What Kind Of Donkey Did Jesus Ride

The Messiah’s Donkey – Wikipedia

It is the donkey on which the Messiah will arrive to redeem the world at the end of days, according to Jewish tradition. Hebrew: “The Messiah’s donkey” is a term that is used in modern Hebrew to refer to someone who is responsible for doing the “dirty work” on someone else’s behalf. The biblical text Zechariah 9:9 states that “your king is coming to you; righteous and having salvation is he, humble and mounted on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey.” This is the origin of the belief. The ‘king’ mentioned in this verse is interpreted by Chazalas to be a reference to the coming of the Messiah.

To the king’s ridicule, Samuel responds with the following words: “Do you have a horse with a thousand colors, like the donkey of the Messiah?

His donkey, without a doubt, will be a miracle.” According to the New Testament (Mark 11:1-11), as Jesus approached the Mount of Olives, he dispatched two of his disciples to a nearby village in order to procure a donkey, or more specifically, an Onager, or wild donkey, for him.

It is believed that this was the fulfillment of Zechariah 9:9, according to Christian religious tradition.

In Jerusalem, when he arrived, he was greeted by Sophronius, who was undoubtedly taken aback by the fact that the caliph of the Muslims, one of the most powerful people on the planet, was riding a donkey, fulfilling the prophecy in Zechariah 9:9 that “your king is coming to the arrival.”

Modern references

In Israel, the phrase “the Messiah’s Donkey” can also refer to a controversial political-religious doctrine attributed to the teachings of Avraham Yitzhak Kook, which claims that secular Jews, who represent the material world, are God’s instrument whose purpose it is to establish the State of Israeland begin the process of redemption, but that once the state is established, secular Jews are required to step aside and allow the Religious – Haredipublic to govern the state.

In the United States, A donkey is used to represent the secular Jewish public, while a collective quasi-Messianic body is used to represent the Religious-Haredi people who would take their place.

In 1998, Seffi Rachlevsky published a book titled The Messiah’s Donkey, which focuses on this issue and sparked widespread controversy among the Jewish and Israeli public.

In this way, the act of riding on the back of a donkey represents the Messiah’s authority over the corporeal world (represented by the donkey).

References

When we read the 21st chapter of Matthew, we learn that Jesus dispatched two of his followers to a town in order to obtain a donkey with a colt alongside it, and that this was the beginning of his victorious entry into Jerusalem. In order for him to be able to ride the donkey on his route to Jerusalem, Jesus instructed them to bring him the donkey and colt. But why did Jesus chose a poor donkey to travel on instead of a majestic horse to carry his cross? Published by the Amazing Bible Timeline with World History, these articles are written by the publishers of the book.

  • There were three reasons why Jesus rode a donkey.
  • Horses are almost often referenced in the Bible in connection with kings and battle, but donkeys are almost always mentioned in connection with regular people.
  • “Jesus utilized the donkey to establish a connection with ordinary people.” Donkeys were not commonly utilized during times of war since they were smaller than horses and possessed of a cautious nature that may be misinterpreted for stubbornness.
  • It was fulfilled in Matthew 21:1-11 when Jesus rode into Jerusalem on a donkey, and he was victorious since he had done it without shedding any blood on the part of his followers.
  • Third, Jesus utilized the donkey to establish a connection with ordinary people.
  • During his time on this planet, Jesus, on the other hand, loved the impoverished and the ill.
  • These articles are written by the publishers of The Amazing Bible Timeline with World History, and are available for free download.
  • On this fantastic study companion, you will have access to over 1,000 references in a circular arrangement that is unique to it. Educate yourself on intriguing facts: Biblical events with scriptural references placed alongside global history demonstrate amusing chronological linkages. People will stop and speak about this well laidout Jesus historical timeline poster, which is perfect for your house, business, or church because of its attractive and simple design. More information about this unusual and entertaining Bible study tool may be found by clicking here.

Triumphal Entry: What You NEVER KNEW about Jesus and the Donkey!

Throughout the Bible, God never missed a chance to employ strong symbols to communicate his message. The fact that Jesus rode atop this humble horse says a great deal about Christ’s character and mission. What was Jesus’ reason for riding a donkey? The Messiah, as predicted by the prophets, is assuming His proper place in the world. Throughout the Bible, God never missed a chance to employ strong symbols to communicate his message. The fact that Jesus rode atop this humble horse says a great deal about Christ’s character and mission.

Matthew 21:1-5 is a passage of scripture.

What was Jesus’ reason for riding a donkey?

He is modest and riding on an ass, on a colt, the foal of an ass.” He is humble and riding on an ass.” The Bible says (Zechariah 9:9) KJV.

The reason the people acclaimed Jesus as their king was because they were chanting, “Hosanna!” The one who comes in the name of the Lord is to be praised! (Matthew 21:9, NIV) Jesus is the actual Davidic Messiah and ruler, according to the Old Testament.

2. Jesus rode a donkey to symbolize peace.

Why didn’t Jesus ride a warhorse like He did in the book of Revelation? Leaders in the ancient Middle Eastern world rode horses if they were going to war, but donkeys if they were going to negotiate peace, explains Mark Boda. Solomon is described as riding a donkey on the day he was acknowledged as the new king of Israel, according to First Kings 1:33. Other biblical passages that mention leaders riding donkeys include Judges 5:10, 10:4, 12:14, and 2 Samuel 16:2. According to Zechariah 9:9-10, a donkey is mentioned, which corresponds to the description of a king who will be “just and possessing salvation, compassionate.” Instead of riding into battle, this monarch would choose to enter in peace.

  • He will go around the world proclaiming peace.
  • “Take away.
  • “The war bow will be broken”: there will be no need for bows or arrows in combat.
  • “His reign shall spread from sea to sea,” which means that the King will have control over a large area with no opponents to worry about.
  • The worldwide peace that this lowly King will declare will be a fulfillment of the angels’ hymn in Luke 2:14: “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, goodwill toward mankind!” (NKJV).

3. Christ’s journey on a donkey harkened back to the foreshadowing of a father sacrificing his own only son.

Isaac, a symbol of Christ, rides a donkey to the altar where he would be sacrificed by his father Abraham (Genesis 49:10-12).

4. Jesus’ journey on a donkey symbolized God’s blessing to His people.

According to Genesis 49:10-12, Jacob’s divine blessing over his son Judoh includes the following reference to a donkey and a donkey’s foal: “The scepter will not depart from Judah, nor the ruler’s staff from between his feet until he comes to whom it belongs, and the obedience of the nations shall be his. In order to wash his clothing in wine, he will soak his robes in the blood of grapes. He will tie his donkey to a vine, and his colt to the most desirable branch. It is predicted that his eyes would be deeper than wine and that his teeth will be whiter than milk.” Jesus is born into the tribe of Judah and is enthroned for all eternity.

In addition, read verses 14-16 about Isaachar, the rawboned donkey who submits to the authority of the king!

5. Jesus’ triumphal journey teaches us that after all of the sacrifices offered for sin, we can enter the rest of faith because of His final sacrifice (Hebrews 10:12).

God’s unambiguous mandate is seen in Exodus 23:12: “Do your job for six days, but on the seventh day do not work, so that your cow and your donkey may rest, and so that the slave born in your household and the foreigner living among you may be refreshed.”

6. Emissaries sent donkeys overloaded with gifts to appease the wrath of an enemy, preventing bloodshed.

For the purpose of avoiding the anger of his brother Esau, Jacob sent donkeys loaded with riches (Genesis 33:8). Abigail arrived with donkeys loaded with food in order to prevent David from murdering her and her family. Nabal, her spouse, had enraged the king-to-be with his behavior. In 1 Samuel 25:26, the wise woman knelt before David and said, “And now, my lord, as surely as the Lord your God lives and as you live, since the Lord has kept you from bloodshed and from avenging yourself with your own hands, may your enemies and all who are intent on harming my lord be like Nabal,” referring to David’s enemies and all who are intent on harming him.

7. God used a donkey to speak His judgment!

Yes, Balaam’s donkey does in fact warn the prophet of His violation to the law. According to the book of Numbers 22, “. The Lord unlocked the donkey’s lips, and the donkey answered to Balaam, ‘What have I done to you that you have hit me these three times?'” ‘You have made a fool of yourself,’ Balaam said to the donkey. If I only had a sword in my hand, I would be able to put you to death right now.’ In response, the donkey inquired, ‘Am I not your own donkey, on which you have always ridden, even to this day?’ Is this something I’ve been doing to you on a regular basis?’ ‘No,’ he responded.

  • As a result, he bent low and fell on the ground facedown.
  • Judges 15:15 is an example of a formalized formalized formalized formalized (Judges 15:15).
  • The donkey was not devoured by the lion.
  • Using a donkey, King Jehu traveled towards Samaria, which was a type of fake Jerusalem, in order to demolish the temple dedicated to the false deity Baal (2 Kings 9:11-10:28).

8. Jesus demonstrated that he was the burden-bearer who came to save us.

Baby Jesus was born in the most humble of circumstances. Remember that a donkey transported a pregnant Mary, a poor woman from Nazareth, all the way to Bethlehem in the first century. (See Luke 2:4-7.) This noble beast of burden was responsible for transporting the Savior of the World. The image of Mary’s donkey was utilized by Jesus to establish a connection with the common people. He was on his way to get them. During his time on our planet, Jesus showed compassion for the poor, the weak, and the downtrodden.

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He went to him and treated his wounds with oil and wine, then left him to rest.

This year, take a more in-depth look at the triumphant entry.

Haggai and Zechariah NIV Application Commentary by Mark Boda are the primary sources. www.Amazingbibletimeline.com www.Taylormarshall.com Kristin M. Swenson, Ph.D. is a Ph.D. candidate. Alan Rudnick, Baylor University, shares his lessons learned from a donkey.

Why Did Jesus Ride a Donkey into Jerusalem? The Triumphal Entry

The Triumphal Entry of Jesus into Jerusalem on a Donkey When they got close to Jerusalem and reached Bethphage, near the Mount of Olives, Jesus dispatched two disciples, instructing them to go to the Mount of Olives and pray “You will find a donkey tied to a post in the village in front of you as soon as you enter it, as well as a colt with her. Bring them to me after they’ve been untied. If someone says anything to you, you are to respond by saying, “The Lord requires them,” and the Lord will dispatch them immediately.” These events took happened as a result of what the prophet had predicted: “Say to the daughter of Zion, ‘Behold your King is coming to you, lowly, and ridden on a donkey, and on a colt, the foal of a beast of burden.'” Matthew 21:1-5 is a passage from the Bible.

John 12:14-16 is a biblical passage.

O daughter of Jerusalem, let your voice be heard!

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Why Did Jesus Ride a Donkey?

Despite the fact that Jesus had come to Jerusalem on multiple occasions to honor the feasts, his final arrival into the city had a special importance for him. He was triumphantly approaching as a modest King of peace, and everyone was cheering for him. Donkeys were traditionally used to enter cities, as opposed to a conquering monarch riding in on his horse, to signify peace, rather than war. Doug Bookman provides the following transcription of his argument for why Jesus rode into Jerusalem on a donkey: “‘Behold, O Jerusalem of Zion, the King comes upon youmeek and lowlyriding on the back of a donkey,’ Zechariah 9:9 says.

That is not the case.

The fact that the monarch rode on a donkey is quite significant.

And don’t forget that when Absalom usurped the kingdom from his father, David, the first thing he did was go get his royal donkey and ride through the streets of the city to prove his legitimacy.

When it says He comes gentle and lowly, the implication is that He does not arrive with a military apparatus to protect him. He does not arrive with an army; instead, he arrives humble and lowly, riding on the back of a donkey. Consequently, I believe that the donkey is a symbol of His kingship.”

Donkeys in the Bible

The following is an excerpt from the Bible Encyclopedia’s “The Donkey” entry in theScripture Alphabet of Animals: “The Donkey”: is somewhat similar in appearance to a horse, but is somewhat smaller and appears to be lazy and uninterested in most activities. In certain areas, like as those where the Bible was written, it is a magnificent huge animal that is used for riding by the local populace. Some of the people recorded in the Bible possessed a large number of donkeys. Abraham possessed sheep, oxen, donkeys, and camels, whereas Job possessed five hundred donkeys at one point and a thousand donkeys afterwards.

  • It’s important to remember that when our holy Savior was approaching Jerusalem a few days before his death, he rode on the back of a donkey, demonstrating his meekness and humility even while the crowds sang his praises and spread their robes in the path of respect for him.
  • The donkey is quite kind and tolerant, and he does not appear to be annoyed even when he is carrying a very big burden.
  • Despite the fact that he appears so uninteresting, he is devoted to his master and will occasionally track him down and run to him even while he is surrounded by guys.
  • Credits for the image: iStock/Getty Images Plus/Diy13

Did Jesus ride a colt, a donkey, or both?

A donkey and a colt are mentioned in Matthew, while only a colt is mentioned in Mark and Luke. Who is correct? In addition, assuming Matthew is correct, what is the best way to ride a donkey and a colt at the exact same time?

Answer

Matthew 21:2-7: Enter the settlement in front of you, and you will discover a donkey tied to a post, as well as a colt tethered to another post beside her. He will be brought to me by the untiedthemand. They brought the donkey and the colt and placed their cloaks on them, and he sat on the backs of them. Mark 11:2-7: Enter the hamlet in front of you, and as soon as you enter there, you will see a colttied, which has never been sat on before. This is a sign that you have entered the right village.

  1. When the people arrived, they placed their cloaks on the colt and seated it in front of Jesus.
  2. Untieitand bringithere are two words that come to mind.
  3. The assertions made by Matthew, Mark, and Luke are all true and accurate.
  4. Matthew’s account is available online (cf.
  5. 9:9).
  6. Also, if you had three pals, Bob (and his two companions), Jeff (and his son, John), visit to your house yesterday and you told your boss the next day that Bob had been at your house, was that a lie because you didn’t add Jeff and John?
  7. It is not necessary for someone to recount every detail of an occurrence in order to be speaking the truth.
  8. They are irrelevant because they are not required for the author’s main point to be established.
  9. Luke 23:38, et.
  10. As a result, all three of them are telling the truth.
  11. Given that the voyage was too long for a young colt to make with one on its back, it is logical to assume that Jesus rode the elder donkey first and then the little colt afterwards.

To be sure, the most apparent solution is that the second “them” in Matthew is speaking about cloth (plural throughout the gospels) rather than a donkey and a colt, as others have speculated.

Related Topics

The Bible has typographical errors. Are there any missing verses? The Infallible Word of God Scripture that has been inspired by God The Canonization of the New Testament is the process through which the New Testament canon is established. The Bible is a collection of writings that are arranged in a chronological order. How to Communicate the Authority of Scripture in a Postmodern Context Scripture’s Scriptural Authority Scripture’s Continuing Relevance The Bible’s Transmission to the Next Generation The Bible’s Attestation of the Truth Scripture It’s only the KJV, yet there’s an error of errors: the 1611 KJV Preface disagrees with KJO.

Why Did Jesus Ride a Donkey for His Triumphant Entry?

You may have been perplexed as to why, with the several options available to Jesus on Palm Sunday, he chose to ride a donkey into Jerusalem. There was no chariot or litter, and there was no thoroughbred horse; Jesus rode on the back of a donkey’s colt, with the cloaks of other people serving as his saddle. In doing so, Jesus delivered a surprise message to the throngs of people who had gathered to see him.

How Did Jesus Disciples Find the Donkey?

Just as Jesus and His disciples were about to arrive in Jerusalem, Jesus instructed two of His disciples to travel to a nearby hamlet (whose name is not specified) and rescue a colt and its mother (Matthew 21:2). Furthermore, Jesus instructed the two disciples on what they should say if anybody inquired as to why they were carrying the donkey and the colt with them (Matthew 21:3). The two disciples followed Jesus’ instructions and discovered the colt and donkey near the village’s entrance. In addition, several passersby (who later turned out to be the colts’ owners) confronted them, and the disciples responded with the same response that Jesus had given them: “The Lord requires it.” (See Luke 19:34.) The owners were pleased with the reaction, and they permitted the disciples to take the colt and donkey (Mark 11:6).

Why Did Jesus Ride a Donkey Instead of a Horse?

The reason for Jesus’ arrival into Jerusalem, which is referred to as the Triumphal Entry, was that he was recognized as the King of the Jews. The manner in which Jesus entered Jerusalem was akin to the manner in which a monarch was coronated during those times. In the Old Testament, the concepts of Messiah and monarchy were intertwined. Jesus, on the other hand, came into Jerusalem on a young donkey that had never been ridden before by anybody else (Luke 19:30). As a result, rather of the customary grand processions that accompanied monarchs in those days, a unique spectacle was produced.

  • The fact that Jesus rode on the back of a young donkey has a great deal of heavenly significance.
  • First and foremost, it is vital to understand that Jesus is accepting His position as King of the Jews in this verse.
  • In order to separate themselves from the rest of the people, monarchs would frequently ride into the city on a horse during their coronation.
  • To be the first to ride the colt was an honor for Jesus, who felt privileged.
  • Jesus came to earth in the role of King of Peace.
  • Horses were magnificent creatures, and they were frequently the mount of choice for kings.
  • They were also ferocious battle creatures.

It was the Jews’ hope that a victorious monarch would come along, one who would push back against the troops of Rome and establish Israel as a sovereign nation.

He did not come to wage war against Rome, as the people had anticipated; rather, He came to deliver the peace that had been prophesied by the angels at His conception (Luke 2:14).

Instead, it was a time of reconciliation between sinful humans and God.

Peer pressure might be one of the most difficult influences to counteract.

It might be difficult to regain one’s public image after having disappointed the expectations of the general public.

Even though the people had high hopes of Jesus, he did not disappoint them. There was nothing He could do to accommodate the pressing wishes of the populace, who longed with all their hearts for a military conqueror who would stand up to and eventually defeat their Roman ruler.

Did Jesus Fulfill Any Prophecies by Riding a Donkey?

The reason for Jesus’ arrival into Jerusalem, which is referred to as the Triumphal Entry, was that he was recognized as the Jewish King. This entry into Jerusalem resembled the manner in which a monarch was coronated during Jesus’ time in the Holy Land. When you read the Old Testament, you will see that the Messiah and royalty were tightly intertwined. On the other hand, Jesus arrived in Jerusalem on a young donkey, which had never been ridden by anyone else before him (Luke 19:30). As a result, instead of the typical magnificent processions that accompanied monarchs in those days, a strange spectacle was produced.

  • The fact that Jesus rode a young donkey carries a great deal of heavenly significance.
  • The fact that Jesus is embracing His position as King of the Jews is significant in this chapter.
  • In order to separate themselves from the rest of the populace, monarchs would frequently ride in on a horse during their coronation.
  • Being the first to ride the colt was a great honor for Jesus.
  • King of Peace is how Jesus introduced himself.
  • In ancient times, horses were magnificent creatures, and they were frequently the mount of choice for royalty.
  • It’s also important to note that they were war monsters.
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It was the Jews’ hope that a victorious monarch would come along, one who would push back against the troops of Rome and establish Israel as a sovereign state.

While the people had expected Him to come to wage war against Rome, He came instead to deliver the peace that had been prophesied by the angels before His birth (Luke 2:14).

Peace between sinful people and God, on the other hand.

Resistance to peer pressure can be one of the most difficult things to do.

Getting one’s public image back on track after disappointing the general public can be difficult.

Jesus was not swayed by the expectations of the crowd. There was nothing He could do to accommodate the pressing desires of the populace, who hoped with all their hearts for a military conqueror who would stand up to and eventually overthrow the Roman oppressor.

Did Donkeys Have a Special Meaning in Jesus’ Day?

Working in the fields might have been associated with moments of tranquility in Jesus’ day. Isaiah illustrates this notion when he states that the Israelites “will hammer their swords into ploughshares, and their spears into pruning hooks” as a result of their defeat. (See Isaiah 2:4) Working the land would be accomplished by using animals of burden (donkeys and oxen) (Isaiah 30:24). Since Israel lived in the Promised Land, which God had given them in accordance with His promise to Abraham, the products of the land were intimately associated with divine favor and favored individuals.

In the Old Testament, obedience to God and peace were closely associated concepts (Leviticus 26:3-6).

In contrast, during times of conflict, the men would abandon their fields and band together to battle against their adversaries who were threatening to steal the Promised Land away from the people of Israel.

How Did People Misunderstand Jesus?

Working in the fields might have been associated with moments of tranquility throughout Jesus’ stay on the planet. According to the prophet Isaiah, the Israelites would “hammer their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks” in order to “harness their might and make themselves strong.” (See Isaiah 2:4 for further information.) To farm the land, the men relied on animals of burden (donkeys and oxen) (Isaiah 30:24). Since Israel lived in the Promised Land, which God had given them in accordance with His promise to Abraham, the fruits of the land were intimately associated with divine favor and favored people.

In the Old Testament, obedience to God and peace were intimately interwoven (Leviticus 26:3-6).

In contrast, during times of conflict, the men would abandon their fields and band together to battle against their adversaries who were threatening to steal the Promised Land away from the Israelites.

Why Did Jesus Ride a Donkey?

The narrative of Jesus triumphantly riding into Jerusalem on a donkey was one that I eagerly anticipated hearing from my Sunday School instructors when I was a little girl. The scenario was dramatized in a few of church plays. Why did Jesus ride a donkey into Jerusalem, and have you ever thought about it? A donkey, to be precise. A domesticated hoofed animal of the horse family that has been domesticated. Long ears and a peculiar braying sound characterize this creature. What do you think this means?

When Did Jesus Get A Donkey to Ride into Jerusalem?

According to the Bible, Jesus and his followers paused in Bethphage, which is located near the Mount of Olives, before proceeding to Jerusalem for Passover week. Two of Jesus’ followers received explicit and comprehensive instructions from the Master. “Go to the settlement ahead of you, and you will immediately discover a donkey tied there, with her foal at her side,” he instructed the group. Bring them to me after they’ve been untied. If anybody says anything to you, tell them that the Lord requires their assistance, and he will send them straight away.” (Matthew 21:1-3; Luke 21:1-3).

When Jesus inquired, they immediately hurried to get the donkey.

As soon as they obtained the donkey and colt, they took them to Jesus, where they laid their cloaks on the donkey for Jesus to sit on (Matthew 21:6). (Luke 19:35).

Why Did Jesus Ride a Donkey into Jerusalem?

A donkey was brought to Jesus by the disciples because Jesus was getting ready to fulfill prophesy. Donkeys were depicted in the Bible as symbols of servitude, humility, suffering, and peace, among other things. Donkey riding, as a result, became a metaphor for the coming of peace. Jesus requested a donkey because the animal would demonstrate that Jesus’ kingdom did not come from man, but rather from God. A colt is a male donkey who is less than four years old and is still growing. A colt was frequently ridden by a new monarch, indicating a change in the balance of power.

  1. A monarch on a donkey would be a powerful symbol of peace.
  2. The prophesy would be fulfilled, however, when Jesus rode into Jerusalem on a humble donkey as a sign of peace, as prophecy had predicted he would do (Zechariah 9:9).
  3. God sent an angel to alter the course of the evil prophet Balaam’s journey to Moab in the book of Judges.
  4. Balaam then continued to thrash the animal out of frustration.
  5. What a rude awakening for Balaam!
  6. At that time, God opens Balaam’s eyes, and Balaam sees an angel standing on the path with a sword drawn, prompting him to repent.
  7. The donkey is a sign of humility, and Jesus is riding it as well.
  8. There is a significant contrast between love and anger: Jesus demonstrates compassion, whereas Balaam demonstrates hatred.

Why Do We Call it Palm Sunday?

Palm Sunday is the Sunday preceding Easter Sunday. That Sunday marks the beginning of Holy Week. We recall and celebrate Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem as our Savior and King on Palm Sunday, which takes place every year on April 14. When Jesus arrived in Jerusalem on a donkey, there was a great throng waiting to greet him. Can you image the dialogues that took place amongst the individuals who were waiting for Jesus? What would you have thought if you had seen Jesus riding up on a donkey and recognized him?

  1. The purpose of this activity was to treat Jesus like a king.
  2. ‘Peace on earth, and glory in the highest’ (Luke 19:38).
  3. Jesus was displaying humility rather than being intimidated.
  4. The question “Who is this?” was raised by a few persons.
  5. This is Jesus, the prophet from Nazareth in Galilee,’ the masses said in response (Matthew 21:11NIV).
  6. As a result, they elected to cut the palm branches and lay them on the ground instead of using cloaks for protection.
  7. These days, many churches hold Palm Sunday celebrations that include handing out palm leaves for people to wave over their heads in jubilation.
  8. Special Palm Sunday services are held in several churches to commemorate this occasion.
  9. The arrest of Jesus took place on Holy Thursday, and His crucifixion took place on Good Friday.
  10. Every minute of Jesus’ life was and continues to be significant.
  11. We have the potential to spread His love and glory to others around us.

Taking in the story of Jesus riding a donkey is a wonderful reminder that every creation of God has a specific and important function. God poured life into every animal and human being on the planet. Each and every creation is significant.

Did People Expect Jesus to Ride a Donkey?

The prophesy of Zechariah was well-known among the Jewish people. They thought that the Messiah would arrive in a lowly manner in order to demonstrate His love. Jesus was not going to arrive as a king with chariots of fire and parties full of people who were just there to serve themselves. Jesus would enter in the state of humility. He was filled with love and compassion. The fact that Jesus rode a donkey rather than a strong horse demonstrated that he was there to serve and save his followers.

When we read the Bible, we gain a better understanding of the messages God provides for His children.

This serves as a powerful reminder that God may utilize anybody or any animal to accomplish His kingdom’s objectives.

A Prayer for Palm Sunday

Father, Thank You for the gift of Your Son, Jesus, which You have given us. May we never forget the manner He arrived in Jerusalem and the significance of each and every moment. Please assist us in demonstrating Your love and glory to everyone. May we never forget the sacrifice that Jesus made for us. Amen, Father, in the name of Your Son. In the Name of the Lord, ‘Melissa Henderson’ is a fictional character created by Melissa Henderson.

Thoughts to Ponder About Jesus Riding a Donkey

“Remember that when our dear Savior was approaching Jerusalem a few days before his death, he rode on a donkey, thereby demonstrating his meekness and humility, even while the multitudes chanted his praises and spread their robes in the street to do him honor? ” If we allow pride to remain in our hearts, how can we expect to be like our Savior? The donkey is quite kind and tolerant, and he does not appear to be annoyed even when he is carrying a very big burden. I would be really disappointed if he were to be treated unfairly.

  1. The Bible states that the bull knows his owner, and the donkey knows his master’s crib; but Israel does not know, and my people do not take into consideration.
  2. In ” Scripture Alphabet of Animals – The Donkey ” by Harriet N.
  3. Unsplash/Tim Mossholder used for this image.
  4. Melissa aspires to inspire readers with her stories, which have appeared in books, periodicals, devotionals, and other publications.
  5. Her interests include volunteering in the community and in her church.
  6. Melissa may be found on social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and at www.
  7. It is our goal that these articles will assist you in understanding the significance and historical background of major Christian festivals and events, and that they will also encourage you as you take time to think on all that God has done for us through his son Jesus Christ!
  8. What exactly is Holy Week?
  9. What is the significance of Maundy Thursday?
  10. What Is the Meaning of Easter?
  11. Then, how come the most magnificent period in human history is surrounded by scared fisherman, loathed tax collectors, marginalized women, wimpy politicians, and disloyal friends?

As a devotional or study for both individuals and groups, this FREE audio offers a fresh perspective on the Lenten season. It is available for download now.

Donkeys: Where science, religion and pop culture collide

Throughout history, donkeys have served as funny, dependable sidekicks in films and children’s literature, ranging from Winnie the Pooh to Shrek. Donkeys, who are often portrayed as humble, obstinate, and perhaps a touch dimwitted, have a long and illustrious history as real-life heroes of agriculture, town planning, and religion. Even more strange is the fact that every donkey in the globe, whether they are grazing in meadows or gracing the big screen, has one unexplained characteristic in common: they all have a black cross on their backs, which runs down the length of their spines and over their shoulders.

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It is possible that if you shaved their fur, you would discover the cross on their skin “Dawn Maton, president of the Western Australia Donkey Society, shared her thoughts.

A biblical and scientific mystery

Ms Maton’s interest in donkeys began late in life, when her daughter left one in her care when she relocated to a foreign country a number of years earlier. Dawn Maton claims that she has never seen a donkey, including her own Mr Darcy, that did not have a cross running down its spine. (From Meghan Woods of ABC South West) “They’re really loyal and hardworking, and they won’t put up with any crap from you,” she said. “They’re actually just obstinate if they believe you’re being ridiculous,” she said.

  1. “Apparently, as Jesus was carrying his cross up the mount, a tiny donkey attempted to assist him but was unable to make it through the mob,” she stated further.
  2. Since its inception hundreds of years ago, the narrative of the little donkey has permeated Christian storytelling and liturgy across the world.
  3. That is not to imply, however, that the donkey does not play an important role in other biblical and historical accounts.
  4. Dr McCarthy said that this was due to the fact that it would seek for the quickest route up the mountain, and that is where roads would be built.
  5. Because of their significance in biblical prophecy, donkeys, according to Christian tradition, were given the cross as a gift.

In Dr McCarthy’s words, “the Christian tale starts up when the donkey is employed in Jesus’ victorious arrival into Jerusalem.” The authorities of the day, in particular, will be surprised when they see him doing this because they will realize he is alluding to the prophesy of Zachariah, which predicts that the king would ride into Jerusalem on a donkey, according to the Bible.

This was one of the ways in which Jesus questioned the officials of the temple before to his crucifixion, and it was shortly after that that he was arrested by the authorities. “With that, his agony, death, and resurrection started.”

A question of camouflage?

In the scientific world, the enigma of the donkey’s cross is less significant since it is less symbolic. Several other animals in the horse family have stripes on their coats, which researchers believe are caused by the same gene that enables contemporary horses to have a camouflaging color in their coats. According to Claire Wade, professor of computational biology and animal genetics at the University of Sydney, different kinds of zebra, the kulan, donkeys, and modern horses separated from one another about 3 million years ago, and their common ancestor most likely had some sort of striping or banding.

The donkey cross, according to researchers, is caused by the same gene that allows a certain current horse coat color to appear.

Ms Wade stated that while there is no definite evidence at this time, study has shown that these “basic marks” may have had a part in camouflaging the perpetrators.

Symbolism in storytelling

Donkeys are not the only component of the natural world that communities have attempted to rationalize via the use of religious stories or cultural symbols. For hundreds of years, these legends have penetrated societies all around the world. The Great Barrier Reef was formed as a result of dreams, according to the Maori, while the Milky Way galaxy is said to have sprung from a canoe. Similarly, Dr McCarthy stated, “the tale of the little donkey and how it was associated with the birth and the crucifixion” was no exception.

As a result of the past emphasis placed on Jesus’ divinity, it is necessary to assist people comprehend that Jesus was a normal person who was not born into luxury.

Jesus rode into Jerusalem on one or two donkeys? The Triumphal Entry in the Gospels

The Triumphal Entry of Jesus into Jerusalem. St. JoseMaria Institute is the source of this image. What was the total number of animals that Jesus rode into Jerusalem at the Triumphal Entry? It appears that the solution should be self-evident: he rode just one animal, either a donkey or a colt. Furthermore, this is exactly what is said in three of the Gospels, including Mark 11:7, among others. This triumphal act, on the other hand, is said to be in fulfillment of prophecy in Matthew’s Gospel; as we have seen, Matthew places a high value on the fulfillment of Scripture, and in Matthew 21:5 he states, quoting Zechariah 9:9: Behold, your king is coming to you, humble, and mounted on a donkey and on a colt, the foal of a donkey.

  1. They draped their cloth over the two animals, and Jesus rode into town while straddling them both (Matthew 21:7).
  2. According to Bart Ehrman’s book, Jesus Interrupted, on page 50, We find ourselves at yet another text by Bart Ehrman, this time relating to the donkey(s) on which Jesus rode into Jerusalem during His Triumphal Entry into the city.
  3. One thing to keep in mind regarding Ehrman’s comment is that all three gospels (Mark, Luke, and John) claim that Jesus rode into Jerusalem on a single donkey.
  4. Let us now turn our attention to the texts of Scripture.

In response to any comments from others, simply state that “The Lord requires them,” and the Lord will dispatch the necessary personnel at the earliest opportunity.” 5″Tell the daughter of Zion, ‘Behold, your King is coming to you, Lowly, andsitting on a donkey, a colt, the foal of a donkey,'” the prophet said.

6As a result, the disciples went and accomplished exactly what Jesus had instructed them to do.

The Gospel of Matthew (Matthew 21:1-7) Now when they drew near Jerusalem, to Bethphage and Bethany, at the Mount of Olives, He dispatched two of His disciples;2and He said to them,“Go into the town opposite you; and as soon as you have entered it you will finda colt tethered, on which no one has sat.

  1. 3And if anybody says to you, ‘Why are you doing this?’ answer, ‘The Lord has need of it,’ and instantly he will send it here.” 4So they went their way, and found the colt tied by the door outside on the street, and they loosed it.
  2. So they let them go.
  3. (Mark 11:1-7) 28When He had said this, He went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem.
  4. Loose it and bringit here.
  5. ’ thus you shall say to him, ‘Because the Lord has need of it.’” 32So those who were sent went their way and founditjust as He had said to them.
  6. And they threw their own clothes on the colt, and they set Jesus on him.

‘BlessedisHe who comes in the name of the Lord!’The King of Israel!” 14 Then Jesus, whenHe had found a young donkey, sat on it; as it is written:15 “Fear not, daughter of Zion; Behold, your King is coming, Sitting on a donkey’s colt.” (John 12:12-15) Matthew says that a donkey (adult) and a foal (baby donkey) were the animals (“s” for plural) that Jesus sat upon, while Mark, Luke, and John all affirm that one donkey was used for the Triumphal Entry.

  1. The best way to reconcile these accounts with Matthew’s two donkeys is that the other three writers could have seen only one donkey, while Matthew saw two.
  2. Matthew would have likely noticed the animals because his Gospel writing is characterized by how Christ fulfilled Old Testament Scriptures.
  3. There are other details that add to our understanding of the number of donkeys.
  4. For example, Luke gives details of the day of Jesus’ birth, though Matthew, Mark, and John bypass it altogether.
  5. The same can be said for the passages above regarding the number of donkeys.

For example, Matthew says in Matthew 21 that Jesus was on the way to Jerusalem “and came to Bethphage” (v.1); Mark says that the disciples were on the way to Jerusalem (matching Matthew) but were also getting closer to “Bethphage and Bethany.” Luke says the same as Mark, that Jesus and the disciples were drawing near to Bethphage and Bethany, and John says that Jesus and the disciples were getting closer to Jerusalem.

Mark and Luke provide more detail regarding the location of Jesus and the disciples as opposed to Matthew and John, but Matthew and John provide the Old Testament fulfillment of Jesus on the donkeys — and Matthew tells us that it was two donkeys instead of one.

There are other particulars, but Ehrman (and those who agree with him) can only claim “contradiction” if some writers said “there was only one donkey Jesus rode on” and then Matthew claimed “Jesus rode in Jerusalem on two donkeys.” Instead, we see that Mark, Luke, and John mention one donkey, but Matthew provides even more detail (2 donkeys) (2 donkeys).

Thus, like Matthew, I agree that Jesus entered Jerusalem on two donkeys and not one.

Of course he does: that’s to get you to believe that Scripture contains errors.

And yet, Ehrman’s not a believer anymore.

Think about it: Ehrman wants the Gospel writers to fight and clash with each other, but Jesus never taught the disciples that.

It is only the work of unbelievers to divide the Gospel writers, but believers can unite them and reconcile their Gospel accounts. Thus, we agree here with all three Gospel writers and disagree with Ehrman regarding the two donkeys in the Triumphal Procession.

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