Who Was The First Disciple Of Jesus Christ

Who were Jesus’ first disciples?

In what year did Jesus summon the first disciples who would follow him and serve as his special witnesses? When and where did he make his selection? Which ones were brothers, and which ones were not? The apostle John keeps a record of the names of the first five persons who were summoned to follow Jesus. John and Andrew were the first two persons who were invited by Christ to follow him as disciples (John 1:35 – 39). Then came Peter (also known as Simon Peter or Simon Peter, verses 40 – 42), followed by Philip (verses 43 – 44), and last Nathanael (verses 45 – 48).

It is recorded in the book of Matthewthen that James (a son of Zebedee and brother of John) was called (Matthew 4:21 – 22), followed by Matthew’s own summoning (Matthew 4:23 – 24).

According to the Bible, it is unknown in what sequence the last five of the original twelve disciples were called to special service.

At least seven different time periods appear to have occurred during which Jesus appears to have called his closest or first twelve apostles (disciples).

  • After his brother Andrew informed Peter of the Messiah’s arrival, Peter was summoned.
  • Jesus instructs his followers to cast a net.
  • James (son of Zebedee and brother of John) was summoned from his boat on the Sea of Galilee, where he was mending nets at the time.
  • The remaining disciples were summoned at a later point in time.
  • These men were named Peter and Andrew, James and John (the sons of Zebedee), James the son of Alphaeus, Judas brother of James (also known as LeBbaeus or Thaddaeus), and Simon the Cantaanite, among others (Simon the Zealot).
  • Several of the apostles were known to have lived in or around Capernaum at the time of their death.
  • James, John, Matthew, Andrew, Peter, and Philip were the disciples that lived in close proximity to one another.

Three of these lists are contained in the Gospels (Matthew 10:1 – 4, Mark 3:13 – 18, Luke 6:12 – 16), while the fourth list (which does not include Judas Iscariot) is found in the book of Acts (Acts 1:1 – 4). (Acts 1:12 – 13). Articles that are recommended

Who was the first disciple of Jesus Christ?

In the life of Jesus Christ, who was the very first disciple?

Jesus of Nazareth:

Throughout the New Testament of the Christian Bible, Jesus Christ serves as a primary figure. His supporters believe that he was born of a virgin and that he was sent by God to die for the sins of mankind, and that those who believe in him would spend eternity with him in heaven with him. Jesus began his three-and-a-half-year ministry at the age of 30 in order to spread the Gospel and inform the world about the Kingdom of God. During that time, Jesus traveled with a group of twelve disciples who were there to support him.

Answer and Explanation:

Throughout the New Testament of the Christian Bible, Jesus Christ is a key character. His supporters believe that he was born of a virgin and that he was sent by God to die for the sins of mankind, and that those who believe in him would spend eternity with him in heaven with God. The ministry of Jesus started when he was thirty years old, and it lasted three and a half years. He traveled around the world to proclaim the Gospel and inform people about the Kingdom of God. When Jesus traveled with 12 disciples, they were able to provide him with assistance throughout this period.

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The New Testament of the Christian Bible is dominated by the figure of Jesus Christ. His supporters believe that he was born of a virgin and that he was sent by God to die for the sins of mankind, and that those who believe in him would spend eternity with him in heaven. At the age of thirty, Jesus began a three-and-a-half-year mission to preach the Gospel and inform the world about the Kingdom of God, which lasted three and a half years. During that time, Jesus traveled with a group of 12 disciples who were there to support him.

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Jesus Christ is a key figure in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. His supporters believe that he was born of a virgin and that he was sent by God to die for the sins of mankind, and that those who accept him will spend eternity with him in heaven. At the age of thirty, Jesus began a three-and-a-half-year ministry to spread the Gospel and inform the world about the Kingdom of God. During that time, Jesus went with 12 disciples who were there to support him.

Mary, the First Disciple

“I am the Lord’s servant,” says the narrator. “I hope it comes to me as you have stated” (Luke 1:38). Despite the fact that she is arguably the most renowned woman who has ever lived, there is shockingly little information on her in the New Testament. Mary appears only in a few scenes from the Gospels and the first chapter of the book of Acts. Although these Marian texts are not in chronological sequence, they do demonstrate how swiftly devotion to the Virgin Mary evolved over the years when they are organized in a logical manner.

Mary occurs just three times in the book (3:21, 31-35) and is barely mentioned once more (6:1-6).

The amount of attention he is receiving means that he does not even have time to consume his food (3:20).

While they are on their way down to Capernaum, Mark fills in the gaps with stories of how Jesus dealt with scribes from Jerusalem who were unable to comprehend him (“he is possessed by Beelzebul”).

Given that he is trapped inside and surrounded by others, the following message must be delivered: “Your mother and brothers are waiting outside for you.” Because of Jesus’ statement (“Who are my mother and brothers?”), it raises the question of who actually constitutes his family at this time, when the Kingdom of God is being announced.

  • Nonetheless, it is recognized as the fundamental Marian scripture by many non-Catholics, probably as a reaction to the Catholic Church’s exaltation of Mary.
  • The people of Nazareth are taken aback by Jesus’ religious prominence, asking, “Where did he receive all this wisdom?” Isn’t he supposed to be a carpenter?
  • “Are his sisters not present with us?” As an answer to the villagers who had taken offense at the local carpenter turned preacher, Jesus compares himself to a prophet who is not recognized in his own territory, among his own family, or even in his own home, as the prophet Elijah was.
  • In Matthew, Mary is referred to as A fundamental shift in perspective occurs as a result of Matthew’s account of Jesus’ conception and birth, which was absent from Mark’s account.
  • A disturbing revelation reaches him that Mary is pregnant, but before he can take action to end the marriage by divorcing her, an angel appears to him in a dream and prevents him from doing so (Matthew 1:18-25).
  • Despite the fact that Matthew does not mention Mary’s reaction to God’s involvement, the conception serves to set the stage for Matthew’s portrayal of Mary throughout the mission of Jesus.
  • Therefore, when Matthew refers to Mark 3, he entirely ignores Mark 3:20-21, in which the family believes Jesus is insane and goes out to bring him back home.

Nonetheless, the family-choice sequence described in Mark 3:31-35 is preserved almost whole in Matthew 12:46-50: Jesus continues to give priority to followers who are linked to him as a result of their obedience to God’s desire.

As in Matthew’s infancy story, the mother of Jesus is just a minor character; in Luke’s infancy narrative, the virgin of Nazareth (Luke 1:26-27) is the central figure.

Mary receives an apparition from the angel Gabriel (1:30-33) in which he informs her that she is to be the mother of the Davidic Messiah, citing freely from 2 Samuel 7:12-16.

In Romans 1:3-4, Paul used comparable language (the Holy Spirit, power, and divine sonship) to describe the message of Jesus as the Son of David and the Son of God.

“Let it be done unto me according to your word,” she says in response to the command.

Following that, the Lucan Mary demonstrates her discipleship in two ways.

Christian disciples, as part of their whole response to the gospel, do more than only absorb and hold on to what God has revealed; they also share it to others.

Mary is referred to as “blessed among women,” in the same way that the heroic women deliverers of Israel, Jael and Judith (Judges 5:24; Judith 13:18), were referred to.

Elizabeth recognizes that Mary’s womb is uniquely fruitful and blesses her as the mother of the Lord, recognizing that Mary is the mother of the Lord (Luke 1:41-44).

It is possible that all future generations will refer to Mary as blessed (1:48), and they will do so in faithfulness to Elizabeth’s prophetic acknowledgment of her duties as the mother of the Lord and a sincere disciple of Jesus Christ.

In that song, Mary conveys the good news that she has delivered to Elizabeth and her sister, Elizabeth.

On the one hand, God’s gift of Jesus gives strength to Israel, exalts the lowly, and provides food for the hungry; on the other hand, it scatters the haughty, brings down the powerful, and sends the wealthy away empty-handed.

As a result, the Magnificat has become more popular than any other biblical chapter, serving as an emblem of hope and a symbol of God’s concern for the impoverished and underprivileged all across the globe.

For Luke, she is the most important character, second only to God.

This wording recalls the language of Genesis 37:11, Daniel 4:28 (Greek), and Daniel 7:28, in which a visionary reflects on a cryptic revelation, of which only a portion has been fully comprehended.

The final scene of the Lucan infancy narrative, which takes place when Jesus is 12 years old, demonstrates her problem.

In the life of a disciple, the issue of accepting God’s incomprehensible will in faith is a constant struggle.

The moms and brothers who come to Jesus in search of him are no longer in opposition to the family that is formed through discipleship.

Indeed, the mothers and brothers survive into the early days of the Church, as they are listed alongside the Twelve and the women in Acts 1:13-14 as those who are looking forward to the Pentecostal arrival of the Holy Spirit.

Although they differ in content from the accounts recorded in the first three Gospels, the fundamental theological issues are the same.

Similarly to the mother and brothers arriving to look for Jesus in the basic Marcan scene, the mother’s implicit request—”They have no wine”—exerts a family claim on Jesus.

Nonetheless, Mary’s response to the angel in Luke 1:38, “Let it be done to me according to your word,” is repeated by the mother of Jesus in John: “Do whatever he tells you.” Similarly, the second Johannine scene (John 19:25-27), which occurs at the foot of the cross, confirms the notion that Mary’s final reaction at Cana reflected the kind of obedience that was characteristic of disciples.

They include two characters who have been named but whose personal names have not been provided by John: the mother of Jesus and the disciple whom he admires, who are among the most important of all.

This is John’s method of dealing with the question of “Who is my mother and who are my brothers?” If in Mark and Matthew there was a contrast between two families, one based on nature and the other based on discipleship, in John (as in Luke) the natural mother is brought into the family of discipleship in a preeminent way, because she is now the mother of the most perfect disciple, who becomes Jesus’ brother, and thus into the family of discipleship as well.

God granted Mary many privileges, which will be recognized in later theology, but all of them are derivatives of those already found in the sparse New Testament references.

“Mary is held up as an example to the faithful for the way in which in her own individual life she completely and responsibly received the message of God and accomplished it,” remarked Pope Paul VI plainly.

“She is deserving of imitation because she was the first and most perfect of Christ’s disciples,” says the Bible.

Father Raymond E. Brown (d. 1998) was Auburn Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Biblical Studies at Union Theological Seminary, New York.This first appeared in the pages ofSt. Anthony Messenger.

The Lord is my master, and I am a servant of the Lord.” So, as you have stated, may it come to me (Luke 1:38). The New Testament contains very little information about her, despite the fact that she is arguably the most famous woman who ever lived. She may be the most famous woman who ever lived, but she is surprisingly underrepresented in the text. A few Gospel scenes and the first chapter of Acts are the only places where Mary is mentioned by name. Although these Marian passages are not in chronological order, they do demonstrate how quickly devotion to the Virgin Mary developed over the centuries when they are presented in this manner.

  • Mark’s Gospel is generally regarded as the earliest of the four Gospel accounts of Jesus’ ministry.
  • (6:1-6).
  • The amount of attention he is receiving prevents him from getting any food (3:20).
  • Jesus’ dealings with scribes from Jerusalem, who also failed to comprehend him (“he is possessed by Beelzebul”), fills in the gaps left by their journey down to Capernaum, according to Mark.
  • “Your mother and brothers are outside asking for you,” someone must tell him because he is trapped inside a building surrounded by people.
  • As his biological family gathers outside, Jesus turns to face those inside and declares, “Here are my mother and my brothers.” Every person who carries out God’s will is my brother and sister, as well as my mother.
  • (See also: Many non-Catholics, perhaps in reaction to Catholics’ elevation of Mary to a higher status, consider it the fundamental Marian text.
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Astonished by Jesus’ religious prominence, the people of Nazareth wonder: “Where did this fellow get all this wisdom?” Not a carpenter, isn’t he?

He’s the son of Mary and the brother of James and Joses, and the nephew of Judas and Simon, right?

Another jarring passage that leads to a positive appreciation of Mary, thank goodness!

Matthew’s account of Jesus’ conception and birth, which was absent from Mark’s account, causes an important shift in perspective.

The news that Mary is pregnant reaches him as a shock, but before he can take action to end the marriage by divorcing her, an angel appears to him in a dream (Matthew 1:18-25).

Despite the fact that Matthew does not mention Mary’s reaction to God’s intervention, the conception serves to set the stage for Matthew’s treatment of Mary throughout the ministry of Christ.

Thus, when Matthew refers to Mark 3, he entirely ignores Mark 3:20-21, in which the family believes Jesus is insane and sets out to bring him back home with them.

Nonetheless, the family-choice sequence described in Mark 3:31-35 is preserved almost whole in Matthew 12:46-50: ” When it comes to disciples who are linked to him by fulfilling God’s will, Jesus still gives precedence to them.

Whereas the mother of Jesus had only a minor role in the Matthean infancy narrative, the virgin of Nazareth (Luke 1:26-27) is the central character in the Lucan infancy tale.

Mary receives an apparition from the angel Gabriel (1:30-33) in which he informs her that she is going to be the mother of the Davidic Messiah, citing freely from 2 Samuel 7:12-16.

When Paul describes the message of Jesus as Son of David and Son of God in Romans 1:3-4, he used comparable imagery (Holy Spirit, strength, divine sonship) to make the connection between them.

“Let everything be done unto me according to your word,” she says in response to the challenge.

In the next section, the Lucan Mary demonstrates her discipleship in two different ways: In order to deliver the good news with her relative Elizabeth, she must first go quickly.

Elizabeth, who is under the influence of John the Baptist while still in her pregnancy, is moved to prophesy in honor of Mary as a result of Mary’s appearance.

Israel’s wombs would be blessed with fruitfulness, according to Moses, provided they listened to God’s word and obeyed the commandments of the law (Deuteronomy 28:1,4).

However, Mary’s response to God’s message at the Annunciation has an additional depth beyond what Moses had in mind—a gospel dimension that Elizabeth understands when she thanks Mary a second time in 1:45 for her faith in God (and thus having met the criterion of discipleship).

Secondly, by thanking God in the Magnificat, Mary demonstrates the entire extent of her discipleship (1:46-55).

However, Mary interprets the identity of Jesus, namely, that he is the Messiah and the Son of God, into the significance of his advent.

Mary is looking forward to the gospel of her son, who, although being declared by God as Divine Son (3:22), proclaimed himself in words of benefits for the poor, the hungry, and the mournful, and woes for the affluent, the satiated, and the revelers.

According to Matthew (2:11–14, 21), Mary is only mentioned as a passive object of care in the events immediately after the birth of Jesus.

While others are awestruck by the wonderful news of the birth of the Messiah and Lord, Mary meticulously preserves all of these events, interpreting them in her heart as she does so (Luke 2:19).

However, despite what has been shown to her, the course of Jesus’ life will be one of difficulty and decision, as Simeon predicts symbolically in Luke 2:34-35 in terms of a sword going through Mary’s soul.

Neither she nor Joseph can comprehend his behavior in the Temple or his statement that he must be attending to his Father’s affairs (2:49-50).

This continual challenge was handled by Mary, as seen by the Lucan reworking of the fundamental ministry scene we witnessed for the first time in the Gospel of Mark.

The finest instances of people who hear God’s message and act on it are found in Luke 8:19-21, the group that is analogous to the parabolic seed planted in excellent soil stated a few lines earlier (8:15), namely, those “who, hearing the word, keep it fast.” Indeed, the mothers and brothers survive until the early days of the Church, as they are included among the Twelve and the women in Acts 1:13-14 as those who are looking forward to the Pentecostal arrival of the Holy Spirit in the first century.

Mary’s role in the gospel of John However, despite the absence of an infancy story, there are two ministry sequences in this Gospel that feature Mary.

Jesus’ mother and brothers are attending a wedding at Cana, a scenario in which he transitions from home life to public preaching (John 2:1-12).

According to Jesus, his rejection of that claim in the form of “My hour has not yet come” is analogous to his mother’s complaint about his behavior when he was 12, “Did you not know that I must be about my Father’s business,” he said.

Nonetheless, Mary’s response to the angel in Luke 1:38, “Let it be done to me according to your word,” is repeated by Jesus’ mother in John: “Do whatever he tells you.” The second Johannine incident, which takes place at the foot of the cross (John 19:25-27), reveals that Mary’s final attitude at Cana mirrored the kind of obedience that was distinctive of followers at that time.

  • They include two characters who have been referenced but whose personal names have not been provided by John: the mother of Jesus and the disciple whom he admires, who are among the most prominent of them.
  • This is John’s method of dealing with the question of “Who is my mother and who are my brothers?
  • God granted Mary several privileges, which would be recognized in later theology, but all of them are derivatives of those already found in the few New Testament allusions to Mary.
  • As Pope Paul VI put it succinctly: “Mary is held up as an example to the faithful because of the way in which, in her own individual life, she completely and responsibly accepted God’s word and performed it.

The fact that she was the earliest and most flawless of Christ’s disciples makes her deserving of imitation.”

Matthew in the Bible

“I am a servant of the Lord. “May it come to pass for me as you have stated” (Luke 1:38). Despite the fact that she is arguably the most famous woman to have ever lived, there is surprisingly little information about her in the New Testament. Mary appears only in a few scenes from the Gospels and the first chapter of Acts. Nonetheless, these Marian passages, which have been arranged in a logical chronological order, demonstrate how quickly devotion to the Virgin Mary has grown over time. In the Gospel of Mark, Mary is referred to as Mark’s Gospel is generally considered to be the earliest of the four Gospel accounts of Jesus’ ministry.

  1. The basic scene depicts a turning point in Jesus’ life: He is transitioning from his Nazareth family circle to a more active teaching and healing career centered at Peter’s house in Capernaum.
  2. His worried family, who is concerned about his strange behavior (“he is beside himself”), sets out to bring him back to their home.
  3. After immediately addressing the second misunderstanding, Jesus does not address the first until the family arrives at the lakeside house (3:31-35).
  4. “Here are my mother and my brothers,” Jesus says as his biological family gathers outside.
  5. Despite this, many non-Catholics regard it as the fundamental Marian text, perhaps as a reaction to the Catholic Church’s elevation of Mary.
  6. Astonished by Jesus’ religious prominence, the citizens of Nazareth wonder: “Where did this fellow get all this wisdom?” Isn’t he a carpenter by trade?
  7. “Why aren’t his sisters here with us?” In response to the townspeople who have taken offense at the local carpenter-turned-preacher, Jesus compares himself to a prophet who is not honored in his own region, among his own relatives, or even in his own home.

Mary is mentioned in Matthew.

Joseph is married to Mary, but he has not yet brought her into his home.

According to the angel, Mary’s conception was conceived by the Holy Spirit (not a male), and her child, who will be named Jesus, will save his people from their sins and embody God’s presence with us (Emmanuel).

Surely, when Jesus began his ministry of proclaiming God’s kingdom, this extraordinarily fortunate mother would have understood what he was getting himself into.

When Jesus returns to Nazareth (Matthew 13:54-58), he acknowledges that he is not honored in his own region and in his own house, but he makes no mention of being dishonored by his own family.

In Luke/Acts, Mary is referred to as In contrast to the image of Mary in Mark and Matthew, which runs from dark to neutral, this two-volume masterpiece shows her in considerably warmer tones.

She and Joseph have been married in this setting as well (although the circumstance is only implied indirectly), but they have not yet lived together.

When Mary inquires as to how this is to be possible given her status as a virgin, the angel responds in what Luke’s readers would recognize as the language of Christian preaching: “The holy Spirit will come upon you; the power of the Most High will overshadow you; and as a result, the child will be called holy, the Son of God” (1:34-35).

  1. In a similar vein, Luke presents Mary as the first person to hear the gospel message.
  2. She thus meets the criteria we found in Mark for the family of disciples: “Whoever accomplishes God’s will is.mother to me,” as Jesus says.
  3. First and foremost, she makes a hasty trip to her cousin Elizabeth in order to convey the good news.
  4. Elizabeth, under the influence of John the Baptist in her womb, is moved to prophesy in honor of Mary as a result of Mary’s entrance.
  5. Moses had predicted that if Israel listened to God’s message, the wombs of Israelite women would be blessed with procreation (Deuteronomy 28:1,4).
  6. However, Mary’s response to God’s message at the Annunciation had an additional depth beyond what Moses had in mind—a gospel dimension that Elizabeth understands when she thanks Mary a second time in 1:45 for having believed (and thus having met the criterion of discipleship).
  7. Second, by thanking God in the Magnificat, Mary demonstrates her commitment to discipleship to the greatest extent (1:46-55).

The angel revealed to Mary who Jesus is, namely, that he is the Messiah and the Son of God; nevertheless, Mary interprets this identification in terms of what his arrival entailed.

Despite the fact that God declared him as Divine Son (3:22), Jesus proclaimed himself in terms of benefits for the poor, the hungry, and the grieving, and sorrows for the affluent, the contented, and revelers.

Mary is only mentioned as a passive object of care in Matthew’s accounts of the events immediately following the birth of Jesus (2:11, 14 and 21).

While others are awestruck by the wonderful news of the birth of the Messiah and Lord, Mary carefully preserves and interprets all of these events in her heart (Luke 2:19).

However, despite what has been shown to her, the course of Jesus’ life will be one of difficulty and decision, as Simeon predicts symbolically in Luke 2:34-35 in terms of a sword going through her soul.

She and Joseph are baffled by his behavior at the Temple and his response that he must be attending to his Father’s business (2:49-50).

The fact that Mary was able to meet the continual struggle is demonstrated in the Lucan version of the fundamental ministry scenario that we saw for the first time in Mark.

The finest instances of people who hear God’s message and act on it are found in Luke 8:19-21, the group that is analogous to the parabolic seed planted in excellent soil stated a few lines earlier (8:15), namely, those “who, hearing the word, hold it fast.” Indeed, the mothers and brothers survive until the early days of the Church, since they are listed among the Twelve and the women in Acts 1:13-14 as among the believers anticipating the Pentecostal arrival of the Holy Spirit.

Mary’s role in John’s life Despite the fact that this Gospel does not have an infancy narrative, it does contain two ministry episodes that involve Mary.

While at Cana, which represents Jesus’ transition from home life to public ministry, his mother and brothers are guests at a wedding (John 2:1-12).

It is akin to the Lucan Jesus’ response to his mother’s concern about his conduct when he was 12 years old: “Did you not realize that I must be about my Father’s business?” In terms of Jesus’ earthly family, both responses emphasize the importance of the duty assigned to him by the heavenly Father who sent him.

  • In the book of Revelation, the hour has arrived (13:1), and Jesus is accomplishing the job that the Father has given him to complete (19:28-30), with a number of disciples who have remained faithful until the end.
  • Jesus is forming a family of disciples by making the former the mother of that disciple and the latter his own mother’s son.
  • God granted Mary several advantages, which would be recognized by later theology, but all of them are derivatives of those already present in the limited New Testament allusions.
  • Pope Paul VI put it succinctly: “Mary is held up as an example to the faithful for the way in which she in her own individual life completely and responsibly embraced the message of God and accomplished it.

The reason Mary ought to be emulated is that she was the earliest and most perfect of Christ’s disciples.”

Did Matthew write the Gospel of Matthew?

The author of the Gospel of Matthew is unknown, however Matthew the Apostle is widely regarded as the book’s primary author. According to the early church, he composed it, and the attribution “according to Matthew” was probably first inserted around the time of the first century AD. Despite the fact that there are compelling reasons against his authorship, no alternate author has been identified.

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Was Andrew the first disciple of Jesus?

Philip was the first disciple to whom Jesus said the words “Follow me,” and he was the first to respond. Bethsaida was where Philip grew up, which was the same city as Andrew and Peter (see John 1:44). Andrew, on the other hand, had chosen to accompany Jesus the day before, rather than waiting to be summoned. The Bible claims that two of John’s followers had followed Jesus together, and it names one of these as Andrew, according to the text. As a result, Andrew was one of the first two to arrive.

  • Let’s give it a go.
  • Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, was one of the two who listened in on John’s speech and then followed him.
  • He initially seeks for his own brother Simon and informs him that they have located the Messias, which is, in this case, the Christ, according to the translation.
  • Moreover, when Jesus saw him, he said to him, “Thou art Simon the son of Jona; you shall henceforth be known as Cephas,” which means “stone” in the Greek language.
  • The day after, Jesus would go out towards Galilee, where he would come across Philip, whom he would instruct to “follow me.” (King James Version, John 1:43) Nathanael is the Fifth Disciple of Jesus Christ.
  • Nathanael confronts him and asks, “How do you know who I am?” Jesus responded by saying to him, “It is written, ‘It is written,'” I saw thee before Philip summoned thee, when thou wast under the fig tree, before Philip called thee.
  • Then Jesus turned to the twelve and said, “Will ye also walk away?” (John 6:67, King James Version) The other three gospels tell the story of Matthew’s vocation as a prophet.
  • (Matthew 9:9, King James Version)And as he walked by, he spotted Levi the son of Alphaeus seated at the customs reception desk, and he said to him, “Follow me.” And he rose to his feet and followed him.
  • Aside from Andrew, who had joined Jesus without receiving a call, no other disciples are explicitly named as having been called.
  • And as Jesus walked down the shore of the Sea of Galilee, he noticed two brothers, Simon named Peter and Andrew his brother, putting a net into the water.

And he tells them, “Follow me, and I will create you men who fish for men.” (Matthew 4:18-19, King James Version) And as he continued his journey, he came across another pair of brothers, James the son of Zebedee and John his brother, who were aboard a ship with Zebedee their father, mending their nets; and he called to them.

Andrew’s following of Jesus would have given John little reason to keep his brother’s identity a secret if it had been James; however, John’s modesty and the fact that John appears to have had personal knowledge of Andrew’s following of Jesus imply that the other disciple was none other than John himself.

The conclusion is that Andrew and John were Jesus’ earliest disciples, who both followed him together after John the Baptist’s testimony proclaimed Jesus as the Messiah.

When and who was the first disciple to truly believe Jesus’ claims

The question’s wording is a little difficult since it makes the assumption that the first believer was a disciple. It may also presume a certain gender at times. As a result, I’ve offered three solutions, although they are listed in the order in which they are believed to be true. The first group of guards is stationed at the tomb. The second is Mary Magdalene, and the other ladies are most likely to follow. The third group consists of male disciples.

FIRST GUARDS

The way the question is phrased suggests that the first believer was a disciple, which makes it a little difficult to answer correctly. A certain gender may also be assumed. To that end, although providing three replies, I have done so in the order of seeming belief rather than in the order of truth. The tomb is guarded by a group of men first. It is likely that the other ladies are Mary Magdalene and Elizabeth. The third group of disciples are the males in the congregation.

SECOND WOMEN

What about the genuine disciples? Do female disciples count as disciples? If this is the case, Mary Magdalene would be the next person to be considered. She arrives at the sepulchre to anoint Christ, only to discover that his body has been removed. She informs Peter and John, who had arrived to find the body gone, that the body has indeed been found, but that they do not believe in the resurrection at that time. On the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene arrives at the sepulchre early in the morning, when it is still dark, and witnesses the stone being removed from the sepulchre.

John 20:1-2 (NIV) Then came in the other disciple who had arrived first at the sepulchre, and he saw and believed what he had heard.

Consider the possibility that the corpse had been taken.

20:9 (John 20:9, NIV) Mary, on the other hand, remains.

THIRD MALE DISCIPLES

If one is interested in learning about the first male disciple to accept that Jesus is the Messiah, one should go no farther than Luke 24 and the two travelers to Emmaus. Without their realizing it, Jesus is explaining the scriptures to them, finishing with the question they are asking themselves. Isn’t it proper for Christ to have endured these sufferings and then entered into his glory? Luke 24:26 (NIV) However, it was not until the breaking of the bread that insight was provided.

In the meantime, when he was having dinner with them, he took bread and blessed it, then broke it and distributed it to them. After then, their eyes were awakened, and they recognized him; after that, he vanished from their sight. Luke 24:30-31 (KJV)

Meet James: The First Apostle to Die for Jesus

The apostle James was given a special distinction by Jesus Christ in the form of a privileged position. As one of Jesus’ twelve selected disciples, he was also one of three individuals who belonged to Christ’s inner circle, a position he held until his death. The other members of the group were James’ brother John and Simon Peter. Another notable accomplishment of the apostle James was his status as the first person to die as a martyr.

Apostle James

  • In addition to being known as:James of Zebedee
  • Nicknamed “Boanerges” or “Son of Thunder” by Jesus
  • In addition to being known for:James accompanied Jesus as one of the 12 chosen disciples. In addition to being the brother of John, this apostle James (because there were two) was a member of Christ’s inner circle of three, which also included Peter and John. He was the first apostle to be murdered for his beliefs after Jesus’ resurrection, and he was the first to preach the gospel following Jesus’ ascension. Several biblical references are provided, including: the apostle James, who is named in all four Gospels, and his martyrdom, which is recorded in Acts 12:2
  • Zebedee’s father, Salome’s mother, and brother, John, are all named Zebedee. His hometown was Capernaum, on the shores of the Sea of Galilee. Fisherman and follower of Jesus Christ, respectively. James was a devoted disciple of Jesus, and this was one of his greatest strengths. He appears to have possessed exceptional personal traits that are not described in Scripture, as evidenced by the fact that his character earned him the status as one of Jesus’ favorites. James’s weaknesses include that he may be impulsive and unintelligent when dealing with his brother John. When it came to earthly problems, he did not always apply the gospel

Who Was the Apostle James?

James was one of the first twelve disciples to be called by the name of Jesus. When Jesus called the brothers, James and John were working as fishermen on the Sea of Galilee with their father Zebedee at the time. When they heard about the young rabbi, they promptly abandoned their father and his business to join him. James was most likely the oldest of the two brothers, given he is usually mentioned first in the narrative. There were three occasions in which Jesus asked James, John, and Peter to see occurrences that no one else was there for: the raising of Jairus’ daughter from the dead (Mark 5:37-47), the transfiguration (Matthew 17:1-3), and Jesus’ anguish in the Garden of Gethsemane (Matthew 26:53-58).

James, on the other hand, was not above making mistakes.

As a result, they were given the moniker “Boanerges,” which means “sons of thunder.” The mother of James and John also went over the line by pleading with Jesus to give her boys special roles in his kingdom, which he refused.

Approximately 44 A.D., under the orders of King Herod Agrippa I of Judea, he was slain with the sword as part of a broad persecution of the early church.

Life Lessons

Despite all he had saw and experienced as a follower of Jesus, James’ faith remained weak until after the resurrection of Jesus. When he and his brother requested Jesus for the pleasure of sitting beside him in glory, Jesus responded by promising them only a share in his suffering (Mark 10:35–45), which they refused to accept. In this lesson, they learned that the greatest calling of a servant of Jesus is to serve others, not themselves. James realized that following Jesus Christ can result in adversity, persecution, and even death, but that the prize is eternal life with him in the presence of the Father.

Key Verses

Luke 9:52-56 (KJV) Then he dispatched messengers ahead of him, who went into a Samaritan hamlet to prepare things for him; nevertheless, the inhabitants in the village were not welcoming of him, because he was on his way to Jerusalem. After seeing this, the disciples James and John asked the Lord whether they should bring down fire from heaven in order to kill them. However, Jesus turned around and reprimanded them, and they fled to another village to seek refuge. (NIV) Matthew 17:1-3 is a biblical passage.

He was transfigured in front of them while they were there.

Just as they were about to leave, Moses and Elijah appeared in front of them, chatting with Jesus.

(NIV) Acts 12:1 and 2 It was at this time when King Herod detained certain members of the church with the intent of persecuting them, according to the Bible. He ordered the execution of John’s brother, James, with the blade in his hand. (NIV)

Who were the first apostles of Jesus?

When Mark Twain jokingly dismissed the testimony of Novel of Mormon witnesses in his 1872 book “Roughing It,” he was expressing his belief in the Book of Mormon. The Whitmer family’s testimony would not have made me feel any more content or at ease than it did. ” It’s a hilarious observation, and Twain, a professional comedian, was clearly looking for laughs when he said it, but his joke doesn’t come close to representing a meaningful engagement with the historical material. But it hasn’t stopped detractors of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from adopting Twain’s witticism as if it were a serious and acceptable intellectual answer to the church’s claims.

Many of these detractors — as I write, I’m looking at a website that utilizes Twain’s remark as proof against Mormonism — are evangelical Christians who hold conservative views.

Consider the apostles of the early Christian church, for example: Peter and Andrew were brothers who were both Galilean fishermen from the little hamlet of Bethsaida, which was also the likely home of the apostle and fisherman Philip.

Peter, on the other hand, had relocated to the equally small town of Capernaum, approximately six miles away, where he joined forces with James (often referred to as “James the Greater,” to differentiate him from the other apostle James) and John, the sons of Zebedee, to start a modest fishing company.

  1. Matthew, also known as Levi, worked as a tax collector in the town of Capernaum.
  2. However, because Levi is also identified as a son of Alphaeus in Mark 2:14, it is plausible that Matthew and James the Less were brothers as well.
  3. Bartholomew, who is most likely to be connected with Nathanael, appears to have been a companion of Philip, who was from the little hamlet of Cana in Galilee, according to the Gospel of Matthew.
  4. Simon Zelotes, also known as the “Zealot,” was most likely from the shores of Galilee and was given the nickname to distinguish him from Simon Peter.
  5. Although Judas Iscariot was the only original Twelve disciple who was not from Galilee, some scholars believe that his alienation from the other eleven Galilean disciples — including Jesus of Nazareth — may have played a factor in his betrayal of Jesus at the very least.
  6. For example, in Acts 6:1-6, Greek-speaking Jews from outside Palestine express their dissatisfaction with the treatment they have received from their Palestinian Jewish leaders.

Without a doubt, the original twelve disciples of Jesus Christ, who were selected from a small geographical area along northern Israel’s shore of the Sea of Galilee, in a backwater sector of the distant and small Roman province of Judea, were closely bound together by kinship and business ties, as well as by previous acquaintance.

  • 44, these were the men selected to spread the gospel of Jesus Christ across the world.
  • Andrew is said to have preached across what is now Ukraine and southern Russia before dying in Greece, according to tradition.
  • Bartholomew, Jude, Simon the Zealot, and Thomas were among the apostles who preached and died in Armenia, Iran, and India, respectively.
  • James, the son of Alphaeus, was most likely killed in Egypt.
  • “What is it about them that they don’t speak our language?” “Does this look like a Jewish temple?” Given that the Christian message was intended to be spread over the entire globe through prophets and apostles, it may seem unusual that Jesus picked only Palestinian Jews to carry it out.

Professor of Arabic studies at Brigham Young University, Daniel Peterson also created the Middle Eastern Texts Initiative, directsMormonScholarsTestify.org, chairsmormoninterpreter.com, blogs daily atpatheos.com/blogs/danpeterson, and is the only speaker in this interview.

Chapter 16: The Chosen Twelve

  1. Judas Lebbeus Thaddeus, a.k.a. Judas Lebbeus Thaddeus. When it comes to Luke 6:16 and Acts 1:13, this Judas (not Iscariot) is referred to as “the brother of James” in the canonical translation of the Bible. Italics indicate that the words “the brother” have been added to the original text as a result of the translation. This section has been updated to read “the son of James” in each occasion, with italics denoting the significance of each word added in the original. “Judas of James” is the name of the character in the original. Neither we nor anybody else knows whose James is being discussed here, nor do we know if the Judas who is being referenced here is the son, the brother, or some other related of the nameless James. The Defined Meaning of the Word “Apostle.” — “In addition, the title ‘Apostle’ carries a special significance and sanctity
  2. It has been bestowed by God on a select group of people who have been called and ordained as’special witnesses of the name of Christ throughout the world,’ thus distinguishing themselves from other church officers in the duties of their calling (Doc. and Cov. 107:23). In its etymology, the term ‘apostle’ is the English counterpart of the Greek word apostolos, which refers to a messenger or an envoy, or more precisely, ‘one who has been dispatched.’ As a result, it indicates that the person who is properly addressed speaks and acts not on his or her own behalf, but on behalf of a higher power from whom he or she has received a commission
  3. Thus in this sense, the title is that of a servant, rather than that of a superior. In relation to His ministry in the flesh, even the Christ, however, is referred to as an Apostle (Hebrews 3:1), and this designation is supported by His repeated proclamation that He came to earth “not to execute His own will, but that of the Father, by whom He was sent.” Despite the fact that an apostle is primarily regarded as an envoy or ambassador, his authority is immense, as is the responsibility that comes with it, since he speaks in the name of a power greater than his own—the name of the One who has designated him as His unique witness. In the event that one of the Twelve Apostles is assigned to minister in a stake, mission, or other division of the Church, or to labor in a region where no Church organization has been established, he represents the First Presidency and has the authority to do whatever is necessary to further the work of the Lord. His responsibilities include preaching the Gospel, administering the ordinances of the Church, and bringing the business of the Church into order wherever he is appointed. Since this specific vocation is so sacred, it is not appropriate to use the title ‘Apostle’ carelessly as the usual or ordinary form of address accorded to living persons who have been called to this position. Unless there is a specific reason to use the more sacred term “Twelve Apostles,” the current quorum or council of the Twelve Apostles (as it exists in the Church today) is better referred to as “Quorum of the Twelve,” “Council of the Twelve,” or simply “Twelve,” rather than “Twelve Apostles,” except when a specific occasion justifies the use of the more sacred term. The title “Apostle” should not be used as a prefix to the name of any member of the Council of the Twelve
  4. Rather, such a person should be addressed or spoken of as “Brother-,” or “Elder -,” and when necessary or desirable, such as when announcing his presence in a public assembly, an explanatory clause may be added, such as “Elder -,” one of the Twelve.” — From the author’s article “The Honor and Dignity of Priesthood,” published in Improvement Era, Vol. 17, No. 5, pp. 409–10
  5. And “Of Alpheus” or “Son of Alpheus” is a title that means “of Alpheus.” — The wordson have been given by the translators in all Bible texts that refer to “James son of Alpheus” (Matthew 10:3, Mark 3:18, Luke 6:15, Acts 1:13), and as a result, the wordson are appropriately initalicized in all of these passages. It is written as “James of Alpheus,” which translates as “James of Alpheus.” In support of the notion that the James talked of was not the son of Alpheus, it is important to note that the wordsonhave been added in the translation of other sections, in all of whichitalicsare used to denote the words provided, for example, “Jamesthe sonof Zebedee” (Matthew 10:2
  6. SeeMark 3:17). Take a look at this in relation to On the preceding page, there was a note 1
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Mary Was The First Disciple

First and foremost, Mary was a disciple. Luke 1:26-38 and 46-56 are examples of biblical quotations. At the time of her betrothal to Joseph, Mary was still a young girl of around fourteen years old. The place where she resided was Nazareth, a dusty backwater of a hamlet in the Galilee. It was a place that was well-known for creating troublemakers with no account. Once upon a time, a messenger from God appeared to Mary and made an astounding proposition to her. The angel informed her that God had chosen her to conceive and bear God’s Son, whom she would name Jesus, and that she would be the mother of God’s Son.

  • It wasn’t like she was anything special; she was simply a regular Jewish girl who had recently been engaged.
  • She was frightened by the presence of this supernatural emissary.
  • What do you think her parents would think?
  • What was the reason for God’s selection of her?
  • Her humility and faith were struck by the angel’s response: “Due to the presence of the Holy Spirit on you and the power of the Most High enveloping you, the child who will be born will be holy and will be addressed as “Son of God” (the Son of God).
  • Nothing will be impossible when God is involved ” (Luke 1:35-37).
  • “For nothing will be impossible with God,” said the angel in his final phrase, which helped convince Mary.

God responded positively to Mary’s “Yes.” She took a leap of faith, trusting that God was in complete control of the situation.

It is regrettable that Mary has received such little attention in our religious heritage.

However, the fact is that Mary is essential to God’s purpose to redeem the world, and she has a special place in it.

In the life of the One who is rescuing the world from its sins, Mary, like any other mother, played a crucial part in his development.

When God picked Mary, he made an excellent decision.

Mary was transformed into a living channel of grace for the entire world.

Mary’s faith and sacrificial participation made it possible for God to complete his work on earth.

Grace ushered in a new era in the world that God adores.

Each and every baptized Christian has been selected and called by God to be like Mary in some way.

Christ is born in your heart, and as a result, you bear him into the world and make him available to others.

Moreover, God comes to us with the conviction that “nothing is impossible with God,” just as Mary did (Luke 1:37).

The song of Mary becomes our song as we strive to live as Christ’s representatives in the world, with God’s assistance: ‘My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant.’ Surely, from this day forward, all generations will refer to me as blessed, since the Mighty One has done great things for me, and his name is sacred.

It is his charity that is extended to those who have feared him from generation to generation.

In his reign, he has deposed the mighty from their thrones and exalted the poor; he has suffocated the hungry with excellent things while sending the wealthy away empty-handed.

It is in recollection of his kindness that he has aided his servant Israel, in accordance with the promise he gave to our forefathers, Abraham, and their offspring for all of time.’

Bible Gateway passage: Matthew 4:18-22 – New International Version

18As Jesus was walking alongside the Sea of Galilee, B)”>(B)he came across two brothers, Simon named Peter C)”>(C)and his brother Andrew, who were travelling in the other direction. They were fishing, so they were tossing a net into the lake to catch some fish. “Come, follow me,” D) says the narrator “‘And I’ll send you out to fish for people,’ Jesus said to the disciples. 20At that point, they abandoned their nets and pursued him. E) The word “e” refers to the letter “e” in the word “equality.” “>(E)21After then, he came across two more brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, who he recognized.

As soon as Jesus called them,22they jumped out of the boat and followed him, abandoning their father in the process.

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The Gospel of Matthew 4:13–22; Mark 1:16–20; Luke 4:31a (Matthew) MT —And leaving Nazareth Between Matthew 4:12 and Matthew 4:13, a period of time has elapsed. Following His violent rejection by the people of Nazareth, who attempted to assassinate Him (see Luke 4:16–30), Jesus’ sojourn in Nazareth came to an abrupt conclusion. (Luke) LK — (Luke) LK He traveled down the mountain MT —and lived at Capernaum, which is near the sea. He chose to live in this significant trading port at the northern end of the Sea of Galilee, which was on a major trade route.

A comparison of the gospels demonstrates that Christ had previously spent a significant amount of time in Capernaum ministering.

This designation was in use even during the time of Isaiah since Galilee was located on the main road by which all Gentiles entered and exited Israel.

According to Matthew, the prophesy given is found in Isaiah 9:1–2.

It was at that point that Jesus began to preach and to declare, “This marks the beginning of His public ministry.” Take note that his message was a carbon copy of the one delivered by John the Baptist.

In all of His public preaching, the theme of repentance was a recurring theme.

While strolling by the Sea of Galilee, which is also known as the Sea of Chinnereth (Numbers 34:11), the Lake of Gennesaret (Luke 5:1), and the Sea of Tiberias (Luke 5:1), Jesus encountered a group of people (John 6:1).

It was also the site of a booming fishing industry.

They sent John away to follow Jesus for a short period of time before returning to their fishing livelihood in Capernaum.

It’s possible that they had returned to Capernaum during Jesus’ previous ministry in the city.

They were fisherman, therefore they were tossing a net into the water.

It could be tossed into the water by hand and then brought back in with the help of the length of weighted rope that was attached to it.

— Then Jesus said to them, “Follow Me.” and they did.

“.and I will turn you into guys who fish for their own food.” Christian evangelism was the major reason for which Jesus summoned the apostles, and it continues to be the central task of His followers today (Matthew 28:19-20; Acts 1:8).

While traveling farther away from the village, MT —He noticed two additional brothers, James the son of Zebedee and John his brother, who were in the boat with Zebedee their father, repairing their nets.

It’s possible that their mother and Jesus’ mother were sisters (Mark 15:40; Matthew 27:55-56 with John 19:25).

James the son of Zebedee is easily distinguished from the other Jameses that appear in the New Testament since he is never mentioned in the Scriptures, with the exception of his brother John, who is mentioned twice.

MK Then He beckoned them, and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with their hired servants and followed Him, leaving their father Zebedee behind. This shows that Zebedee’s fishing company was successful, and that he was a well-known and respected businessman (John 18:15).

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How would you feel if you had to envision Peter, Andrew, James and John abandoning everything they owned, including their houses, careers, families, and whole lives in order to follow Jesus? What must have been the atmosphere like throughout those discussions? Please share your comments with us on our blog! We’d love to hear your thoughts about Jesus’ earliest disciples. Please contact us! Devotionals are posted every day.

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