How Do We Know Jesus Is God

How Do We Know That Jesus Is God?

Judas was and continues to be a puzzle. He had spent time with Jesus and was well acquainted with him. Not only that, but he had been selected to be a member of a select group of insiders who were close to Jesus. The gospels continue to refer to Judas as ‘one of the twelve,’ a word that emphasizes the tragedy of his betrayal of the Lord. However, they also claim that he surrendered to the Tempter, a sobering warning for anybody who believes they are immune to temptation and likely the source of St Paul’s caution: “Let anyone who thinks he stands, take heed lest he fall” (1 Corinthians 10:12).

The current market worth of thirty pieces of silver is unknown, although it was a very little quantity in those days.

Judas’ greed and dishonesty, according to the evangelist John, were the decisive considerations, although money could not have been his major motivation, considering the sum involved.

Perhaps he had been persuaded by the politics of the Zealots, ancient-day terrorists who sought to grab power and brutally abolish Roman rule over Israel.

  • On the other side, it’s possible that Judas was concerned about his own safety.
  • Earlier that week, an attack on money changers had taken place.
  • At the same time, he had a strong belief in Jesus, as seen by his eventual sadness.
  • According to the Qumran writings, many Jewish people at that time thought that there were two global powers, one of which was benevolent and one which was evil.
  • Read the blue text at the bottom of the page.
  • What exactly transpired?
  • Considering that the Last Supper was the Passover supper, which had to be eaten within the city gates, this makes sense.

None of them appeared to have had a disagreement with him, which gives us a sense of the atmosphere in that room.

They didn’t even consider the possibility that he was mistaken.

How did Jesus know that Judas was his betrayer?

We know he had supporters in high-ranking positions, and any one of them could have forewarned Jesus of the priests’ plans.

So, what happened after that?

The dish into which they dipped this bite was almost certainly a bowl of sauce or gravy.

In this particular instance, it was a unique, last-ditch plea to Judas.

People in the ancient world loathed anybody who, after receiving hospitality or friendship (like Judas did), betrayed their host by revealing their true identity.

But Judas’ conduct was much more heinous: he not only ate with Jesus that evening, but he also grabbed food from the identical dish that Jesus had used.

Stay with me, or go to the priests and betray me, was what Jesus was saying.

‘Whatever you’re going to do, make sure you do it swiftly.’ The gospel of John merely indicates that Judas quickly left the house, and that it was nighttime at the time.

Take a look at the green text at the bottom of the page.

After Judas had left the upper chamber where they had been feasting, Jesus performed a divine service by washing the feet of his companions.

Jesus prayed in the garden, but the tranquility was disturbed by the appearance of a large detachment of soldiers and authorities.

They were accompanied by Judas.

Because of the darkness, if there had been a conflict, the incorrect man may have been detained.

Writing in Greek, Mark used an emphatic version of the word katephilesen to express his point of view.

Francisco Salzillo’s The Kiss of Judas (El Beso de Judas) was painted in 1754.

The statement brings home the magnitude of Judas’ betrayal.

Alternatively, the phrase might be interpreted as Accomplish what you came to do, which is a loving reprimand.

Caravaggio’s The Betrayal of Jesus by Judas The actions of Judas could not be excused, and he was well aware of this.

When we discover that he returned the money to the priests and attempted to return it, we may get a sense of his desperation.

He was well aware that he couldn’t halt the flow of events, yet he was still extremely regretful of his own conduct.

He then walked away and committed suicide by hanging.

Meanwhile, Jesus was confronted by the hurriedly gathered tribunals.

Take note of the black text at the bottom of the page.

With offers of friendship and forgiveness, he attempted to pull Judas back from the edge, but it was too late.

Judas betrayed Jesus to his enemies, identifying him with a kiss as the one who sold him. Jesus was apprehended and carried away to stand trial for his crimes. For further information, please check The Last Supper (also known as the Last Supper of Christ)

  • John 1:1, 20:28, Romans 9:5, Philippians 2:16, Titus 2:13, and 1 John 5:20 explicitly declared the divinity of the Son
  • Attributed divine titles to Jesus (Isaiah 9:6, Luke 2:11, Isaiah 40
  • Matthew 3:3, Jeremiah 23:5–6
  • Luke 1:32–33
  • Joel 2:22
  • And Acts 2:21)
  • And assigned to Him divine attributes:
  • Isaiah 9:6
  • John 1:1-2
  • Revelation 1:8
  • 22:13
  • Omnipresence—Matthew 18:20
  • 28:20
  • John 3:13
  • Eternal existence—Isaiah 9:6
  • Revelation 2:23
  • John 2:24-25
  • Revelation 21:17
  • Revelation 2:23
  • Omnipotence— Isaiah 9:6
  • Philippians 3:21
  • Immutability— Hebrews 1:10-12
  • 13:8
  • Every attribute belonging to the Father— Colossians 2:9
  • Every attribute belonging to the Son— Colossians 2:9
  • Every attribute belonging to the Son— Revelation 1:8
  • God’s eternal existence is described in Isaiah 9:6 and John 1:1-2, as well as Revelation 1:8 and 22:13
  • God’s Omnipresence is described in Matthew 18:20 and 28:20, and in John 3:13
  • And God’s Omnipotence is described in Revelation 1:8 and 22:13
  • God’s Omniscience is described in Revelation 1:8 and 22:13. 2:24-25
  • 21:17
  • Revelation 2:23
  • Revelation 2:24
  • All of God’s attributes are listed in Colossians 2:9
  • Philippians 3:21
  • Revelation 1:8
  • Omnipotence is listed in Isaiah 9:6
  • Immutability is listed in Hebrews 1:10-12 and 13:8
  • And every attribute pertaining to the Father is listed in Colossians 2:9 and 13.
  • His heavenly honor was bestowed upon Him (John 5:22–23
  • 14:1
  • 1 Peter 1:6–7
  • 2 Peter 1:17
  • Revelation 5:13)

There are many passages in the Bible that provide a persuasive portrayal of Jesus as divine, and this is only a quick summary of them. See the following article for further details on how to do so effectively: Is he a good guy or is he the God-man? The Argument in Support of Jesus’ Deity

Bryce Klabunde

There are many passages in the Bible that paint a persuasive picture of Jesus as divine, and this is only a quick summary of them. See the following article for additional details on how to do it properly: Was he an honorable individual or an agent of the Almighty? What the Evidence Says About Jesus’ Divinity

How Do We Know Jesus is God?

Some have claimed that Jesus never claimed to be the Son of God and that he’d roll over in his grave if he knew that his followers today were adoring him. Perhaps you’ve heard similar claims. As a result, they must have missed the news that Jesus had risen from the grave, something they had apparently never heard before. Take, for example, the passage in John 5:16-20, in which Jesus plainly portrays himself as divine. His detractors were so enraged as a result that they “worked even harder to find a means to murder” him as a result.

Because Jesus “not only violated the Sabbath, but he also addressed God as his Father, therefore elevating himself to the status of God.” In his capacity as the greatest teacher who ever lived, Jesus would have recognized if these individuals were misinterpreting his remarks and would have intervened to correct them if they were drawing incorrect inferences from his statements.

  • “Your father Abraham rejoiced as he looked forward to my arrival,” Jesus tells his listeners in John 8:56-59.
  • It took them completely by surprise when Jesus said, “I tell you the truth, before Abraham was ever born, I Am!” In a single remark, he asserted not only that he existed prior to Abraham, but he also claimed to be God by claiming the sole identity “I Am” (Exodus 3:14) for himself.
  • They chose the second option once more, this time picking up stones to murder him.
  • The original phrasing makes it apparent that he was claiming to be one in nature or essence with God, rather than just claiming to be one in purpose with God.
  • 33).
  • No, he was making it very apparent that he was God’s Son—that he was god shown in human form.
  • In a different instance, he put it succinctly into words why his identity was so important: “Unless you accept that I Am who I claim to be, you will die in your sins” (John 8:24).

The Gospel of Mark, which was probably the first biography written about him, has several references to himself, including this one.

In addition, you will see the Son of Man sitting in the seat of authority at God’s right hand, descending on the clouds of heaven” (Mark 14:61-62).

Why?

For the second time, Jesus promised them that they would see him “seated in the position of authority at God’s right side,” which was a clear connection with the divine being described in Psalm 110:1.

Jesus also promised them that they would one day see him “coming on the clouds of heaven,” which signifies he will return to judge humankind, just to make sure there was no mistake in their minds.

Because of their clear nature, Jesus’ assertions of equality with the Father were considered heresy—if they had not been proven to be genuine.

However, we are still confronted with the question of whether Jesus Christ is indeed who he claimed to be.

However, there is a fourth possibility, one that more and more doubters are beginning to accept these days: that he was a legend, or at the very least that his claims to divinity were legendary.

Let’s take a quick look at the three alternatives to his being who he claimed to be, the Son of God, according to the Bible: a.

First, was Jesus deluded?

Perhaps you’ve heard it said that Jesus never claimed to be the Son of God and that he’d roll over in his grave if he realized that his followers today were adoring him. If that’s the case, you’re not alone. As a result, they must have missed the news that Jesus had risen from the grave, something they had apparently never heard of. Take, for example, the passage in John 5:16-20, in which Jesus plainly portrays himself as deity. These actions infuriated his critics, who “worked all the harder to discover a means to assassinate him,” according to the New York Times.

Due to the fact that “Jesus not only violated the Sabbath, but he also addressed God as his Father, therefore elevating himself to the status of God,” As the greatest teacher who ever lived, Jesus would have recognized if these individuals were misinterpreting his teachings and would have corrected them as soon as they realized they were making the erroneous inferences from his statements.

  1. In John 8:56-59, we can see how Jesus shook up his audience once more: “Your father Abraham rejoiced as he anticipated my arrival.” And he was relieved to have seen it.
  2. You claim to have seen Abraham, but how do you know that?
  3. Either Jesus truly was God manifested in human flesh, or he was an outright blasphemer, in the opinion of his audience.
  4. Moreover, in John 10:30-33, Jesus reaffirmed this assertion even again.
  5. According to the original phrase, he was asserting that he and God were one in nature or essence, rather than just united in purpose.
  6. 33).
  7. To the contrary, Jesus was emphasizing his position as the divine Son—deity manifested in the form of a human person.

In a different instance, he put it succinctly into words why his identity was so important: “Unless you accept that I Am who I claim to be, you will perish in your sins” (John 8:24).

The Gospel of Mark, which was possibly the oldest biography written about him, has several references to himself, including this one.

He was slammed and condemned to death by his opponents, who accused him of blasphemy and declared him deserving of death once more.

It appears that Jesus was using the heavenly term “I Am” to define himself once again, which is something that no regular person should ever do.

Lastly, in Daniel 7:13-14, he refers to himself as “the Son of Man,” which is a term derived from a passage in which the Son of Man is proven to have divine attributes.

See also:  Who Was The Youngest Of The Disciples Of Jesus?

Similarly, in Daniel’s prophesy, there is another reference to God (7:13).

As long as we believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, we may be confident in the redemption he provides.

The alternatives for who he was have been narrowed down to three: the Son of God, an honest but misguided individual, or a deceiver, according to a common belief.

The fourth possibility, which more and more doubters are beginning to accept, is that he was a legend, or at the very least that his claims to god were mythical. Now, let’s have a look at the three alternatives to his being who he claimed to be, the Son of God, as described in the Bible:

Or, second, was he trying to deceive people?

Perhaps you’ve heard it said that Jesus never claimed to be the Son of God and that he’d roll over in his grave if he knew that his followers today were adoring him. In all likelihood, they never read what Jesus had to say, and they must have missed the news that he had been raised from the grave. Take, for example, the passage in John 5:16-20, where Jesus plainly portrays himself as divine. His opponents were so enraged as a result that they “worked even harder to find a means to assassinate him.” Why?

  1. Instead of admitting that he was “making himself equal with God,” he went on to bolster those assertions.
  2. He was relieved when he realized it.” “You aren’t even fifty years old,” they exclaimed, shocked.
  3. His audience understood what he was saying: either Jesus truly was God manifested in human form, or he was a blasphemer.
  4. And, in John 10:30-33, Jesus reiterated his allegation.
  5. According to the original phrase, he was asserting that he was one in nature or essence with God, rather than simply being unified in intent.
  6. 33).
  7. No, he was making it very apparent that he was God’s Son—deity manifested as a human being.

And another time, Jesus put it succinctly into words why his identity was so important: “Unless you accept that I Am who I claim to be, you will die in your sins” (John 8:24).

The Gospel of Mark, which was probably the first biography written about him, has several self-references, including this one.

His opponents were appalled once more, accusing him of blasphemy and declaring him deserving of death.

It appears that Jesus was using the holy term “I Am” to define himself once more, which is something that no regular person should ever do.

He also addressed himself as “the Son of Man,” a moniker derived from Daniel 7:13-14, in which the Son of Man is proven to have divine attributes.

This is another another allusion to God in the same Danielic prophesy (7:13).

If Jesus Christ is the Son of God, we may be confident in the redemption he provides.

The alternatives for who Jesus was have been narrowed down to three: the Son of God, an honest but misguided individual, or a deceiver, according to many.

Let’s take a quick look at the three alternatives to his being who he claimed to be, the Son of God, according to the Bible:

Third, might Jesus—or at least his claims to deity—have merely been legendary?

As appealing as that alternative may be to some individuals today, it is rife with deadly defects that must be avoided. So far, we’ve looked at how historically accurate the New Testament is, particularly in regard to the Gospel stories of Jesus’ life and career. Also mentioned was the large number of early manuscript records we have for those works, which much exceeds the number of early manuscript records we have for any other work from antiquity. In addition, a lot of the facts in the biblical tales have received solid secular validation, as previously stated.

Seven secular writings and many creeds of the first church are among the sources that expressly refer to his divine character, making up a total of twenty-four sources.

According to him, the most reasonable interpretation is that these creeds “fully embody Jesus’ actual teachings.” No, the weight of history—both religious and secular—is on the side of Jesus being and doing precisely what the Bible tells about him: that he was God manifested in human flesh, who came to be the Savior of the world, as the Bible claims.

There are numerous reasons for believing in Jesus, including his fulfillment of numerous messianic prophecies in the Old Testament, his morally impeccable life, his divine insights into human nature and even into the specific thoughts of the people he spoke with, and most importantly, his resurrection from the dead—an event well documented by the eyewitnesses who knew the tomb was empty and who saw, talked with, and even shared a meal with the risen Jesus.

So why did Jesus, the Son of God, come to live among us?

What did he want to achieve? According to the most famous line in the Bible, John 3:16, God himself explains himself: “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, so that everyone who believes in him will not die but but live forever.” He recognized that we were doomed and that we had surrendered our life to the power of sin. His life, on the other hand, was not forfeited. It was completely free of sin and stain. This clean existence was willingly given in exchange for our sinful lives in order for us to be set free.

In response to the tax collector Zacchaeus’ inquisitiveness, Jesus replied, “The Son of Man has come to seek and rescue those who are lost.” “Even the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve others, and to sacrifice his life as a ransom for many,” Jesus said in Mark 10:45, elaborating on his mission.

He is the bestselling author of a number of books, including Becoming a Contagious Christian (which is available on Amazon).

Their two adult children reside with them near Denver, Colorado, where Mark and Heidi live with them.

You may get in touch with him through Twitter. Editorial note: Mark will be joining us on our IGNITE Tour in 2016, which will include Houston, San Antonio, Dallas-Fort Worth, and other cities in Texas. More information will be released in the following weeks.

10 Biblical Reasons Jesus Is God

On one of the most critical days of his career, Jesus inquired of his followers, “Who do you claim that I am?” (Matthew 16:15; Mark 12:15). The answer to this issue is more significant than any other since it will determine the future of the world. Nonetheless, when Christians ask people the question “who do you sayJesusis?” now, just as they did inJesus’ day, they receive a wide range of responses regarding his identity, as they did then. The New Testament, on the other hand, provides us with information regarding whoJesusis.

Introduction

When it comes to defending the reality of the Christian faith, understanding Jesus’ divinity is essential. The notion of Christ’s deity is rejected by all major faiths 1as well as cultic organizations 2as well. Aspects of these arguments are a product of rationalism (“reason” is superior, not God), which elevates revelation above revelation, or they are a result of an incorrect interpretation of what the doctrine says. The revisionist history argument, which asserts that Christ’s divinity was formed at the Council of Nicaea in the 4th century 3and was not something held by the early church, is another more prominent source of opposition.

It is critical to understandJesus’ identity because if we dispute the divinity ofJesus, we are denying the existence of the Father (1 John 2:23; cf.

Here are ten scriptural arguments in support of Jesus’ divinity.

1: The Bible Teaches That There Is One True God

Defending the reality of the Christian faith requires a thorough understanding of Jesus’ divinity. All mainstream faiths 1as well as cultic sects 2reject the notion of Christ’s divinity as taught by the Bible. Aspects of these concerns are a product of rationalism (“reason” is superior, not God), which elevates revelation above revelation, or they are a result of misinterpretation of the concept. The revisionist history argument, which asserts that Christ’s divinity was formed at the Council of Nicaea in the 4th century 3and was not something held by the early church, is another more prominent source of opposition.

Getting Jesus’ identification is critical because if we dispute Jesus’ divinity, we are effectively denying the Father’s existence (1 John 2:23; cf.

Ten scriptural arguments for the divinity of Jesus are presented in the following list:

2: The Bible Teaches That Jesus Pre-Existed Before The World Was

The New Testament makes it very apparent that Jesus lived in eternity prior before his birth in Bethlehem, as evidenced by various verses. In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth, according to the Bible’s Genesis 1:3. John 1:1 has the exact identical words, “In the beginning,” as in John 1:1. 8 In John 1:1, we are told that the Word (logos) was with God from the beginning and that the Word was not only with God but was God himself. This Word is the one who brought everything into being at the beginning of time (John 1:3).

  • John 17:3–5 contains Jesus’ petition, in which he simultaneously refers to his pre-existence and utilizes words that can only be spoken concerning deity.
  • Because I completed the task that you assigned me, I was able to glorify you on this planet.
  • Amen.
  • But take note that Jesus is distinct from the Father in that Jesus is the one who is speaking to the Father in this passage.
  • This discourse depicts Jesus speaking about the splendor he enjoyed with the Father even before the world was created; the phrase “in your own presence” relate to the fact that they participated in heavenly glory before the earth was created.

Paul exhorts the Philippians to adopt the same mindset as Christ Jesus, who “existed in the form of God” and “existed in the form of man.” 11These phrases appear before the verbs “emptied,” “taking,” and “becoming,” and they allude to the pre-existence of the one who “exists in the form of God,” according to the Bible.

The alternative was for him to essentially “become himself nothing” 14by undergoing two transformations: first, adopting the shape of a bond-servant, and then being transformed into the likeness of mankind.

The result is that everyone’s knee will be bowed and every tongue will confess thatJesusis Lord (Philippians 2:10–11); onlyGodshould be praised as the only God who should be worshipped as Lord (see Isaiah 45:23).

3: Jesus Is Creator Not Creature

Jesus was a created creature, according to Jehovah’s Witnesses, who think that Paul’s assertion in Colossians 1:15 that Jesus was the “firstborn of all creation” teaches. The doctrine of the Jehovah’s Witnesses, on the other hand, is similar to the position of the old Colossian heresy that Paul had to contend with. They taught that Jesus was the first of many created mediators between God and mankind, and that they were the false teachers of Colossae who taught this. By employing the precise Greek wordprtotokos, which means “firstborn,” Paul disavows the notion that Jesus is a created creature.

  1. Psalm 89:20–27 describes David, the youngest of Jesse’s sons, as the “firstborn” who ruled over Israel, in the same way.
  2. According to Paul, when he refers to Jesus as “firstborn over all creation,” he is inferring that he is the supreme ruler over all of creation.
  3. 16 So why didn’t he put it to use?
  4. According to Paul, by referring to Jesus as the “firstborn over all creation,” he is implying that he is the ultimate king over all of creation.
  5. Throughout this passage, Paul explicitly rejects the notion that Jesus is a created creature, because he portrays Jesus as the Creator of the entire cosmos, which exists only as a result of his creative ability (John 1:1–3, Hebrews 1:2, 8–10).
  6. This phrase comes from the Greek term for “Godhead,”theotis, which literally means “the condition of being God.” 17 Only God has the ability to create (Isaiah 42:5, 44:24, 45:18).

4: Jesus Identifies Himself as Divine

In his interaction with the Pharisees during the Feast of Tabernacles/Booths (John 8:13), Jesus warned them, “I told you that you would die in your sins, because unless you believe that I am he, you will die in your sins” (John 8:24). After hearing Jesus’ remark, the Jewish people reacted by questioning him, “Who are you?” (See also John 8:25.) In his final address to the Jews, Jesus said clearly who he is: “Really, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was, I am” (John 8:58). (John 8:58). As evidenced by its context in the book of Isaiah (Isaiah 41:4; 43:10–13; 46:4; 48:12; cf.

The Jewish officials sought to stone Jesus for blasphemy because he explicitly identified himself with Yahweh of the Old Testament, which was against the law (see John 5:18; 10:33).

5: The Apostles Identified Jesus as Divine

As a divine being, Jesus and his apostles both declared him to be. The Apostle Peter referred to Jesus as “our God and Savior” (2 Peter 1:1; see also Titus 2:13) and exhorted Christians to “worship Christ the Lord as holy” (2 Peter 1:1; see also Titus 2:13). (1 Peter 3:15). 18 In James 2:1, Jesus’ own half-brother James, who at once was an unbeliever (John 7:5), referred to him as “the Lord of glory.” (See also 1 Corinthians 2:8; Psalm 24:7–8). How about a guy or a prophet who might be described in such a manner?

  • Isaiah 44:6), among other things.
  • In chapter 1, the author identifies Jesus (the Son) as superior to any prophet (verses 1-2), superior to angels (verse 5), worthy of our worship (verses 6-8), the creator of all things who is unchangeable (verses 2–3, 10; cf.
  • Psalm 45:6–7).
  • Acts 2:30).
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6: The Jewish Leaders Recognized Jesus’ Claim to Divinity

In response to Jesus’ words and acts, the Jewish authorities reacted violently, which is one of the most compelling evidences of Jesus’ deity. A paralyzed is healed by Jesus in Mark 2, and his sins are also forgiven by Jesus (Mark 2:5). This is the reason why the scribes scream blasphemy, because it is only God who has the power to pardon sins (Mark 2:7). 19 Jesus is accused of blasphemy once more during his trial before the Sanhedrin, this time for his response to the high priest’s question: “Are you the Christ, the Son of the Blessed?” (Matthew 14:61) “I am, and you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of Power, and coming with the clouds of heaven,” Jesus said (Mark 14:62).

What was the high priest thinking when he reacted that way?

As described in Daniel 7, the divine Son of Man is brought before the Ancient of Days, before whom all peoples and countries serve.

7: The Early Church in the New Testament Prayed to Jesus

Even though prayer is something that should be directed only to God, Jesus instructs his followers in how to pray to him (John 14:13–14; 16:26). When Stephen is about to be stoned to death in the book of Acts, he screams out to the Lord Jesus to come and take his sprit away from him (Acts 7:59). The Greek phrase for “calling on” (epikaloumenon) is interesting because it echoes Peter’s plea to the people in Acts 2:21, who were told to “call on” (epikaleshtai) the Lord in order to be saved. Another way in which Paul characterizes the Corinthians is as people who “call upon the name of our LordJesusChrist” (1 Corinthians 1:2).

In the Old Testament, people “called on” the name of Yahweh, which means “called upon” (Joel 2:32). The Corinthians were a group of people who prayed to Jesus Christ as their Lord.

8: The Early Church in the New Testament Worshipped Jesus

People offered their worship to Jesus, and he received it (Matthew 2:2, 14:33, 28:9). Another one of the most famous examples comes from the mouth of Thomas when he cried out, “My Lord and my God!” (See also John 20:28.) IfJesuswas not divine, then Thomas committed a grave mistake in his devotion; however,Jesusmade no attempt to rectify Thomas’ wrong in his worship. Nonetheless, Peter (Acts 10:25–26), Paul (Acts 14:14–15), and the angel in Revelation (Revelation 22:8,9) all rebuked people for attempting to worship them in their respective books of scripture.

What’s more, in the book of Revelation, the elders, angels, and every creature in heaven and on earth declare that “him who sits on the throne and to the Lamb” (Revelation 5:11–14; cf.

9: Jesus Made Claims That No Human Being Could Ever Make

The words and deeds of Jesus not only recognized him as God, but he also demonstrated his divinity via his actions and words. Jesus stated that in order to enter the Kingdom of Heaven, we must first acknowledge him as Lord (kurios, Romans 10:9; cf. Matthew 7:21). Just claiming that Jesus is Lord will not bring you into the Kingdom; rather, you must confess Him as Lord in order to be admitted into the Kingdom. 21 According to Jesus, admittance into God’s Kingdom is contingent on a person’s knowledge of him as well as his reciprocal knowledge of the other person (Matthew 7:23).

Could Moses have ever made a claim like this about the ten commandments?

It is impossible for a human being to provide someone relief from the Law.

God has never granted any man or prophet complete authority in heaven and on earth, but in Daniel 7:13–14, God grants the Son of Man the authority that was previously granted to Moses (see also Matthew 26:64).

10: Jesus IstheSon of God

It is frequently pointed out that the phrase “Son of God” do not refer to Jesus as a one-and-only son of God. God referred to Israel as God’s son in the Old Testament (Exodus 4:22–23; Hosea 11:1), the monarch as God’s son in the Bible (Psalm 2:7), and the angels were referred to as God’s sons in the New Testament (Matthew 1:2–3). (Job 38:7). Even in the New Testament, Adam and believers are referred to be God’s sons or daughters (see Genesis 3:15). (Luke 3:38; Romans 8:14). There is, however, a distinction between an adoptive son and a relational Son of God, the latter of whom is a god by nature, while the former does not exist.

  1. “We have a law, and according to that law, he ought to die because he has declared himself to be the Son of God,” the Jewish leaders said at Jesus’ trial before Pilate.
  2. John 10:36).
  3. As a result, by referring to himself as theSon of God, Jesus was asserting that he possessed “the privileges and authority of God himself” (cf.
  4. 24 The contention that Jesus never claimed to be God must be answered by those who believe that he was executed on the grounds of blasphemy.

Because we are already dead in our sins (see John 3:18 and Ephesians 2:1), failing to believe inJesusas the Son ofGod results in judgment, whilst trusting inJesusas the Son ofGod results in eternal life (see John 3:15–17, 6:40 and 20:31) is significant.

Conclusion

Despite the fact that there are several challenges toJesus’ divinity, the New Testament plainly gives eye-witness evidence to the words, deeds, and teachings ofJesus that demonstrate his deity to the world. A falseJesuswill not be able to help you. If we do not correctly identify Jesus as the Messiah, we shall perish in our sin (John 8:24).

How do we know Jesus is the son of God?

My own favorite Christmas card images Under the words “History is littered with men who would be gods,” Genghis Khan, Hitler, Napoleon, and other kings and dictators are shown alongside other monarchs and tyrants. But there is only one God who would be man, and it is depicted on the inside of the card next to a picture of Christ in his manger. Is there any proof that the Christ of Christmas is in fact the divine Son of God, as some believe? Of course, the Bible asserts that Christ is the Son of God.

However, every faith has its own set of sacred writings.

Here are the reasons why I am certain that Jesus Christ was and continues to be the Son of God.

How can we believe those who first experienced Jesus’ resurrection?

According to the ancient historians Tacitus and Thallus the Samaritan, Pontius Pilate was the one who crucified Jesus on the cross. Early Christians believed that Jesus rose from the grave on Easter Sunday morning, according to Josephus, a first-century Jewish historian who was in Rome at the time. What evidence do we have that they were correct? David Hume was a Scottish philosopher who lived in the eighteenth century and is renowned today as the “Father of Skepticism.” In his book, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, he outlined six criteria by which we should evaluate persons who claim to have observed a miraculous event.

  1. Many
  2. Bright
  3. Educated
  4. Of unquestionable honesty
  5. Prepared to suffer significant financial loss if they are proven wrong
  6. And their assertions should be easily corroborated.

His rules, in my opinion, are a wonderful approach to evaluate individuals who claim to have witnessed a miracle. How do the eyewitnesses to the resurrected Christ do when measured against these standards?

  1. They were numerous: more than five hundred people witnessed the risen Lord (1 Corinthians 15:6). They were brilliant, as shown by the fact that the literature they produced is the most widely distributed book in history. They were well-educated: Paul was tutored by Gamaliel, who was considered the greatest scholar in Judaism (Acts 22:3)
  2. And they were well-traveled. They were men and women of unquestionable integrity
  3. They were plainly willing to suffer great loss, as seen by their readiness to die for the Christ whom they preached
  4. And they were certainly willing to suffer great loss. As a result, their statements were easily corroborated by the fact that Jesus’ empty tomb was readily accessible to anybody who desired to see it (cf. Acts 26:26, “this action was not done in a corner”)

As a result, the witnesses were trustworthy. What about the resurrected body they claimed to have seen?

How can we believe the resurrection truly happened?

Having established that Jesus of Nazareth was crucified and buried, and that his tomb was discovered to be empty on the third day, we may now go on to the next historical truth. Since then, critics have sought to explain why Jesus’ tomb was empty and how his followers’ lives have been transformed. It has been suggested that the disciples took the body when the guards were sleeping (Matthew 28:11-15). This was the oldest known explanation for the holiday of Easter. However, how would sleeping guards be able to determine the identities of these thieves?

  1. And why would the disciples sacrifice their lives for something they were well aware was a lie?
  2. What strategy would they use to overwhelm the guards?
  3. Why would they suffer and die as a result of a deception like this?
  4. When the misled disciples saw an empty tomb, they falsely claimed that the Lord had risen from the dead.
  5. And wouldn’t it be natural for the Christians to produce the corpse as soon as they began preaching the resurrection?
  6. The bereaved ladies and apostles proceeded to the incorrect tomb, discovered it to be empty, and immediately began proclaiming the resurrection.
  7. The “swoon theory” is a fifth method to consider.
  8. He or his disciples paid the medical examiner into declaring him dead, and then he awoke in the tomb and looked to have been resurrected, according to legend.

The question is, how did he manage to push the stone aside when in such poor health, and overcome the guards? It’s hard to imagine how Jesus was able to appear through walls (John 20:19, 26) and ascend to heaven (Acts 1:9).

The truth of the resurrection

Jesus Christ’s resurrection from the dead is the only explanation that makes sense in light of the empty tomb, the transformed lives of the disciples, and the spread of Christianity across the world. As a result, he is the individual he claimed to be: the divine Son of God. Christmas is a time when Jesus came to forgive us of our sins and to offer us eternal life as God’s children. All presents, however, must be opened. Open yours today and ask Jesus to forgive you of your sins and to accept you as his Lord and King.

Jesus is, in fact, the God who would become a man.

Putting your faith in him is not a leap into the unknown, but rather a step into the light.

Is Jesus God? – Common Questions

Some people believe that Jesus Christ was simply a man, or that he was a great teacher. However, He was and continues to be much more than that. According to the Bible, Jesus is one-of-a-kind in both His person and His purpose. During His time on earth, He was more than simply a spiritual being; He was also God’s Son (John 3:16) and God Himself—God manifested in human form (John 1:14). (1 Timothy 3:16). His humanity was unquestionably complete, but His divinity was unquestionably complete as well (Colossians 2:9).

  • It is understandable that this may be true, but it is crucial to remember that God is far greater and more powerful than we are capable of understanding or comprehending.
  • According to him, He and His Father are one (John 10:30), and that He is on an equal footing with the Father (John 17:5).
  • Not only did he assert that he was God, but he also asserted that he possessed divine authority.
  • He asserts the power to resurrect people from the dead (John 5:25-29) and to forgive sins (Mark 2:5-7), which are things that only God has the authority to perform (1 Samuel 2:6; Isaiah 43:25).
  • (Matthew 28:20).
  • Claiming to be anything, as Jesus claimed to be God, does not imply that one is in fact in that position.
  • Jesus’ identity is not only determined by what He says, but rather by what He does.
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These pieces of evidence include prophecies that were fulfilled and miracles that were documented in which Jesus overturned the rules of nature.

But it was His resurrection from the dead after His death on the cross that provided the most definitive proof of His deity and immortality.

Is it true that Jesus ever said, “I am God”?

Many individuals who believe in only one God would consider the individual to be blaspheming.

Hedid, on the other hand, provide us with grounds to accept such a claim without uttering these terms.

For example, Jesus declares in Revelation 1:17 and 22:13 that He is “the beginning and the last,” which corresponds to God the Father’s statement in Isaiah 44:6.

If we believe that Jesus could only claim to be God by speaking just one statement, we would wonder where He says things like, “I am a brilliant teacher, but I am not God,” or “I am simply a prophet; don’t worship me,” among other things.

There is good news in that Jesus revealed to us that He is God in a number of distinct ways!

Except for God, who else could lay claim to these things?

Just because you believe in Jesus as God does not imply that there are numerous gods.

“God has shown Himself to us in three ways—as Father, as Son, and as Holy Spirit,” as Billy Graham eloquently put it.

Have you ever considered some of the objects we see around us that are both three—and yet also one—dimensional at the same time?

Patrick taught the Irish about this hundreds of years ago using a clover leaf, which has three leaves yet is still considered to be only one leaf.

Regardless matter whether a quart of water is made up of ice, water, or steam, it is still the same quart of water.” Heaven is real, and there is only one way to go there—the one way to be free from your sin and to have a personal connection with God—and that is via Jesus Christ.

If Jesus is God’s Son, how can He be both God and God’s Son?

God has never had a wife, according to the Bible.

In contrast to us, Jesus was not conceived by two earthly parents; rather, He was born of a virgin as a result of a miracle performed by God.

Having a child born of a virgin may seem impossible; even Jesus’ mother, Mary, wondered aloud, “How will this be?” But God is all-powerful, and he prepared a way for the holy Jesus to come into the world as a human being (Luke 1:34).

Jesus was entirely God and totally human at the same time.

The fact that Luke was aware of the impossibility of a virgin birth did not prevent him from concluding that it was true after much inquiry.

That He was born miraculously is even further proof of His divinity.

Heaven is real, and there is only one way to go there—the one way to be free from your sin and to have a personal connection with God—and that is via Jesus.

“Salvation can be found in no one else, because there is no other name under heaven given to mankind by which we must be saved,” according to Acts 4:12.

The reason behind this is as follows: We are all sinners, which means that we all fall short of God’s flawless ideal.

That entails an eternity of estrangement from the Creator.

In the presence of God, we can have eternal life since He vanquished death by rising again, and this is possible only if we place our confidence in Him.

DISCOVER MORE Following His death and resurrection, hundreds of individuals witnessed and believed in the resurrected Christ; over the course of 2,000 years, countless others have realized that no one else can satisfy human hearts’ most profound desires and wants.

“All the riches of wisdom and understanding are hidden in Jesus Christ alone,” according to the Bible (Colossians 2:3).

The Bible informs us that Jesus Christ is God, and there are several reasons why we may put our faith in this book of scripture.

” in the Common Questions section.) Apart from the fact that we have several grounds to trust that the Bible’s content is accurate, many people will discover that reading the Bible allows God to communicate to them—perhaps not audibly, but via His words.

Different translations of the Bible are available in an attempt to make the Bible comprehensible to a variety of audiences; yet, the primary doctrines—as well as the person of Jesus Christ—remain the same throughout all translations.

If you’re interested in learning more about Jesus and what the Bible has to say about Him, read the book of John in your Bible. It’s a fantastic location to get started.

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Jesus is not God the Father in the traditional sense. He is the Son of God. According to the teachings of theChalcedonian Creed, the Son has always been truly God, consubstantial (of the same substance or essence as the Father) with the Father. His human essence was assumed during the incarnation, making him really man and consubstantial with us. Some, on the other hand, argue that the New Testament does not refer to Jesus as God. The New Testament frequently uses the term “God” (Greek:theos) to refer to “God the Father,” despite the fact that, as previously stated, Jesus is not the Father.

We could put it this way: “God” does not always refer to the Son in particular, but the Son is always God, regardless of who is speaking.

Here are some of the most straightforward examples: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God,” according to John 1:1.

Jesus says in John 20:28 that Thomas replied, “‘My Lord and my God!'” ‘To them belong the patriarchs,’ says the apostle Paul in Romans 9:5, “and from their race comes the Christ, who is God over all, blessed forever,’ says God in the flesh.

“However, concerning the Son, he declares, ‘Your throne, O God, is forever and ever, and the scepter of uprightness is the scepter of your kingdom.'” “To those who have obtained a faith that is on an equal footing with ours through the righteousness of our God and Savior Jesus Christ,” says 2 Peter 1:1.

According to Murray Harris, who has written a definitive treatment on this subject (Jesus as God: The New Testament Use of theos in Reference to Jesus), the following general lines of evidence are helpfully summarized: If the early Church had never used the title “Jesus,” his deity would still have been evident in his being the object of human and angelic worship as well as of saving faith; the performer of exclusively divine functions such as the act of creation, the forgiveness of sins, and the final judgment; the addressee of petitionary prayer; the possessor of all divine attributes; the bearer of numerous titles used of Yahweh in the Old Testament; and the co-author of divine blessing.

  1. Faith in Christ’s deity does not rest on the evidence or validity of a series of “proof-texts” in which he may be referred to as such, but rather on the general testimony of the New Testament, which is corroborated by personal experience, as stated in the Bible.
  2. Putting Jesus in His Place: The Case for the Deity of Christ, by Robert Bowman and Ed Komoszewski, is one of the most accessible books on the subject.
  3. Jesus is deserving of theH onors that are only due to God.
  4. God is the only one who can receive N amesthat.
  5. Jesus sits on the throne of God and has aS eaton it.
  6. And we should not downplay our salvation, because when we do, we can expect to receive little in return.” The earliest known account of a Christian martyr’s death contained the following declaration: “It will be impossible for us to forsake Christ.

“Our Lord, come!” was the oldest surviving liturgical prayer of the church, and it was addressed to Christ. In all likelihood, it was the message of what the church believed and taught that led to the designation “God” being an appropriate name for Jesus Christ.

Evidence proves Jesus is Lord and Christ

George Randall, Jr. – George Randall, Jr. God communicated via His prophets hundreds of years before Jesus of Nazareth was born, allowing them to spread His message. They foresaw future events as well as the arrival of the Savior of humanity. The purpose of making these prophecies in advance of the event was to demonstrate that it was genuinely the work and the Word of God, rather than the product of human imagination. In order to be completely convinced that Jesus Christ is Lord and Savior of mankind, we will continue to compare the Holy Scriptures in order to be completely convinced that Jesus Christ is Lord and Savior of mankind; and that Jesus Christ is your Savior if you would place your confidence in him.

“Be aware of the Lord.” Numerous predictions, some of which are rather detailed, are recorded in the Old Testament concerning the betrayal of Jesus Christ, His sufferings, His death, and even His rising from the grave.

We know it was Judas who betrayed Jesus because the prophecy in Zechariah 11:12-13 is fulfilled in the New Testament in Matthew 26:14-15,24,27:9-10, and Luke 22:48, for “thirty pieces of silver,” which was fulfilled in Matthew 26:14-15,24,27:9-10, and Luke 22:48.

Additionally, in these lines, we see the betrayer returning the blood money and tossing it into the temple.

“They must strike the judge of Israel on the face with a rod,” the Bible says.

He was hit on the head with a reed, and they spit on him while they did so.

A “Righteous Servant” of God is described here, one who will “justify many, for He shall bear their iniquities” (sins).

“He is reviled and rejected by the majority of men.” “He was wounded for our trespasses, He was bruised for our iniquities.and it is through His stripes that we have been healed,” the Bible says.

(Matthew 27:12-14 and John 19:9-10 now provide fulfillment.) He has been released from jail and from judgment:.

“And He was buried among the wicked and with the affluent,” says the Bible.

These words were foretold long before the Roman Empire ever existed, and long before the Romans’ torturous death by crucifixion was known.

… a gathering of the wicked has surrounded Me; they have wounded My hands and feet.

27:33-50.

He then gave up the ghost.

Consider the parallels between Psalm 34:20 and John 19:36-37.

It becomes clear when you compare the various Old Testament prophecies with the countless New Testament occurrences reported in the four Gospels that there is perfect harmony and that God’s Word has been precisely fulfilled.

After all of this convincing evidence, a person would have to be deaf or a stupid not to accept what they are seeing.

Until the next week, Peter 3:18 (II Peter 3:18) “But grow in grace and in knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ,” the apostle Paul says.

All honor and glory are due to Him now and forever. Amen.” Randall Jr., George Randall Jr., Randall Jr. At Rocky Ford Christian Church in Cana, Virginia, George Randall Jr. serves as the minister to the young people.

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