Who Wrote Fairest Lord Jesus

Fairest Lord Jesus – Wikipedia

Fairest Lord Jesus
by Anonymous
Native name Schönster Herr Jesu
Genre Hymn
Meter 8.8.4.4.8.8 with refrain
Melody Crusaders’ Hymn
Composed 1842; 180 years ago

The Christian song “Fairest Lord Jesus,” also known as “Beautiful Savior,” is a favorite of many people.

History

The “Crusader’s Hymn,” according to some versions, was so named because it was performed by German Crusaders on their journey to the Holy Land. William Jensen Reynolds, on the other hand, believes that any relation between this song and the Crusades is “totally erroneous.” The Jesuit Order, which was established after the Crusades, is said to have given rise to the expression. The song first appears in Franz Liszt’s oratorioLegend of Saint Elizabeth, where it is used as part of the “Crusader’s March.” However, there is no proof that the tune existed earlier to 1842, when the hymn was published in Schlesische Volkslieder (German for “Saxon Folk Song”).

(2013 film).

Melody

The music, which was originally aSilesianfolk song, and the Germantext, which was published for the first time in 1842 by August Heinrich Hoffmann von Fallersleben and Ernst Richter under the titleSchönster Herr Jesu, were written by August Heinrich Hoffmann von Fallersleben and Ernst Richter (Most beautiful Lord Jesus). When the Danish hymn writerB. S. Ingemann penned Dejliger jorden in 1850, it was put to the same tune as the previous year. Fair Is Creation was the title of an English translation by Jens C.

With the exception of their musical context, the lyrics to Daniel and German are unconnected.

Lyrics

Joseph A. Seiss provided the translation in 1873. Fairest Lord Jesus, Ruler of all nature,O Thou of God and man the Son, Thee will I treasure, Thee will I honor,Thou, my soul’s glory, joy, and crown, I give you my heartfelt thanks and praise. Beautiful Savior, indeed! Lord of all countries, you are a king! Son of God and Son of Man at the same time! Yours be the glory and honor, the acclaim and worship, now and forevermore, O Lord!

References

  • Original German (courtesy of CPDL.org)
  • Historical context (courtesy of Psalter Hymnal)

History of Hymns: ‘Fairest Lord Jesus’

Hannah Cruse contributed to this article. “Fairest of all, Lord Jesus,” Translation from Münster Gesangbuch (1677), by Joseph August Seiss. 189 hymns from the United Methodist Hymnal Beautiful Lord Jesus, supreme ruler of all nature, O thou of God and man the Son, thee will I cherish and honor, thee my soul’s pride, joy, and crown; thee will I cherish and honor, thee will I honor. Christians have sung and appreciated the hymn “Fairest Lord Jesus” for more than three hundred years. How did this song of devotion, which has been sung by many generations, come in the current day?

  • “A typical illustration of the persistence of false knowledge,” writes Carl Daw, Jr., in his introduction to the song, “is provided by this hymn” (Daw, 2016, p.
  • Rather of discussing the text first, then the music, or the tune first, then the text, I shall describe each evolution in the history of this hymn in the order in which it occurred historically.
  • In 1662, a Jesuit manuscript created in Münster, Westphalia (Germany), which had six stanzas, was copied and used as the basis for this hymn (Westermeyer, 2010, p.
  • It was in the Münster Gesangbuch(1677), a Catholic hymnbook, that the first printed version of “Fairest Lord Jesus” appeared.
  • Sacred songs were assembled by Heinrich Hoffman von Fallersleben (1798-1874) in his book Schlüsselische Volkslieder (1842), which was published in 1842.
  • 716-718).
  • This melody was based on a song published in 1766 by Dutch Kapellmeister Christian Ernst Graf (1723-1804), “Laat ons juichen Batavieren,” which translates as “Let us celebrate Batavieren” and was composed by Christian Ernst Graf himself.
  • Check out the following link to see if you can pick up on the similarity: “Laat ons juichen Batavieren.” However, there were several alterations made to the song before it was republished.
  • (1850).
  • 64).

Willis published three stanzas of the German text, “Fairest Lord Jesus,” in Church Chorals and Choir Studies, along with an English translation, “Fairest Lord Jesus.” Three stanzas of “Fairest Lord Jesus” were included in the prominent Congregational Churches’ hymnal,Plymouth Collection of Hymns and Tunes for the Use of Christian Congregations (1855), but no translator was identified.

  1. The Legend of St.
  2. In his “Crusader’s March,” French horns start the majestic song, which is then sensitively responded to by flutes and strings (listen to “Crusader’s March,” where the melody first appears at 2:45).
  3. Following the production of Liszt’s oratorio, an increasing number of variations on the theme of “Fairest Lord Jesus” began to appear in periodicals.
  4. ().
  5. A choral setting of the song Beautiful Saviour was created in 1919 by F.
  6. Olaf College Chorus, and is being performed by the group today.
  7. Lilian Stevenson (1870–1960) was born in Glasgow, Scotland.

The hymn melody CRUSADERS’ HYMN was harmonized by Canadian composer James Hopkirk and published in The Book of Common Praise in 1938.

It was published in the EpiscopalHymnal 1982(1985) to the tune CRUSADERS’ HYMN, which was renamed ST.

The new name alludes to Liszt’s oratorio about St.

Many hymnals produced in the 1980s used the tune name ST.

ELIZABETH.

As a result of their distaste for the period of Christian history known as the Crusades, a growing number of hymnal committees have abandoned the traditional tune’s title.

For hundreds of years, Israelites were subjected to mass murder and religious persecution as a result of the Crusades.

This brings us up to the present day.

Approximately sixty percent of hymnals use the version “Fairest Lord Jesus” (5.6.8.5.5), while fifteen percent use the translation “Beautiful Saviour” (5.6.7.5.5.8); the remaining twenty-five percent use alternate translations.

ELIZABETH, which is a variation of CRUSADERS’ HYMN.

Jesus is designated as both the Son of God and the Son of Man, a statement that is usually taken to relate to Christ’s two natures, one divine and one human, as well as his two natures as a human being.

the Son of Man did not come to be served; he came to serve and to offer his life in order to rescue many people,” are cited by scholars as the roots of this notion (Good News Translation).

After that, we are to adore the Son of God and the Son of Man, who is to be “my soul’s glory, joy, and crown,” according to the rest of the stanza.

In this case, the parallel is that Jesus outshines the brightest lights in the skies and is more pure than all of the angels of heaven together.

The five are organized in a similar manner: Verse 2: Jesus is more beautiful than the forests (Wálder) and the fields (Felder); Verse 3: Jesus shines brighter than the moon (Mondern), the sun (Sonne), and the stars (Sternlein); Verse 4: Jesus is more lovely than all of heaven (Himmels) and all of earth (Sternlein) (Erden).

There are many different German versions, just as there are many different English ones.

Blessed Lord Jesus, who is present with us in word and sacrament,I implore thee:Lord, be kind unto us now and till the end of the world.I entreat you.

Richard Watson’s direct translation of the original) This hymn has endured the test of time for more than three hundred years and will continue to be sung in future generations.

What could be more beautiful than meadows in bloom in the springtime, or the rays of the sun or the twinkling of the stars? Jesus, the “ruler of all nature,” is our example. He “shines brighter than all the angels that heaven has to offer”!

Sources

The Plymouth Collection of Hymns and Tunes: for the Use of Christian Congregations, edited by Henry Ward Beecher, is a collection of hymns and tunes for Christian congregations (New York: A. S. BarnesCompany, 1855). (See Hymn 658 on page 270 for further information.) On the 21st of March, 2020, accessed Glory to God: A Companion to the Book of Revelation by Carl P. Daw, Jr. (Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2016). Vol. 3A of The Hymnal 1982 Companion, edited by Raymond F. Glover (New York: The Church Hymnal Corporation, 1990), by Raymond F.

  1. The Baptist Hymnal: A Companion to the Hymns of the Baptists, by William J.
  2. “Schönster Herr Jesu,” by J.
  3. Accessed on March 21, 2020, from Canterbury Press.
  4. Verses from the Good News Translation (GNT) are protected by the American Bible Society’s Copyright 1992.
  5. A church musician herself, she founded The Church Musician’s Assistant, an online resource that offers adaptable sheet music as well as training courses and coaching for church music-makers.

Fairest Lord Jesus

The Plymouth Collection of Hymns and Tunes: for the Use of Christian Congregations, edited by Henry Ward Beecher, is a collection of hymns and tunes written for Christian congregations (New York: A. S. BarnesCompany, 1855). In Hymn 658 on page 270, this is explained further. As of March 21, 2020, this page was available for viewing. Glory to God: A Companion by Carl P. Daw, Jr. (Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2016). Volume 3A of The Hymnal 1982 Companion, edited by Raymond F. Glover (New York: The Church Hymnal Corporation, 1990), is dedicated to the year 1982.

Reynolds (Nashville: Broadman Press, 1976).

Hymnal Companion: Evangelical Lutheran Worship (Paul Westermeyer, Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal Companion) (Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress, 2010).

Currently pursuing her Master of Sacred Music (2019) at Southern Methodist University, Hannah Cruse is an organist, oboist, composer, and writer.

A church musician herself, she founded The Church Musician’s Assistant, an online resource that offers adaptable sheet music as well as training courses and coaching for church musicians. With her partner, Matt, and dog, Bub, she presently dwells in the woods of Tennessee with them.

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The beautiful hymn “Fairest Lord Jesus” has a number of different genesis stories, all of which are interesting. The most widely accepted narrative is that it was sung by the German Crusaders on their long and exhausting journey to the Holy Land in the twelfth century. According to another, more likely narrative, it was sung by supporters of John Hus, who were expelled from Bohemia in 1620 as part of the anti-Reformation purge, and who eventually moved in Silesia, which is now part of Poland.

It is credited to the German Jesuits, who originally published it in their Munster Gesangbuch in 1677, and it is classified as their work.

See Less

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADER’S HYMN is the name of the tune (ST. ELIZABETH) Joseph Augustus Seiss is the author of this piece. Meter readings are erratic. Revelation 1:16 is the Bible verse. The year is 1991. Sources: Münster Gesangbuch (1677); Anonymous German Hymn (1677); and other sources. Baptist Hymnal, Volume 176 (1991).

Baptist Hymnal 200847

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” The tune is called CRUSADER’S HYMN (ST. ELIZABETH) and was composed by Joseph Augustus Seiss. Meter: A meter that is not working properly. The year is 2008. In this section, we will discuss the subject of creation. Sources: Münster Gesangbuch (st. 1, 3), anonymous German Hymn, unidentified translation source Hymnal 200847 (Baptist Hymnal)

Celebrating Grace Hymnal159

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADERS’ HYMN is the name of the tune (ST ELIZABETH) Joseph August Seiss is the author of this piece. Meter reading: 5.6.8.5.5.8 The year is 2010. Subjects: God the Son | Epiphany; Jesus Christ as Saviour and Redeemer |; Praise and Adoration of Jesus Christ | Anonymous German Hymn, Münster Gesangbuch, 1677; translated from an unknown source, st. 1-3; source: Celebrating the 159th anniversary of the Grace Hymnal

Chalice Hymnal97

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” ST. ELIZABETHM is the title of the tune. eter: 568.558 eter: The year is 1995. Subjects: God as revealed in Jesus Christ | Praise for Christ | Jesus Christ |; Nature | Originally published in Münster Gesangbuch, 1677; tr. Church Chorals and Choir Studies, 1850; alternative title: Choice Hymnal 1997

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Church Hymnary (4th ed.)463

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” SCHNSTER HERR JESU (ST. ELISABETH)Tune Title: SCHNSTER HERR JESU (ST. ELISABETH)Author: Lilian Stevenson (1870-1960) Meter readings are erratic.

Biblical passages: Psalm 27:4; Isaiah 44:2; Song of Solomon 5:10; Song of Solomon 5:16 The year is 2005. Subject: Christ Risen | Priesthood and Reign; Devotion |; Our Response to Christ | In Devotion; Spring | Münster Gesangbuch, 1677, as a source. Church Hymnary, 4th edition, page 463

Common Praise (1998)619

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADERS’ HYMN is the name of the tune. Meter reading: 568 558 Scriptural references include Matthew 17:1-9, Mark 9:2-9, Mark 14:3-9, Luke 9:28-36, John 12:1-8, 2 Corinthians 4:1-6, Ephesians 1:15-23, Philippians 2:5-11, and Revelation 1:4-8. The year is 1998. Jesus Christ is the subject of this article. It is based on the Münster Gesangbuch, 1677; tr. Church Chorals and Choir Studies, 1850; alternative: Common Praise (1998)619

Glory to God630

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADERS’ HYMN is the name of the tune. Joseph August Seiss is the author of this work. Meter reading: 5.6.8.5.5.8 Scripture references: Psalm 45:2, John 5:23, John 8:12, John 12:1-8, 1 Corinthians 1:31, Philippians 2:9-11, 1 Thessalonians 2:19-20, 1 Timothy 6:16, Hebrews 1:3, Revelation 22:16, etc. The year is 2013. Subject: Affection for God |; Creation |; Jesus Christ | Ascension and Reign; Love for God |; Praise for God |; Sovereignty of God |

1-3, trans.

God is praised 630

Hymnal117

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” Anonymous, Heinrich A. H. von Fallersleben, and Joseph A. Seiss wrote the CRUSADERS’ HYMN, which is the title of the tune. The year is 1992. The following sources were used: Schönster Herr Jesu!, Gesangbuch Münster (Sts. 1, 3), 1677; Heinrich A. H. von Fallersleben, Schlesische Volkslieder (St. 2), 1842; tr. anonymous, Church Chorals and Choir Studies (Sts. 1-3), 1850; Joseph A. Seiss, Sunday School Book for the Use of Evangelical Lutheran Congregations (St.

Hymns for a Pilgrim People57

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” SCHNSTER HERR JESUS is the title of the tune. Author: Joseph A. Seiss (1823-1904), who lived in the United States. Meter reading: 5.6.8.5.5.8 Scripture reference: Isaiah 33:17 The year is 2007. Subjects: Adoration and Praise |; Children |; Jesus Christ |; Source: Münster Gesangbuch, 1677 | Hymns for the Pilgrims is a collection of hymns written for the pilgrims. 57

Hymns of Faith46

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ First Line: Most excellent Lord Jesus! Author: Joseph A. Seiss is the title of the tune. Psalm 45:2 is the scripture reference. The year is 1980. Subject: Christ | Beauty; Christ | Character; Praise | of Christ Hymns of Faith46 Source: Gesangbuch, Münster, 1677; translation by anonymous (v. 1-3)Hymns of Faith

Hymns of Glory, Songs of Praise463

the Most Beloved Lord Jesus (Display Title) To begin, “Fairest Lord Jesus!” says the author. Author: Joseph A. Seiss, who wrote the tune’s title. Psalm 45:2 (the Bible) 1980 is the year of publication. Subject: Choir |; Christ | Beauty; Christ | Character; Praise | of the Lord Hymns of Faith46 (from the Gesangbuch, Münster, 1677; trans. anonymous (v. 1-3))

Hymns of Promise39

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADER’S HYMN is the name of the tune.

The meter reads 5.6.8.5.5.8. 2015 is the year of the pig. Subject: Glory to God the Father | Münster Gesangbuch, 1677, as a source. Hymns of Promise, number 39

Hymns of the Saints226

the Most Beloved Lord Jesus (Display Title) Lord Jesus the most beautiful is the first line of this poem. CRUSADER’S HYMN is the title of the tune. 5.6.8.5.5.8 is the meter reading. 2015 is the year in which we celebrate Subject: Glory to God the Father and the Son | Münster Gesangbuch, 1677, is the source for this information. 39th Hymn of Promiscuity

Hymns to the Living God70

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADER’S HYMN is the title of the tune written by Joseph A. Seiss. Meter readings are erratic. 2017 is the year in question. In this hymn, the subject is Revelation and Adoration; the source is the Münster Gesangbuch, 1627; the translation is unknownHymns to the Living God70

Moravian Book of Worship470

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ First Line: Most excellent Lord Jesus! The tune is called ST. ELIZABETH (CRUSADER’S HYMN) and was composed by Joseph A. Seiss. The meter reads 5.5.7.5.5.8. Psalm 45:2, Hebrews 1:1-12, and Jude 1:24-25 are examples of biblical passages. The year is 1995. • Christ |; Christ-adoration and praise |; Christ-love and devotion |; Son and Redeemer |Source: Münster Gesangbuch (1677) The Book of Worship of the Moravians470

Praise y Adoración184a

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” Joseph August Seiss was born in 1823 and died in 1904. The year is 2016. Christ | ; Jesus Christ is the subject of this article. Munster Gesangbuch is the source in German (1677) 184a – Praise and Adoration

Rejoice Hymns255

the Most Beloved Lord Jesus (Display Title) Lord Jesus the most beautiful is the first line of this poem. Joseph August Seiss (1823-1904) was an American author and journalist. 2016 is the year in which we celebrate. Christ | ; Jesus Christ is the subject of this essay. Munster Gesangbuch is the source for this song (1677) Complimentary and Adoring Treatment184a

Sing Glory199

Display title: Most beautiful Lord Jesus, supreme master of all creation First line: Most excellent Lord Jesus, supreme master of all nature Meter reading: 56 85 58 The year is 1999. Sing Glory199 is a song about a woman who was raped and raped again.

Sing Joyfully104

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ First Line: Most excellent Lord Jesus! Author: Joseph A. Seiss is the title of the tune. The year is 1989. |Source: Münster Gesangbuch |Subject: Adoration Sing a Happy Song104

The Celebration Hymnal87

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADERS’ HYMN is the name of the tune. Joseph A. Seiss is the author of this work. The meter reads 5.6.8.5.5.8. The year is 1997. Christ as an example | Adoration and Praise | Jesus Our Savior; Adore the Lord; Children’s Hymns |; Christ as an example Anonymous German Hymn, Münster Gesangbuch, 1677; translated from an unknown source, st. 1-3; source: Hymnal de la Fête de la Fête87

The Cyber Hymnal1423

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ First line: Most excellent Lord Jesus, supreme master of all nature CRUSADER’S HYMN is the title of the tune written by Joseph A.

Seiss. German Jesuits wrote this piece in the 17th century, which was published in the Münster Gesangbuch in 1677. The Cyber Hymnal1423 is a collection of hymns written in cyberspace.

The Hymnal 1982383

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” St. Elizabeth is the title of the tune, and the meter is 568. 558. The year is 1985. Source: German composite; tr. published in New York in 1850; alternative version in The Hymnal 1982383.

The Hymnal 1982384

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” SCHNSTER HERR JESUM is the title of the tune. 568. 558. 568. 558. The year is 1985. Source: German composite; tr. published in New York in 1850; alternative version in The Hymnal 1982384.

The Hymnal for Worship and Celebration88

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADER’S HYMN is the name of the tune. Joseph A. Seiss is the author of this work. The meter reads 5.6.8.5.5.8. The year is 1986. Christ | The Epiphany; God | The Beginning of Time; Jesus Our Savior: His Adoration and Praise | Children’s Hymns Anonymous German Hymn, Münster Gesangbuch, 1677; translated from an unknown source, st. 1-3; source: Music for Worship and Celebration (The Hymnal for Worship and Celebration)88

The Presbyterian Hymnal306

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADERS’ HYMN is the name of the tune. Meter reading: 5.6.8.5.5.8 The year is 1990. Subject: Jesus Christ | Individual of the Bible Church Chorals and Choir Studies, 1850; alt., trans. from The Presbyterian Hymnal, 306; Münster Gesangbuch, 1677; Church Chorals and Choir Studies, 1850;

The United Methodist Hymnal189

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ First line: Most excellent Lord Jesus, supreme master of all nature St. Elizabeth is the title of the tune written by Joseph August Seiss. Meter reading: 568.558 The year is 1989. Subject: ; Christian Year | Easter; Jesus Christ | Lordship of Christ; Jesus Christ | Love for Nature; The Grace of Jesus Christ | In Praise of Christ; Children’s Choir Selected Works Münster Gesangbuch, 1677, as a source. The Hymnal of the United Methodist Church189

The Worshiping Church115

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADER’S HYMN is the name of the tune. The author(s) is unknown; Joseph A. Seiss (1823-1904) is credited. The meter reads 5.6.8.5.5.8. Bible verses: Psalm 27:4; Psalm 45:2; Psalm 46:2; Song of Solomon 2:2; John 5:23; John 8:12. Philippians 2:8; Philippians 2:11; Revelation 5:11-13; Revelation 22:16. The year is 1990. • Spring • Subject: Jesus Christ | Son of Man • Subject: Gesangbuch, Münster, 1677, as a source.

Timeless Truths1089

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ First line: Most excellent Lord Jesus, Ruler of all creation. CRUSADER’S HYMN is the title of the tune written by Joseph A. Seiss. Meter reading: 11.8.10.8 Song of Solomon 6:10 is the scripture reference. German Jesuits, 1677; The Cyber Hymnal (The Gospel Trumpet Company, Hymnal of the Church of God, 1953 (79); Timeless Truths (Timeless Truths1089; The Cyber Hymnal (The Gospel Trumpet Company, Hymnal of the Church of God, 1953 (79)

Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.)170

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADER’S HYMN is the name of the tune.

The meter reads 5.6.8.5.5.8. Psalm 45:2 is the scripture reference. The year is 1990. Subject: Jesus Christ | His Praise; Christ | Friend; God in Nature |; Jesus Christ | God’s Beauty 1677; tr. 1850, 1873; Münster Gesangbuch as source. Revised edition of the Trinity Hymnal (revised edition)170

Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.)171

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” SCHNSTER HERR JESUM is the title of the tune. 5.8.8.5.8 eter: 5.8.8.5.8 Psalm 45:2 is the scripture reference. The year is 1990. Subject: Jesus Christ | His Praise; Christ | Friend; God in Nature |; Jesus Christ | God’s Beauty 1677; tr. 1850, 1873; Münster Gesangbuch as source. The Trinity Hymnal (Revised edition)171

Trinity Psalter Hymnal283

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADER’S HYMN is the name of the tune. The meter reads 5.6.8.5.5.8. Psalm 27:4; Psalm 45:2; Hebrews 1:3-4 are examples of scripture. The year is 2018. Subject: ; Children’s Hymns |; Christ | As a Friend; Christ | In Praise of; God in Nature |; God in the Universe Gesangbuch, Münster, 1677; trans. 1850, 1873; The Trinity Psalter Hymnal has 283 hymns.

Voices Together130

Schönster Herr Jesu is the title seen on the screen (Beautiful Savior) First Line: Schönster Herr Jesu, thank you very much (Beautiful Savior) CRUSADERS’ HYMN is the name of the tune. Heinrich A. H. von Fallersleben is the author of this work. Meter reading: 5.6.7.5.5.8 (Irregular) Scriptural references: Philippians 2:9-11; Colossians 1:15-17; Hebrews 1:18. The year is 2020. Subject: Creation | Beauty of; Jesus Christ | Images and Names of; Christ’s Reign | Sources: stanza 2 Heinrich A. H. von Fallersleben (Germany), Schlesische Volkslieder 1842; stanzas 1, 3 Gesangbuch (current-day Germany), 1677; trans.

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H.

Voices United341

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ First line: Most excellent Lord Jesus, supreme master of all nature CRUSADERS’ HYMN (SCHNSTER HERR JESU) is the title of the tune. 5 6 8 5 5 8 meter: 5 6 8 5 5 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter: 5 6 8 meter The year is 1996. Subject: Adoration and Praise |; Angels |; Annunciation |; Baptism of Jesus |

  • Transfiguration; Creation |; Easter 1 |
  • Year A; Easter 2 |
  • Year C; Epiphany 3 |
  • Year B; Epiphany Last/Transfiguration |

Worship and Rejoice123

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADER’S HYMN is the name of the tune. The meter reads 5.6.8.5.5.8. Scripture references: Psalm 27:4, Psalm 45:2, Song of Solomon 2:1, Matthew 12:18, Mark 10:45, John 5:23, John 8:12, Philippians 2:9, Revelation 5:11-13, Revelation 22:16. The year is 2003. Adoration is the subject of this article. Gesangbuch, Münster, 1677, as a source. Praise, Worship, and Rejoicing123

Worship and Service Hymnal47

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ First Line: Most excellent Lord Jesus! CRUSADERS’ HYMN (Tune Title)Author: Joseph A.

Seiss, 1823-1904Tune Description: 2006 is the year in question. Subject: Adoration |; Christ | Beauty of; Christ | Life and Ministry; Worship |; Christ | Adoration |; Christ | Beauty of; Christ | Life and Ministry German, 17th CenturyWorship and Service Hymnal47 is the source for this hymn.

Worship in Song120

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” CRUSADER’S HYMN is the name of the tune. nAuthor’s name is unknown. The year is 1996. Singing (or song) is a subject that includes angels, beauty, children, joy, the living Christ, nature, and singing. Source: Münster Gesangbuch, 1677, p. 120. Worship in Song

Yes, Lord!228

Display title: Most Beloved Jesus Christ The first line reads: “Fairest Lord Jesus.” Title of the tune:Date of composition: 1982 |Source: Munster Gesangbuch |Subject: Worship and Adoration Thank you, Lord!228

Fairest Lord Jesus

Scripture References: Psalm 27:4-6, Psalm 45:1-17, and Isaiah 33:17 “Fairest Lord Jesus,” which sounds as gentle as a lullaby, appears to be a delicate hymn for rosy-cheeked infants. However, it has a strange and legendary German background, since it was initially performed as a significantly harsher, more warlike combat song during World War I. According to legend, the hymn was composed in the 12th century as an anthem of the Teutonic Knights, which was performed in Prussia under the Holy Roman Empire, or in the 18th century as a Germanic song from the Germanic province of Silesia.

  1. This is thanks in part to Franz Liszt, a child prodigy who went on to become a world-renowned composer.
  2. Elizabeth,” he utilized this piece as the combat march for his costumed crusaders, who marched to the beat of the music.
  3. When we take a deeper look, we can discover that this is also true for many hymns and gospel principles as well.
  4. “For He will conceal me in His shelter in the day of tribulation; He will hide me beneath the cover of His tent; He will place me high on a rock,” says the gospel, referring to our Lord’s protection in war (Psalm 27:5-6).
  5. And praise be to Jesus, our Saviour, who is also the ruler of all creation.
  6. Siess Beautiful Lord Jesus, supreme monarch of all nature, O thou of God and man the Son, Thee will I treasure, Thee will I honor, thou, my soul’s pride, joy, and crown, I will give you my heartfelt devotion and reverence.
  7. The sun shines brightly, the moonlight is much brighter, and all of the sparkling celestial host is beautiful: yet Jesus shines brighter, Jesus shines purer than all of the angels heaven has to offer.
  8. Lord of all countries, you are a king!
  9. Glory and honor, acclaim and admiration, now and forevermore, are yours to have and to hold.

Emily R. Brink’s Psalter Hymnal Handbook is available online. Bert Polman was in charge of the editing. Faith Alive Christian Resources, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1998. Faith Alive Christian Resources, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1998.

The Story Behind Fairest Lord Jesus

The fact that this song is over two hundred years old surprises me a bit. For some reason, I assumed it was quite recent, probably from the late nineteenth century or perhaps the early twentieth century, although some stories claim it dates back to the 12th century, when Crusaders were making their way to the Holy Land. Some believe that it was originally performed to the accompaniment of a Gregorian chant. None of this can be supported by evidence. Others date the composition of the song to circa 1620, when adherents of the reformer John Hus were expelled from Bohemia in a brutal purge, according to legend.

  • This is claimed to have been a folk tune from the Bohemian region.
  • This hymn was discovered by Hoffman Fallersleben while listening to a group of Silesians singing it.
  • This is the version of the hymn that we are all familiar with.
  • One of the hymns included in the collection has a notation stating that it was “sang by the German knights on their approach to Jerusalem.” It’s possible that’s where the Crusader tale got its start.

Fairest Lord Jesus

The fact that this song has been around for so long surprises me. Due to a variety of factors, I assumed it was a relatively recent composition, probably from the late nineteenth or perhaps early twentieth century. However, other legends claim it dates back to the 12th century, when Crusaders were making their way to Jerusalem. Many people think that the song was originally sung to the accompaniment of a medieval chant. This cannot be supported in any way. According to some, the song was written in or around 1620, during a deadly purge that drove the adherents of John Hus from Bohemia.

A folk song from the Bohemian region, it is thought to have originated here.

This hymn was discovered by Hoffman Fallersleben while listening to a group of Silesians singing it.

Here’s the familiar rendition of the hymn.

“Sung by the German knights on the journey to Jerusalem,” according to a notation about this hymn in that collection, is correct. The tale of the Crusaders may have begun right there in this place and time. It Came Upon a Midnight Clear was also written by Willis, who was also a composer.

Fairest Lord Jesus: Lyrics

Holy and glorious Lord Jesus, all-powerful Ruler of all nature, I shall treasure and worship Thee, for Thou art the glory, joy, and crown of my soul. The meadows are beautiful, and the forests are much more beautiful, draped in the blossoming clothing of spring; but Jesus is even more beautiful, and Jesus is even purer, and He is the one who makes the heart of the bereaved sing. The sun is shining brightly, the moonlight is much brighter, and the entire twinkling celestial host is aglow; yet Jesus shines brighter, Jesus shines purer than all the angels heaven has to offer.

Lord of all countries, you are a king!

Yours is the glory and honor, the acclaim and worship, now and forevermore.

About the Performers

There is almost nothing to be found. A few of other hymns are available on their YouTube account.

“Fairest Lord Jesus”

“THE MOST HOLY LORD JESUS” “Thou art beautiful than the offspring of mankind,” says the narrator (Psa. 45.2) INTRODUCTION: Psalm 45 contains a Messianic prophesy, and as a result, the one referenced in verse 2 is referred to as “Fairest Lord Jesus” in a well-known song ( 41 inHymns for Worship Revisedand514 inSacred Selections for the Church). There is very little information available about its origins. This song is frequently referred to as “The Crusaders’ Hymn” because of a narrative that it was sung by German crusaders in the twelfth century as they made their way to Palestine to confront the Moslems in battle.

  1. It was composed for a Roman Catholic hymnbook published in 1677, the Münsterisch Gesanbuch.
  2. Elizabeth, or Schonster Herr Jesu) is considered to be an old German-Silesian folksong that dates back to the time of the Crusades, however there is no way to verify this claim.
  3. As told by the story, the song was being sung in a service at Glaz in the district of Silesia, by a group of Silesian peasant followers of Jan Hus, who was among the very first Reformers to emerge.
  4. He recorded the song’s text and music in five stanzas from the oral recitation and included it in his collection of folk songs,Schlesische Volkslieder, which was published in Leipzig in 1842.
  5. Following his education at Chauncey Hall, Boston Latin School, and Yale, where he got his A.
  6. It was in New York City, New York, that he published hisChurch Chorals and Choir Studies, which included “Fairest Lord Jesus,” in 1850.
  7. However, while these are likewise excellent, they have not yet achieved the same level of popularity as the ones offered by Willis, who served as a music editor during the period 1852 to 1864.

On May 7, 1900, he passed away in Detroit.

1) and the 1937Great Songs of the Church No.

L.

2and the 1966Christian Hymns No.

O.

Welch; and Currently, it can be found in the 1971Songs of the Church, the 1990Songs of the Church 21st Century Edition, and the 1994Songs of Faith and Praise, all edited by Alton H.

E.

McCann; and the 1992Praise for the Lordedited by John P.

I.

“Dearest Lord Jesus, how lovely you are!

O Thou, the Son of God and of man, the Son of God!

I will cherish and honor thee.” As a result of His dominion over natural forces (Matt.

The miracles that Jesus accomplished are recorded so that we might be convinced that He is the Son of God, who reigns supreme in both heaven and on earth, as follows: 20:30-31C (Matt.

20:30-31C).

From the second stanza of Philippians 2, we discover that Jesus is fairer than all of nature’s beauty combined “Meadows are beautiful, and forests are much more beautiful.

There is much in the natural world that God has placed here for us to enjoy and from which we can profit; they serve as proof of God’s presence and goodness: for example, the following are examples of natural phenomena: Psalms 19.1-4, Acts 14.15-17 and 17.24-29, and Romans 1.19-20B are examples of biblical literature.

  1. Jn.
  2. In this regard, we consider Jesus as the fairest since He is in the position to be accorded complete preeminence, as follows: Col.
  3. According to the third verse, Jesus is more lovely than the celestial host, both physical and angelic in nature.
  4. God created the sun, moon, and stars to provide light for the advantage of men on earth (Gen.
  5. B.
  6. 1.14-18B).
  7. 8.12C.

1.1-4 IV.

God’s son and man’s son!

Thine be the glory and honor, the praise and worship, both now and in the future!” A.

It is as a result of this that He leads the nations with a rod of iron, as follows: Ps.

Therefore, He is deserving of respect, glory, acclaim, and devotion both now and in the future.

Stanza 5 makes it clear that Jesus is more just than anything this world could possibly provide.

Christ is the source of all spiritual benefits in the heavenly regions, including: 1.7B is the ephridine atom.

n.

As a result, because Jesus is the most beautiful, we must recognize Him as the King of our hearts, the Lord of our lives, and the Savior of our souls: Matt.

He is deserving of our admiration. In reality, He is deserving of our adoration because He is God. In order to honor Him as our “Fairest Lord Jesus,” may we always be willing to confess Him before others.

Fairest Lord Jesus – Hymn of the Week

Fairest Lord Jesus – Hymn of the Week – A Quick Guide to the Word

Fairest Lord Jesus – Introduction of the Hymn

Doctor Larry Frazier hosts The Hymn of the Week, in which he shares the good news via music while incorporating religion and everyday experience. Hello and welcome to the Hymn of the Week series. This week, we’ll take a look at a song that has a surprising number of connotations. First and foremost, there were the Crusades. First and foremost, there’s the eastern European province of Silesia. In the third place, a 19th-century American music critic and church musician who is credited with writing the melody for the classic Christmas song “It Came Upon the Midnight Clear.” And, finally, a Lutheran clergyman from Maryland with Moravian ancestors.

See also:  How To Argue Like Jesus?

Lutherans are particularly fond of one.

The hymn “Fairest Lord Jesus,” as you may have guessed, is this week’s “Hymn of the Week!”

Click Below for Fairest Lord Jesus Lyrics

Beautiful Lord Jesus, ruler of all nature, O Thou of God and man the Son, I will love and honor Thee, for Thee are the glory, joy, and crown of my soul; and Thou art the Son of God and man, I will honor Thee. The meadows are beautiful, and the forests are much more beautiful, draped in the blossoming clothing of spring; but Jesus is even more beautiful, and Jesus is even purer, and He is the one who makes the heart of the bereaved sing.

(3-5)

And all the sparkling starry host; Jesus shines brighter, Jesus shines purer than all the angels Heav’n can brag; Jesus shines brighter, Jesus shines purer than all the angels Heav’n can boast. There is no one nearer, fairer, or more dear to me than Thou, my Savior, who is the source of all loveliest beauty, both heavenly and earthly; none can be closer, fairer, or more dear to me than Thou, my Savior, who is the source of all wonder. Beautiful Savior, indeed! Lord of all countries, you are a king!

Yours is the glory and honor, the acclaim and worship, now and forevermore.

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The sun is fair, the moonlight is much fairer, and the entire sparkling celestial host is fair; yet Jesus shines brighter and purer than all the angels Heav’n has to offer. There is no one nearer, fairer, or more dear to me than Thou, my Savior, who is the source of all loveliest beauty, both heavenly and earthly; none can be closer, fairer, or more dear to me than Thou, my Savior. What a lovely Savior you are. You are the ruler of all the worlds! Jesus Christ is both God’s Son and Man’s Son.

The original German text appears in Lutheran hymnals in the following translation.

Beautiful Savior, Son of God and Son of Man, monarch of creation, Son of God and Son of Man!

I would genuinely love Thee, and I would sincerely serve Thee, O Light of my soul, my pleasure, and my crown. The meadows are pretty, the forests are fair, and they are adorned with the flowers of blooming spring; Jesus is fairer, Jesus is purer, and He makes our sorrowing heart sing with joy.

(3-4)

Sunshine and moonlight are both beautiful, as are the brilliant stars in the sky; but Jesus shines brighter and purer than all the angels in the sky, because he is the Son of God. The most glorious Savior, Lord of the nations, Son of God and Son of Man ever created! Let all honor and glory, all praise and worship, now and forevermore, be Thine! And now, please listen to the Londonderry Choir play our song in conjunction with the music “Crusaders’ Hymn,” which is set to our hymn.

Background of Fairest Lord Jesus

According to folklore, German crusaders in the 12th century sung “Schoenster Herr Jesu” (“Fairest Lord Jesus”) as they marched into Palestine in order to combat Moslems. The hymn’s true authorship remains a mystery, regardless of whether or not it is true. ‘Muensterisch Gesangbuch’ (Muenster Songbook), a Catholic hymnal published in 1677 in the German city of Muenster, Westphalia, was the first publication to include it. German Jesuits in Muenster were able to date a handwritten manuscript of the Hymn to 1662 by examining the text.

Silesian Folksongs

Later, in 1842, the hymn “Fairest Lord Jesus” was included in a collection titled “Schlesiger Volkslieder” (Silesian Folksongs). This collection was published in Leipzig, Germany, in 1842 by Heinrich August Hoffman von Fallerslebein (1789-1874), who was born in the same year. His explanation was that he had written down both the words and the melody after hearing them sung by pious Protestant Silesian peasants in Glaz.

Richard Storrs Willis

During his doctoral studies in Germany, Richard Storrs Willis (1819-1900) came across the song “Fairest Lord Jesus.” Willis, a Yale alumni from 1841, returned to the United States in 1848 to take up the position of music critic at the New York Herald Tribune. Two years later, he wrote three stanzas, the first of which was “Fairest Lord Jesus,” which was set to the melody “Crusaders’ Hymn” (Crusaders’ Hymn). The hymn gained popularity in the United States because to a publication called “Church Chorals and Choir Studies.”

Joseph Augustus Seiss

Joseph Augustus Seiss, a Lutheran clergyman from New York City, adapted the song for use in Sunday School by evangelical Lutherans in 1873. Seiss’s translation contained two more stanzas, each of which began with the phrase “Beautiful Savior.” This version is still used by many Lutherans today. Seiss was born in 1823 in the Maryland town of Graceham to parents who were of Moravian descent. After graduating from Gettysburg College and Seminary of Pennsylvania in 1848, he went on to become a member of the Lutheran clergy.

The Lutheran Church of Pennsylvania appointed him to a number of high-ranking positions until his death, which occurred in 1904. As a finale, we hear Leontyne Price’s rendition of “Fairest Lord Jesus,” which was sung by the Choir of Men and Boys of St. Thomas Episcopal Church in New York City.

Background of the Tune

Additionally, Richard Storrs Willis has exceptional musical ability in addition to his tremendous writing abilities. His graduation studies brought him into contact with the great composer Felix Mendelssohn, with whom he struck up a personal bond that continues to this day. Among Mendelssohn’s Romantic masterpieces are the oratorio “Elijah” and the Symphony No. 5, “Reformation,” both of which are performed today. This symphony made extensive use of Martin Luther’s chorale “A Mighty Fortress” as well as the majestic Dresden “Amen” in its composition.

Thomas Church in Leipzig, where he composed sacred music masterpieces.

Willis Introduces Fairest Lord Jesus to the United States

Additionally, Richard Storrs Willis has exceptional musical ability in addition to his significant writing talents. A close connection with the renowned composer Felix Mendelssohn emerged when he was studying for his master degree. In addition to the oratorio “Elijah,” Mendelssohn’s romantic masterpieces include the Symphony No. 3, “Reformation,” and the Symphony No. 4, “Elijah.” A major usage of Martin Luther’s chorale, “A Mighty Fortress,” as well as the majestic Dresden “Amen” were heard in this symphony.

Thomas Church in Leipzig, where he made sacred music masterpieces.

“St. Elizabeth”

Richard Storrs Willis was a talented pianist in addition to his tremendous writing abilities. His graduation studies brought him into contact with the great composer Felix Mendelssohn, with whom he formed a strong connection. Mendelssohn’s Romantic masterpieces include the oratorio “Elijah” and the Symphony No. 3, “Reformation.” This symphony made extensive use of Martin Luther’s chorale “A Mighty Fortress” as well as the majestic Dresden “Amen” in its final movement. Mendelssohn was also a proponent of the works of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), who worked at St.

Devotion or Scripture Related to the Hymn

It is a lovely lyrical reflection on the essence of Jesus Christ, and it is entitled “Fairest Lord Jesus.” Take, for example, Philippians 2:5-11. “Christ Jesus, despite the fact that he was in the form of God, did not see his equality with God as something to be taken advantage of. He, on the other hand, emptied himself by taking the shape of a slave and being born in the likeness of a human. And as a result of being discovered in human form, he humbled himself and became submissive to the point of dying—even death on the cross.

So that at the mention of Jesus’ name, every knee in heaven, on earth, and beneath the earth will bow in reverence.

And now, please enjoy the magnificent performance by the Metropolitan Boys Choir, followed by the Eden Symphony Orchestra, of the Lutheran preacher Joseph Augustus Seiss’ translation of our German song.

Goodbye and Keep Singing

This lovely literary study on the essence of Jesus Christ is titled “Fairest Lord Jesus” (the fairest Jesus). For example, have a look at Philippians 2:1-5. Although he was in the form of God, Christ Jesus did not see his equality with God as something to be abused. His self-emptying process resulted in his adopting the shape of a slave and being born in the likeness of a human. Moreover, upon being discovered in human form, he humbled himself and became submissive to the point of death, even death on a cross.

Therefore, every knee should bow in heaven, on earth, and beneath the earth when the name of Jesus is said, In addition, every tongue should declare that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

The Metropolitan Boys Choir, followed by the Eden Symphony Orchestra, will deliver a magnificent rendition of the Lutheran preacher Joseph Augustus Seiss’s translation of our German hymn, which you may hear here.

Fairest Lord Jesus – written by 1842

JESUS, THE MOST HOLY OF ALL written in the year 1842 The Narrative This song is also referred to as the “Crusader’s Hymn” because, according to some, it was sung by German Crusaders on their trip to the Holy Land during the Middle Ages. However, there is no proof that the song existed earlier to 1842. This song makes no mention of persecution or of a crusade in any way shape or form. Moreover, it isn’t exactly the kind of hymn that would psychologically prepare one for going on a crusade! As an alternative, it expresses gratitude for a magnificent Savior.

  • but even more so, they cherished God the Creator!
  • The Song (in English) Read this hymn, and then use it to express your gratitude to God today!
  • Oh, Thou, the Son of God and man, Thee will I love and adore; Thou, the glory, joy, and crown of my soul, I give thee my heartfelt thanks and praise.
  • As beautiful as the sunshine, even more beautiful than the moonlight, and as beautiful as the entire sparkling celestial host; Jesus shines brighter, Jesus shines purer than all the angels heaven has to offer.

Beautiful Savior, indeed! Lord of all countries, you are a king! Son of God and Son of Man at the same time! Thine be the glory and honor, the acclaim and worship, now and forevermore.

Behind the Hymn: Fairest Lord Jesus ⋆ Diana Leagh Matthews

Fairest Lord Jesusis a hymn that is shrouded in mystery. The song’s creator and place of origin are both unknown. In Germany and other parts of Europe, the song appears to have begun as a traditional folk song. Some historians think the song dates back to the 12th century, when it was performed by the German crusaders on their long, perilous, and exhausting trek to the Holy Land, according to legend. It is known to as the Crusader’s Hymn as a result of this association. The statements, according to some historians, came from a variety of sources, including the Jesuit Order, Moravians during the anti-Reformation purge, and adherents of John Hus.

No one knows who was responsible for translating the song into English.

The hymn is also referred to as “Beautiful Savior” in some circles.

It’s possible that’s where the Crusader tale got its start.

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