What Does The H Stand For In Jesus H Christ

Why Do People Say “Jesus H. Christ,” and Where Did the “H” Come From?

Spencer Alexander McDaniel (A.M.D. ): So let’s start with the origins of the name “Jesus Christ” and discuss it from there. The name is a formal title. “Jesus” is an Anglicized form of the Latin nameIesus, which is in turn a Latinized form of the ancient Greek name o (Isos), which is in turn a Hellenized form of Jesus’s original name in ancient Palestinian Aramaic, which was “yă’,” a shortened form of the earlier Hebrew name “Yahweh is Salvation,” which literally translates as “Yahweh is Salvation.

Therefore, throughout the early part of the first century CE, while Jesus was living, the name yă’ was one of the most frequent male given names in Judaea and Galilee.

Despite the fact that many people now regard the word Christas as if it were Jesus’ last name, it is actually an insult rather than a proper name (i.e.

An Anglicized version of the Latin wordChristus, which is in turn a Latinized form of the ancient Greek term (Christós), which means “anointed one,” the English wordChrist is derived from the Latin wordChristus.

  1. It was not uncommon in antiquity for the title ofmîa to be granted to more than one individual; rather, it was a generic title that might be bestowed to anybody who was seen as fulfilling the function of God’s anointed.
  2. Now that we’ve covered the basics, we can move on to explaining where the term “Jesus H.
  3. The Chi Rho monogram is well-known to most Christians throughout the world.
  4. In early Christianity, it was a kind of ingenious shorthand that was used to express “Jesus” without having to write his whole name out in front of them.
  5. Here’s an example of one type of it: While the Chi Rho monogram is composed of the capital forms of the first two letters of the Greek word, the IH monogram is composed of the first three letters of, which, as you may recall, is the Greek spelling of the nameJesus.
  6. This is the initial letter, the Greek letter iota I, which appears similar to the Latin letter I and produces the sound of the letter mach ine, or the consonantal sound of the wordy ellow, depending on how it is spoken.
  7. Finally, there is the lunate sigma, a variant of the Greek letter sigma that looks strikingly similar to the Latin letter c and produces the same sound as in the words oft and etymology.

When the letters of the IH monogram were mistaken for the Latin letters J, H, and C at some point in history, most likely somewhere in the early nineteenth century, illiterate Americans who were accustomed to the Latin alphabet and who understood nothing about the Greek alphabet made this mistake.

  • Apparently, several individuals came to the conclusion, “Hey, I think H must be his middle initial!” after seeing his name.
  • Christ” came to be seen as a bit of a joke, and it was even used as a minor profanity on occasion.
  • He recalls a comical account of how the evangelical preacher Alexander Campbell, the head of the “Restoration Movement,” ordered the young Samuel Clemens to print some pamphlets for one of his sermons while he was apprenticed to a printer about 1847, when he was still a teenager.
  • C.” at one point in the text in order to avoid having to reprint three entire pages of material.
  • Instead of simply amending the wording of the leaflet to say “Jesus Christ,” however, the printer modified it to say “Jesus H.Christ,” perhaps because he was irritated by the reverend’s behavior.

The tale told by Mark Twain is not the origin of the term, but it is an early example of the phrase being used, which is crucial to remember. This post first published on the Quora discussion forum. To see, please click here.

Jesus H. Christ – Wikipedia

When used in reference to the Christian religious figure of Jesus Christ, Jesus H. Christ is an expletive interjection that means “Jesus Christ.” It is often shouted in a state of rage, astonishment, or annoyance, yet it can also be used to convey a sense of levity. When used as exclamation points or expletives in English-speaking, Christian-influenced countries, the words “Christ,” “Jesus,” and “Jesus Christ” are frequently used together.

History

Around the year 1855, Alexander Campbell Although the exact date of the first usage of the term is uncertain, Mark Twain (1835–1910) noted in his autobiography that it was in widespread use even when he was a boy. The following is the story of a practical joke played on a revival preacher by Twain’s friend in 1847, when he was working as a printer’s apprentice, as told by Roger Smith (1994):Twain recalls a practical joke played on a revival preacher when he was working as an apprentice in a printing shop that Alexander Campbell, a famous evangelist who was visiting Hannibal at the time, hired to print a pamphlet of his sermon During a routine review of the galleys, Twain’s fellow apprentice, Wales McCormick, discovered that he needed to make place for some dropped words, which he accomplished by abbreviating Jesus Christ on the same line to J.

  • C.
  • Fill fill the blanks with whatever you choose.” And the puckish McCormick went over and beyond: he set up Jesus H.
  • At least according to Smith (1994:331-2), the phrase “Jesus H.
  • Additionally, the term is identified as belonging to American English by Quinion, a British author who published in 2009.

Stress pattern

Several authors have emphasized the importance of placing a strong emphasis on the letter “H,” linking it in various ways to the practice of expletive infixation. Its lengthy survival, according to Quinion, must be due in large part to its cadence, as well as the way in which an exceptionally high stress may be placed on the H. In addition, it might be viewed as an example of emphatic infixing that closely corresponds to the models of words such as abso-bloody-lutely and tribu-bloody-lation. A linguist named Dwight Bolinger made similar observations when he mentioned “Jesus H.

In the words of Horberry, “the great accent on the H somehow enriches the rhythm of its host sentence.

Etymology

Even while swearing by the name of Jesus Christ has been standard practice for many years, the specific origins of the letterH inthe expressionJesus H. Christremain a source of conjecture. While other interpretations have been advanced, the divine monogram of Christian symbolism is the most frequently acknowledged as the source of the symbol’s origin. The sign, which is formed from the first three letters of the Greek name of Jesus (H), is transliterated iota-eta-sigma, which can appear as IHS (with lunate sigma), JHS (with lunate sigma), or JHC (with lunate sigma) (“J” was historically a mere variant of “I”; seeJ).

Particularly intriguing would be the “JHC” variation, which would allow for the interpretation of the “H” as part of a name.

Folk etymology

While the foregoing is the most likely origin of the “H,” there is still the matter of folk etymology, which is the notion shared by ordinary people (which is not necessarily historically true) as to where the “H” originates from (which is not always historically correct). There is a possibility that the name “Harold” is the source of this variation form; indeed, Smith (1994:32) mentions that it is the basis of a variant version known as “Jesus Harold Christ.” The nickname “Harold” may have originated from a common mistake (often made by youngsters) of the words “Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name,” which appears in the Lord’s Prayer.

Variants

The number of alternative versions, most of which have the letter “H” changed with something longer, is enormous. A person named “Jesus Harold Christ” is referenced above (which means “Our Father, who art in Heaven, Harold be thy name.”). Smith mentions Jesus Holy Christ, Jesus Hecking Christ, and Jesus H. Particular Christ, among other names for Jesus. Dictionary of Slanglists published by Green’s Slanglists, Inc. Jesus H!, Jesus H. Crow!, Jesus H. Johnson!, Jesus H. Mahogany Christ!, Jesus hopping Christ!, Jesus Johnnycake Christ!, Jeezus K.

  1. Johnson!, Jesus H.
  2. Reist!
  3. Christ is risen from the dead!
  4. Christ!
  5. Christ!
  6. As far as Smith is concerned, the simple fact that there are so many different spelling variations contributes to the sense of comedy (and outright blasphemy) that is inherent in “Jesus H.
  7. stand for?

Notes

  1. In Adams, Cecil (June 4, 1976), “Why do people say “Jesus H. Christ”?” in The Straight Dope (retrieved August 1, 2008), the author asks “Why do people say “Jesus H. Christ”?” The irony is in the seemingly haphazard selection of the letter “H,” which has no biblical validity whatsoever. Horberry (2010:26) points out that using a middle initial would give the impression that “Christ” was Jesus’ final name, which is not the case
  2. For further information, seeJesus (2010:26). See “Variants” below for further information about comedy
  3. “At that time, the ordinary swearers of the region developed a unique method of accentuating the Savior’s name when they were profaning it.” According to the context of Twain’s comment (which is included here in the main text), he was referring to the historical figure “Jesus H. Christ.” Harriet Elinor Smith is the editor of this work (2010) Mark Twain’s autobiography is available online. The University of California Press (Berkeley) has a page number of 458
  4. Smith (1994:332). For further information, see also R. Kent Rasmussen’s “Wales McCormick,” in The Critical Companion to Mark Twain: A Literary Reference to His Life and Work (Infobase Publishing, 2007), page 786
  5. Draper (1993) provides more information, stating that the printing business served as the printing site for the Hannibal Courier. Avoiding the letter “J. C.” necessitated the resetting of three of the sixteen pages
  6. Quirion (2009)
  7. Bolinger (1986:84-85)
  8. Horberry (2010:25)
  9. Green’s Dictionary of Slang
  10. AbcSmith (1994:332)
  11. AbcSmith (1994:332) See, for example, for web attestations of the misconception
  12. And
  13. “Jesus H. Christ!, excl. — Green’s Dictionary of Slang” is the result of a machine search of the internet for terms occuring in the frame “Jesus Christ”, both h-initial and more widely, as reported by blogger “Tenser” at
  14. “Jesus H. Christ!, excl. greensdictofslang.com. The date is March 16, 2021.

References

  • (1986)Intonation and its parts: melody in spoken English. Dwight Bolinger’s dissertation. Stanford University Press is located in Stanford, California. The following extract is available to read online at Google Books: The novel Albee, written by Stephen J. Bottoms, is titled Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Cambridge University Press
  • Cassidy, Frederick G. (1995), “More on Jesus H. Christ,” American Speech, 70: 370
  • Draper, Mark (1993), “Alexander Campbell,” article in Christie Graves Hamric (ed.) The Mark Twain Encyclopedia
  • Cassidy, Frederick G. (1995), “More on Jesus H. Christ TaylorFrancis
  • Falvey, Kate
  • TaylorFrancis (2010) “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” is a play by Edward Albee that has dark comedy. Dark Humor, edited by Harold Bloom and Blake Hobby, is available online. Roger Horberry of Infobase Publishing and Roger Horberry of Infobase Publishing (2010) How to make business jargon come to life, even if it looks fine on paper A C Black is the initials of the author’s surname. The following excerpts are available to read online at Google Books: Lennox, Doug (2013)Now you know everything about everything Dundurn. It is possible to read the following excerpt on Google Books: Quinion, Michael (2009) Why is Q Always Followed by U? : Word-Perfect Answers to the Most-Asked Questions About Language. In the United Kingdom, Penguin is known as “Penguin” and “Penguin UK” is an abbreviation for “Penguin United Kingdom.” Ian Ransom’s book, Waiting for the Rapture, was published in 2006. iUniverse
  • Salinger, J. D. (1951) The Catcher in the Rye (The Catcher in the Rye). Little, Brown and Company
  • Roger Smith, New York (1994). “The H of Jesus H. Christ” is an abbreviation. American Speech, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 331–335. https://doi.org/10.2307/455527

External links

  • Michael Quinion’s explanation on WorldWideWords (which supports the IHC idea) is below. Harold, that is thy name! (This number has an interesting relation to the Epistle of Barnabas(9:6-7)(written between 70 and 190 AD), which states: “The eighteen is I (=ten) and H (=eight) – you have Jesus.”

The Grammarphobia Blog: The ‘H’ in ‘Jesus H. Christ’

Q: What does the “H” in the phrase “Jesus H. Christ” stand for? It’s clear that it’s not a middle initial, so why is it included? A: There have been a slew of hypotheses put out concerning the origin of the “H” in “Jesus H. Christ,” which is one of a number of expletives or exclamations that make use of the name of God. Possibly, it derives from a monogram consisting of the first three letters of the Greek word for Jesus, which is the most plausible explanation. In Greek, the name “Jesus” is written in capital characters while “o” is written in lowercase letters.

  • Why does one version of the monogram conclude with a “S” while another version ends with a “C”?
  • For example, the sigma in is in the center and at the conclusion of the sentence.
  • The IHS form is more prevalent than the IHC variant, which The Catholic Encyclopedia describes as a rare “learned abbreviation” (a learnt acronym).
  • Furthermore, it serves as the insignia of the Society of Jesus, a Jesuit religious organization that was founded in 1540.
  • Christ” first appeared in print in the late nineteenth century.
  • A seemingly amusing usage of the word was cited in an anonymous Texas newspaper, according to the source, which read: “At Laredo the other day, Jesus H.
  • Voicing a conversation between the Adam and Eve characters in a scenario that takes place in the Garden of Eden: Wife.

How those apples have been pecked!

Man.

Christ hears your statements, He will inform his Father, who will reprimand you.

The phrase was first heard by Mark Twain, who was working as a printer’s apprentice in Missouri in the mid-1800s.

into Jesus H.

Christ” is used as “an oath or as a forceful cry of astonishment, incredulity, dismay, or the like” when referring to Jesus Christ.

Christ, holy leaping Jesus Christ,” among other things.

That 1906 passage in Mark Twain’s Autobiography, which was published in 1924, 14 years after the author’s death and with an introduction by Albert Bigelow Paine, is DARE’s first example of a quotation from a living author.

We’ll add a few words to the citation to put the statement in its appropriate context: Towards the end of the night about five o’clock the cook would call out: “Come bullies, come bullies, come bullies, turn out.” Some people would be fine with him, and they would just go back to their seats.

Christ, do you want to sleep there all day?” and so on.

If you’re interested in learning more, we’ve covered a variety of additional idioms that refer to or hint to God in previous entries from 2015, 2012, 2011, and 2008. Donate to the Grammarphobia Blog to assist in its ongoing operation. Also, be sure to check out our books on the English language.

Urban Dictionary: jesus H. christ

An alternative to the person of Jesus Christ. There are a variety of reasons why the H is included. Some believe it represented the word “Holy,” while others believe it represented the word “Harold” because of the phrase “Our Father, who art in heaven, Harold be thy name.” Other hypotheses about the origin of the H. include: 1. The letter H stood for haploid, which means that Jesus does not have a human father. 2. It is reminiscent of the H in the IHSlogo, which may be found on a variety of Christian memorabilia.

  1. It is “Iesous” in the Greek language, with the E sound represented by the Greek letter eta, which appears like a H on the page.
  2. 3.
  3. The problem is that the inscription is typically presented asINRI: Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum, which is incorrect (J.C., King of the Jews).
  4. Christis a term that is the same as “Jesus Christ,” but with the letter H put in, most likely for humorous purposes.
See also:  Which Of The Following Is Not A Parable Of Jesus

Jesus H. Christ – Wiktionary

Jesus Christ’s body is an extension of his. in Latin characters, with a fanciful middle initial, maybe developed from a reading of the Greek-alphabet abbreviation for Jesus (Y) as three initials in Latin letters, (IS)(sometimes IS, employing alunate sigma), aGreek-alphabet abbreviation for Jesus (Y), in Latin letters. See the article “Christogram” on Wikipedia. At the very least, the term goes back to the late nineteenth century, however according to Mark Twain, it was already outdated by 1850.

332) defines formalized adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbi

Interjection

JesusH.Christ

  • 1980 The Blues Brothers, starring Dan Aykroyd and John Landis, was released in June by Universal Pictures. Jake:Yes! Yes! Jesus H.tap-dancing in the streets I have seen the light, Jesus Christ
  • Universal Pictures released the film Fletch in 1985, directed by Andrew Bergman. Jesus H. Christon a popsicle stick, according to Stanton Boyd. First and foremost. James McManus’ 2004 book, Positively Fifth Street, reveals that Alan Stanwyk does not hold a single share of the company. With no mirth in his voice, he murmurs, “I’m going to get out of their path.” “All I had was a bunch of jacks.” Of course, we trust what he says. As soon as Beelzebub and Jesus H. Christ get involved, what are jacks? The Last of the Honky-Tonk Angels : The Story of the Honky-Tonk Angels was published in 2004 by Martha Moyer. His words were, “Jesus H. Christ on the cross.” He locked onto my mirrored look and didn’t let go. “Can you tell me how long you’ve been aware of this?”

Quotations

  • See Citations:Jesus H. Christ for a list of quotations that use this word.

Synonyms

  • Christ Jesus with a bald head
  • Christ Jesus on a raft
  • Christ Jesus with a bald head

References

  • Cassidy, Frederick G., published in 1995. “More on Jesus H. Christ,” American Speech 70:370
  • Smith, Roger, 1994. “More on Jesus H. Christ,” American Speech 70:370
  • Smith, Roger, 1994. Why do people say “Jesus H. Christ”?, from The Straight Dope
  • Explanation from WorldWideWords by Michael Quinion
  • Harold be thy name

Jesus H. Christ mystery: Shock theory reveals origin of letter H – Where did it come from?

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  • When the American author determined to get revenge on an old mentor from his past, he was thinking back on his time as a printer’s apprentice.
  • The printer had dropped a few letters, and as a result, he reduced Jesus Christ to JC to save space.
  • Jesus H.
  • As a mild profanity, the term had already gained widespread recognition in the general public, thanks to the popular belief that the “H” stood for Jesus’ middle initial.
  • The enigma of Jesus H.
  • Christ, as Mark Twain memorably referred to him, is an allusion to Jesus Christ.
  • Monograms are symbols that are formed by overlapping more than one letter to form a cohesive sign.

Christians frequently employed the well-known Chi Rho monogram, but a less well-known one was the IHC monogram, which you can see in the illustration below (will have pic).

Due to their resemblance to Latin letters, researchers who studied the Greek text in more recent centuries mistakenly identified the I as a “J” based on the Latin alphabet.

According to MentalFloss, the term “Christ” is commonly used nowadays to refer to Jesus’ last name, which is incorrect.

Christ is a riddle (Image: Wikimedia Commons) The enigma of Jesus H.

Christ” was absolutely wrong.

According to popular belief, this occurred sometime around the early 19th century. And it just so happens that this was the time period in which Mark Twain was living. He will no sure have contributed to the likelihood that Jesus did in fact have a middle name by his use of the expression.

r/NoStupidQuestions – What does the ‘H’ stand for in Jesus H Christ?

Ooh, I love it when this question shows up! Using the name of Jesus Christ as an oath has been common for many centuries. But the precise origins of the letter H in the expression Jesus H. Christ are obscure. While many explanations have been proposed, the most widely accepted derivation is from the divine monogram of Christian symbolism. The symbol, derived from the first three letters of the Greek name of Jesus (Ἰησοῦς), is transliterated iota-eta-sigma, which can look like IHS, ΙHϹ (with lunate sigma), JHS or JHC (“J” was historically a mere variant of “I”; see J) (“J” was historically a mere variant of “I”; see J).

The “JHC” variant would particularly invite interpretation of the “H” as part of a name.: It doesn’tstandfor anything, and it exists only as a result of an old symbol kinda looking like JHC.

Jesus H Christ – Meaning & Origin 2022 (Term explained)

What exactly does the name Jesus H Christ mean? An allusion to Jesus Christ, the promised Messiah of the Christian faith. Jesus H. is an acronym that stands for Jesus H. As an expletive remark, Christ is used to express surprise, rage, or exhilaration in response to something unexpected. Christians believe that the holy figure Jesus Christ did not originally have the middle name “H.”, and thus using his name in a profane or offensive manner is deemed blasphemy. When people refer to themselves by this name, they frequently apply additional pressure to the “H.” While some have speculated that the H represents the word “holy,” others have argued that it represents the word “Harold.” Some have even suggested that it has something to do with the way the name “Jesus” is written in Greek characters.

Origin

What is the historical background ofJesus H Christ? It is unclear where the term originated, although it was used in Mark Twain’s autobiography (1835-1910), which was published in 1910. The concept of the letter “H” standing for “holy” originates from the Christian religion, which holds that Jesus Christ is a sanctified being. Despite the fact that “Harold” appears to be a seemingly random idea, it comes from the biblical verse: “Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name,” which may have been misconstrued as “Harold be thy name” by the general public and youngsters.

Spread and Usage

What was the method through whichJesus H Christ spread? Native English people employ the term as a slur and an exclamation point in their speech. Additionally, it may be used in a hilarious manner, and, like many other things, it has become popularized in the internetmeme world, particularly in erroneous allusions to true religious figures.

External References

Published:04/01/2020 by|Updated:04/01/2020 | 1,178 views | Published:04/01/2020 by Please report a mistake.

The H of Jesus H. Christ on JSTOR

Information about the Journal It is primarily concerned with the English language in the Western Hemisphere, while papers on English in other regions of the globe, the effect of other languages on English, and linguistic theory are also included in the journal’s publications. The journal is not devoted to any specific theoretical framework, and issues frequently include contributions that are of interest to an audience that is larger than the language studies community as a whole. Since its inception in 1925, American Speech has established itself as one of the most respected journals in its field of expertise.

Information about the publisher This press publishes approximately one hundred books and thirty journals per year, with the majority of its publications focusing onthe arts, humanities and social sciences; however, it also publishes two journals of advanced mathematics, as well as several publications aimed at primarily professional audiences (e.g., in law or medicine).

In recent years, it has established its strongest reputation in the broad and interdisciplinary field of “theory and history of cultural production,” and is widely regarded as a publisher who is willing to take risks with nontraditional and interdisciplinary publications, both books and journals, and to publish in both English and Spanish.

Definition of Jesus H. Christ

Interjection It may be offensive at times. (It is used as an oath or as a powerful statement of disbelief, dismay, amazement, disappointment, agony, or other strong emotions.) EVALUATE YOUR KNOWLEDGE OF AFFECT AND EFFECT VERSUS AFFECT! In effect, this exam will determine whether or not you possess the necessary abilities to distinguish between the terms “affect” and “effect.” Despite the wet weather, I was in high spirits on the day of my graduation celebrations.

Origin ofJesus H. Christ

This etymology comes from the Greek monogram forJesus(Isoûsin Greek), spelled IHSor IHC, which is taken from the first three letters ofIsoûswritten in Greek uncial (capital) letters, in which theH(the uncial Greeketa, transliterated as,is reinterpreted as the English letterH; seeJesus).

Words nearbyJesus H. Christ

A dictionary definition for jesuit’s bark is jesuit ware. A dictionary definition for Jesus is Jesus Christ,Jesus freak,Jesus H. Christ. A dictionary definition for jesuit’s bark is jet airplane,jetavator,jetbead,jet-blackDictionary.com Unabridged Random House, Inc. 2022, based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Random House, Inc.

How to useJesus H. Christin a sentence

  • For example, I recall that H. Jon Benjamin informed me that the Church’s apology for Hiroshima and Nagasaki came “far too late.” In a 2009 interview, Church apostle Dallin H. Oaks stated that the Church “does not have a position” on the subject
  • Alternatively, fast-fashion stores such as Zara and H M produce knockoffs of runway looks
  • He seems to be expecting not just me, but also Thom Mount, the studio’s head of production
  • I’m not sure what I’m supposed to say.
  • An examination of the holiday season, on the other hand, reveals how little Christ there is in it. G was a gambler who had only bad luck on his side
  • H was a hunter who was on the prowl for a deer
  • Aside from Solomon, Jesus was also seated at the foot of the king, yet he made no claim to being personally greater than Solomon. Several long and thin slots have been made on the bottom surface of the valve-seat H in the shape of a crescent. In the promise made to Christians via Christ, the rewards of time and eternity are a component of the promise. Only those who do not believe in Christ are considered foreigners from the nation of Israel and strangers from the covenants of promise.

what is it? What does it mean?

Shortenedversionof thefull nameJesus Hitler Christ.” I don’t knowman,Jesus Hitler Christsounds weird.””Sojust gowith Jesus H. Christ?””Yeah” 29 11


Jesus H Christ – video

A term used to show specificsuprise, disgust, or shock in response to an event, as indicated by the “H” in the phrase (which stands for “Holy”). It is used in the same context as “Jesus Christ!” with the addition of the pronoun “His” to emphasize the importance of the concern. To be clear, there is no difference between the word “Jesus Christ” and the phrase “Jesus Christ.” “Jesus H. Christ, you frightened the shitouttame!” 231 183

What does “Jesus H Christ” mean?

Jesus H. Christ is a legendary figure that has its origins in Christian mythology. A variety of different concepts are said to be represented by the letter “H” in the center of the names, ranging from “Holy” to “Harold.” Recent research, on the other hand, argues that the “H” is actually an abbreviation for “HeySeuss.” The middle name of thisstory bookcharacter was just added in order to pay honor to the greatestchildren’s storyteller of all time: Dr. Seuss. While the movement began as somewhat of a cult practice, it swiftly gained popularity in pop culture, even making an appearance on the silver screen as a vulgarity from time to time.

  1. This fan-fabricated name seems to be a pleasant coincidence in that, while reading the middle name, you are also instructed on how to pronounce hispanic first names.
  2. Dr.
  3. God says that he will be known as Jesus HeySuess Christ.
  4. Seuss: Jesus H.
  5. Seuss book.

Jesus H Christ – what does it mean?

Jesus Henry Christ is his given name. Christ’s illegitimate son via Mary Magdalene, and the grandson of God The phrase is still in use today as a way to convey surprise or enthusiasm, and it has been used during his lifetime. Many people were taken aback when Mary introduced him as “Jesus H Christ.” They shook their heads in astonishment. Mary: Hello, Luke. Have you ever met my son, Jesus H Christ, who is also the grandson of God? Luke: Jesus Christ, the Son of the Living God! Give your Grandpa kudos!

  1. What does the H stand for, by the way?
  2. Make a little wine out of some water!
  3. Jesus H.
  4. Your prayers have been heard and answered!

Bring the water to the table! Mary: Jesus Christ, the Son of the Living God! You’re far too young to be drinking. Jesus H Christ: My Grandpa, you’re a jerk! “Jesus H Christ!” says Luke emphatically. in this manner, and so forth 629 417 629 417 629 417 629 417 629 417

Jesus H Christ – meaning

An exclamation of astonishment and displeasure. “Holy” is most likely represented by the letter H. “JesusH. Sufferin’Christ,” says the author. 657 401 657 401 657 401 657 401

Jesus H Christ – definition

Almost 50 years ago, I was employed as a surgical technologist. One of the physicians used to swear by Jesus H. Christ all the time. Upon being inquired as to what the letter “H” stood for, he stated that it stood for “For Hallmark, for people who care to send the very best.” What, Jesus H. Christ, are you a moron or what? The year is 53 years and seventeen days.

Jesus H Christ – slang

He is the proprietor of the taco business across the street. He would prefer people to refrain from approaching him with requests to heal their eyesight. He is pronounced hay-zoos, despite the fact that his name is written the same as Jesus, the Son of God. Hector is the middle initial of his given name. His father runs a garage, while his mother works as a nurse in the community. He has two younger brothers who are both in the military. Although Jesus Christ makes the tastiest tacos, he will not be able to restore my eyesight.

Jesus H Christ

1. It is used to demonstrate shock. 2. What does the H. abbreviation mean? 3. As seen in the movie Full Metal Jacket, where the drill instructor uses it. “Jesus H. Christ, come quickly! So, what exactly is that? It’s a jelly doughnut, of course!” 201 67 201 67

Jesus H Christ

An alternative to the person of Jesus Christ. There are a variety of reasons why the H is included. Some believe it represented the word “Holy,” while others believe it represented the word “Harold” because of the phrase “Our Father, who art in heaven, Harold be thy name.” Other hypotheses about the origin of the H. include: 1. The letter H stood for haploid, which means that Jesus does not have a human father. 2. It is reminiscent of the H in the IHSlogo, which may be found on a variety of Christian memorabilia.

  • It is “Iesous” in the Greek language, with the E sound represented by the Greek letter eta, which appears like a H on the page.
  • 3.
  • The problem is that the inscription is typically presented asINRI: Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum, which is incorrect (J.C., King of the Jews).
  • Christis a term that is the same as “Jesus Christ,” but with the letter H put in, most likely for humorous purposes.
  • Christ, myplungerbroke!” 1663 615 “Jesus H.

Jesus H Christ

Jesus Christ’smiddle name. Some say it’s “ Harold ” or “Holy” but it is yet to beconfirmed. Also used as a phrase to express unsettlement.1) Let’s pray toour lord and saviourbaby JesusH Christ!2) *guy stubs toe*JESUS H CHRIST! 29 11


“Jesus H. Christ”: Why “H”?

“Jesus H. Christ!” exclaimed the crowd. We’ve all heard that term at some point in our lives, maybe as far back as most of us can remember. In fact, if you’re anything like me, you probably didn’t even notice it (though you could have found it disagreeable because it’s considered a minor kind of obscenity at the time) and were never interested in finding out where it originated from or why the middle initial was “H.” To us, it was nothing more than a slang phrase that was only used in the United States.

In September 2016, I embarked on a trip around the coast of Spain’s southernmost peninsula.

“Jesus H.

In Spain, perhaps?

Because of this, I realized there was a lot more to that “strictly American slang term” than I had previously realized. And, as is my tendency, I had to look into it, which resulted in the creation of this page. The majority of my information for this page came from two Wikipedia articles:

Because I’ll be summarizing a lot of material, you may use those links to get further information and references. As described in the Wikipedia article, Jesus H. Christ, the expression appears to be uniquely American, and it was already in common use by the nineteenth century, as evidenced by a Mark Twain story that took place while he was working as a printer’s apprentice in 1847 (copied here from that article):recounts a practical joke a friend played on a revival preacher while Twain was an apprentice in a printing shop that Alexander Campbell, a famous evangelist who During a routine review of the galleys, Twain’s fellow apprentice, Wales McCormick, discovered that he needed to make place for some dropped words, which he accomplished by abbreviating Jesus Christ on the same line to J.

  1. C.
  2. Fill fill the blanks with whatever you choose.” And the puckish McCormick went over and beyond: he set up Jesus H.
  3. It goes on to claim that the expression’s use fell, at least in print, until roughly 1930, but that it then began to be used more regularly again from 1970 until the current day, according to the article.
  4. An explanation for this decision appears to be found in an ecclesiastical art form known as the Christogram (alternatively known as “divine monogram”), such as the “JHC” that I had seen in Cádiz, Spain.
  5. Furthermore, the name “Jesus Christ” itself developed into a rich source of such symbolism.
  6. These symbols can be seen on priests’ and ministers’ robes, on church flags, as well as in inscriptions and paintings.
  7. Of course, because the New Testament was written in Greek, those Christograms are based on Greek characters, with some transliterations into Roman letters thrown in for good measure (what modern English uses).

Spoiler alert: If you have a keen eye, you will note that the capital eta (“”) resembles a Roman “H,” and as a result, you should be able to predict where this is going.

It was the first thing I saw since I had studied Greek in college, and it was the first thing I noticed.

To make it, you just superimpose the first two letters of chi over each other; however, either the chi is made smaller or the rho, which is more usually lengthened so that the chi does not hide the rho, is used.

Or, at the very least, you will begin to see it in churches today.

And then there’s a family of Christograms that really contribute to the formation of the letter “H” in the phrase “Jesus H.

The Christogram “JHC” that I observed in Cádiz, as well as the Christogram “JHS” that appears on the robes of the Archbishop of Canterbury in The Crown, both fit into this category.

Here are two instances, the first of which is contemporary and the second of which is medieval: So, what’s the deal with the variations?

Isn’t it true that the “J” in German still behaves in the same way?

As a result, the name of Jesus was altered from, albeit the German pronunciation of “Jesu” is more closer to the original Koine Greek pronunciation than the English pronunciation.

In order for a “S” or a C to appear, the process must be repeated several times.

Now pay close attention to the final sigma, “.” You may see the beginnings of the Roman “S” in that shape, but with a different proportioning scheme.

That is why I suggested that you utilize the first two and last letters of the Greek alphabet, because the final sigma is quite similar in appearance to the letter “c.” However, it has been discovered that there is more to it than that.

It turns out that during the Hellenistic period (4th and 3rd century BCE), the symbol used for carving inscriptions was reduced to a C-shaped shape, which was more common at the time.

According to some sources, the Cyrillic alphabet, which was used by Russian and other Slavic languages, was based largely on the Greek alphabet; in fact, the Cyrillic letter C, which is used for the “s” sound in Russian and other Slavic languages, appears to have originated from this lunate sigma.

  1. However, the middle initial, the eta (“”), remains Greek in each of the variations.
  2. According to Wikipedia (H), the letters “H” and “H” were acquired by the Greeks and the Latins from the Phoenicians, who had acquired them from earlier sources.
  3. If you’re interested in learning more about Russian, you should know that the Cyrillic letter “H” for the “n” sound is not linked to the Greek letter.
  4. The Cyrillic letter “H” just depicts the final conclusion of a procedure that was only a transient item in Greek to begin with.
  5. Christ” came from the IHC family of Christograms, particularly the one that I had seen in Cádiz, Spain, “JHC,” which on the surface appears to be somebody’s initials, namely those of “Jesus H.
  6. The “X” represents the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the word “Christ,” which is written as a capital “C” in English.
  7. The following “explanation,” which is based on a biology joke, is given in the original Wikipedia article: Facetious etymology is employed.

In order to provide context for the joke’s scientific origins, seePloidy.

Virgin birth, scientifically known as Parthenogenesis, is a true phenomenon that has been witnessed in nature.

However, this is not the case with mammals.

If meiosisis is not employed in the parthenogenetic method that is being used, the children will be complete clones of the mother.

As a result of the fact that all of the parthenogenetic kids would be complete clones of their mother, it would follow that they would all be girls.

Armed with this knowledge (and a healthy dose of levity), we can easily see that the Virgin Birth offers a significant challenge to fundamental Christian theology and tradition.

Jessica Christ, what are you talking about?

As a result, Christian teaching is a big cover-up designed to conceal the reality that Jesus Christ was a woman from us.

Christ, cites an article written by Roger Smith as its primary source (The H of Jesus H.

American Speech 69:331-335, 1994).

Apparently, “Harold” is an alias: Even though this is the most likely source of the letter “H,” there is still the matter of folk etymology, which is the sense shared by ordinary people (which is not always historically right) about where the letter “H” originates from, which must be addressed.

When this sentence is read incorrectly, it might be misinterpreted as referring to the Deity’s name (“thy name is.”) rather than the correct meaning, which is “may thy name be sanctified.” Due to the phonetic similarity between the words hallowed (IPA) and Harold, there would be some confusion (IPA).

  • What was Smith’s conclusion as a result of this?
  • Christ,” according to Smith, is full of fun – and blasphemy – because of the sheer number of spelling variations on the title character’s last name.
  • stand for?
  • Spread the word and have fun!
  • In my first investigation, I had separately noticed how similar the Greek letter eta (“H”) appeared to the English letter “H.” As I recall, this was a coincidence.
  • Christ: While other interpretations have been presented, the divine monogram of Christian symbolism is the most frequently acknowledged as the source of the symbol’s origin.
  • The symbol is derived from the first three letters of the Greek name of Jesus ().
  • Smith proposes the following idea for how this learned-sounding abbreviation may have served as the foundation for vulgar slang: it was observed by ordinary people when it was worn as an adornment on the vestments of Anglican (or, in America, Episcopal) clergy.

Despite the fact that I don’t recall it having any effect on my thoughts on the subject at the time, I now strongly suspect it was this experience that led me to learn about the lunate sigma – I had taken two semesters of Koine Greek in university and later a semester of classical Greek in the mid-70s without ever having heard of a lunate sigma.

However, there are several different explanations for this, as well as for many other questions, such as why West Coast Swingis danced in a slot (my personal favorite explanation is the drunken sailors on liberty in Long Beach, Calif).

Trying to figure things out is always entertaining. I hope I’ve piqued your interest and given you something to think about. Spread the word and have fun! First posted on 2017 March 09. Updated on 2020 December 03.

Theory explain where phrase ‘Jesus H. Christ’ came from

  • Given that I’ll be summarizing a lot, you may use those links to get further information and sources. According to the Wikipedia article,Jesus H. Christ, the expression appears to be uniquely American, and it was already in common use by the nineteenth century, as evidenced by a Mark Twain story that took place while he was working as a printer’s apprentice in 1847 (copied here from that article):recounts a practical joke a friend played on a revival preacher while Twain was an apprentice in a printing shop that Alexander Campbell, a famous evangelist During a routine check of the galleys, Twain’s fellow apprentice, Wales McCormick, discovered that he needed to make room for some dropped words, which he accomplished by abbreviating Jesus Christ on the same line as J. C. Indignantly, Campbell stormed into the shop and ordered McCormick to correct the mistakes he had found “Don’t ever again bring disgrace upon the Savior’s name while you’re still alive.” Make sure everything is in place.” And then some: he set up Jesus H. Christ and printed out all of the pamphlets, which was a first for the puckish McCormick! It goes on to say that the use of the expression declined, at least in print, until around 1930, but that it then began to be used more frequently again from 1970 to the present day, according to the article. Neither the actual origin nor the true reason for choosing “H” as the middle initial are known to us today. An explanation for this choice appears to be found in an ecclesiastical art form known as a Christogram (also known as a “divine monogram”), such as the “JHC” that I had previously seen in Cádiz, Spain. Christian religious symbols were created as early as 312 CE based on letters used to identify Christ
  • For example, the Alpha-Omega ( ) symbol was derived from the phrase “I am alpha and omega” in Revelation, which means “I am first and foremost” (verses 1:8, 21:6, and 22:13). Furthermore, the name “Jesus Christ” itself evolved into a rich source of such symbols over time. Jesus’ monograms or divine monograms were born out of this phenomenon, which is actually quite common, though I doubt that most people are even aware that they exist, let alone that they are known as such. These symbols can be found on the vestments of priests and ministers, on the banners of churches, and in inscriptions and artwork. Take, for example, the coronation scene in Netflix’s The Crown, where we can see the “JHS” Christogram on the back of the Archbishop of Canterbury’s robe (see below). Due to the fact that the New Testament was written in Greek, those Christograms are based on Greek letters, with some transliterations into Roman letters thrown in for good measure (what modern English uses). For the Greek word “Jesus Christ,” the letter “H” is written in all capital letters: It is written in mixed case as follows: It is possible to draw inspiration from both directions when creating Christograms. Spoiler alert: If you have a keen eye, you will notice that the capital eta (“”) resembles a Roman “H,” and as a result, you should be able to guess where this is heading. TheChi-Rho, formed from the first two characters of the Greek alphabet “,” is an early Christogram (“Christ”). Because I had studied Greek in college, that was the first thing I noticed, and it was the only thing. It also appears to be the most frequent at the moment (at least based on my own experience), and may be found in both Catholic and Protestant congregations alike. To make it, you just superimpose the initial two letters of chi over each other. However, either the chi is made smaller or the rho, which is more usually lengthened so that the chi does not hide the rho, are used to create this symbol: I’m confident that now that you’ve seen it, you’ll recall that you’ve seen it in the past. In any case, you will begin to see it in churches as of right this minute. One of the earliest Christograms is theIX monogram, which combines the first letters of both terms, the iota from and the chi from, and superimposes them over one another as follows: As an illustration, the following is taken from a sarcophagus from the late third century AD in Constantinople. An additional option is theIH monogram, which is formed by superimposing the first two capital letters of the word “IH” over each other as follows: Because of the parallels between this Christogram and International Harvester’s business emblem, I’m confident that they are simply accidental. After that, there’s a whole family of Christograms that really contribute to the “H” in “Jesus H. Christ” being spelled correctly. These are based on the first two and final letters (or the first three letters, depending on how you think about it) of the word ‘adventure’. As well as the Christogram on the vestments of the Archbishop of Canterbury in The Crown, “JHS,” which I observed in Cádiz, the Christogram on the Christogram on the vestments of the Archbishop of Canterbury in The Crown also comes into this category. These individuals are members of the IHS family of individuals. Consider the following two examples, the first of which is contemporary and the second of which is medieval: As a result, why are there so many different versions? When it comes to the letter “J,” it is straightforward since the letters “I” and “J” in Latin were essentially interchangeable, particularly when followed by another vowel, in which case it acquired a palatal sound very similar to the beginning “Y” in English (eg, yard, yellow, Yiddish, yoke, Yule). Does the letter “J” in German continue to act in the same fashion, or is it something else entirely? In this case, the iota (“”) might be transformed into a “J” by Latinizing it. Simple. As a result, the name of Jesus was altered from, but the German pronunciation of “Jesu” is more closer to the original Koine Greek pronunciation than the English version. The interchangeability of letters “I” and “J,” by the way, is a small narrative factor in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), when Indy needs to spell out “Iehova” and makes the error of starting with “J” and nearly falling through the floor as a result of his mistake. In order for a “S” or a C to appear, the process must be repeated several times in order to be successful. It’s easy to understand the “S” because it’s simply a translation from Greek to Roman, but the “C” requires a bit more clarification. Now pay close attention to the final sigma, “” There are elements of the Roman “S” visible in that shape, but in a different proportion. In other cases, the lower “tail” would vanish, and the letter would appear to be the Roman “c” in appearance (also used in English). As a result, I advocated for the adoption of the first two and last letters of, because the final sigma is quite similar in appearance to the letter “c.” There is, however, more to it than that, as it has been discovered. The ” lunate sigma,” which I had never heard of before, came to my attention when I was studying for this website. It turns out that during the Hellenistic period (4th and 3rd century BCE), the symbol employed for carving inscriptions was reduced to a C-shaped shape, which is consistent with other evidence. The name “lunate” was given to this form due to its crescent shape, which resembled one that would appear on a full moon. Because the Cyrillic alphabet, which was used by Russian and other Slavic languages, was based largely on the Greek alphabet, it appears that the Cyrillic letter “C” for their “s” sound came from this lunate sigma. The Cyrillic alphabet was also used by the Greek language. As a result, the IHS/JHCfamily of Christograms differ in appearance from being entirely Greek to having one Roman letter and two Greek letters to having two Roman letters and one Greek letter, among other variations. Every version, however, retains the Greek eta (“”) as the middle initial. Although it appears to be a coincidence that the Greek letter “H” looks similar to the English letter “H,” I discovered that there is a little more to it when doing research for this website. According to Wikipedia (H), the letters “H” and “H” were acquired by the Greeks and the Latins from the Phoenicians, who had acquired them from even older sources. It was employed by the Phoenicians to signify a sound similar to the English letter “H.”. While both Greek and Latin utilized their copies of that borrowed letter to represent the same sound, such as the English “H,” the sound of that borrowed letter altered in Greek, becoming the vowel sound we are familiar with from Ancient and Koine Greece. Also, in case you are unfamiliar with Russian, the Cyrillic letter “H” for the sound of the letter “n” is not linked to the Greek letter “n.” In fact, the “nu” (“”), which appears precisely like the Roman “N,” was a loan from the Greek language. After a certain point in the process of that borrowing into Cyrillic, the end ends of the cross member of the “” began to migrate closer to the vertical center of the letter, and the cross member began to become more horizontal in shape. This final consequence of the procedure, which was just a transient entity in Greek, is represented by the Cyrillic letter “H.” Taking our thesis back to its genesis, it appears to be highly likely that the “H” in “Jesus H. Christ” is derived from the IHC family of Christograms, particularly the one that I had seen in Cádiz, Spain, “JHC,” which on the surface appears to be someone’s initials, namely those of “Jesus H. Christ.” In addition, the abbreviation Xmas is quite widespread. The “X” represents the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the word “Christ,” which is written as a syllable. The word Xmas has been used as an acceptable shorthand for almost half a century, contrary to the modern popular notion that it originated as a secular attempt to eliminate the Christian tradition from Christmas by “taking the ‘Christ’ out of Christmas.” When faced with such ill-conceived concerns, my standard answer has been to declare that we must restore the “X” to the word Christmas. The following “explanation,” which is based on a biology joke, is given in the original Wikipedia entry: etymology with a slant As part of a biology joke, the letter H is believed to stand for “Haploid,” with the implication being that, according to the concept of the Virgin Birth, Jesus had no biological father and hence his genome would have been wholly acquired from his mother, the Virgin Mary. If you want to know what inspired the joke’s scientific foundation seePloidy. Keeping with the sarcastically humorous character of the joke, I believe that this would cause even more issues. Birthing a virgin, referred to as Parthenogenesis in science, is a true phenomenon that has been witnessed in nature, primarily in invertebrates, though it has also been reported in some fish, amphibians and reptiles, as well as in birds on rare occasions. However, this does not apply to mammals. Aside from that, the genetics of gender in reptiles is significantly different from those of mammals, as an example (ie, X and Y chromosomes). If meiosisis is not utilized, the kids will be complete clones of the mother, depending on the specific parthenogenetic process involved. In addition to being entire clones of their mother, all parthenogenetic kids would be female since they are all full clones of their mother. I mean, every single one of them! By using this information and adding adequate amounts of humor, we can easily see that the Virgin Birth offers a significant challenge to fundamental Christian theology and tradition. Because Jesus was a woman, he could not have been a male, as is often believed. Jessica Christ, what are you talking about. She was featured in the December 1971 edition of National Lampoon magazine. In other words, Christian teaching is a big cover-up designed to conceal the truth that Jesus was a woman from the general public. The Wikipedia page, Jesus H. Christ, cites an essay by Roger Smith as a source for the information it provides (The H of Jesus H. Christ. American Speech 69:331-335, 1994). So, what does the “H” stand for in the center of your middle name. According to “Harold,” Even though this is the most likely origin of the “H,” there is still the matter of folk etymology, which is the sense shared by ordinary people (which is not always historically right) as to where the “H” originates from, which has to be addressed. In this case, the name “Harold” might be a probable origin
  • In fact, Smith (1994:32) mentions the name “Harold” as the foundation of a variant version, “Jesus Harold Christ.” A popular misreading of the words “Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name” in the Lord’s Prayer (often made by children) may have led to the creation of the nickname “Harold” for him. When this sentence is read incorrectly, it might be misinterpreted as stating the name of the Deity (“thy name is.”) rather than the correct meaning, which is “may thy name be honored.” Due of the phonetic similarities between the words hallowed (IPA) and Harold, there might be some mistake (IPA). Apart from the letter “H,” there are a huge variety of variations. In light of this, what is Smith’s conclusion? “Jesus H. Christ,” according to Smith, is full of hilarity – and blasphemy – because of the sheer number of spelling variations present. Specifically, he claims that the H provides “the ability to use the Lord’s name in vain by adding something to it that the imagination is urged to complete: What does the H. stand for? Whatever the errant imagination proposes and the imaginer is prepared to appreciate.” Enjoy and spread the word. Those middle “H” initial has a variety of folkloric interpretations. In my first investigation, I had independently noticed how close the Greek letter eta (“H”) appeared to the English letter “H.” As I recall, this was something I had seen independently. Alternatively, it’s possible that I came across this in the Wikipedia article,Jesus H. Christ: A Biography. The divine monogram of Christian iconography is the most frequently accepted derivation, despite the fact that numerous other interpretations have been advanced. Transliterated as iota-eta-sigma, the sign is formed from the first three letters of the Greek name of Jesus (). It can be written as IHS (withlunate sigma), IHC (withlunate sigma), JHS (withlunate sigma), or JHC (withlunate sigma) (“J” was historically a mere variant of “I”
  • See J). Smith proposes the following idea for how this learned-sounding term came to be used as the foundation for vulgar slang: it was observed by ordinary people when it was worn as an adornment on the vestments of Anglican (or, in America, Episcopal) clergy, Smith explains. The “JHC” variation would be particularly prone to the “H” being interpreted as part of a name. Despite the fact that I don’t recall it having any effect on my thoughts on the subject at the time, I now strongly suspect it was this experience that led me to learn about the lunate sigma – I had taken two semesters of Koine Greek in university and later a semester of classical Greek in the mid-70’s without ever having heard of a lunate sigma. In any case, I personally feel that Christograms and the Greek letter are the most plausible sources of that middle initial’s occurrence. Many different explanations exist for this, as well as for other concerns such as why West Coast Swing dancers performed in a slot (my personal favorite explanation is the drunken sailors on liberty in Long Beach, Calif). Experimenting with different solutions is always enjoyable. I hope I’ve piqued your interest and gotten you thinking. Enjoy and spread the word. The first time this image was uploaded was on March 9, 2017. The most recent update was made on December 3, 2020.

Published on: |Revised on: In a recent internet hypothesis, it was claimed that the misunderstanding origins of the phrase ‘Jesus H. Christ’ and the origin of the letter H had been resolved. The hypothesis asserts that it has solved the mystery of the odd ‘Jesus H. Christ’ origin, and that the letter ‘H’ was not the holy figure’s middle name, as previously thought. The misconception is said to have arisen from the interpretation of an old monogram – in which initials are braided over one another to form a design – by the public.

According to the document, the misconception stems from the usage of monograms by the religion to write the name of Jesus without having to spell all the letters.

As the decades passed, the letter ‘I’ was mistaken for the letter ‘J,’ and the inaccurate ‘J’ from the abbreviation ‘JHC’ was justified as standing for Jesus, and the ‘C’ as standing for Christ.

Since then, allusions to ‘Jesus H.

Jesus H.

Christ” came about.

Christ’ in his autobiography, which was published in 1876.

The young Twain was then known as Samuel Langhorne Clemens, and he was hired to publish booklets of sermons delivered by Reverend Alexander Campbell.

Rev.

In an attempt to retaliate against his mentor, Twain altered the name of Jesus Christ from Jesus Christ to Jesus H.

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