Where Did Jesus Ascend To Heaven From

Where did Jesus’ ascension into Heaven take place?

All of the significant events in Jesus’ life took place in specific locations around the Holy Land. Many of the events can be traced back to their actual location, while others are only known via oral traditions passed down from generation to generation. Regarding Jesus’ ascension into Heaven, the Bible makes specific reference to the mountain on which he was seen by his disciples at the time of the miraculous occurrence. In the Acts of the Apostles, St. Luke recounts how Jesus’ followers got together and asked him a question about the kingdom of God.

“They returned to Jerusalem from the mount called Olivet, which is near Jerusalem and a sabbath day’s travel away,” according to St.

This is the same “Mount of Olives” that Jesus went through his “agony in the garden” before being captured and brought into captivity, according to tradition.

According to The Golden Legend, a medieval text that covers a variety of tales, the mountain was endowed with significant significance that was worth exploring.

This mountain was also known as the Mount of Three Lights, according to another translation, because it received light from the Temple by night because a fire burned continuously on the altar; in the morning, it caught the sun’s rays from the east before they reached the city; and the hill’s olive trees produced a plentiful supply of oil, which was used to fuel the Temple’s lights.

Sulpicius, the bishop of Jerusalem, and the Gloss both claim that when a church was built on the site where Christ had stood later on, the spot where Christ had stood could never be covered with pavement; more than that, the marble slabs that were placed there burst upwards into the faces of those who were laying them.

Regardless of whether or not this last narrative is true, it serves to emphasize the fact that Jesus was actually present on earth and that his presence continues to be with us even after his ascension.

(John 14:18). More information may be found at: The name of the stand that is used in Eucharistic adoration serves to remind us of what is taking place. Continue reading:How to read the Bible when you’re not sure where to begin

Where Did Jesus Ascension Take Place?

According to the Bible, Jesus ascended from a chamber (Mark 16:19), in Bethany (Luke 24:50-51) or from the Mount of Olives (Luke 24:50-51), among other places (Matt. 28:16-20; Acts 1:12).

Answer

28:16-20 (Matthew 28:16-20) The eleven disciples then traveled to Galilee, where they arrived at the mountain that Jesus had instructed them to visit. When they first saw Jesus, they bowed their heads in reverence; yet, others were skeptical. After then, Jesus appeared to them and stated, “Everything in heaven and on earth has been handed to me as a result of this revelation. As a result, go and make disciples of all countries, baptizing them in the name of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, and instructing them to follow everything I have instructed you to do in the first place.

  • Luke 24:50-51 (KJV) As soon as he had brought them out to the neighborhood of Bethany, he blessed them by raising his hands in the air.
  • Acts 1:12 is a biblical passage.
  • Matthew does not mention the ascension, but he does say that the words of Matthew 28:18-20 were uttered at the “mountain where he had commanded them to go” (probably Mount Tabor, the probable site of the Transfiguration).
  • The words of Mark, on the other hand, provide a very condensed version of what actually happened (compare Mark 16:12-19 to Luke 24:13-52).
  • The ascension at the Mount of Olives, according to Luke’s enlarged narrative, is congruent with the historical record.
  • As a result, Luke, who is also the author of Acts, is consistent when he refers to “the region of Bethany,” which includes the Mount of Olives, as being in the same location.
  • As a result, there are no inconsistencies between the various accounts.

How Did Jesus Leave the Earth? (The Ascension)

The ascension of Christ into heaven was one of the most momentous occasions in the life of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, Jesus ascended into heaven both visually and physically forty days after His resurrection, according to the Bible. Luke Luke was the only New Testament author to recount the event of the ascension. He was separated from them and lifted up into the heavens as he was extending his blessings to them. In return, they returned to Jerusalem with great excitement, and they spent the rest of their time in the temple praying to God and praising and blessing him.

Luke describes Jesus’ separation from them in a way that suggests they are already familiar with the tale of Jesus’ ascension to the Father.

After giving commands to the apostles whom he had selected via the Holy Spirit, I gave you a previous account of everything Jesus began to do and teach until the day in which he was taken up, which I gave you in the previous account, O Theophilus (Acts 1:1, 2).

The Bible confirms that Jesus ascended into heaven in plain view of His followers, as recorded in the Gospels.

Meanwhile, while they continued to stare upward as he rose, two men in white clothing appeared beside them and inquired of them, saying, ‘Men of Galilee, why are you standing here looking up into the heavens?’ This same Jesus, who was carried away from you into heaven, will return in the same manner in which you witnessed him ascend into heaven’ (Acts 1:9-11).

  • Stephen was the first Christian to be executed because of his faith in Jesus Christ.
  • However, because he was filled with the Holy Spirit, he looked up into the skies and saw the glory of God, as well as Jesus standing on the right hand of God, and exclaimed, ‘Look!
  • This proved that Jesus had risen to heaven and had remained there.
  • You will see the Son of Man seated at the right hand of the Father’s throne and ascending on the clouds of heaven in the days to come (Matthew 26:64) Mark Although the lengthy conclusion to Mark’s gospel may not be entirely original, it does represent an ancient belief.
  • When the Lord Jesus finished speaking to them, he was taken up into heaven and seated at the right hand of God, where he continues to sit today (Mark 16:19).

‘Stop clinging to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father; instead, go to my brothers and tell them, ‘I climb to my Father and your Father, and my God and your God,’ Jesus replied to her.” (See also John 20:17.) In addition, Christ predicts His ascension in the Gospel of John, asking, “What if you should view the Son of Man rising where he was previously?” ” (John 6:62).

1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 “And without controversy great is the mystery of godliness,” says the ancient Christian confession of First Timothy 3:16, which includes the phrase “He who was manifested in the flesh, justified in the Spirit, seen by angels, preached among the Gentiles, believed on in the world, received up in glory” (1 Timothy 3:16).

The verb “taken up” is the same as the verb “taken up” that appears in Acts 1:2.

It is also true that he who descended is also the one who soared far beyond all the heavens, in order to fill all things with himself (Ephesians 4:10).

In Christ, which he accomplished by raising him from the grave and putting him at his right hand in the celestial realms (Ephesians 1:20) Without some type of ascension, this exaltation would not have been possible, and the one recounted by Luke appears to be the one that was comprehended by the disciples.

  1. The ascension, according to Luke, was completed theologically, as Paul describes in his letter.
  2. He is speaking of Jesus Christ, who is at the right hand of God, having ascended into heaven after having subjected angels, authorities, and powers to his will and authority (1 Peter 3:22).
  3. Hebrews The writer to the Hebrews has a clear understanding of what Christ’s ascension has achieved for the world.
  4. Furthermore, in Hebrews 7:26, our high priest is praised for having been elevated above the sky, a reference to his position of authority.
  5. Beginning with the factual tale of Jesus’ ascension into heaven from the Mount of Olives, there is a spiritual dimension to the story.
  6. As a bonus, the other two gospel writers make allusions to Jesus’ ascension as well.

As a result, the ascension of Jesus is mentioned in a number of distinct places in the New Testament, including the Gospels. The Holy Bible, New King James Version, (Nashville, Tennessee: Thomas Nelson, Inc., 1982), is a translation of the Bible.

Where did Jesus ascend to Heaven?

The ascension of Jesus Christ into heaven was one of the most momentous occurrences of His life. According to the Bible, Jesus ascended into heaven both visually and physically forty days after His resurrection. Luke Until Luke recorded the ascension, there was no other New Testament writer who had witnessed the event. Now it happened that, while he was blessing them, he was separated from them and lifted up into heaven. And they worshiped him, returned to Jerusalem with great delight, and spent their time in the temple ceaselessly singing and glorifying the Almighty God.

  1. They were already aware with the story of Jesus’ ascension, according to the way Luke describes his departure from them.
  2. When Jesus ascended, His Disciples were present to witness it.
  3. Following his words, he was lifted up and carried away by a cloud, out of sight of them, as they stood there watching him.
  4. The Ascension of Jesus is supported by further evidence.
  5. As a result of his trust in Christ, Stephen became the first Christian to be put to death.
  6. The Holy Spirit filled him, and he looked up into the heavens, where he beheld the glory of God and Jesus standing at the right hand of God, proclaiming: ‘Look!
  7. That Jesus had ascended to heaven and remained there was evidence of this.
  8. It is expected that the Son of Man will be seen as a seated figure at the right hand of authority, riding on the clouds of heaven (Matthew 26:64) Mark Although the lengthy conclusion to Mark’s gospel may not be original, it does reflect an ancient religious belief.
  9. When the Lord Jesus finished speaking to them, he was taken up into heaven and seated at the right hand of God, where he remains to this day (Mark 16:19).
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‘Stop clinging to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father; instead, go to my brothers and tell them, ‘I ascend to my Father and your Father, and my God and your God,’ Jesus said to them.” According to the Bible, John 20:17 In addition, Christ predicts His ascension in the Gospel of John, asking, “What if you should view the Son of Man rising where he was previously?” ” (John 6:62).

1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 Timothy 2 Timothy 1 Timothy 1 “And without controversy great is the mystery of godliness,” says the ancient Christian confession of First Timothy 3:16, which includes the phrase “He who was manifested in the flesh, justified in the Spirit, seen by angels, preached among the Gentiles, believed on throughout the world, and received up in glory” (1 Timothy 3:16).

This is the same verb that is recorded in Acts 1:2, which means “to be taken up.” Ephesians Ascension is the term used by Paul.

Furthermore, he stated In Christ, which he accomplished by raising him from the dead and seating him at his right hand in the heavenly places (Ephesians 1:20) Without some sort of ascension, this exaltation would have been impossible to achieve, and the one described by Luke appears to be the one that was understood.

  1. What Luke implies was accomplished at the ascension is explained theologically by Paul.
  2. In this passage, he speaks of Jesus Christ, who is at the right hand of God, having ascended into heaven after having subjected angels, authorities, and powers (1 Peter 3:22).
  3. Hebrews The author of Hebrews has a clear understanding of what Christ’s ascension accomplished.
  4. In a similar vein, our high priest is referred to as “exalted above the heavens” in Hebrews 7:26.
  5. Beginning with the historical narrative of Jesus’ ascension into heaven from the Mount of Olives, there is a spiritual dimension to the narrative.
  6. In addition, Jesus’ ascension is alluded to by the other two gospel writers.

As a result, the ascension of Jesus is mentioned in a variety of ways throughout the New Testament. (1982), The Holy Bible, New King James Version (Nashville, Tennessee: Thomas Nelson Inc.), p. viii.

Disputed sites

Ascension Rock or Hill, as the landmark is sometimes referred to due to its location on a ridge, is a part of the Status Quo, a more than quarter-millennium-old decree by the Ottoman empire and affirmed by the Treaty of Paris in 1857 that embodies the understanding among religious communities—Jewish, Muslim, Latin Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Armenian Christians, and others—regarding nine shared religious sites in Jerusalem and Bethlehem.

The status The Catholic Church and other Christian groups are at odds about the ownership of the majority of the sites.

The fact that the other purported Ascension site—a grotto in the Church of the Pater Noster—is under Islamic administration, which charges a modest fee from pilgrims, as well as the fact that it is under Islamic administration, has led some Christian groups, particularly the Evangelicals, to visit the other purported Ascension site.

The Church of the Pater Noster, which is located quite close to the Ascension edicule, is a Catholic church, and as such, may be less offensive to Evangelicals and other “Christians.” In addition, it is dedicated to the location where Christ is said to have taught the Apostles the Universal Prayer (the Lord’s Prayer).

  • The Pater Noster, which is considered a French realm, is managed by Carmelite nuns from France.
  • A number of ceramic plaques, each with the Lord’s Prayer in a different language, are strategically placed throughout the garden and glisten in the sunlight.
  • There are about 140 different versions of the Our Father, which is really the Universal Prayer.
  • During my stay, I was able to see Pampango, Cebuano, Ilonggo, and Waray dialects.

Grotto or cave

In the Pater Noster church, where is the Ascension place located? It is located within the Pater Noster complex, in the grotto or cave known as “the Lord’s instruction.” According to legend, this was the location where the earliest Christians would congregate in the face of Roman persecution. According to their beliefs, this was “the specific point” in Luke’s narrative where Jesus prayed alone before instructing the apostles or proceeding with his ministry. The early Christians were able to identify the location where Christ ascended into Heaven from this location.

  1. When Constantine, in the early fourth century, issued the Edict of Milan, which abolished the ban on Christianity, Christians were able to begin freely practicing their religion.
  2. It was dubbed the “Imbomon” or “hillock” by the locals.
  3. The Church of the Pater Noster was constructed in the late nineteenth century on the ruins of the Byzantine church of Eleona, which had been destroyed by fire.
  4. One source of ambiguity is from the fact that the New Testament appears to provide two competing narratives of Christ’s ascension.
  5. He then withdrew from them and was lifted up to Heaven,” according to the Gospel of Luke (24:50-51).
  6. Following a brief description of Pentecost, or the 50th day after Easter, she wrote of the early Christians: “(I)mmediately after breakfast, they ascend to Eleona, which is to say, to the Mount of Olives.
  7. In that place, lessons are read, hymns are interwoven, and antiphons are sung as well.

Once all is completed.

“Pater Noster” in Tagalog, meaning “Lord’s Cave.” Egeria’s account is particularly eye-catching.

Also on Pentecost, the two stories of the Ascension in Luke and the Acts of the Apostles were read one after the other, without any interpolation or ambiguity.

Do all of these memorials to Christ’s Ascension work in concert with one another to commemorate the event?

Almost certainly.

And on the Mount of Olives, where Christ taught the Apostles the Our Father, he said that everyone had a divine birthright that is universally recognized. Ascension Day marked the fulfillment of a lifelong dream as he was reunited with the Father for the first time. INQ

When did Jesus ascend to heaven?

Gramps, This last year, I’ve been studying the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ. I’m attempting to figure out when Jesus was exalted to the highest point in the sky. Christina

Answer

Greetings, Christina I’m presuming your inquiry is about the time period following Christ’s resurrection when he ascended to his Father. If this is the case, please accept my apologies for any confusion. Even while we don’t have a certain date, we do have the following details: In the first place, we know that there was a period of time on the morning of Christ’s resurrection when he had not yet risen to heaven (see John 20:17): 17 To Mary, Jesus says, “Do not touch me, for I have not yet ascended to my Father.” Instead, go to my brethren and tell them, “I climb unto my Father, as well as your Father; as well as my God, as well as your God.” Christ may have risen to heaven for a period of time before returning to earth to continue teaching his followers, according to this passage of scripture.

  1. Following that, we read in Luke 24:51 that Christ ascended to heaven after meeting with the apostles: 51 In the midst of his blessing them, he was separated from them and lifted into the presence of the Father in the air.
  2. In conclusion, we read the following from the institution handbook for Luke 24: Jesus Christ’s real ascension into heaven to be with His Father, according to Elder Bruce R.
  3. It is literally true that Christ has ascended into heaven in the broadest and most complete sense of the word.
  4. … Jesus, who had been raised from the dead, ascensioned from the earth and proceeded to the realm where his Father resides.

20:24) The Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, 1:872, states that That Christ had not been to heaven prior to this and after the resurrection is not necessarily true; we know that Christ has returned to the earth since; however, this event is commonly referred to as “The Ascension,” and it can be considered the point at which Christ’s primary location was with his Father rather than on the earth in the presence of men.

This response may also be of interest to you: What are the events that transpired following Christ’s crucifixion? I hope this has provided an answer to your inquiry, and I urge you to continue your research into the life and teachings of our Lord!

Gramps

Answer In the days following his resurrection from the dead, Jesus “presented Himself alive” (Acts 1:3) to the women who had gathered around the tomb (Matthew 28:9-10), to His disciples (Luke 24:36-43), and to a crowd of more than 500 people (1 Corinthians 15:6). During the days after His resurrection, Jesus instructed His followers about the nature of God’s kingdom (Acts 1:3). Jesus and His followers traveled to Mount Olivet, which is located near Jerusalem, forty days after the resurrection.

  • Jesus then blessed them and proceeded to climb into the heavens as soon as he finished blessing them.
  • The Scriptures make it clear that Jesus’ ascension was a genuine, physical return to the presence of the Father.
  • A cloud obscured Jesus from the disciples’ vision as they strained to catch a last sight of Him, then two angels arrived and vowed that Christ would return “in exactly the same way that you have watched Him leave” (Acts 1:11).
  • After sending His Son into the world at Bethlehem out of love, God the Father was bringing the Son back home to be with the Father.
  • 2) It represented the completion of His earthly mission.
  • The return of His celestial splendour was symbolized by this event.
  • 4) It represented His elevation to the right hand of the Father (Ephesians 1:20-23).
  • 5) It provided Him with the opportunity to provide a place for us (John 14:2).
  • 7) It established a precedent for His return.
  • At the moment, the Lord Jesus is in the presence of the Father.

God the Father is the Head of the Church (Colossians 1:18), the provider of spiritual gifts (Ephesians 4:7-8), and the One who fills everything in everything (Colossians 1:26-27). (Ephesians 4:9-10).

Ascension

Answer In the days following his resurrection from the dead, Jesus “presented Himself alive” (Acts 1:3) to the women who had gathered at the tomb (Matthew 28:9-10), to His disciples (Luke 24:36-43), and to a crowd of more than 500 people (1 Corinthians 15:6). When Jesus returned from the dead, He spent the next few days teaching His followers about the kingdom of God (Acts 1:3). Jesus and His followers traveled to Mount Olivet, which is located near Jerusalem, forty days after His resurrection.

  • Jesus then blessed them and proceeded to rise into the heavens as soon as he finished giving the blessing to them.
  • The Scriptures make it clear that Jesus’ ascension was a genuine, physical return to the presence of the Father in heaven.
  • A cloud obscured Jesus from the disciples’ vision as they strained to catch a last sight of Him, and two angels arrived, promising that Christ would return “in exactly the same way that you have witnessed Him go” (Acts 1:11).
  • The end of His earthly mission was marked by this event.
  • He had come to the end of his time as a human being with physical limitations.
  • He had completed everything that He had set out to do.
  • With the exception of a brief appearance during the Transfiguration, Jesus’ brilliance had remained hidden throughout His earthly stay (Matthew 17:1-9).
  • According to Matthew 17:5, the One with whom the Father is pleased was brought up in glory and given a name beyond all other names (Matthew 17:5).
  • 5) It provided Him with the opportunity to create a place for us to live (John 14:2).
  • This established the stage for His return in the following way: That He went, Jesus will return in the same manner as He came-literally, personally, and clearly in the clouds-in order to establish the Kingdom of Heaven and Earth (Acts 1:11; Daniel 7:13-14; Matthew 24:30; Revelation 1:7).
  • The Scriptures commonly depict Him as being at the right hand of the Father, which is a position of honor and power (Psalm 110:1; Ephesians 1:20; Hebrews 8:1).

God the Father is the Head of the Church (Colossians 1:18), the provider of spiritual gifts (Ephesians 4:7-8), and the One who fills all in all (Colossians 1:26-27). (Ephesians 4:9-10).

Scripture and observances

When Jesus appeared to the Apostles on various occasions over a period of 40 days, according to the first chapter of The Acts of the Apostles, he was taken up in their presence and hidden from them by a cloud, which is a common biblical image symbolizing God’s presence and which is represented by a cloud in the Bible. Although belief in the Ascension may be found in other books of the New Testament, the focus and imagery used in those writings are much different. According to the Gospel of John, the glorification portrayed by the Ascension tale appears to have occurred immediately following the Resurrection.

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The Ascension of Jesus is included in the Apostles’ Creed, which was a statement of faith used for baptism in the early church at the time of Jesus.

Despite the sense of separation implied in this act, which could be expected to establish a tone of melancholy, the entire liturgical season of Ascensiontide, from the 10 days before Pentecost, is marked by gladness as the rising Lord triumphs in the final victory over death and hell.

For want of a better phrase, Christ “was hoisted up into heaven so that he may make us heirs with him of his Godhead.” When the people of Europe were enthralled by the visual and theatrical arts during the Middle Ages, they found an expression in a variety of ceremonial acts that were connected with the feast.

Art

The Ascension is an ancient motif in Christian art, with depictions of it dating back to the 5th century. The oldest depiction of the Ascension, which was popular in the Western world until the 11th century, portrays Christ approaching from the side, rising to the summit of the hill, and clutching the hand of God, which emerges from a cloud above to draw him into the presence of God. The Apostles, who have gathered below, are keeping an eye on the proceedings. Another rendition of the Ascension was made in Syria in the 6th century and was later used in Byzantine artwork.

  1. He holds a scroll in his hands and makes a gesture of blessing.
  2. Paul, who was not present since he was not present according to historical records.
  3. Peter, an allegory of the church that Christ departs behind.
  4. Similarly, by the 11th century, the Western world had embraced a frontal depiction of the world.
  5. The mandorla is frequently surrounded by angels; nevertheless, he is not always supported or even surrounded by angels; as a result, he is no longer carried to heaven, but instead ascends by his own strength.
  6. When it comes to religious subjects, the Ascension was a popular choice during the Renaissance and Baroque periods, when both periods incorporated the iconography of Christ with his wounds on show.

Those in charge of editing the Encyclopaedia Britannica Melissa Petruzzello was the author of the most recent revision and update to this article.

What mountain was Jesus on when He ascended into heaven?

The responses from the community are arranged according to how many people voted for them. The greater the number of votes, the higher the position of an answer on the list. According to Luke (both in his gospel and in the book of Acts), Jesus’ ascension took place at Bethany (Luke 24:50), which was located on the southeastern slope of the Mount of Olives (just outside Jerusalem), and which, as mentioned in Acts 1:12, was at a distance of a Sabbath day’s journey (2,000 cubits, or approximately 3,000 feet, based on Joshua 3:4, where that was the required separation distance in the Israelite camp between “(Matthew 28:16-20) The gospel of Matthew closes with the resurrected Christ on a mountain in Galilee, but it does not go on to chronicle His ascension from that point on.

The 31st of May There have been 20190 replies.

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Apostle Bartholomew Witnesses The Ascension of Jesus

Kelly Wise Valdes contributed to this article. The apostle Bartholomew, who was born in the Galilee town of Cana, just outside of Jerusalem, is said to have witnessed Jesus Christ’s ascension on the third day. Some have questioned the authenticity of the ascension; nonetheless, it has been stated that Bartholomew was present on the site as a recorded eyewitness throughout the incident. Bartholomew is a character about whom little is known at this time. His origins are unknown, however it has been suggested that he hailed from a long family of farmers, and it was via farming that he met Disciple Philip during a commodities exchange.

  • Bartholomew’s first reaction to Jesus was one of skepticism, as it is widely believed that individuals from Nazareth are unsuited for God’s job.
  • “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” Philip urged Bartholomew to come and see for himself what he was talking about.
  • Some stories even claim that Bartholomew witnessed Jesus’ resurrection after He had been raised from the dead.
  • His close friends also allege that he left behind a handwritten copy of the Gospel of Matthew, which they believe to be true.
  • Fishermen, a tax collector, and a rebel were among those who joined the movement as new adherents.

In order to discover more about how God transformed each man from ordinary to remarkable, this series will highlight one of the disciples every month in a lighthearted and entertaining manner.

When did Jesus ascend into Heaven?

It is an excellent question, and I believe that the crux of the issue is the word ‘touch me not’ that is used in the King James Version. For John 20:17-18, the Bible Knowledge Commentary defines what it means to state the following. “She may have physically embraced Him, because the Lord responded, “Do not hold on to Me, for I have not yet returned to the Father.” She may have physically embraced Him. rather than this, go to my brothers and inform them. These statements alluded to the beginning of a new relationship, the arrival of new relatives, and the assumption of new responsibilities.

  • In light of the King James Version’s “Touch Me not,” several interpreters have questioned why He could not just be “touched.” The NIV translation is more accurate because He was surely not invulnerable to attack (cf.
  • 28:9; John 20:27).
  • In fact, Jesus said, “I am the way I am.” “For the church, this (the physical touch) does not represent My true presence.
  • He referred to His disciples as His brothers in His teachings.
  • instead, I refer to you as friends” (15:15).
  • Heb.
  • 8:15-17, 29; Gal.

Mary’s new responsibility was to bear witness to the fact that He had risen from the dead.

Christians today are also recipients of special grace, and they, too, have been entrusted with the new responsibility of witnessing to the rest of the world (cf.

28:16-20).

It is preferable to understand the command as not attempting to ‘hold onto’ Him or prevent Him from leaving again.

Wishing you the best.

Why Jesus Had to Ascend to Heaven: Answers from Scripture and Aquinas

It is an excellent question, and I believe that the crux of the issue is the term ‘touch me not’ that is used in the KJV. When it comes to John 20:17-18, the Bible Knowledge Commentary clarifies what to say. “Because the Lord said, “Do not cling on to Me,” she may have physically touched Him; nonetheless, He has not yet returned to the Father. rather than that, go to my brothers and inform them. A new relationship, new relatives, and a new sense of obligation were conjured up by these few words.

  1. Several interpreters have questioned why He could not be “touched” because of the KJV’s “Touch Me Not” line.
  2. Matt.
  3. The fact that Mary had once experienced the loss of Jesus’ presence (after His crucifixion) made her fearful of experiencing it again.
  4. My ascension and the giving of the Holy Spirit to the church will mark the beginning of a new chapter in our relationship.” Jesus then went on to explain the significance of the newly discovered relatives to his disciples.
  5. Later, He had said that they were pals, saying, “I no longer refer to you as servants, but rather as friends” (15:15).
  6. Heb.
  7. 8:15-17, 29; Gal.
  8. His raised presence was now Mary’s duty, and she had to bear witness to it.
  9. The Christians of today are also receivers of extraordinary grace; as a result, they have been entrusted with a fresh responsibility to bear witness to the gospel across the globe (cf.
  10. 28:16-20).

Not to ‘hold onto’ Him or prevent Him from going again is a more accurate interpretation of the order. When He returned to the Father is revealed in the chapter from Acts 1 that you referred to before. Greetings and good luck.

Leading the Way to Heaven

As St. Thomas Aquinas explains, Christ’s ascension is a component of his redemptive work that results in our redemption (Summa TheologicaIII, 57, 6). His text is taken from John 16:7, in which Jesus says to the apostles, “But I tell you the truth, it is best for you if I depart.” “First and foremost, He prepared the road for our elevation into heaven,” writes St. Thomas. Specifically, St. Thomas quotes Ephesians 4, in which St. Paul recalls a Psalm prophesying the Christ, saying, “He rose on high and took prisoners captive; he bestowed gifts on men” (Ephesians 4:8).

  1. Paul interprets Psalm 68 as a reference to Christ’s liberation of the righteous souls from Hades and the opening of the gates of heaven on their behalf.
  2. Consequently, St.
  3. And if I go and make a place for you, I will return and take you to myself, so that you may be where I am as well” (John 14:2-3).
  4. As Jesus was about to go for his final journey, the Apostle Thomas said, “Master, we don’t know where you’re going; how can we know the way?” (See also John 14:5).
  5. No one else can bring anybody else to the Father except through me.
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Interceding for Humanity

The second explanation given by St. Thomas for why the Ascension is crucial to salvation is that it enabled Jesus to go to heaven in order to intercede for us as the everlasting high priest. It is in Hebrews 7:25 that he asserts that “he is always capable of saving those who approach God through him,” because “he lives eternally to make intercession for them.” He is quoting from the Bible. “For Christ did not enter into a sanctuary fashioned by human hands, a replica of the genuine sanctuary, but into heaven itself, in order that he may now stand before God on our behalf,” we read in Hebrews 9:24.

Granting Gifts to the Church

Christ, who sits at the right side of the Father, gives the Spirit and the gifts of the Spirit to the Church, which she receives. After quoting the prophecy that “He gave gifts to men,” St. Paul goes on to say in Ephesians 4 that “the one who descended is also the one who climbed far beyond all the heavens, that he may fill all things with himself.” It was to equip the holy ones for the work of ministry, for the building up of the body of Christ, that he gave some as apostles, others as prophets, others as evangelists, others as pastors, and others as teachers, in order that we might all come to the unity of faith and knowledge of Jesus Christ, to mature manhood, to the extent of the full stature of Christ.” (Ephesians 4:9-13).

The Church, enlivened by the Holy Spirit and empowered by his charisms, evolves into the fullness of Christ, who is present in all his glory in heaven.

Even though Matthew’s Gospel does not recount the actual occurrence of the Ascension, it substitutes the Great Commission as the apostles ascend the mountain with Jesus for the final time: “All authority in heaven and on earth has been handed to me.” Send out disciples to all peoples, baptizing them in the name of the Father, of the Son, as well as in the name of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey all I have ordered you.

Then you’ll notice that I’ll be with you constantly, right up until the end of time” (Matthew 28:18-20).

Speaking further of the gifts associated with the future Holy Spirit, Jesus informed the apostles, “The Advocate, the holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name—he will teach you everything and remind you of all I have told you.” The peace I give you I leave with you; the peace I leave with you.” (See also John 14:26-27.)

Seated at the Father’s Right Hand

“So then, when he had spoken to them, the Lord Jesus was snatched up into heaven and seated at the right side of God,” according to Mark’s Gospel (Mark 16:19). St. Thomas clarifies that this is not to be interpreted as a spatial arrangement, because the Father is pure spirit, and hence cannot be perceived as such. Instead, it indicates that Christ now abides in the whole exposed splendour of the divinity (while on earth, this brilliance was obscured) and that the full authority of judgment has been given to him by the Father (SummaIII, 58, 1).

In terms of divinity, it indicates that the Father and the Son are co-equal in the Godhead, despite the fact that the Father is the source of the relationships that exist within the Trinity (SummaIII, 58, 2).

“Therefore, because we have a great high priest who has gone through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us cling to our confession,” the book of Hebrews says.

In order to obtain mercy and find grace in time of need, let us boldly approach the throne of grace” (Hebrews 4:14-16).

The Ascension Increases our Faith, Hope, and Charity

In addition, St. Thomas teaches that the Ascension works to bring us up in the virtues of faith, hope, and charity (SummaIII, 57, 1, ad. 3). Jesus replied to the Apostle Thomas, and this is what St. Thomas quotes: “Have you now come to believe because you have seen me?” People who have not seen and yet have believed are blessed” (John 20:29). As a result, first and foremost, the Ascension strengthens our confidence in the unseen Christ. As a second benefit, it fosters optimism, because Christ has gone to the place he has promised to those who have remained true to him.

“My children, I will only be with you for a short period of time longer,” Jesus informed the apostles at the Last Supper.

You should love one another in the same way that I have loved you.

The Fittingness of the Ascension

Christ ascended to heaven both for our sake and because it was appropriate for who he is to do so. “Now, as a result of His Resurrection, Christ has entered into an everlasting and incorruptible existence,” says St. Thomas. However, although our earthly home is a location of generation and corruption, the heavenly home is a sanctuary of purity and purity alone. As a result, it was not appropriate for Christ to remain on earth following His resurrection; rather, it was appropriate for Him to go to heaven” (SummaIII, 57, 1).

” He felt a certain kind of satisfaction from the coincidence.

(SummaIII, 57, 1, ad 2).

His supernatural presence can be felt in the countless manifestations of the Holy Spirit that take place throughout the Church, as well as in a concrete sense in the Holy Eucharist.

As part of the Pentecostal celebrations, the Church is now calling out for the arrival of the Holy Spirit: “Come, Holy Spirit, come!” (From the Pentecost Sequence.)

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New International Version (New International Version) (NIV) 9As soon as he stated this, he was picked up by A) the police “>(A)right in front of their very eyes, and a cloud obscured his appearance from their view. 10They were staring up into the sky intently as he passed them when two guys clad in white B) appeared out of nowhere “>(B) was standing next to them. 11 “Men of Galilee,” C) “Men of Galilee,” C) “”What are you doing standing here staring up at the sky?” they inquired. This same Jesus, who has been taken away from you and is now in heaven, will return to you.

Matthias Chosen to Replace Judas

a new International Version has been published (NIV) A) He was taken up in the air after saying this; B) He was taken up in the air after saying this; “>(A)right in front of their very eyes, and a cloud obscured his appearance from their view.’ When two guys dressed in white B) appeared out of nowhere and looked up into the sky as he passed them, they were startled “They were standing next to B.

11 ‘Men of Galilee,’ C) a group of men from Galilee “”Why are you standing here staring up at the sky?” they said (C).

Footnotes

  1. The New International Version (NIV) (NIV) 9As soon as he stated this, he was dragged away in A) a car “>(A)right in front of their very eyes, and a cloud obscured him from their view. 10They were staring up into the sky intently as he passed them by when two guys clad in white B) appeared out of nowhere “>(B) stood next to them. 11 “Men of Galilee,” C) “Men of Galilee” “”Why are you standing here staring up at the sky?” they said. This same Jesus, who has been taken away from you and ascended into heaven, will return D) “>(D)in the same manner as you have witnessed him ascend into heaven.”

New International Version (New International Version) (NIV) NIV® stands for New International Version® of the Holy Bible. Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011, and 2012 byBiblica, Inc.®Used with permission from the owner. All rights are retained around the world. The New International Version (NIV) Reverse Interlinear Bible provides translations from English to Hebrew and from English to Greek. Zondervan has copyright protection till the year 2019.

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