Who Was Jesus Malverde

Jesús Malverde – Wikipedia

Jesús Malverde
Jesús Malverde image
Angel of the Poor, Generous Bandit, The Narco Saint
Born 15 January 1870Sinaloa, Mexico
Died 3 May 1909 (age 39) Sinaloa, Mexico
Venerated in Sinaloa;Folk Catholicism
Majorshrine Culiacan, Mexico
Feast 3 May
Patronage Mexican drug cartels, drug trafficking, outlaws, bandits, robbers, thieves, smugglers, people in poverty

Jesus Malverde (meaning “bad-green Jesus”), also known as the “Cjuba Lord,” “angel of the poor,” or the “narco-saint,” was a folklore figure in the Mexican state of Sinaloa. He was born in 1870 and died in 1909, and is a folklore hero in the state of Sinaloa. He has ancestors from both the Yureme and the Spanish cultures. According to legend, he was a “Robin Hood” character who was claimed to have taken from the wealthy in order to give to the less fortunate. Some people in Mexico and the United States, notably drug traffickers, regard him as a folk saint, and he is venerated as such.

History

Historically, the presence of Malverde has not been established. The rumor has it that he was born Jess Juarez Mazo and grew up under the dictatorship of Mexican tyrant Porfirio Diaz, whose local backer Francisco Caedo was the governor of the state of Sinaloa. He is said to have been a bandit following the death of his parents, which he blamed on his family’s financial difficulties. Railroads were built throughout Malverde’s formative years. He noticed the dramatic social shift that took place in his town.

Jess Malverde is claimed to have worked as a carpenter, tailor, or railway worker throughout his lifetime.

Because of the link between green and sorrow, his rich victims gave him the epithet Malverde (evil-green), which means “evil green.” In accordance with the legend surrounding Malverde’s life, Caedo mockingly promised Malverde a pardon in exchange for his stealing the governor’s sword (or in some versions his daughter).

  1. On May 3, 1909, he is believed to have died in Sinaloa, Mexico.
  2. According to some accounts, he was betrayed and murdered by a friend.
  3. His remains was believed to have been refused a proper burial, with his body being allowed to decay in public as a demonstration of this.
  4. Bernal was a robber from the southern state of Sinaloa who rose through the ranks to become an anti-government rebel.

In exchange for his capture, Caedo promised a prize, but he was deceived and murdered by old associates. In the northern Sinaloa region, Bachomo was an indigenous Indian insurgent who was arrested and killed.

Cult

Since Malverde’s alleged death, he has acquired a Robin Hood-like reputation, which has made him popular among the poor population ofSinaloa’s highland districts. Locals are claimed to have informally buried his bones by piling stones on top of them, forming an acairn in his honor. As a result, throwing a stone atop the bones was considered a gesture of respect, and it granted the individual the ability to beseech the spirit of the deceased. Among his first purported miracles was the recovery of items that had been misplaced or stolen.

  • At Malverde’s shrine, a great party is organized every year to commemorate the anniversary of his death.
  • The original location, which was later converted into a parking lot, has now been resurrected as an unauthorized shrine, complete with a cairn and donations of incense.
  • His intercession, on the other hand, is sought by persons who are experiencing difficulties of all types, and a number of purported miracles have been credited to him in the local community, including personal healings and blessings.
  • Spiritual goods with the image of Jess Malverde on them are available in both the United States and Mexico, as well as other countries.

In culture

In late 2007, a brewery in Guadalajara launched a new beer, Malverde, into the market in Northern Mexico, which quickly became a hit. In one episode of the television showBreaking Bad, a resemblance of Malverde may be seen. In 2017, the Japanese rapper A-Thug paid tribute to him by releasing a mixtape titled « God MALVERDE ». In episode 7 of season 1 of the Netflix series Narcos: Mexico, the character Neto tells the narrative of Jesus Malverde to the guy who murdered his son before ordering him to be killed.

A dramatized depiction of several incidents in his life is presented in the play.

See also

  • End of 2007 saw the introduction of Malverde, a new beer produced by a brewery in Guadalajara, onto the Northern Mexico market. In an episode of the television showBreaking Bad, a resemblance of Malverde emerges. His name was given to a mixtape by the Japanese rapper A-Thug in 2017, which was titled “God MALVERDE.” In the seventh episode of season one of the Netflix series Narcos: Mexico, the character Neto tells the narrative of Jesus Malverde to the guy who murdered his son before ordering him to be executed. In 2020, Jesus Malverde will star in his own Telemundo series. A dramatized depiction of several incidents in his life is presented in the play.

References

  1. Park, Jungwon
  2. “Jesus Malverde” as a Popular Subject Between the Good and the Bad: Dialécticas of “Jesus Malverde.” ABCDE at the University of Pittsburgh Pat Price’s Dry Place: Landscapes of Belonging and Exclusion (pp.153–157) is a book about belonging and exclusion. ” Gang triggerman honored with ‘Scarface’ headgear,” writes Karl Penhaul in the New York Times. The 16th of April, 2009, CNN. It was retrieved on the 16th of April, 2009. reorganization of the group
  3. Global Catholic Review published an article by Kate Kingsbury and R. Andrew Chesnut titled “Narcosaint” Jess Malverde Miraculously Materializes during the Trial of El Chapo Guzman in 2019. Sam Quinones is a writer who lives in Los Angeles. 227 True Tales from Another Mexico: The Lynch Mob, the Popsicle Kings, Chalino, and the Bronx, published by the University of New Mexico Press in 2001
  4. Sam Quinones, Jesus Malverde, Frontline
  5. Quinones, Sam Manuel Roig-Franzia is the author of this work (22 July 2007). A frantic homage to a potent symbol performed in the eerie darkness of the evening. According to the Washington Post. retrieved on July 29th, 2021
  6. The Oregonian: Meth’s ugly spread is fueled by hidden powerhouses, according to the newspaper. 10/23/2004
  7. s^ Associated Press writer E. Eduardo Castillo (7 December 2007). In honor of the unofficial drug saint, a Mexican firm has launched a beer. The San Diego Union-Tribune published this article. CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  8. “Meet Jess Malverde, the patron saint of Mexico’s drug gangs.” Retrieved on February 11, 2008. the 3rd of September, 2015

Further reading

  • Manuel Esquivel’s “Jesus Malverde” (Jus Ed., Mexico, 2008) ISBN 978-607-412-010-3
  • Kingsbury and Chesnut 2019, “Narcosaint” Jess Malverde Miraculously Materializes at El Chapo Guzman’s Trial by Kingsbury and Chesnut, Global Catholic Review
  • Esquivel, Manuel
  • “Jess Malverde” (Jus Ed., Mexico, 2008) ISBN 978-60 The Lynch Mob, the Popsicle Kings, Chalino and the Bronx are all true stories from another Mexico told by Sam Quinones in True Tales from Another Mexico (University of New Mexico Press, 2001)
  • Wald, Elijah, Narcocorrido: A Journey into the Music of Drugs, Gun, and Guerrillas (University of New Mexico Press, 2001)
  • “Without God or Law: Narcoculture and belief in Jess Malverde” (Without God In 2005, Religious Studies and Theology 24:53 published a paper by James H. Creechan and Jorge de la Herran-Garcia. The Pacific News reported that “Jesus Malverde-Saint of Mexico’s Drug Traffickers” may have been bandit hung in 1909
  • The Portland Mercury reported that “Our Blessed Saint of Narcotics?”
  • The Washington Post reported that “Time Zones: An Hour at the Feet of a Mexican Narco-Saint—In the Eerie Twilight, Frenetic Homage To a Potent Symbol”
  • The International Herald Tribune reported that “Mexican Robin Hood figure gains a kind

External links

  • Photos by Jorge Uzon: The Chapel of Jesus Malverde in Culiacan, Sinaloa
  • The Chapel of Jesus Malverde in Culiacan, Sinaloa

Who is Jesus Malverde? Question on narco-saint hangs over ‘Chapo’ Guzman drug cartel trial

It contains all of the typical questions that would be asked to prospective jurors in the impending New York trial of accused Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin “Chapo” Guzman, among others. Prospective jurors are quizzed on their history, media watching habits, and whether or not they are aware of the latest news on drug cartels. “Are you familiar with Jesus Malverde?” asks question No. 58, which jumps out. At a three-day law enforcement training held this week in El Paso, participants discussed Malverde, the Virgin of the Rosary, and other so-called “narco-saints” who are popular with Mexican drug gangs.

The presentation in the Bowie High School theater was made possible by a grant awarded to the El Paso Independent School District Police Department to combat gang activity. Jay Dobyns, a former ATF undercover motorcyclist who infiltrated the Hells Angels, speaks in El Paso about his experiences.

Who is Jesus Malverde?

Malverde is a renowned Mexican folk saint who is often regarded as the unofficial patron saint of drug smugglers due to his association with organized crime. In addition to being recognized as the “Generous Bandit,” Malverde is also known as the “Angel of the Poor,” according to Robert Almonte, a law enforcement consultant who has conducted considerable study into the “narco-saint” phenomena and who presented at the El Paso conference. Although the Mexican folk saint is revered by those involved in the drug trade, “you also have those who are not involved in criminal activity who pray to him as the Angel of the Poor,” according to Almonte, “who are not involved in criminal behavior.” Malverde is pictured with black hair and a black mustache, and he has a neckerchief on, giving him a Clark Gable-like appearance.

  1. He may be seen on a variety of items, including religious figurines, votive candles, key chains, and T-shirts, among others.
  2. He was a Mexican Robin Hood-type robber who stole from the affluent and distributed the proceeds to the poor in Sinaloa’s Pacific Coast state during the late 1800s and early 1900s, according to the tales of Malverde.
  3. Almonte claims that drug traffickers loved Malverde because they recognize themselves in the good-hearted bandit who robbed them blind.
  4. The Jalisco New Generation Cartel has expanded its operations to the El Paso area.
  5. Almonte is a retired deputy chief of the El Paso Police Department and a former United States marshal for the Western District of Texas.
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Chapo and Malverde

In response to the Guzman juror inquiry concerning Malverde, Almonte speculated that the question may be related to the folk saint’s significance in the Sinaloa drug-trafficking culture. A visit to the Malverde national shrine in Culiacan, the capital of Guzman’s native state of Sinaloa, has been made by Almonte. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman’s mental health is worsening, according to his lawyer. “I believe the defense will try to argue that (Guzman) committed the crime. In the end, he did the wrong thing, but he did it for the right reasons, much like Jesus Malverde,” Almonte explained.

MORE:Mexico extradites drug lord Joaquin “Chapo” Guzmán to the United States “Chapo Guzman is a hero to a large number of people in the Mexican state of Sinaloa. “They have a greater affection for Chapo Guzman than they have for the Mexican government,” he claimed.

The generous bandit

There is some doubt as to whether Juan Malverde even existed in the first place. According to tradition, Malverde was a bandit called Jesus Juárez Mazo who wore green as camouflage to surprise and rob affluent victims in the highlands of Sinaloa, and who would distribute the proceeds to the impoverished in the region. Malverde was finally apprehended by the Mexican authorities, and he was allegedly executed on May 3, 1909. Miracles, such as the recovery of misplaced things, were credited to Malverde according to folklore.

The term Malverde is a combination of the Spanish words for “bad” (mal) and “green,” which are both used to describe the environment (verde).

Ballads were written to commemorate the legend of the folk saint.

The legend of Malverde, according to Almonte, first came to his attention in the early 1990s, when belief in the folk saint grew throughout the United States.

Surpassed by Santa Muerte

According to Almonte, up until a few years ago, Malverde was the most popular image among Mexican drug traffickers, but he has since been superseded by the Santa Muerte, sometimes known as the controversial “Saint Death.” Almonte stated that it is usual to locate Malverde artifacts at shrines dedicated to the Virgin of the Dead. MORE:The number of killings in Juárez surpassed 100 in the month of May, as murders increased as a result of drug violence. Almonte underlined that not all Malverde Christians are involved in drug trafficking, despite popular belief.

MORE:Times Live panelists discuss three ways El Paso may begin to reclaim the narrative around the border.

Other Mexican saints

  • Santa Muerte— The skeletal image has gained popularity among the impoverished and oppressed, who turn to her for protection and assistance in a variety of situations, including criminal cases. The Catholic Church has spoken out against her. Juan Soldado, or Juan the soldier, is a character in the film. The unofficial patron saint of illegal immigrants is St. Francis of Assisi. When a firing squad executed Juan Castillo Morales in Tijuana in 1938 for raping an 8-year-old child, he was a soldier in the Mexican army. The legend has it that after his death, blood began to pour from the rocks as a message from God that he was not guilty. Toribio Romo Gonzalez, also known as St. Toribio Romo, was a priest who was assassinated by Mexican government forces in 1928 amid anti-clerical persecutions. Undocumented immigrants have taken to the Catholic saint, who has gained popularity in recent years. According to legend, Saint Toribio has appeared to migrants crossing the border in order to help them while they are in difficulty.

jesus malverde

Santa Muerte— The skeletal image has gained popularity among the poor and oppressed, who turn to her for protection and assistance in a variety of situations, including criminal investigations. The Catholic Church has criticized her actions. It’s Juan the soldier, alias Juan Soldado. The unofficial patron saint of illegal immigrants is St. Joseph of the Cross. When a firing squad executed Juan Castillo Morales in Tijuana in 1938 for raping an 8-year-old girl, the soldier was a soldier with the Mexican army.

In 1928, amid anti-clerical persecutions in Mexico, Toribio Romo Gonzalez, a priest, was assassinated by Mexican government forces.

According to legend, Saint Toribio has appeared to migrants crossing the border in order to save them when they are in danger.

Meet Jes�s Malverde Patron Saint of Drug Lords : Department of Cultural Affairs Media Center : Press Releases

(Albuquerque, New Mexico) – The city of Albuquerque is celebrating its 150th anniversary. As a result of the state’s strong Christian heritage, many homes in New Mexico are adorned with Santos, retablos, portraits of patron saints and other religious symbols, many of which are handcrafted by local craftsmen. Following a recent presentation on a specific patron saint with a dark side, a diverse group of New Mexico Museum of Natural History employees and citizens serving on the advisory committee forDrugs: Costs and Consequences, the new exhibition now on display at the Museum, received additional information about the saint in question.

His aliases include Angel of the Poor, Generouse Bandit, and Narco Saint, among others.

It was on display at the third meeting of the Drug Enforcement Administration advisory committee, which is working with the New Mexico Museum of Natural HistoryScience to maximize the impact of the DEA exhibition, “Drugs: Costs and Consequences, Opening Eyes to Drug-Induced Damage.” The Malverde statue was on display at the meeting.

Malverde is believed to have died on May 3, 1909, in Sinaloa, Mexico.

According to some accounts, he was betrayed and murdered by a friend.

His body was reported to have been refused a proper burial, and instead left to decay in a public place as a demonstration of the injustice.” Malverde’s existence has not been historically confirmed, although it is probable that he was created by merging facts from the lives of two recognized Sinaloan bandits, Heraclio Bernal (1855–1888) and Felipe Bachomo (1883–1916), who were both killed in the same year.

  1. According to legend, he was born in 1870 in the Mexican state of Sinaloa, probably under the name of Jess Juarez Mazo, and grew up in the United States.
  2. Drugs: Costs and Consequences is a touring exhibition organized by the Drug Enforcement Administration Museum and the Drug Enforcement Education Foundation.
  3. The show will be on display every day in Albuquerque until the end of the year, with a specific end date to be chosen.
  4. As the depth and breadth of the opioid crisis in New Mexico came into view, the museum was eager to collaborate with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and our many engaged local partners to expose the horrific impact that these narcotics are having on our community.
  5. The New Mexico Museum of Natural History is located in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
  6. Among the exhibitions, events, and seminars offered by the NMMNHS are those in Geoscience, which include Paleontology and Mineralogy, Bioscience, and Space Science.
  7. The Museum, which is a component of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, is open seven days a week from 9 a.m.
  8. The address is 1801 Mountain Road NW, which is northeast of the Historic Old Town Plaza in Albuquerque, New Mexico 87104, and the phone number is (505) 841-2800.

On the website media.newmexicoculture.org, you may find information on upcoming events, news releases, and photographs of activities at the New Mexico Museum of Natural HistoryScience and other divisions of the Department of Cultural Affairs.

Everything You Need To Know About Malverde

Culiacán’s Altar, photographed by David Boté Estrada/Flickr What is more likely: a real-life Robin Hood, who robbed the affluent during the Porfiriato period and gave it everything to the poor, or just an inflated and over-hyped mythical figure created by narcotraficantes (drug traffickers) seeking for a means to exonerate their own actions? Even in the context of Mexican culture, the figure of Malverde is divisive to say the least. Discover all you need to know about the so-called ‘narco saint’ in this comprehensive guide.

  1. According to legend, Juárez Mazo began stealing the affluent in order to provide for the destitute in his hometown in the Mexican state of Sinaloa after he was orphaned.
  2. Toward the end of his life, he made the decision to surrender to the police so that the reward placed on his head may be collected and distributed to the citizens of the town he loved.
  3. Guadalajara’s Malverde district|Esther Vargas/Flickr But how did he go from being a Robin Hood to becoming a Narco Saint?
  4. Escalante escaped the gunshot after praying to Malverde for help, and since that tragic occurrence, traffickers from all over the world have prayed to him for good fortune in their ethically problematic endeavors.
  5. In addition to being a symbol of hope for people illegally crossing the infamously perilous US border, Malverde is frequently associated with other controversial’saints’ such as Santa Muerte and San Judas Tadeo, who are both linked to drug trafficking.
  6. niceness/Flickr / Malverde cap|Angel Morales Rizo/Flickr Malverde has made significant ‘cameos’ in popular culture, including the telenovelaLa Reina del Sur, as well as the television seriesBreaking Bad, and he was even the’star’ of a film trilogy set in the state of California.
  7. However, Malverde (also known as the angel of the poor) is unquestionably the most revered figure in his native state of Sinaloa, which explains another of his titles – ‘El Rey de Sinaloa’ (the King of Sinaloa).
See also:  Where Was Jesus When He Was Arrested

According to legend, if there are people holding vigil and playing narcocorridos (songs that idolize – read, exaggerate – narcos and their drug-running successes) at Malverde’s chapel in Sinaloa, then a batch of drugs has managed to make it successfully across the border into the United States from Mexico.

Culiacán’s Altar, courtesy of David Bote Estrada/Flickr

Malverde: The Story Behind The Man Who Became The Patron Saint Of Drug Dealers

For as long as I can remember, there has been a wooden key holder next to the front entrance of my parent’s house, just by the front door. In the center of the design is a man with black hair, a nice mustache, and a white shirt on his chest. It was given to my parents as a present by my godfather during one of his lengthy excursions to the northern part of Mexico. Actually, I didn’t pay attention to the key holder until I was in my teens and a friend I had invited over inquired as to why we had a statue of the patron saint of drug traffickers in our home.

Despite the fact that I had no clue what he was talking about, I refused to believe it was him.

This Mexican Robin Hood, also known as the “generous bandit,” the “angel of the poor,” or even the “narco saint,” is one of the most popular folk heroes in our country, not only because he allegedly stole from the rich in order to give to the poor, but also because, by doing so, he exposed the corrupt dictatorship that had kept people in the worst of circumstances.

In fact, some people believe that he is nothing more than an urban legend that has grown in popularity through time to the point that he is now regarded not just as a hero but also as a very powerful saint, according to them.

The legend

Jess Juárez Mazo was a young man from humble beginnings who was allegedly born on December 24th, 1870 (remember the date) in northern Mexico. His parents died either of hunger or a minor illness that they couldn’t afford to treat because they couldn’t afford to do so (it all depends on the version of the story you get). However, it is reported that he blamed poverty for their deaths and that he resolved to do everything in his power to prevent more people in his home state of Sinaloa from meeting the same tragic end.

Soon after, he rose to prominence as one of the most wanted robbers in the region, earning the moniker Malverde, which is a play on the words “bad” and “green,” or, to put it another way, a distortion of the phrase “hierba mala.” Eventually, he confronted the governor of the state, Francisco Caedo, and informed him that he was mistreating the people and that labor conditions were in fact slavery, according to the story.

  • From that point on, he became Caedo’s most formidable adversary.
  • They had no idea that Malverde wasn’t dead and that his people, who had witnessed everything, had rescued him from certain death.
  • The governor set a bounty on his head because he wanted him out of the way once and for all.
  • However, in 1909, he was hanged from a tree and denied a proper burial because of his religious beliefs.
  • After that, people began throwing rocks at his bones until they were all buried, allowing him to finally rest in peace, according to legend.

This was the exact moment in time when the saint was born. As a gesture of gratitude for providing him with a proper burial, the people believed that Malverde’s spirit would guide them and assist them. Since then, he has become a destination for people seeking miracles.

The story today

Some historians think that The Great Malverde was actually a collection of the exploits and stories told by Heraclio Bernal and Felipe Bachomo, two bandits from the pre-revolutionary period who lived during the time of the Malverde. In addition to Bernal, who was one of the most notable anti-Daz rebels at the period, and who was betrayed by one of his followers, Bachomo was an indigenous rebel who assisted the impoverished in his village by targeting federal members and stealing items. There is a great deal of paperwork and proof pertaining to these two personalities, however there is little evidence pertaining to Malverde’s existence.

  1. Now, remember how I instructed you to keep a few pieces of information handy?
  2. Even the names are similar), and it all starts with the day of the week.
  3. The combination of all of these parallels led to his being elevated to the rank of a saint, particularly in the country’s northern areas.
  4. So, the question would be, why is he so closely tied with the drug culture?
  5. A well-known fact is that cartels have long been responsible for supporting schools in northern cities and even paving the streets.
  6. However, as we already discussed, Malverde is revered by a wide range of groups, not only criminal organizations.
  7. As a result, he is still available to assist individuals in need in numerous ways.

A Wrestler’s Story of How He Became a Hero By Fighting With His Bare Fists It could pique your interest.

Meet Jesús Malverde, the patron saint of Mexico’s drug cartels

1 of a total of 38 Photographs of the saint JESUS MALVERDENARCOS On March 2, 2013, in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero, a community police officer wearing a hat representing Jesus Malverde -the patron saint of drug traffickers- takes part in the March for Justice and Dignity in Ayutla de los Libres, where he is joined by other police officers. Hundreds of individuals armed with rifles, pistols, and machetes chose to provide protection for the villages of Guerrero, forming a vigilante group in response to gangs conducting robberies, kidnappings, and murder, according to local authorities.

  • Guerrero is one of the states most badly impacted by the violence.
  • RICHARDS/AFP / Getty Images 384 out of 384 (38%) On July 12, 2011, in Culiacan, Sinaloa state, Mexico, a young guy kneels at the altar of the Chapel of Jesus Malverde, where he prays.
  • He was born in 1888 in Paredones, near Culiacan, and was likely hung when he was 21 years old.
  • His religion is extremely popular among common criminals, and it has now been adopted by drug traffickers, as has happened with numerous representations of popular culture in the past.

Saint Jesus Malverde was a bandit who lived in the 18th century who was transformed by his followers into the “saint of drug dealers.” On June 11, 2008, Mexico was lashed by a conflict with drug cartels fighting their position and trafficking to the United States with unprecedented intensity and sophisticated weapons.

  1. There were at least 1,378 fatalities during the course of the year, which is a 47 percent increase over the same period in 2007.
  2. On June 11, 2008, Mexico was lashed by a conflict with drug cartels fighting their position and trafficking to the United States with unprecedented intensity and sophisticated weapons.
  3. There were at least 1,378 fatalities during the course of the year, which is a 47 percent increase over the same period in 2007.
  4. On June 11, 2008, Mexico was lashed by a conflict with drug cartels fighting their position and trafficking to the United States with unprecedented intensity and sophisticated weapons.
  5. There were at least 1,378 fatalities during the course of the year, which is a 47 percent increase over the same period in 2007.
  6. On June 11, 2008, Mexico was lashed by a conflict with drug cartels fighting their position and trafficking to the United States with unprecedented intensity and sophisticated weapons.
  7. There were at least 1,378 fatalities during the course of the year, which is a 47 percent increase over the same period in 2007.

On June 11, 2008, Mexico was lashed by a conflict with drug cartels fighting their position and trafficking to the United States with unprecedented intensity and sophisticated weapons.

There were at least 1,378 fatalities during the course of the year, which is a 47 percent increase over the same period in 2007.

On June 11, 2008, Mexico was lashed by a conflict with drug cartels fighting their position and trafficking to the United States with unprecedented intensity and sophisticated weapons.

There were at least 1,378 fatalities during the course of the year, which is a 47 percent increase over the same period in 2007.

In numerous Mexican states, the geography of violence includes victims that have been executed, decapitated, bound, and tortured with messages against rival gangs, or bodies who have been threatened by police and street announcements.

Photograph by Luis Acosta for AFP Photograph by LUIS ACOSTA/Getty Images 15 out of 38 16th out of 38 On July 12, 2011, a crucifix is shown next to a photograph of a guy carrying an AK-47 assault rifle, which was put by believers at the Chapel of Jesus Malverde in Culiacan, Sinaloa state, Mexico, according to Reuters.

  • He was born in 1888 in Paredones, near Culiacan, and was likely hung when he was 21 years old.
  • His religion is extremely popular among common criminals, and it has now been adopted by drug traffickers, as has happened with numerous representations of popular culture in the past.
  • In spite of his widespread veneration, Jesus Malverde has been denied canonization by the Catholic Church.
  • He was a type of local Robin Hood who plundered the affluent in order to give to the needy.
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AFP/Yuri CORTEZY PHOTOGRAPHY URI CORTEZ/Getty Images URI CORTEZ/Getty Images 18 out of 38 19 out of 38 On June 2, 2008, souvenirs were displayed outside the chapel dedicated to Saint Jesus Malverde, a bandit from the XVIII century who was transformed into the “saint of drug dealers” by the locals in Culiacan, Sinaloa state, Mexico.

In numerous Mexican states, the geography of violence includes victims that have been executed, decapitated, bound, and tortured with messages against rival gangs, or bodies who have been threatened by police and street announcements.

Getty Images/AFP PHOTO/LUIS ACOSTALUIS ACOSTA/AFP PHOTO/LUIS ACOSTALUIS ACOSTA 20 of 38On December 3, 2008, a mock-up of the chapel of Saint Jesus Malverde, a bandit from the XVIII century who was transformed into the “saint of drug traffickers,” was on exhibit at the Museum of Drugs in Mexico City.

Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP Photograph ADDITIONAL INFORMATION IN THE IMAGE FORUM Photograph by RONALDO SCHEMIDT/Getty Images 21 out of 3822 out of 38 In Culiacan, Sinaloa state, Mexico, on July 12, 2011, an image of Jesus Malverde is shown beside representations of Jesus Malverde that are for sale at the Chapel of Jesus Malverde.

  1. In spite of his widespread veneration, Jesus Malverde has been denied canonization by the Catholic Church.
  2. He was a type of local Robin Hood who plundered the affluent in order to give to the needy.
  3. AFP Photo/Yuri CORTEZYuri CORTEZ/Getty ImagesYuri CORTEZ/AFP Photo 23 out of 38 On July 12, 2011, a storm approaches the Chapel of Jesus Malverde in Culiacan, Sinaloa state, Mexico, and a view of the chapel is seen.
  4. He was born in 1888 in Paredones, near Culiacan, and was likely hung when he was 21 years old.
  5. His religion is extremely popular among common criminals, and it has now been adopted by drug traffickers, as has happened with numerous representations of popular culture in the past.
  6. In spite of his widespread veneration, Jesus Malverde has been denied canonization by the Catholic Church.
  7. He was a type of local Robin Hood who plundered the affluent in order to give to the needy.

AFP/Yuri CORTEZY PHOTOGRAPHY URI CORTEZ/Getty Images URI CORTEZ/Getty Images 26th out of 38 On September 20, 2014, in Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico, a general view of Jesus Malverde’s Chapel was captured.

Image courtesy of Pedro Gonzalez of CON/Getty Images.

In spite of his widespread veneration, Jesus Malverde has been denied canonization by the Catholic Church.

Image courtesy of YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images 29th out of 38 St.

Charbel (R), as well as a Crucifix, surround a picture of Jesus Malverde (center) (front).

He is currently on the run from authorities.

It is said that Jesus Malverde is worshipped by a large number of drug traffickers in this region, which is also regarded as the “cradle of drug trafficking in Colombia.” Rather than being a mere coincidence, it happens to be the home state of one of the most well-known and powerful drug lords in the world: Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, who has twice escaped from Mexican maximum security prisons.

(Photo courtesy of Fernando Brito/Associated Press) Fernando Brito33 of 3834 of 38 Fernando Brito33 of 38 Images and statues of popular saint Jesus Malverde fill a chamber within the Jesus Malverde shrine in Culiacan, Mexico, in this photo taken on Tuesday, April 5, 2011.

The state of Sinaloa is often regarded as the birthplace of drug trafficking in the United States.

AP35 of 38 On Thursday, police and military will resume their search for corpses in the area.

One of the presentations at St. Mary’s University, titled “The Drug Underworld for Law Enforcement,” included a statue of Jésus Malverde, renowned as the patron saint of narco traffickers, as well as other artifacts from the drug trade. John Davenport/Express-News38th of 38 photos by John Davenport

The legend of Jess Malverde weaves together elements of Mexican mythology with elements of the drug battles. He takes from the wealthy and distributes the proceeds to the less fortunate. The destitute venerate him as their savior. Malverde is also accused of shielding narcos like as Joaqun Guzmán aka El Chapo and the Sinaloa Cartel from capture and death, according to certain reports. Known as thenarcosantón, or the patron saint of drug traffickers, he is revered worldwide. The bandit is based on a real-life Mexican guy named Jess Juarez Mazo, who was born in 1870 in Culiacán, the capital of the state of Sinaloa.

  • Then things began to shift.
  • He robbed from the wealthy and returned the proceeds to his fellow residents, and he was only apprehended by the governor after a betrayal, according to one account of events.
  • Then the drug cartels co-opted him in order to enhance their own reputations, and the figure rose to unprecedented levels of prominence.
  • During the development of the Mexican drug cartels in the 1980s and 1990s, the Malverde cult’s popularity soared to unprecedented heights.
  • The infusion of drug money into the cult of Malverde has resulted in a boom of chapels all across Mexico, as well as in the United States and Colombia, among other places.
  • The character’s similarity may be seen in the blockbuster television series “Breaking Bad,” which is powered by drugs.
  • Poor people ranging from low-level drug runners to prostitutes and the homeless seek safety from Malverde.
  • He is not the only narco-saint in the world.
  • Although neither is acknowledged by the Catholic Church, in this period of instability in Mexico, the “generous bandit” and his counterparts’ fan bases continue to increase.

Jesús Malverde, patron saint of the poor and of drug traffickers

Some believe that this saint’s ancestors were beneficent bandits, and this is true. He is regarded as an accommodating and approachable saint by the most marginalized, who consider him a friend in their everyday lives in dangerous neighborhoods. He is also seen as a defender of drug dealers by others. Others consider him to be a non-entity, someone who simply did not exist. Jess Malverde has been raised to the stature of a Mexican Robin Hood, thanks to urban mythology. The legend has it that he plundered the wealthy despots of Sinaloa state (in northern Mexico) during the close of the 19th century and then distributed his loot among the extremely poor.

  • Malverde was shot and injured during one of the several hold-ups, and he eventually surrendered.
  • It was illegal to bury him, and his body was left hanging from a tree as a symbol of what may have happened.
  • Known as “the poor people’s bandit,” Jess Malverde made a name for himself.
  • But it’s not just that.
  • Julio Escalante and his son Raymundo are two well-known personalities from the state of Sinaloa.
  • However, Raymundo pleaded to Malverde to save Julio’s life, and in what is considered a miracle by the saint, a sinner was able to hear Julio’s pleas and intervene to save his life.
  • Some of them are well-known drug lords, such as Rafael Caro Quintero, Amado Quintero, and Amado Carrillo, aka Seor de los Cielos, as well as El Chapo’s loyalists and supporters.

He has even transcended national boundaries: alters in his honor have been erected in Los Angeles (the United States) and Cali (Colombia).

The Colonia Doctores neighborhood in Mexico City is home to a small church dedicated to Saint Jess Malverde.

Photo courtesy of Consuelo Pagaza, September 2016.

Every day, whether the chapel is open or not, visitors in fancy vehicles and on foot stop in front of the picture of Jess Malverde to speak with him or leave donations along Dr Vértiz Boulevard.

Alicia Pulido, the person in charge of the chapel, brings out two substantial mannequins that are 1.8 metres tall and places them on exhibit.

Consuelo Pagaza took this photo on September 9, 2016.

Scapulars, photos, stamps, and’miracles’ can be found on the tables, walls, and altars, among other things (articles of faith used by the Catholic Church for its saints, but customised with a picture of Malverde or the Santa Muerte.) The donations of his admirers include flowers and apples, as well as paintings, cigars, cigarettes, bottles of tequila or liquor, and money in the form of coins.

Consuelo Pagaza took this photo on September 9, 2016.

Some people carry replicas of Saint Jess Malverde as an offering, to express gratitude, or to request a miracle from him.

Every month, on the third and seventeenth of the month, a mass is held in honor of Jess Malverde.

Conceived and photographed by Consuelo Pagaza on 09/2016Alicia takes a position to the side of the saint and prepares an illuminated loudspeaker to signal the commencement of the mass.

Moreover, they repeat lines such as “Jesus Malverde, pray for us; Jesus Malverde, listen to us” in the intervals between each prayer.

When the service is finished, some of the devout go up to the saint and make prayers of all types, including requests for miraculous intervention.

The queue in front of the picture of Jess Malverde is formed by men and women of all ages, and one by one, they approach the saint and speak face to face, hand in hand, with him. This article has been translated from the original Spanish language.

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