11). Lazarus is resting at the table with Jesus, who is speaking to him. Martha, ever the proactive servant, is putting supper on the table.

  • Afterwards, Mary makes her public display of devotion to Jesus by lavishing a whole pint of exquisite perfume over his feet and defying rules of decorum by unfurling her hair to clean them.
  • They are now surrounded by the fragrance of a wonderful perfume, thanks to Lazarus.
  • Mary’s shameless, modest, lavish gesture is a magnificent depiction of pure devotion.
  • This is unreserved devotion of a gracious and merciful God.

Chung Kwan Park, a Korean singer, encourages worshipers to connect with Mary’s adoration in his song, “to My Precious Lord I bring my flask of fragrant oil; bending down, I kiss his feet, anointing them with the oil.” Put yourself on your knees and imagine what type of love would move you to willingly part with a year’s pay as a worthy answer to the Lord of life.

  1. After then, the atmosphere becomes considerably frigid.
  2. Isn’t it preferable to take the entire year’s salary that was used to purchase the perfume and donate it to the less fortunate?
  3. Judas is a thieving group treasurer who is solely concerned with his personal financial gain.
  4. It is impossible to overstate how stark the difference is: Mary is charitable, but Judas is avaricious.
  5. Mary is a selfless person, whereas Judas is self-centered.
  6. These two individuals work together to provide stark contrasts in the context of Jesus’ own teaching: “Wherever your wealth is, there will also be your heart” (Matt.
  7. As we reflect on Jesus’ condemnation of Judas, we are reminded that real discipleship means turning away from all that is selfish, self-centered, and cold-hearted.

To overcome the urge to look down our noses at acts of worship that appear to our pompous selves to be unusual, strange, or over the top in their presentation.

Nonetheless, this overlooks an important aspect of this text—and of the gospel as a whole.

It is a perfume intended for the burial of Jesus.

As if to say, “While you will rightfully be loving and helping the poor at all times, this is actually my death week,” Jesus welcomes Mary’s action as totally appropriate in the context of an expected pattern of love to the poor (v.

As the Gospel of John frequently demonstrates, Jesus was well aware that he would die.

She has spent her money on a burial ointment that is fit for a king.

She comes to terms with the unsettling reality that her Lord will perform miracles in an unfathomably countercultural, if not scandalous, manner.

While carrying palm branches on Palm Sunday, we will be tempted to reach for upbeat major-key praise songs rather than solid minor-key odes that proclaim, “Ride on, Ride on in majesty; ride on in lowly pomp to die.” Inevitably, there will be a strong temptation to rush through Palm Sunday and Easter, paying little attention to the tragedy and severe injustice of Jesus’ suffering and death.

True, we are not called to lavish burial perfume at the feet of a Savior as he journeys to the cross and the tomb of Jesus Christ.

However, the extravagant and humble way of devotion that has been laid out before us is still profoundly influenced by the simple fact that the divine plan of salvation did not arrive at Easter until after Jesus’ passion, death, and burial, but only after these events.

During this season of Lent, this is the Lord who calls to us, “Come, follow me.” John D.

Originally published as part of CT’s 2019 Lent/Easter devotional, Journey to the Cross, which is available for digital download at the link above.

Bible Gateway passage: Mark 14 – New International Version

With only two days to go until the Passover and the Festival of Unleavened Bread, the chief priests and the teachers of the law devised a plan to secretly capture and kill Jesus, and the disciples were on their way to join them. E)”>(E) 2 The authorities warned that rioting would occur at the event if this were to occur. A woman approached him while he was in Bethany, F)”>(F)sitting at the table at the home of Simon the Leper, bearing a jar of extremely expensive perfume, composed entirely of pure nard, in an alabaster jar.

  1. G)”>(G) Some of those there were muttering angrily to one another, “Why this waste of perfume?” they wondered.
  2. 6 “Leave her alone,” Jesus instructed.
  3. She has done something very wonderful for me.
  4. However, you will not always be able to count on me.
  5. She prepared my body for burial by sprinkling perfume on it the night before.
  6. L)”>(L) 11They were overjoyed to learn this and expressed their willingness to contribute financially.

The Last Supper M)”>(M)N)”>(N)

)”>(O)Jesus’ disciples approached him on the first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, when it was usual to sacrifice the Passover lamb. “Where do you want us to go and make preparations for you to eat the Passover?” they inquired. 13So he dispatched two of his followers, instructing them to “go into the city, and you will be met by a man carrying a jug of water.” Keep up with him. 14, tell the owner of the home he enters: “The Teacher inquires as to where I might find a place to stay so that I can have a meal with my followers during the Passover.” 15He will take you upstairs to a huge room that has been P)”>(P)furnished and is waiting for you.

As a result, they prepared for the Passover.

During their meal, when they were reclining at the table, he declared, “Truly I tell you, one of you will betray me—one of you who is dining alongside me.” 17When they realized it was him, they were distraught, and one by one, they protested, “Surely you don’t mean me?” Twenty-one “It is one of the Twelve,” he said, “one of them who dips bread into the basin with me.” Q)”>(Q)21The Son of Man R)”>(R)will follow in the footsteps of those who have gone before him.

However, woe betide the one who betrays the Son of Man!

“Take it; this is my body,” Jesus said as he broke the bread in front of his followers.

Afterward, after giving gratitude, he handed the cup to them all and asked them to drink from it together.

25 “Truly, I tell you, I will not drink from the fruit of the vine again until that day when I drink it for the first time in the kingdom of God,” Jesus says in the Gospel of John. V)”>(V) 26 After they had finished singing a hymn, they proceeded to the Mount of Olives. W)”>(W)

Jesus Predicts Peter’s Denial X)”>(X)

Jesus warned them that “you will all slip away” since it is written: “I will strike the shepherd, and the sheep will be dispersed.” “However, once I have risen, I will go ahead of you into Galilee.” Z)”>(Z)29 “However, after I have risen, I will go ahead of you into Galilee.” “Even if everyone else abandons me, I will not.” Peter said. 30 In response, Jesus stated, “Truly I tell you, today—yes, tonight—before the crow crows twice, you will disown me three times.” AA) “> The following is an example of a formalized formalized formalized (AA) 31 But Peter repeated, passionately, “Even if it means dying with you, AB),” he said “>(AB)I would never, ever abandon you.” And every single other person agreed with me.

Gethsemane AC)”>(AC)

32They arrived at a location known as Gethsemane, where Jesus instructed his followers to “Sit here while I pray.” 33He accompanied Peter, James, and John AD)”>(AD), and he became extremely concerned and agitated as a result of their presence. The AE)”>(AE)he replied to them, “My soul is filled with sadness to the brink of death.” “Stay here and keep an eye on everything.” 35After walking a short distance, he collapsed on the ground and begged that the hour AF)”>(AF) would pass him by as quickly as possible.

  • However, it is not what I will, but rather what you will.
  • “Are you sleeping, Simon?” he inquired of Peter.
  • 38Keep a close eye on yourself and hope that you will not be tempted.
  • “AK)”>”AK”>”AK”>”AK”>”AK”>”AK”>”AK”>”AK”>”AK”>”AK”>”AK”>”AK”>”AK”>”AK”> (AK) 39He left the room and prayed the same thing a second time.
  • They were at a loss for what to say to him.
  • Enough!
  • Look at what has happened: the Son of Man has been handed into the hands of sinners.
  • Let’s get this party started!

Jesus Arrested AM)”>(AM)

43At the same moment he was about to speak, Judas, AN)”>(AN)one of the Twelve, came. A large group of people, armed with swords and clubs, had gathered around him, dispatched by the top priests, the teachers of the law, and the elders. 44At this point, the betrayer had established a signal with them, saying, “The one I kiss is the man; capture him and take him away under protection.” 45Judas ran up to Jesus and said, “Rabbi!”>(AO) before kissing him on the lips. 46The men apprehended Jesus and took him into custody.

48 “Do you think I’m instigating a revolt?” Jesus inquired.

However, the Scriptures must be followed to the letter. “AQ)”> “AQ)”> (AQ) 50At that point, everyone abandoned him and left. AR)”>(AR) 51Jesus was being followed by a young man who was dressed simply in a linen cloth. As soon as he was apprehended, 52he ran nude, leaving his clothes behind.

Jesus Before the Sanhedrin AS)”>(AS)AT)”>(AT)

53They brought Jesus before the high priest, and all of the chief priests, the elders, and the teachers of the law gathered in one place. 54.2 Peter kept his distance and followed him directly into the courtyard of the high priest. 54.3 AU)”>(AU) He sat with the guards and warmed himself by the fire as they watched him. AV)”>(AV) 55The chief priests and the entire Sanhedrin were present. AW) AW) AW) AW) “However, they were unsuccessful in their search for proof against Jesus, which would allow them to execute him.

See also:  Who Had Jesus Crucified

57After that, other people rose to their feet and offered the following false testimony against him: 58 The following is what we overheard him say: ‘I will demolish this temple built by human hands and in three days I will erect another, AX)’ “‘(AX) was not created by human hands.'” But even then, their evidence did not jibe with one another.

  1. “Are you the Messiah, the Son of the Blessed One?” the high priest inquired once again.
  2. “And you will see the Son of Man seated at the right hand of the Mighty One, descending on the clouds of heaven,” says the Bible.
  3. BB) BB) BB) BB) “BB questioned, “Why do we need any more witnesses?” he said.
  4. “What are your thoughts?” They unanimously declared him to be deserving of death.
  5. And then the guards dragged him away and thrashed him.

Peter Disowns Jesus BE)”>(BE)

In the courtyard below, BF) was working while Peter was down below “>(BF)one of the high priest’s servant girls happened to walk through. 67When she noticed Peter putting on some heat, BG) “>(BG)she fixed him with a piercing stare. “You were also with the Nazarene, Jesus,” BH) continues “She used the abbreviation (BH). 68However, he categorically denied it. The BI) says, “I don’t know or comprehend what you’re talking about.” “>(BI)he replied as he walked out the door and into the entrance. 69When the servant girl noticed him, she exclaimed to others who were gathered around her, “This fellow is one of them.” 70Once more, he denied it.

BM) Then Peter remembered the words Jesus had told to him: “Before the rooster crows twice more, you will disavow me three times.” “His tears fell down his cheeks as he cried out.

Bible Gateway passage: John 12 – New International Version

The day before Passover, B)”>(B)Jesus traveled to Bethany, C)”>(C), where Lazarus dwelt, whom Jesus had resurrected from the grave six days before the festival of Passover. 2A supper was held in Jesus’ honor at this location. D) Martha was in charge “In the meantime, Lazarus was seated at the table next to him. 3After that, Mary took roughly a pint of pure nard, which was a costly perfume; E “It was she who poured it on Jesus’ feet and then rubbed the soles of his feet with her hair. F) The letter “F” stands for “Failure to Comply with the Law.” “>(F)And the perfume filled the air, filling the entire home with its scent.

7 “Leave her alone,” Jesus said in response.

It’s true that you’ll always have the poor among you,J)”>(J)but it’s also true that you’ll never have me.” A huge number of Jews learned that Jesus was present and flocked to see him, not only for his own sake but also in order to meet Lazarus, whom he had recently raised from the dead.

M)”>(M)

Jesus Comes to Jerusalem as King N)”>(N)

Twelve days later, the large audience that had gathered for the celebration learned that Jesus was on his journey to the Holy City of Jerusalem. ‘Hosanna!’ they exclaimed as they marched out to meet him with palm branches in their hands. The king of Israel has been blessed!P)”>(P)”Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!” Q)”>(Q) 14Jesus came upon a young donkey and sat on it, just as it is described in the Bible: 15 “Do not be afraid, Daughter Zion; for, as you can see, your king is on his way, seated on a donkey’s colt.”R)”>”Do not be afraid, Daughter Zion; for, as you can see, your king is on his way, seated on a donkey’s colt.”R)”>”Do not be afraid, Daughter Zion; see, your king is coming,seated on a donkey’s colt.”R) (R) 16At first, his disciples were perplexed by what he was saying.

S)”>(S) They only realized what had happened after Jesus was glorified T)”>(T) that these things had been written about him and that these things had been done to him after he had been glorified.

18A large number of people came out to greet him after hearing that he had done this sign, V)”>(V)because they had heard about it. “See, this isn’t getting us anywhere,” the Pharisees observed to one another. Take a look at how the entire globe has converged on him!” W) (W)

Jesus Predicts His Death

As it happened, there were some Greeks among those who went up to the festival to worship. 21They came to Philip, who was from Bethsaida Y)”>(Y)in Galilee, with a request, and Philip agreed to meet with them. “Sir, we would like to see Jesus,” they expressed their desire. Philipp proceeded to inform Andrew, who then told Jesus, who then told Andrew and Philip again. 23Jesus responded, “The hour Z)”>(Z)has arrived for the Son of Man to be exalted, and the hour Z)”>(Z)has come.” Very honestly, I tell you that until a kernel of wheat falls to the ground and dies, AB)”>(AB)it is nothing more than a single seed.

  1. 25Anyone who loves their life in this world will lose it, but anyone who despises their life in this world will keep it AC)”>(AC)for the rest of their lives in eternity.
  2. AD)”>(AD)26 The one who serves me will be honored by my Father, AE)”>(AE) 27 I’m at a loss for what to say now that my spirit is upset, AF)”>(AF) ‘Father, AG)”>(AG), could you please save me from this hour’?
  3. God’s name be glorified, Father!” When a voice from heaven spoke, it said, AI)”>(AI)”I have praised it, and I will laud it once more.” 29Some in the throng who were present and heard it said that thunder had broken out, while others claimed that an angel had spoken to him.
  4. When I am lifted up from the ground, I will attract all people to myself, and this is what I will do: AM)”>(AM).
  5. AO)”>(AO)34 “We have heard from the Law AP)”>(AP) that the Messiah will be with us forever,” a member of the audience said.
  6. AS)”>(AS)Who is this ‘Son of Man,’ and what is his mission?” 35At that point, Jesus assured them, “You will have the light AT)”>(AT)just a short bit longer.
  7. AU)”>(AU) AV)”>(AV)Anyone who walks in the dark will not be able to see where they are going.
  8. AX)”>(AX)

Belief and Unbelief Among the Jews

37Even after Jesus had done a plethora of miracles AY) “Despite the fact that he was in their presence, they refused to believe in him. 38This was done in order to fulfill the prophecy of Isaiah the prophet, who said, “Lord, who has believed our message, and to whom has the arm of the Lord been revealed?” AZ)”>(AZ) 39As a result, they were unable to believe because, as Isaiah writes elsewhere:40 “He has blinded their eyes and hardened their hearts, so they can’t see with their eyes, nor comprehend with their hearts, nor turn—and I would cure them if I had the opportunity.” BA)”>(BA) 41Isaiah stated this because he had seen the splendor of Jesus BB) “>(BB)and brought up the subject of him.

  1. (British Columbia) “But many others, including some of the leaders, had faith in him at the same time.
  2. BH) BH) BH) BH) BH) “After that, Jesus called out, “Whoever believes in me does not trust in me alone, but believes in the one who sent me.” BI) Business Intelligence “>(BI)45The person who looks at me is looking at the one who sent me to you.
  3. ” Because I did not come to judge the world, but rather to save the world, I was sent.
  4. BM) BM) BM) BM) BM) “>(BM)on the final day of the month.

50I am aware that following his command will result in eternal life. BO)”>(BO) Consequently, whatever I say will be exactly what the Father has instructed me to say. “British Petroleum” (BP) “> The following is an example of a formalized formalized formalized (BP)

Matthew 26:6–13; Mark 14:3–9; Luke 7:36–50; John 12:1–8

Sixth, when Jesus was in Bethany in the house of Simon the leper, Leprosy was a word used to describe a variety of skin illnesses; see Leviticus 13 ” href=” f1-“>17. awomancameuptohimwithanalabasterflaskofveryexpensiveointment,andshepoureditonhisheadashereclinedattable. “Why this waste?” they demanded, when they realized what had happened to the disobedient. 9 For this, it might have been sold for a huge quantity of money and the x donated to the destitute.” “Why are you causing problems for her?” replied Jesus, who was well aware of what they were doing.

11 Forz you’ll always have the poor with you, buta you’ll never have me with you.

13 Truly, I say to you, whereverc thisgospelisproclaimedinthewholeworld, what she has done will also be remembered in her honor.”

Jesus Anointed at Bethany

Leprosy was a name used to describe a variety of skin ailments; see Leviticus 13 for further information. 3b Andwhilehewasatc BethanyinthehouseofSimontheleper, “A href=” f1-“>Anchor text: 1ashewasrecliningattable,awomancamewithanalabasterflaskofointmentofpurenard,verycostly,andshebroketheflaskandpoureditoverhishead. Four people expressed their outrage by asking themselves, “Why was the ointment used in that manner? 5 Thisointmentcouldhavebeenavailableforsaleformorethanthreehundreddollars. arii It was equivalent to a day’s salary for a laborer ” href=” f2-“> “>2 and d were given to the less fortunate.” And they reprimanded her for it.

Shehasdoneabeautifulthingtome.

However, you will not always have me.

9 And really, I say to you, wherever the gospel is preached throughout the entire globe, what she has done will be remembered.”

A Sinful Woman Forgiven

36u One of the Pharisees approached him and invited him to join him for dinner; he agreed and went to the Pharisee’s house to accept the invitation. And behold, a woman of the city, who was a sinner, when she learned that he was reclining at table in the Pharisee’s house, brought an alabaster flask of ointment,38 and standing behind himathisfeet with tears in her eyes began to wet thisfeet with her tears and wipe them with the hair of her head, kissing his feet and anointing them with the ointment.

  1. One owed five hundred and fifty denarii, while the other owed fifty.
  2. Nowwhichofthemwilllovehimmore?” 43 Simon responded, “I’m assuming it was for this person that he forgave the greater debt.” Andhesaidtohim,“Youhavejudgedrightly.” 44 ThenturningtowardthewomanhesaidtoSimon,“Doyouseethiswoman?
  3. .45f You offered me a kiss, but she hasn’t stopped kissing my feet from the moment I arrived.
  4. 47 As a result, I tell you that her crimes, which are numerous, are forgiven—because she was greatly loved.

49 Then those who were seated at the meal with him started to ask among” href=” f1-“>1themselves, “Who is he, who even forgives sins?” 50 “Your faith has rescued you,” Jesus told the woman, “and now depart in peace.”

Mary Anoints Jesus at Bethany

12 Because it was six days before Passover,j Jesus traveled to Bethany,k where Lazarus was, whom Jesus had resurrected from the grave. 2 As a result, they prepared a meal for him there. Martha served, and Lazarus was among those who sat at the table with him. Therefore, 3m Marytookapound Greeklitera; an alitra (or Roman pound) was about 11 1/2 ounces or 327 grams. A href=” f1-“>1ofexpensiveointmentmadefrompurenard was applied to the feet of Jesus, and she cleaned the soles of his feet with her hair.

4 Nevertheless, Judas Iscariot, one of his followers (and the man who was about to betrayhim), asked,5 “Why wasn’t this ointment sold for three hundred denarii?” “Adenarius was the equivalent of a day’s salary for a laborer.” Is 2andn given to the poor?

6 He stated this not because he cared for the poor, but because he was a thief, and because he was in charge of the moneybag, he used it to help himself to whatever was placed in it.

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