Why Did Jesus Ask His Father To Glorify Him In John 17 1 5

How He Prayed: He Prayed for Glory

We’ll be kicking off a three-week sermon series called “How He Prayed” starting tonight. We’re looking at Jesus’ prayer in John chapter 17 to see how he may serve as an example for how we should pray. The prayer of Jesus, recorded in John 17, is known as the High Priestly Prayer of Jesus. A priest is a person who serves as a link between God and the people he or she serves. As Jesus prays in this verse, we may learn how to approach God on our own behalf and on behalf of others through his example.

The slides from the sermon are accessible at the bottom of this page.

After further consideration, it occurred to me that, because Jesus recited this prayer after the final supper the night before he was killed, it might also make an excellent Easter series.

Father, please show us your splendor.

  • Father, please do not allow us to listen to this lecture series on prayer and then leave without praying.
  • Father, please send your Holy Spirit to fill this space so that we may come face to face with your life-giving presence as well as the life-giving presence of your Son, Jesus Christ, in this location.
  • What would you ask for in a prayer if you knew you were going to die the next day?
  • Do you want to spend more time with the people you care about?
  • the first chapter of John (17:1a) After saying this, Jesus raised his eyes to the heavens and said, “Father, the hour has come.
  • When the hour of his crucifixion came, when he was tried and scourged, when he was rejected and executed, it was.
  • Bravehearttells the narrative of William Wallace (played by Mel Gibson), a Scottish nationalist who rallies his countrymen against the oppressive English.

She coerces him into drinking it, kisses him goodbye, and then walks away, leaving him spitting it out.

“Father, please make it pain less,” Jesus may pray in this place for a sedative.

“Father, please save me.” He, on the other hand, prays.

Make your Son a source of honor so that your Son may make you a source of honor.

He begins by praying for glory for himself, so that he might then exalt his heavenly Father.

Matthew 6:9b (Bible).

Consequently, in Matthew 6 and John 17, we witness two instances of Jesus praying for his disciples. In both of these instances, Jesus begins his prayer by focusing on respecting and worshiping his heavenly Father. As a result, when we pray, we should:

1. We can begin with glory. (John 17:1)

What exactly is glory? What is it that Jesus is pleading for? Glory may be defined as “to honor or laud.” But it’s not only applause that’s coming. It is the act of appreciating the value or character of something. The film is a satire on Glory is based on the historical narrative of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry regiment, which was a military force comprised primarily of African-Americans during the American Civil War. They are humiliated and disrespected throughout the novel. The novel concludes with a brave attack against Fort Wagner.

The fort’s walls were built to keep them in, but they burst free as they tore down the wall, showing their innate daring, bravery, and heroism.

Glory is God’s presence revealed. (Exodus 33:14, 18-19)

Glory, what exactly is it. So, what is it that Jesus is pleading? Glorification literally translates as “honor or acclaim.” Applause, however, is not the only response. Recognition of something’s value or character is what it is. It was a very good film. In Glory, the tale of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry regiment, a military force comprised primarily of African-American soldiers, is told through flashbacks. They are humiliated and disrespected throughout the novel. The narrative concludes with a brave attack against Fort Wagner.

The fort’s walls were built to keep them down, but they broke through as they tore down the wall, showing their innate boldness, bravery, and bravery.

God’s presence is revealed in Jesus Christ. (John 1:14)

Have you ever wished to behold the splendor of God? Just take a look at Jesus. John 1:14 (New International Version) It was the Word that became human and established his home among us. It has been shown to us in its fullness, the glory of the one and only Son, who has come from the Father, full of grace and truth. (NIV®) (New International Version) (NIV®) Jesus demonstrates the splendor of his heavenly Father. God’s presence may be felt in Jesus. God’s benevolence, mercy, and compassion are all shown in the person of Jesus Christ.

  • Doesn’t Christmas bring out the best in people, don’t you think?
  • People make charitable contributions over the holidays when they would not otherwise do so throughout the year.
  • God’s presence is seen in the person of Jesus Christ.
  • We have the ability to pray in order to honor and glorify Jesus and the Father.
  • Would you like to be exalted, Jesus?
  • Oh God, please show me your splendor.
  • Amen.” When we begin by concentrating on honoring God and enjoying his glory, our prayers shift from being oriented on ourselves to being centered on God.
  • But how can we be certain that we will not drown?

Will we not be consumed by God’s perfect holiness, as well as by his anger against our transgressions? It is necessary for sinful creatures to beg God for a life preserver in order to encounter an endlessly good God. When we pray, we have the option to: 1) Begin with glory.

2. We can pray for eternal life. (John 17:2-3)

We come before Jesus Christ in humility, admitting our sins and pleading with him to grant us eternal life, which he graciously grants.

Eternal life is a gift. (John 17:2)

Good acts alone will not bring us eternal life; we cannot earn it this way. It is not a merit badge in any way. It is not a promotion in any way. It is not an award given to the employee of the month. Eternal life is given as a Christmas present. The Bible says in John 17:2 Because you delegated authority to him over all people in order for him to be able to bestow eternal life to all those whom you have given him. (NIV®) (New International Version) (NIV®) As a result, in order to safely enjoy God’s grandeur, we must receive the gift of everlasting life, which we cannot get via our own efforts.

Jesus claims that he only provides this gift to those who have been given to him by his Father.

This is the most priceless gift that has ever been offered.

Eternal life is the gift of knowing the Father and the Son. (John 17:3)

According to one commentator, eternal life does not imply living eternally. Because you have everlasting life, you will experience this. Eternal life is a partnership between two people. John 17:3 (KJV) This is what it means to have eternal life: to know you, the one and only true God, as well as Jesus Christ, whom you have sent. (NIV®) (New International Version) (NIV®) Did you get what I said about the definition? Eternal life consists on “knowing” the one and only true God (Jesus is referring to his Father) as well as in knowing Jesus Christ personally.

  1. After that, you must get to know the Father and Jesus personally.
  2. The sort of understanding he’s referring about here is personal (John 10:14-15).
  3. Instead, do you have a sense of their worries, their pleasures, what they like doing, what makes them laugh, and what makes them sad?
  4. Is Jesus aware of your existence?
  5. Do you laugh with him, or do you let him watch you cry?
  6. In the absence of Jesus, you will perish in the pit of inexperience with God.
  7. Today was the day of the baptism.
  8. She’s going to jump right in.
  9. The water is really fine.

Thus let’s take a look at what we’ve learned so far. When we pray, we might begin with glory (which is God’s presence manifested) and work our way down the list. We can pray for eternal life (which is to know and be known by the Father and the Son), but how can we bring our prayers to a close?

3. We can close in praise. (John 17:4-5)

The proper reaction to awe and wonder is praise. WORSHIP is the appropriate response to God’s limitless kindness as shown in Jesus Christ. That’s exactly what we want to do when we read the final two verses. 4:1-4; John 17:4-5 I have brought you honor on this planet by completing the task you assigned me. Thank you. And now, Father, please exalt me in your presence to the level of grandeur I enjoyed with you before the world was created. (NIV®) (New International Version) (NIV®) Jesus declares that he has completed the task assigned to him by his Father.

  1. That life is one lived in obedience to the Father—teaching the Word of God to his followers, curing the blind and deaf, rebuking the hardhearted—and it is the life of Jesus.
  2. The death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus constitute the culmination of his work.
  3. “Freedom!” is the last thing William Wallace screams before being executed in Braveheart.
  4. When Jesus died, he completed his mission to liberate us from our slavery.
  5. Are you able to appreciate his completed work?
  6. The following are some of the things we can say when we pray: 1) We can begin with glory since Jesus came down from the heights of glory to show God’s wonderful presence to us.
  7. Our ability to have a relationship with the Heavenly Father is due to the fact that, for a time, Jesus’ relationship with the Father was severed at the cross.
  8. The most effective approach to conclude a sermon about prayer is with prayer.
  9. Father, please show us your splendor!
  10. More sermons may be found by clicking here, and our narrative can be found by clicking here.

Jesus Prays for the Glorification of the Father and the Son (17:1-5) – IVP New Testament Commentary Series

Jesus opens his prayer with the same topic that he opened his keynote talk with: the connection between the Father and the Son (John 10:30). (5:19-23). In this passage, Jesus “lifts up his eyes toward heaven” (v. 1, which is hidden in the NIV), referring to the Father who is separate from him and to whom he is obedient, continuing the theme of oneness but also distinguishing himself from others. Jesus will talk of the past and the future from an eternal perspective in his prayer, but it will all be grounded in the present, at this specific climax juncture in redemption history: Father, the moment has here (v.

  • As previously stated (2:4; 7:6, 8, 30; 8:20), this hour has cast a shadow over the entire tale, and its coming has already been indicated (12:23), with ramifications for glory (12:27-28), judgment (12:31-32) and Jesus’ return to the Father (12:31-32).
  • Continuing on with the subject of glory, Jesus pleads with the Father to honor the Son in order for the Son to glorify the Father in return (v.
  • As a result, even while asking on his own behalf, the Father is his ultimate objective and source of satisfaction.
  • The Son is therefore requesting that his own honor be disclosed, namely that he is one with God; in turn, Jesus will glorify the Father as he continues to show him as one who is deserving of all acclaim and respect, according to the Scriptures.
  • Over the course of the Gospel, Jesus has shown the grandeur of the Father by demonstrating his characteristically generous love.
  • 1 Jn 4:8, 16; 3:16).
  • Although Jesus elaborate on his prayer for glorification in verse 2, it is important to pay close attention to his specific line of thought in order to understand what he is saying.
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In addition, butfor (kathos) might be rendered as “as if,” implying that the earlier granting of power is not necessary for the glorification, but is rather akin to the glorification.

What authority is it that Jesus is alluding to?

(5:20-27).

In addition to meaning “all flesh,” the word might also signify “all life on earth” (for example, Gen 7:15-16 and 21; Alford 1980:875), which would be consistent with the Son’s role as “the one through whom all things were formed” (John 1:3).

The final section of verse 2 speaks about the Son giving eternal life to all those who have been entrusted to him by you.

Although this is grammatically conceivable, it does not do justice to the differences that exist between the two portions of the poem.

In other words, the Son will bring glory to the Father by granting eternal life to those who are given to him by the Father.

As a result, the flow is from the beginning to the end of time.

The Son has given life to all of creation, and it is now up to him to provide eternal life to those who have been entrusted to him by God from inside creation.

6:37, 39; 10:29; 17:6; 18:9).

The Father acts while they are still alive (cf.

Throughout this Gospel, the importance of both divine sovereignty and human responsibility is emphasized, yet there is never any question that all is dependent on the Father’s favor.

H.

G.

Jesus takes a moment to ponder the meaning of the phrase “everlasting life” (v.

John included this passage as a parenthetical comment, similar to a footnote in the book of Revelation (Barrett 1978:503).

Although Jesus’ use of the third person to refer to himself appears unusual, there are precedents of this in the Old Testament (e.g., 2 Sam 7:20).

Similarly, Jesus never refers to himself as “Jesus Christ” in the Gospels, despite the fact that this language is fairly popular outside of the Gospels.

As a result, the language is most likely from a later period (though cf.

Most academics today would agree that the notion itself comes from the later church, but this raises the question of Jesus’ identity and how much of the later church’s understanding came from Jesus himself, which is a complicated topic (cf.

F.

Moule 1977).

F.

This is true throughout the whole Gospel of John.

3).

This knowledge, according to John, is closely related with faith (which, in turn, permits the appropriation of everlasting life; 6:47; 20:31), and it comprises right intellectual comprehension, moral alignment via obedience, and the closeness of unity with Christ (cf.

So it refers to the sharing of life, and because it is the life of God that is shared, it is also the sharing of eternal life.

When translated literally, “life of eternity, age” (hayye ‘olam,Dan 12:2), everlasting life is defined as “life of eternity, age,” and it is used in opposition to temporal existence as well as in comparison between this age and the age to come.

The significance of this link with the era to come is most apparent in the Gospel of John.

A personal relationship with God is at the center of the life of the future era, which is already present in Jesus and made available to his disciples.

This emphasis on knowledge has a Gnostic ring to it.

For example, Clement of Alexandria (who died in A.D.

Despite the fact that some of the language and thought of this Gospel is similar to Gnosticism in its various forms (for more on this, see Rudolph 1992), the fact that this knowledge comes through the historical deeds of Jesus, the incarnate Son of God, that it is grounded in faith, that it is available already now within history, and that it is not concerned with self-knowledge and cosmic speculation distinguishes it from Gnosticism itself (cf.

  • Schmitz and Schütz 1976:403 There will be no revealed religion that is gnostic; the only question is whether or not the information offered is real or untrue.
  • However, what they have to say about this revealer is vastly different.
  • However, this verse, in keeping with the overall message of this Gospel, indicates that Jesus is considerably more than a prophet.
  • Consequently, he shares in deity, because “the knowledge of God and the knowledge of a creaturecould not be eternal life” (Alford 1980:875).
  • However, Jesus now talks of the Father’s glorification that has already occurred as a result of his service, as opposed to his previous prayer for God’s glory in the future (v.

However, even if his job is not finished when he dies (10:18; 19:28, 30), he declares, “I exalted you on earth, having accomplished the task.” Despite the fact that the NIV translation is technically correct, it fails to convey the everlasting, confident perspective seen in Jesus’ remark that his work has already been completed.

  1. The Father had entrusted him with this particular task.
  2. However, the glory of God may also be seen in the Son’s obedience itself, for his humility, obedience, and sacrifice represent the love that is demonstrated through the laying down of one’s life.
  3. 1-2) and mentioning the glorification evident in his ministry (v.
  4. 5).
  5. Glory now appears to allude to the dazzling glory of the divine presence, the “unapproachable light” that Paul refers to in his letter to the Corinthians (1 Tim 6:16).
  6. Because the Son is requesting that, via the glory of the crucifixion, resurrection, and ascension, he be allowed to return to where he was previously, beside(para;NIV,with)the Father (cf.

vv. 2, 24; 1:18, H. C. G. Moule 1908:40-42). Once again, the profound mystery of the loving oneness of the Godhead is revealed to us in this passage of Scripture. The generosity of InterVarsity Press allows us to make the IVP New Testament Commentaries available to you.

Jesus Prays to be Glorified

With the relationship between the Father and the Son, Jesus continues where he left off in his keynote address (5:19-23). “Lifting up his eyes toward heaven” (v. 1, which is obscured in the NIV) to the Father who is distinct from him and to whom he is obedient continues the theme of oneness while also being distinct. In his prayer, Jesus will speak of the past and the future from an eternal perspective, but it will all be rooted in the present, at this particular climactic point in salvation history, as follows: Godfather, the hour has arrived (v.

  1. As previously stated (2:4; 7:6, 8, 30; 8:20), this hour has cast a shadow over the entire story, and its arrival has already been signaled (12:23), with implications for glory (12:27-28), judgment (12:31-32) and Jesus’ return to the Father (12:31-32) (13:1).
  2. 1).
  3. The term “glorify” generally refers to the act of elevating someone to a position of honor and esteem.
  4. While glorification is used to describe the death of the Son of God in John’s gospel, it also has a more specific meaning in this passage.
  5. This same love is revealed in the most profound way through the death of the Son, because God is love, and love is the laying down of one’s life for another (cf.
  6. The character of Christ and his Father will be revealed in his death, as gracious love will be revealed in both.
  7. Jesus’ request for his glorification, according to the New International Version, is based on (for)the authority that the Father has already given him over all people (pases sarkos,”all flesh”).

The case for choosing this alternative will be made clear to us soon.

Before this, Jesus had spoken about his authority received from the Father to give life and to judge others (John 10:10–13).

As of this writing, he is speaking of the Father’s role as the agent of creation, which the Son assumed.

(1:3).

To accomplish this, according to the New International Version (NIV), God the Father granted Jesus authority over all of humanity.

Rather than reading the second half of verse 2 as a direct parallel to the first half of verse 1, it is preferable to read it as a parallel to In other words, the Son will bring glory to the Father by granting eternal life to those who are given to him by the Father in heaven.

As a result, the flow is from the beginning of time to the beginning of time.

Since God gave life to all of creation, the Son has now come to give eternal life to those who have been given to him by God within the realm of creation.

6:37, 39; 10:29; 17:6; 18:9).

It is the Father’s grace that allows him to act while they are still alive (see Eph 2:1-10).

“In the contrast between all flesh and whatever thou hast givenis expressed the inevitable tragedy of God’s mercy; it is offered to all, but only received by a select few, and those who are chosen to receive it (Hoskyns 1940b:590; cf.

C.

Moule 1908:32-36).

3).

However, even if it is understood as Jesus’ response to what he has just said, it flows quite naturally, much as verses 6-8 will react to verse 4.

Despite the fact that the phrase “only true God” is not attributed to Jesus anywhere else, it is similar to John’s own vocabulary (1 Jn 5:20).

It is true that Paul’s texts contrasting the Christian faith with pagan polytheism and idolatry are similar to this double reference to the one true God and to Jesus (1 Thess 1:9-10; 1 Cor 8:6).

Mt 11:27).

C.

D.

BF Westcott comes closer to the truth when he says that John is delivering “the substance of what the Lord said probably at greater length” in “conventional language (so to speak)” (1908:2:244).

He has been entrusted with the ultimate mission of giving eternal life, that is, knowledge of God and of the Son (v.

Despite the fact that knowledge of God is not the same thing in every source, “the notion that knowledge of God is essential to life (salvation) is common to Hebrew and Hellenistic thought” (Barrett 1978:503).

Dodd 1953:151-69).

While the word “eternal” (aionios) literally translates as “infinite” or “timeless,” it refers to both the quantity and the quality of life.

As a matter of fact, the wordeternalis is associated with the word “age” (aion).

Because, according to Jewish tradition, life in the age to come is characterized by a restored relationship with God, and this is precisely what Jesus is referring to in this passage of scripture.

We participate in God’s life only when we know and enjoy his goodness, which is the only way we can live” (IrenaeusAgainst Heresies4.20.5).

Yes, it is true, and early Christians believed they possessed true knowledge, as opposed to what has been “falsely called knowledge” (tes pseudonymou gnoseos,1 Tim 6:20).

220), and his fundamental understanding of knowledge was consistent with our verse.

Schmitz and Schütz 1976:403-5 and Rudolph 1992 There will be no revealed religion that is gnostic; the only question is whether or not the knowledge claimed is true.

As a prophet, Jesus is unsurpassed—indeed, he is the greatest revealer of God.

The knowledge of God revealed through the Son is not sufficient; eternal life also includes knowledge of the Son himself.

So the Son’s equality with the Father is affirmed, as is his subordination as son and as one who has been sent, by this amazing statement.

4).

It has been the distinguishing feature of his life throughout the Gospel to see him glorified, and this glory has been characterized by grace and truth throughout his ministry (1:14).

This is how Jesus’ words and deeds reflected the glory of the Father, as the nature of his works revealed the nature of the one who entrusted them to Jesus to do them.

In the final verses of the chapter, after praying for the glorification of the cross and its provision of life (vv.

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4), Jesus adds yet another aspect of the glory: “And now, Father, glorify me in your presence with the glory I had with you before the world began” (v.

The incarnate one, who is about to die, takes up the language of Wisdom (Proverbs 8:23; Wisdom of Solomon 7:25; Brown 1970:754), which was previously used by Wisdom.

Despite this, the element of love is still present in the film.

(cf. vv. 2, 24; 1:18, H. C. G. Moule 1908:40-42). Once again, the ineffable mystery of the loving unity of the Godhead is revealed to us in this passage of Scripture. Because of the generosity of InterVarsity Press, the IVP New Testament Commentaries are made available.

Coram Deo

It was necessary for Christ to be exalted in His humanity in order for Him to be able to live before God’s face as the incarnate Mediator in order for him to be welcomed back into God’s presence (John 17:5). His humanity had to take part in glory in order for him to be able to view God in glory. The same may be said for ourselves, which is why we shall be exalted in the future. The purpose of our participation in God’s splendor is not so that we will be worshipped, but so that we will reflect that glory and experience the beauty of God as we behold Him in His fullness.

For Further Study

QuestionAnswer The prayer of Jesus reported in John 17 is the longest documented prayer of Jesus in any of the Gospels. Following the completion of His final teachings to the disciples and before He is betrayed, imprisoned, and killed, Jesus prays this prayer to the Father. Jesus begins by praying for himself, then for His followers, and last for all Christians, before concluding the prayer. This intercessory prayer is referred to as Jesus’ High Priestly Prayer in some circles. When God revealed the Law to the Israelites via Moses on Mount Sinai, the post of high priest was established in his honor.

  1. On the Day of Atonement, one priest was chosen to serve as the high priest, who would enter the Holy of Holies and give the sacrifice that would temporarily conceal the sins of the people.
  2. When Jesus arrived, He gave His life as the ultimate sacrifice, one that would not only atone for the sins of the people, but also fully cleanse them and bring them to salvation.
  3. Beginning with His High Priestly Prayer, Jesus explains that His goal in coming to earth was to bring honor and glory to His heavenly Father by granting eternal life to all who believe in Him.
  4. (John 17:3).
  5. (John 17:2).
  6. His statements had been accepted by the eleven disciples who stayed with Him.
  7. According to Jesus, the Father has given Him the disciples, and the disciples are the Father’s property; Jesus and the Father are one in everything (John 17:6, 9–10).

Given that He will no longer be physically present in the earth, Jesus prays that the Father would provide protection for the disciples.

Christ declares that the world despises and hates His apostles and disciples because they are not of the world, just as He is not of the world (John 17:14, 16).

Throughout John 17, Jesus prays that His followers will be purified by the truth, which is God’s Word, and that they will be undivided in their faith (John 17:17).

Following His prayers for His followers, Jesus prays for everyone who would come to trust in Him as a result of their message (John 17:21).

Jesus prays for Christians to be in God so that the rest of the world would come to believe in Jesus as the Messiah (John 17:21).

In John 3:16–17, Jesus declares that He loves the world, and that His sacrifice, which provides eternal life, is available to anyone who trusts in Him.

Jesus also prays for all those who believe in Him to be with Him and to witness His majesty (John 17:24).

He also claims that He has made the Father known to His disciples.

Jesus explains that He recited the High Priestly Prayer because He was on His way to the Father and He wanted His followers to “enjoy the full measure of my joy within them” as He prepared to go (John 17:13).

According to Jesus, “all who come to God via him will be saved entirely” (Hebrews 7:25).

He demonstrates the depth of that redemption via his High Priestly Prayer, which includes themes of oneness, indwelling, glory, and giving, among other things. Questions about John (return to top of page) What is the High Priestly Prayer of Jesus?

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John 17:1-3 How the Son Brings Glory to the Father

Introduction to the book of John 17 Possibly, the seventeenth chapter of this gospel could be considered the culmination of the theology that John has been recounting for us. That theology, that doctrine, which has been so beautifully and in some instances ineffably expounded for us by our Lord in the last few chapters has now reached a point in which we find the Lord breaking away from his addresses to the disciples and beginning to address His Father on His own behalf, as recorded in the following verses.

This chapter is, in many ways, so holy, so lofty, and so wonderful that we must take a step back and marvel at it.

Honestly, I was apprehensive about this chapter in the weeks preceding up to my studies on it, just because of the depth and complexity of the riddles that were hidden in this chapter.

As much as reading it and desiring to study it might be exciting, there is also a holy terror in approaching it any other way than how Jesus would have us to approach it.

Because of this, I invite you to join me as we explore the chapter together and pray that God would kindly provide us wisdom and proper thinking; that we may “think His thoughts after Him,” as so many have wisely stated it, “think His thoughts after Him.” 17:1 “Father, the hour has come; glorify your Son so the Son may glory you, for you have given him power over all flesh, to give everlasting life to everyone those you have given him,” Jesus remarked when he had finished speaking these words.

  1. When John adds, “When Jesus had uttered these words,” he is referring to the full of the discourses that we have just been learning in class.
  2. We must remind ourselves that everything Jesus has spoken to them has been with the goal of soothing them and guiding them to the true knowledge of God.
  3. His death isn’t something He’s deciding on haphazardly; rather, He’s committed to serving and loving His disciples to the very end (see John 13:1), and this same commitment is reflected in His prayer.
  4. The time has come for him to shine.
  5. He’d fixed His sights on the cross and was adamant about seeing His purpose through to completion (Luke 9:51).
  6. 1:1-4).
  7. The glory of the Trinity is shared by all three members of the Trinity.
  8. A distinguishing attribute of the Trinity is that they are all consumed with desire for the glory of the other.
  9. The greatest goals of the Son are to highlight the Father’s work, the Father’s plan, the Father’s purposes, the Father’s character and qualities, the Father’s love, and a variety of other attributes.
  10. According to Bruce Ware, “.more than anything else, Jesus was concerned with performing what the Father had asked him to do.” It’s impossible to ignore the passion with which people want to amplify one another.

What role will the cross play in bringing glory to the Father? According to John Piper, there are at least two ways in which God will get praise and especially take joy in the cross:

  1. God’s delight is found in what the Son achieves through his death
  2. When it came to his love for the Father’s glory, the Son’s suffering was the ultimate litmus test.

According to Piper, “It was the Father’s just commitment to his own name that necessitated the necessity of restitution for sin.” As a result, when the Son gladly accepted the pain associated with that compensation, every stride on the road to Calvary carried the message across the universe: “The glory of God is of infinite worth!” The glory of God is of infinite value! Finally, Piper says, “When Jesus died, he praised the Father’s name and saved the people of his Father’s house.” And if the Father takes great pleasure in the glory due to his name, and since he takes great pleasure in the election of a sinful people for himself, how can he not take great pleasure in the wounding of his Son, through which these two wonderful divine pleasures are reconciled and made one?

3.

His authority extended not only to those in his immediate vicinity (as a teacher to a small group of men), not only to his role as a prominent public figure (whose popularity with the general public was steadily increasing), but also to the very expanses of the heavens and the entire universe itself.

Jesus, on the other hand, who possessed total power, could never be corrupted.

He has no claim on me, (John 14:30) and I have told these things to you in so that you may have peace in me (John 14:31).

But take comfort; I have triumphed over the entire world.” (See also John 16:33) And thus, for Jesus, power was employed at His discretion, and it only required one thought, one snap of the hands, and one uttered phrase of “be quiet” (Mark 4:39) to command the entire universe to submit to His will.

  1. The idea is that all authority was placed in the hands of Jesus, and He utilized this authority to bring suffering to the Father.
  2. We’ll miss it if we don’t pay attention to our surroundings.
  3. 1).
  4. When it comes to the Salvation of Sinners There have been a plethora of occasions – many, many occasions – when the subject of the “why” of God’s method of salvation has arisen in seminary, Sunday School, or a discipleship class.
  5. Why didn’t He simply prohibit sin from occurring in the first place?
  6. The ground level view of our sin-ravaged planet and our fallen, sad situation causes us to question, “Why God?” The mystery of “why” is one that goes beyond our ability to comprehend the essence of the question.
  7. He expressed his displeasure with God, claiming that he was not being compassionate to him.

And while I agree with these two realities, I believe that the goal is misguided.

True, He predestined the universe to be as it is, and He predestined that His Son would suffer for our sins, before He even spoke, “Let there be light,” which means, “let there be life.” Even yet, we’re left with the issue of why.

Jesus states unequivocally in this passage that the purpose for which He has been given authority to provide redemption is to bring God glory.

Exactly for the same reason that God breathed life into Adam and Eve, God also sent His son: to bring Him glory.

This objective was at the center of every breath, every word, and every action taken by our Lord during His sojourn on this planet: to bring glory to God.

” God’s Glory is Exalted in Jesus’ Salvation of the Chosen The second element of this is that Jesus says this: “to provide eternal life to all whom you have given him,” which means “to give eternal life to everyone whom you have given him.” He is now speaking in the third person, referring to “him” as himself, Jesus, and referring to “him” as “himself.” God’s elect — a select set of individuals – are at the center of God’s mission of salvation, which is at the very heart of this mission.

See also:  How Long Did Jesus Live

Bringing God honor is the ultimate goal of Jesus’ life, and it is built on the reason for why He came, which was to die for those whom He had predestined for redemption.

In the words of Piper, “The atonement does not make possible the spiritual quickening of all individuals; rather, it ensures and effectively accomplishes the spiritual quickening of those who are chosen.” When you have debates with individuals in church regarding the nature of elections, it is interesting to see that one of the topics that dissidents often bring up is the purported “unfairness” of the electoral process.

  1. Many people are offended by the notion that God would have a specific set of elect people in mind, which is understandable.
  2. However, we cannot ignore this detail since it appears that this is the manner in which Jesus wishes to bring the greatest amount of credit to the Father.
  3. Moreover, everything will be made abundantly clear in His petition to the Father, which will be found in this chapter.
  4. And that eternal life is to be distributed in accordance with a plan that has been devised amongst the Members of the Trinity since before the creation of the universe.
  5. he predestined us for adoption as sons through Jesus Christ, in accordance with the purpose of his will, to the glory of his glorious grace, with which he has blessed us in the Beloved, out of love for us.
  6. What is the reason that God only saves some people and not others?
  7. As a result, I believe that Jesus’ motivation for completing the atonement for his chosen people is based on the fact that doing so will bring the Father the greatest amount of honor.
  8. Christ sought us out, purchased us, and now intercedes on our behalf in order to bring glory to the Father.
  9. Throughout the New Testament, the message of redemption is set forth in such a straightforward manner, and this is one of those instances.
  10. It has also been brought up that adherence to God’s plan brings God honor.
  11. He goes on to elaborate on what He was trying to say.

“Jesus responded by saying, ‘I am the way, the truth, and the life.’ ‘There is no other way to the Father than through me.'” He declares that the Father is the one real God – an act of devotion and awareness of the truth of who God is – and connects this to what everlasting life means: to “know” God the Father and to “know” Jesus Christ, who is the only way to eternal life (note that he equates himself to being on par with God, and thus equal with God).

When it comes to NT academics, the word “know” is a well-known term, and it conveys the same closeness of knowledge and understanding that you would have with anybody who you had come to know over a period of time.

That life, which does not exist in us because we have fallen, is provided by the Holy Spirit, who seals us until the day of Christ’s resurrection.

To those who claim that Jesus’ teachings were merely moral principles for us to emulate, I say that you have completely missed the point of Jesus’ ministry. And it is passages like this that serve to highlight this point even further.

What does John 17:5 mean?

“It was the Father’s just commitment to his own name that necessitated the need for restitution for sin,” Piper explains. Consequently, when the Son lovingly accepted the pain of that restitution upon himself, every stride on the road to Calvary sent a message across the universe: “The glory of God has unlimited worth!” The glory of God has boundless value! Finally, Piper says, “When Jesus died, he glorified the Father’s name and saved the people of his Father. And since the Father takes great pleasure in the honor due to his name, and since he takes great pleasure in the election of a sinful people to himself, how can he not take great pleasure in the bruising of his Son, through which these two magnificent divine joys are reconciled and made one?

It extended not only to those in His immediate vicinity (as a teacher to a small group of men), not only to his role as a prominent public figure (whose popularity with the general public was steadily increasing), but also to the very expanses of the heavens and the entirety of the universe itself.

  1. The only exception to this rule was Jesus, who was invincible.
  2. In the same way that he has no claim on me (John 14:30), I have said these things to you so that you may find peace in me.
  3. Nevertheless, be encouraged: I have defeated the world.”.
  4. For Jesus, authority was exercised at His discretion, and it only required one thought, one snap of the hands, and one whispered phrase of “be quiet” (Mark 4:39) to command the entire universe to submit.
  5. To reiterate, all authority rested in Jesus, and He utilized this authority to bring calamity upon Himself and His Father.
  6. We’ll miss it if we don’t pay attention.
  7. 1).
  8. The question generally goes something like this: Why in the world would God create all of us if He knew that sin would befall all of humanity?
  9. In Matt Chandler’s words, this appears to be just as enigmatic from “the ground” as it is from God’s point of view (if we were putting ourselves in His seat, that is).
  10. The mystery of “why” extends beyond our ability to comprehend the essence of the situation.
  11. Mr.

God did not respond to Job’s questions with answers, but rather reprimanded him over the length of three chapters, essentially saying, “I am God, and you are not – who are you to inquire why?” Human theologians have done all they possible can to construct excuses or ways out for God (theodicies), so that He is not the source of sin and evil while yet maintaining sovereignty over the universe.

  • No, we don’t have to absolve God of all responsibility.
  • And while we are unable to comprehend or respond the most profound counsels of God’s will, we do receive a very clear purpose statement as to the greater reason for this, which is couched in the context of redemption, in this passage.
  • So all of God’s plans for this world, which are so inextricably and wonderfully intertwined with the mission of Christ, must be understood in terms of God’s glory as the basis for all of God’s intentions for this world.
  • It is this idea that underpins Jesus’ whole existence: his life, death, burial, resurrection, and ascension.
  • When it comes to the glory of God, as John Piper puts it, “we are dealing with a reality that is not just ultimate in the ultimate goal of history, but also vital to the gospel.
  • Another aspect of this is that Jesus says, “to give eternal life to everyone whom you have given him,” which means, “to give eternal life to everyone who you have given him.” As at this point, he is speaking in the third person, and he refers to “him” as himself, the Messiah.
  • The cause for which Jesus came, namely to die for those whom He had predestined for redemption, serves as the foundation for Jesus’ desire to bring God praise.

In the words of Piper, “The atonement does not make possible the spiritual quickening of all individuals; rather, it ensures and effectively accomplishes the spiritual quickening of those who are elect.” When you have debates with individuals in church regarding the nature of elections, it is interesting to see that one of the topics that dissidents often bring up is the purported “unfairness” of the electoral process.

  • Many people are offended by the notion that God would have a specific set of elect people in mind, and this is understandable.
  • Although this detail is important, we must not overlook it since it appears to be the method in which Jesus wishes to bring the greatest amount of honor to the Father in this world.
  • Moreover, it will be made abundantly clear throughout His appeal to the Father in this chapter.
  • And that everlasting life is to be distributed in accordance with a plan that has been devised by the Members of the Trinity since before the beginning of the universe.

he predestined us for adoption as sons through Jesus Christ, in accordance with the purpose of his will, to the glory of his glorious grace, with which he has blessed us in the Beloved, out of love for us (3:1-3) (Ephesians 1:3-9) In other words, when Paul states that God picked those who were chosen “in him before the foundation of the world,” he is saying that God did so in order to “proclaim the glory of His gracious grace.” God saves some people but not others, and why is that?

It is impossible for us to understand the Lord’s secret councils (Romans 11:33-36), since they are beyond our comprehension, but we can understand that God conducts His affairs in such a manner that He obtains the greatest amount of reputation and glory for Himself.

As you can see, the ultimate goal of all things is the glory of God in all things.

This is how Edwards puts it: “All that has ever been talked of in Scripture as an ultimate aim of God’s works is included in that one term, ‘the glory of God,’ which is also the name by which the final end of God’s works is most usually referred to in Scripture.” 17:3 They will recognize you as the one real God, and they will know Jesus Christ, whom you have sent, and this will be the source of their eternal life.

Throughout the New Testament, the message of redemption is spelled out in such a short manner; this is one of those passages of Scripture.

It has also been brought up that adherence to God’s plan earns Him honor.

He goes on to elaborate on what He was trying to convey before.

He heard Jesus say to him, ‘I am the way, the truth, and the life.’ ” It is only through me that anybody may reach the Father.” He declares that the Father is the one real God – an act of devotion and awareness of the truth of who God is – and connects this to what everlasting life means: to “know” God the Father and to “know” Jesus Christ, who is the Son of God (note that he equates himself to being on par with God, and thus equal with God).

This term “know” is one that NT scholars are acquainted withginsk, and it conveys the same close knowledge or understanding that you would have with someone that you have grown to know over a period of time.ginsk According to Jesus, having a relationship with God is the foundation of eternal life – and that relationship is life-giving in nature.

These are supernatural conceptions, and the repercussions of believing in them will last for eternity.

To those who claim that Jesus’ teachings were only moral principles for us to emulate, I answer that you have completely missed the essence of Jesus’ mission on the earth. In verses like this, it becomes even more obvious that God exists.

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