What Happened To Jesus After He Died

He Descended into Hell?

Joseph purchased a linen shroud, and after lowering him to the ground, he covered him in the linen shroud and placed him in a tomb that had been carved out of solid rock. And he rolled a stone on the tomb’s entrance to seal it off for good. All of us are aware that Jesus died. (Mark 15:46) “‘Father, I entrust my spirit into your hands! He then exhaled his last breath after saying this’ (Luke 23:46). What occurred, though, when he passed away? Even while we know that his body was interred in Joseph’s tomb, we don’t know what happened to his soul.

What Is Death?

First and foremost, what precisely is death. In death, there is a division between things that should be joined together. Fundamentally, it is a state of being separated from God. According to Ephesians 2:1–2, “You were dead in your trespasses and sins,” which means “dead in your former way of life.” It is to be dead, to be enslaved to evil spirits, to be alienated from God, and to be offspring of his wrath to continue to live in sin. It is an estrangement, a hostility, and an alienation from the life and hope of the living God when this form of separation occurs.

Death, on the other hand, is more than merely being separated from God.

  1. Death shatters the bond that God created between embodied souls and ensouled bodies, and death is the tearing apart of that union.
  2. Psalm 16:10 provides us with a window into the teaching of the Bible.
  3. “God created human beings to be both embodied souls and ensouled bodies,” says the author.
  4. In addition to the spirit being abandoned “to Sheol,” the body also saw degeneration or decay.
  5. As a result, before to Jesus, when a person died, their souls were often sent to Sheol (or Hades) and their bodies (flesh) rotted.

The latter is something we’re all familiar with, while the former is a little more difficult to grasp. A brief look at the Bible will reveal why Peter believes David’s prophesy in Psalm 16 is such excellent news for the world.

What Is Sheol?

Sheol is the location of the souls of the deceased in the Old Testament, including both the good (such as Jacob in Genesis 37:35 and Samuel in 1 Samuel 28:13–14) and the wicked (such as Abel in 1 Samuel 28:13–14). (Psalm 31:17). According to the New Testament, the Hebrew wordSheolis is translated asHades, and the portrayal of Sheol in both the Old and New Testaments has a striking resemblance to the Greek mythological figure of Hades. It is located under the surface of the earth (Numbers 16:30–33), and it resembles a city with gates (Isaiah 38:10) and bars (Numbers 16:30–33).

  • In this country of darkness, the shadowy spirits of mankind can be found, as can be found in any other area of gloom (Isaiah 14:9; 26:14).
  • The most essential aspect of Sheol is that it is a realm where no one praises God (Psalm 6:5, 88:10–11, 115:17, Isaiah 38:18, among other passages).
  • From there, we learn that the biblical Sheol is divided into two compartments, similar to the Hades of Greek mythology, namely, Hades proper (where the wealthy man is transferred, according to Luke 16:23), and “Abraham’s bosom” (where the angels carry Lazarus, Luke 16:22).
  • While Abraham’s bosom is within hearing distance of Hades, it is separated from it by “a huge gap” (Luke 16:26), and it serves as a haven of solace and repose, similar to the Greek Elysium.
  • In Sheol/Hades, all deceased souls are sent, but Sheol is separated into two different sections, one for the virtuous and another for the evil.

Where Did Jesus Go When He Died?

In the aftermath of his atoning death for sin, Jesus travels to Hades, the City of Death, and pulls the gates off their hinges. As a result, what can we infer about Jesus’ whereabouts on Holy Saturday from this? Several Christians believe that following Jesus’ death, his soul was taken up into heaven to be in the presence of the Father, in accordance with Jesus’ words to the thief on the cross recorded in Luke 23:43. In contrast, the passage in Luke 23:43 states that Jesus would be in the presence of the thief (“Today you will be with mein paradise”), and based on the Old Testament and Luke 16, it appears likely that the now-repentant thief would be at Abraham’s side, a place of comfort and rest for the righteous dead, which Jesus here refers to as “paradise.” Following his death on the cross for sin, Jesus travels to Hades, the City of Death, and pulls the gates off their hinges in a show of defiance.

John the Baptist and the rest of the Old Testament faithful are ransomed from Sheol’s tyranny by him.

Heb.

Following his resurrection, Jesus ascends to heaven, bringing with him the ransomed dead, resulting in paradise no longer being located down near the region of agony, but rather up in the third heaven, the highest heaven, where God resides (2 Corinthians 12:2–4; 1 Thessalonians 4:13).

But the wicked remain in Hades in torment until the final judgment, when Hades releases the souls of the dead who dwell there and they are judged in accordance with their deeds, and then Death and Hades are thrown into hell, where they will burn for an eternity in the lake of fire (Revelation 20:13–15).

Good News for Us

In what ways does this have ramifications for Holy Week? Christ’s journey to Hades indicates that he was, in fact, created in the same manner as we are. Along with bearing God’s wrath on our behalf, he had to undergo death, which was the severance of his spirit from his physical body. In Luke 23:50–53, his body was in Joseph’s tomb, and his spirit had been in Sheol, which means “in the depths of the ground,” for three days (Matthew 12:40). The celestial choir and the saints of old come together in worship of the Lamb when we die.

  • However, unlike our bodies, Jesus’ body did not deteriorate after burial.
  • As the firstfruits of the resurrection harvest, God resurrected him from the grave and rejoined his soul with his now-glorified body, making him the firstfruits of the resurrection crop.
  • As an alternative, when we die, we unite with the heavenly choir and the saints of old to sing praises to the Lamb who was killed on the cross for our sakes and the salvation of all mankind.
  • The Lord has certainly risen from the dead.

Where was Jesus for the three days between His death and resurrection?

QuestionAnswer On the cross, after saying, “It is finished,” Jesus bowed his head and surrendered his spirit, according to the Bible (John 19:30). When Jesus died on the crucifixion, his corpse stayed there until it was brought down and laid in a neighboring tomb (John 19:40–42). His spirit, on the other hand, was somewhere else. Thirty-two hours later, He was raised from the dead by the reunification of his body and spirit (John 20). There has been some debate concerning where Jesus was during the three days between His death and resurrection—that is, where His spirit was during that time period.

  1. During Jesus’ entry into His kingdom, the believing thief requests to be remembered, and Jesus responds, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise” (Luke 23:42).
  2. As a result, upon His death, Jesus was taken to the region of blessing where God resides—heaven.
  3. Another passage is frequently cited in the discussion of where Jesus was during the three days that elapsed between His death and His resurrection.
  4. (ESV).
  5. According to this interpretation, the spirits Jesus addressed could have been either demonic or human in nature, but not both.
  6. Peter does not tell us what Jesus said to the spirits that were imprisoned, but it could not have been a message of redemption since angels cannot be rescued, as we know from the Bible (Hebrews 2:16).
  7. However, there is another reading of the text from 1 Peter.
  8. The fact that Jesus had “in spirit” taught to the people of Noah’s day while they were still alive on earth is provided by Peter as a footnote to the passage.
  9. The wordnow in 1 Peter 3:19 is included for clarity in the Amplified Bible and the New American Standard Bibles of 1977 and 1995, and it contrasts with the words “long ago” (NIV) and “formerly” (ESV) in 1 Peter 3:20.

The Amplified Bible and the New American Standard Bibles of 1977 and 1995 include the wordnow in 1 To further understand, consider the following paraphrase of 1 Peter 3:18–20: When Jesus died in the flesh, He was raised to life in the Spirit (it was by means of this same Spirit that Jesus preached to those who are currently imprisoned—those souls who rebelled during the period of God’s great patience when Noah was constructing the ark).

The prophet Noah was used by Jesus to teach spiritually to the people of Noah’s day, according to this viewpoint.

Another verse, Ephesians 4:8–10, is cited in the explanation of Jesus’ actions during the three days that elapsed between His death and resurrection.

According to the English Standard Version, Christ “led a multitude of prisoners.” Some believe that phrase alludes to an occurrence that is not mentioned anywhere else in the Bible, namely, that Jesus gathered all of the saved who were in paradise and transported them to their eternal home in heaven.

Another interpretation of Ephesians 4 is that the phrase “ascended up high” is a direct allusion to Jesus’ ascension.

In His triumph, Jesus had beaten and captured our spiritual adversaries, including the devil, death, and the curse of sin, and He had taken them captive.

The only thing we can be certain of is that, according to Jesus’ own words on the cross, He was taken up to be with the Father in paradise.

As well as this, we may confidently state that because His work of salvation was completed, Jesus did not have to suffer in hell. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) What happened to Jesus during the three days that elapsed between His death and resurrection?

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What Happened after the Cross and before the Resurrection?

This is a thought-provoking and significant question. Those associated with the so-called “Faith Movement” have a version of this that is wholly incompatible with biblical teaching. “Do you believe that the punishment for our sin was to die on the cross?” Frederick K.C. Price, a key instructor in the “Faith Movement,” has asked. If it were the case, the two robbers would have been forced to pay your debt. No, the penalty was to be sent into Hell itself, where they would spend the rest of their lives alienated from God.

  • 2).
  • This is not in accordance with what the Bible says.
  • The work Jesus had to accomplish after the crucifixion and before the Resurrection was critical and must not be overlooked.
  • In the same way, He who descended is also the One who climbed far above all the heavens, in order that He may fill all things.” (See also Ephesians 4:8–10).
  • The fact that Jesus used a real person name indicates that this was not a parable.
  • The narrative tells about a place named Hades, which served as both a haven and a source of misery for the characters.
  • If the individual was a believer, he was taken to Abraham’s bosom, where he found consolation and rest (Hebrews 11:13).
  • Immediately after His death, Jesus descended into Hades, into Abraham’s bosom, the realm of consolation, where He announced liberation to all who had died in faith.
  • No matter how long it takes, the unbeliever will be thrown into Hell, where he or she will be punished until the Great White Throne Judgment depicted in Revelation 20:13–15 takes place.

Afterwards, Death and Hades were thrown into the Lake of Fire for all eternity. This is the second death in the series. In addition, anybody who was not found to be recorded in the Book of Life was thrown into the Lake of Fire.”

Where was Jesus between Crucifixion and Resurrection?

  • This weekend is one of the most well-known weekends on the Christian calendar each year, with Good Friday commemorating Jesus’ death on the cross and Easter celebrating his Resurrection the following Sunday morning being two of the most important events on the calendar. Some Christians, however, have been debating the location of Jesus between His death and resurrection for more than two millennia, and the issue continues to be a source of contention today. In Jackson, Eric Petty, the main pastor of Skyline Church of Christ, explained that he “is not a man who is going to act like I have all the answers,” and that “this is one that I can’t claim I certainly know.” In my opinion, this is a fascinating subject, and we could stay here all day talking and debating and coming to completely different conclusions, both of which would be rational and understandable.” The fact that Jesus died to take away my sin and your sin – and all of our sins – is what counts most in the end. On the first day of the week following His death, He rose from the dead to claim triumph over death. And He extends the same triumph to us at this time.” According to the Bible’s account of Jesus’ death in Matthew 27:46-50, he died at 3 p.m. on Friday. ‘The Jewish calendar and clock at that time suggests that Jesus was crucified at noon and died three hours later at 3 p.m.,’ said William Watson, pastor of Historic First Baptist Church in Jackson. “Because the clock for each day begins at sunrise, which is about 6 a.m. for us, the clock for each day begins at noon,” Watson added. When the Bible says Jesus was crucified at the sixth hour, that implies noon, and He died at the ninth hour, which would be 3 p.m., that means He died at noon.” And because of the way the Jewish calendar is organized, each day lasts from dawn to nightfall. Be a result, after He died on Friday afternoon, early Sunday morning is referred to as “the third day” following His death, as promised by Jesus Himself.” As a result, there is around a 36 to 40 hour period during which Jesus’ spiritual position is uncertain. There are others who think Jesus was in Heaven at the time of the event. In Luke 23:43, Jesus is described as saying to a thief who was crucified with Him, “Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in paradise.” This is supported by the Bible. However, there is a verse in 1 Peter 3 that says the opposite is true. Following the explanation in 1 Peter 3:18 that Christ died once for the sins of all people and was raised to life, the following two verses state, “in which he went and proclaimed to the spirits in prison, because they had previously refused to obey, when God’s patience waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was being prepared, in which a few, namely, eight persons, were brought safely through water.” “I looked it up, and even Martin Luther, who started the Protestant Reformation and was well-versed in Scripture, said in his own commentaries that this is the most difficult passage in the New Testament to understand because it’s not entirely clear what Peter is trying to say,” Petty explained. “It’s the most difficult passage in the New Testament to understand because it’s not entirely clear what Peter is trying to say,” Petty added. You read the passage and you come across the phrase, ‘Christ died for everyone’s sins,'” she says. That makes sense.”‘He was raised to life in the Spirit,'” I understand. OK. Peter, I’m still here with you. It goes on to say that Jesus went to jail and preached to the spirits there who had defied God long ago, while Noah was building the ark. And I want to say something like, “Hey Peter, could you please go over that again?” But, sadly, at this moment, that is not going to happen.” Some believe that Jesus spent the weekend between His death and Resurrection in Hell, preaching to the souls who were already there, giving them a chance to receive the forgiveness made possible by His sacrifice that had not been previously available prior to His death. This interpretation is based on the language of 1 Peter. Given the phrasing of the scripture, it appears that Jesus performed this miracle at the very least for those who perished during the Flood in Genesis 6, when it rained for 40 days and 40 nights while Noah and his family were in the ark. When it comes to the passage from Peter, Watson has his own take on the matter. In response, Watson stated, “I would submit to you that there were people who believed in Christ before His incarnation on this earth.” Because there was no means to be righteous before Christ and hence no way to be righteous before Christ, righteousness could be ascribed to those who lived on earth prior to Christ, as we read in the Scriptures. They placed their trust in Him and His ability to save them. I believe that Jesus did not necessarily preach to those who were in Sheol or the black abyss, which is the state of being separated from God’s presence for all of eternity. Then Jesus went into jail and preached to those souls who had trusted in Him before He came to earth and lived as a man, telling them: “You lived your life with faith in Me, and you’re about to witness what you believed I would do come true.” Both Petty and Watson held similar opinions concerning the person who asked the inquiry, as well as any topic pertaining to Scripture. According to Watson, “If someone is asking you that question, it’s not a negative thing.” It is written in the Bible that God says, ‘Seek Me, and you will find Me.'” It was He who made Himself lower than we were in order to raise us up, and it was because of this that we might search for Him and He will show Himself to us.” “I think it’s important to have these kinds of discussions because the first thing God wants from us is for us to seek Him,” Petty explained. The fact that two or more of us may differ on anything like this, but that we discuss rational, scripturally-based arguments for what we think, can only be a positive thing, says the author. One must believe in the facts that Jesus came to earth and led a flawless life before dying and rising from the dead. He then ascended to Heaven and will come back to earth to take His followers with Him into the presence of Almighty God. And it is for this reason that we commemorate the Resurrection.” Brandon Shields can be reached at [email protected] or by phone at 731-425-9751. JSEditorBrandon may be followed on Twitter @JSEditorBrandon or on Instagram at editorbrandon.
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Theology Thursday: Where Did Jesus Go When He Died?

By Dr. Valerie J. De La Torre The second article of the Apostles’ Creed is the larger grouping of statements that focus on Jesus Christ, the second person in the Trinity. This portion declares Christ’s birth, suffering, death, burial, resurrection and ascension, including his anticipated return to judge all humanity. This is important as we look more broadly into the short phrase that declares that Jesus “descended into hell.” These few words have been the subject of discussion for theologians and laypersons over the centuries.

2:27-31; Romans 10:7; Colossians 1:18; I Peter 3:19, 4:6; Ephesians 4:9).

2:27-31; Romans 10:7; Colossians 1:18; I Peter 3:19, 4:6; Ephesians 4:9).

Did Jesus Go to Hell?

The area referred to as “hell” in this creedal declaration was formerly referred to in the Bible asGehenna, which means “the land of the dead” in Greek. It is seen as a region of perpetual torment for individuals who are rejected at the final judgment. The Hebrew name Sheol is used to describe the location in the Old Testament, and it alludes to the grave — a place far removed from God’s presence where the virtuous and the wicked both stay — in the Old Testament. As a result, the issue must be raised as to whether this is the location where Jesus was taken after his death.

  1. According to a subsequent interpretation, this site of descent represents Christ’s victory over the Kingdom of Satan, which was accomplished in death.
  2. That is, the promise of the approaching judgment at Christ’s return, in which the final victory over death and evil will be revealed, is supported by this second viewpoint.
  3. Although a later medieval opinion argued once more that only Christians of the pre-Christian time were in fact recipients and beneficiaries of Christ’s preaching in Hades, as intimated in Matthew 27:52 and again in Hebrews 12:23, this position was rebutted by a later medieval view.
  4. In other words, the anguish of the crucifixion alone was a vicarious suffering of what it could be like to be separated from God in hell.

Resolution in the Context

According to the Bible, the area referred to as “hell” in this creedal declaration was previously known in Greek asGehenna, which means “reign of death.” It is seen as a location of perpetual torment for those who were rejected at the final judgment. It is the Hebrew name Sheol that is used in the Old Testament to describe this region, which alludes to the grave, which is a place far away from God’s presence where the virtuous and the wicked are buried together. As a result, the issue must be raised as to whether or not this is the location where Jesus was taken after his death.

According to a later interpretation, Christ’s victory over the Kingdom of Satan, which was finished in death, is represented by this region of descended representation.

This second point of view affirms the promise of the approaching judgment at the time of Christ’s return, when the final victory over death and evil shall be demonstrated.

Although a later medieval interpretation indicated once more that only Christians of the pre-Christian period were in fact recipients and beneficiaries of Christ’s message in Hades, as intimated in Matthew 27:52 and again in Hebrews 12:23, this position was rebutted by scholars in the twentieth century.

Therefore, the anguish of the crucifixion alone was a vicarious suffering of what it may be like to be separated from God in hell.

What happened between crucifixion and resurrection?

Dear Father Gregory, I have a question. Do people have a clear understanding of what occurred to Jesus between the time of his death and the time of his resurrection on Easter Sunday? Was he just dead, or had he gone somewhere else? Answer: This topic was posed to me by a student, and it is a question that frequently arises around Easter season, when churches ponder on these kinds of concerns in their sermons. This period of time between Jesus’ death and resurrection is referred to as the harrowing of hell in traditional Christian doctrine.

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This is an issue for which the Scriptures do not provide a very clear response.

12:40) (Matthew 12:40) (Matthew 12:40) (Matthew 12:40) (Matthew 12:40) This is made clearer in the First Epistle of Peter, which states that “this is why the Gospel was proclaimed even to the dead, that, while they were condemned in the body like men, they may live in the spirit like God.” (4:6) (II Peter 4:6) These verses imply an early idea that individuals who had died, probably those who lived before the time of Christ, were granted a second chance by Christ himself before the resurrection in order to respond to the Christian message after death.

However, this is merely one reading of the text, and it is not the only conceivable interpretation.

It is today known as the Creed of the Apostles.

180 and as late as A.D.

“Christ fell to the lowest,” according to the Greek text, which can be translated into modern English as either “Christ descended to the dead” or “Christ sank into hell.” The book was first written in Latin in the ancient world, which tells us something about how the individuals who were historically closest to the composition viewed it.

  1. This can be translated as “to those below,” or it can be translated as “to the infernal regions,” which might refer to the doomed.
  2. A number of early Christian theologians, some of whom have subsequently been canonized, including St.
  3. Hippolytus of Rome (170-235), claimed that Christ entered hell and released a number of the damned.
  4. Hippolytus was expelled from the Catholic Church as a result of his outrage.
  5. Peter, in contrast with Callixtus, who was more flexible, and Pope Pontian, who was more conservative.
  6. His opinions on the harrowing are particularly important because, despite the fact that he was never regarded as a church teacher, they reflect those of a large number of early Christian writers, with the harrowing serving as an excellent illustration.
  7. Following the death of Hippolytus, the concept of harrowing was further developed.
  8. In this painting, Christ is represented as descended into hell and speaking to the noble people of the Old Testament, such as Adam and Moses, before delivering them from the flames of the underworld.

In the scripture, Christ enters hell and is described as follows: “And the Lord stretched out His hand, and said: Come to me, all my saints, who bear my image and likeness.” You who have been convicted by the tree, as well as by the devil and death, now see the devil and death condemned by the tree, don’t you?

  1. Adam looked up at the Lord, who was holding him by the right hand, and exclaimed, “Peace be to you, with all your children, my righteous ones!” Following this response, Adam and the other Hebrew saints are exorcised from their earthly bodies and transported to heavenly bodies.
  2. Because the concept of Jesus Christ storming the gates of hell is so compelling and has been employed in so much Christian imagery throughout history, including medieval, Byzantine, and Renaissance art, it deserves to be discussed more.
  3. Even the present Catholic Church supports this idea, albeit it clarifies that this descend to the abode of the dead did not benefit the genuinely condemned, but only those who were already in the abode of the dead.
  4. However, in response to the question posed to me by the student, I believe it is fair to reply that, from a Christian perspective, whatever Jesus was doing after his death, he was surely rather busy in those three brief days.

Please write to him at P.O. Box 8102 Redlands, CA 92375-1302 or send an email to [email protected]. You can also follow him on Twitter at @Fatherelder if you want to get in touch.

Did Jesus Descend to Hell Between His Death and Resurrection?

We know from Jesus’ response to the thief that when someone dies, they are immediately brought into the presence of the Father. “Truly, I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise,” says Jesus in Luke 23:42. “Truly, I tell to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise.” This remark also informs us that Jesus died and was resurrected by His Father. We don’t know much more than that regarding Jesus’ whereabouts throughout those three days. It’s important not to read too much into a parable or narrative, as this might lead to confusion.

Did Jesus Descend to Hell? Bible Verses for this Theory

1 Peter 3:18-20 is the scripture of Scripture most frequently cited by people who believe in the existence of hell. “Because Christ also died for sins once and for all, the just for the unjust, in order that He might bring us to God, having been put to death in the flesh but made alive in the spirit; in which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison, who once were disobedient, when the patience of God waited in the days of Noah, during the construction of the ark, in which a few, namely, eight persons, were brought safely through the water.” “In which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison,” they say, referring to the verses in question.

  • According to legend, Jesus descended into Hell and preached to the souls of the damned.
  • There is no indication in the Bible that a lost soul who has died receives a second opportunity at redemption.
  • However, there is another reading of this verse that is more logical.
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Interpreting the Scripture

Jesus was crucified in the body, yet he was raised to life by the Holy Spirit after his death. The term “brought alive” is a passive verb, which means that someone other than Jesus was responsible for bringing Jesus back to life. Either Jesus was brought back to life by the Spirit, or He was brought back to life by His spirit. Regardless of the outcome, the Spirit must have had a role. The chapter then goes on to tell us who these souls in prison are: they are those who did not listen to Noah (who was preaching repentance to the world in the power of the Holy Spirit under the direction of God at the time of his imprisonment).

However, just eight persons heeded the warning and were saved—”brought safely through the floodwaters” The term “jail” is used in a metaphorical sense.

Furthermore, a wide gap has been established between us and you, in order that anyone who seek to pass over from here into you will not be able to do so, and that none who wish to cross over from there will be able to do so.” Jesus did not go to hell for those three days, according to the Bible, which is not mentioned anywhere else.

Most people believe Jesus’ physical body stayed in the tomb, just as ours will remain in the grave once we die.

The distinction is that God did not allow Jesus’ body to degrade like other people’s bodies did.

Other Bible Verses about Jesus’ Descent to Hell

Other Bible scriptures, such as Romans 10:6-7, Ephesians 4:8-9, and Acts 2:27, that have been cited to support the belief that Jesus went to hell between his crucifixion and resurrection have also caused confusion. However, as discussed in this ZondervanAcademic.com article, these verses are frequently taken out of context and given meaning that is not intended by the author. The Apostle’s Creed was later amended to include the phrase “and he fell into hell.” Did Jesus Descend into Hell Before He Was Resurrected?, a film by Garrett Kell, explored this question.

Where Was Jesus During the Three Days Before His Resurrection?

When Jesus died and was laid to rest on Friday evening, the world mourned. Then, at the crack of dawn on the following Sunday morning, his corpse was resurrected from the dead and brought out of the tomb. During the time that Jesus’ body was in the tomb, however, where was Jesus’ spirit hiding? Scripture does not provide a satisfactory response to this question. However, it does provide us with a few hints. Several of such “clues” will be discussed in this article, along with some comments from another ancient source.

In Paradise

The crucifixion of Jesus is recorded in all four gospels. The threesynoptic gospelsrecord that there were two others who were crucified with Jesus that day. Luke, on the other hand, provides a detail that is absent from the other stories. One of the robbers who were crucified with Jesus appeared to recognize Jesus and prayed that Jesus would remember him when he entered his kingdom (Luke 23:40-42). He was assured by Jesus that he would be with him in paradise that day, and that he would be with him forever (Luke 23:43).

As opposed to Gehenna, which was the residence of the wicked, Paradise was the home of the virtuous when they died.

Not at some point in the future, but right now, right now.

However, that resurrection is still some time in the future, since it awaits the return of Jesus.

Preaching to the Spirits in Prison

There is a second verse in the Bible that many people feel has something to say about this topic as well. In 1 Peter 3:18-22, Peter speaks of Jesus’ death, resurrection, and ascension into the presence of God the Father. There is a section of this chapter that is difficult to comprehend, and it has prompted a number of different interpretations throughout the years. He was put to death in the body, but he was raised to life in the Spirit, according to Peter in this text. Then, after being raised from the dead and given the ability to speak, Jesus went and made proclamation to the imprisoned spirits – to those who had been rebellious long ago when God waited patiently in the days of Noah while the ark was being constructed (1 Peter 3:18-22).

  1. Which spirits were being held captive, where were they, what message did Jesus deliver to them, and when did he do so are all unknown.
  2. Angels that did not maintain their places of leadership but instead fled their appropriate residence have been imprisoned in darkness, chained with eternal chains until the great Day of Judgment.
  3. What did Jesus say to the spirits that were imprisoned in the tomb?
  4. Instead, it’s more probable that he’s announcing his triumph over them and their disobedience against the will of God.
  5. When exactly did this declaration take place?
  6. But what exactly does it mean to be “brought alive in the Spirit”?
  7. This incident would be postponed until after Jesus’ resurrection, and it would have no bearing on the period of time between Jesus’ death and resurrection, if this is the case.

However we interpret this verse, it does not provide credence to the widely held belief that Jesus was a prisoner of hell at the time of the events described here. We’ll have to go elsewhere for it.

In Hell

Although its exact origin and date are uncertain, the Apostle’s Creed is an early declaration of Christian doctrine that dates back to the first century. This credo includes the statement about Jesus that he “was crucified, died, and was buried; he went into hell.” This statement about Jesus is included in this creed. “On the third day, he rose from the dead.” In certain circles, the phrase “he plunged into hell” is debatable. Some denominations have decided to do away with it. Others have changed it to indicate that he “descended into the underworld.” My belief is that it is critical to acknowledge that the Apostle’s Creed is not Scripture and has never been recognized to be so.

  1. With the exception of the remark about Jesus being sent into hell.
  2. The closest would appear to be 1 Peter 3:18-22, which has already been discussed.
  3. Despite this, it is crystal clear from the Scriptures that Jesus was not a prisoner in hell for those three days.
  4. If Jesus did descend into hell, he did so as a victorious conqueror rather than as a shackled prisoner, according to the New Testament.
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What Does This Mean?

Ultimately, I do not believe we will ever be able to know for certain what Jesus accomplished during those three days, other than the fact that he was in Paradise. From this vantage point, we can see him extending greetings to others who had entered before him as well as the repentant thief who came with him. iStock/Getty Images Plus/doidam10 is credited with this image. Ed Jarretti has been a disciple of Jesus for a long time and is a member of Sylvan Way Baptist Church. He has been a Bible teacher for more than 40 years and writes a blog at A Clay Jar on a regular basis.

Ed is married, the father of two children, and the grandpa of three grandchildren.

Bible Q&A: Where Did Jesus Go When He Died?

Question:I heard Colin Smith on the radio today talking about his novel, The Thief on the Cross, and it piqued my interest. I’m a little perplexed at what Jesus said to him. As a child, I was taught that Jesus told his disciples, “I tell you the truth, today you will be with Me in paradise” (Luke 23:43, New International Version), which I thought was odd since, on that particular day, Jesus did not go to heaven. “Do not cling on to me, for I have not yet gone to the Father,” Jesus says to Mary Magdalene even after his resurrection.

  1. That it could/should say something like, “I tell you the truth today, you will be with Me in paradise,” or something like.
  2. In response to your inquiry, it should be noted that it is part of a larger discussion regarding where Jesus was between his death on Good Friday and his triumphant resurrection on Easter morning, which has been studied extensively.
  3. In the Christian tradition, death is defined as the separation of a person’s soul or spirit from their physical body.
  4. We are aware that the Father is present in heaven.
  5. When Christ arose from the dead on Easter morning, his soul was clothed in a new resurrection body.
  6. His body was hauled to the surface.
  7. When Christ returns, they will accompany him from heaven, and they will be given a resurrection body that will be modeled like his own resurrection body, which will be revealed (1 Thessalonians 4:14-16).
  8. He was raised from the dead by the Spirit, who then returned to earth to be clothed in the resurrection body, which he appeared to the disciples over a period of 40 days prior to his ascension.
  9. Another point that is connected to the previous one is the (I believe incorrect) belief that Jesus fell into hell between his death and resurrection.
  10. However, while the creed claims that Christ descended into hell, I believe that the most accurate approach to explain this is to state that Christ experienced hell in all of its aspects on the cross.
  11. Because he took our place and offered himself as a sacrifice on our behalf, Christ endured everything that hell has to offer for us at Calvary.

This was the understanding of the creed held by the reformers. I hope this information is useful, and thank you for taking the time to write with a well-thought-out inquiry. Colin believes in Christ.

What Happened After Jesus Died? – Resources

We know from Jesus’ response to the thief that when someone dies, they are instantly brought into the presence of the Father. “Truly I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise,” says Jesus in Luke 23:42. “Truly I tell to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise.” This remark also informs us that Jesus died and was resurrected by His Father. Beyond that, we know virtually nothing about Jesus’ whereabouts over those three days. It’s important not to read too much into a parable or narrative, as this might lead to confusion.

  1. When reading Jonah 2:2, some versions say “from the depths of Sheol,” another translation reads “from the depths of hell,” and still another says “from the tomb,” according to the Bible.
  2. Later in the book of Jonah, in verse 6, we are told that his “life was pulled up from the pit.” Some interpreters believe that this is an allusion to the place called Hell.
  3. According to the Hebrew mindset, sheol is not a realm of punishment but rather of death, where the soul awaits resurrection and judgment.
  4. He is using imagery to describe how he felt exactly the same as if his body had been buried in the soil (grave) and he had been imprisoned there for all time.
  5. If someone wishes to think that He went to hell, the passages might provide evidence for that belief.
  6. Examine the passages in question.
  7. “‘He ascended,’ what does it imply unless it means that He likewise sank into the lower regions of the earth,'” says Ephesians 4:8-10.
  8. However, once again, the most straightforward interpretation of this phrase is that Jesus ascended into the heavens after first having dropped into the ground beneath him, into the grave.
  9. The Bible states in I Timothy 3:16 that Jesus “was seen by angels.” After His resurrection, He was indeed seen by angels, as is plainly indicated in all three synoptic gospels immediately following His death (Matthew 28:6; Mark 16:6; Luke 24:6).
  10. There is absolutely no basis for making such an assumption.

In order to bring us to God, Christ had to die in our place in order to be raised from the dead in the spirit, after having been put to death in the flesh but made alive in the spirit; through which He also went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison, who had once been disobedient, while the patience of God waited in the days of Noah, during the construction of the ark, in which a few, that is, eight people were brought safely through the water.” “In which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison,” they say, referring to the verses in question.

  • According to legend, Jesus descended into Hell and preached to the souls of the damned.
  • There is no indication in the Bible that a lost soul who has died receives a second opportunity at redemption.
  • However, there is another reading of this verse that is more logical.
  • The term “brought alive” is a passive verb, which means that someone other than Jesus was responsible for bringing Jesus back to life.
  • In either case, the Spirit had to have played a role.
  • As a result, the same Spirit who raised Jesus as a testament “in order that He may bring us to God” also spoke to those souls who are now in jail in Noah’s day; and they are in prison because they did not listen to the preaching when it was being given to them at the time.

It is said in Luke 16:26 that lost spirits are withdrawn and restrained, and this is supported by the Bible: Furthermore, a wide gap has been established between us and you, in order that anyone who seek to pass over from here into you will not be able to do so, and that none who wish to cross over from there will be able to do so.” Jesus did not go to hell for those three days, according to the Bible, which is not mentioned anywhere else.

In actuality, virtually little is said about what transpired during the event.

When He left the presence of the Father, the Spirit revived His body three days later (in the same way that our bodies will be raised—the first-born from the grave, as stated in Col.

1:18; see also John 11:25). The difference is that God did not allow Jesus’ corpse to rot because of his sacrifice (exactly the promise found in Psalm 16:10 above.) John Piper has provided an excellent response to this question:

Did Jesus Spend Saturday in Hell?

Written by John Piper “He was crucified, died, and was buried,” according to the Apostles’ Creed. He was sent into the depths of hell. Jesus Christ resurrected from the grave on the third day.” This sentence can be interpreted in a variety of ways. I merely want to contemplate the conventional interpretation that Christ went to the land of the dead in order to preach the gospel to Old Testament saints in order to set them free to enjoy the fullness of the experience of eternity. This is the viewpoint expressed in the Catholic Catechism, as well as by many Protestants.

The majority of the argument is based on two verses in 1 Peter.

(1 Peter 3:18-20) (6) For this reason, the gospel was preached even to the dead, so that, even though they were judged in the body, as humans are, they may live in the spirit, as God does.” 1 Peter 4:4-6 (New International Version) In reference to 1 Peter 3:19, I interpret these words to signify that Christ, via the voice of Noah, went and spoke to that generation, whose spirits are now “in jail,” that is, in hell, according to my interpretation.

So, Peter does not claim that Christ preached to them while they were imprisoned, as some have suggested.

In light of what Peter said earlier about the spirit of Christ speaking through the prophets of old, I believe this is the more natural interpretation of the verse that is being promoted.

(10:10–11; 1 Peter 1:10–11) In reference to 1 Peter 4:6, I interpret the phrase “preached to the dead” to refer to individuals who have died after having heard the gospel preached to them.

According to J.

D.

As a result, I believe that there is no textual basis in the New Testament for the assertion that Christ spent the time between Good Friday and Easter teaching to people who were imprisoned in hell or the underworld.

For these and other reasons, I believe it is preferable to remove the phrase “he fell into hell” from the Apostles Creed rather than interpreting it in a way that is more acceptable, as Calvin did. (This post was first published on theDesiring God Blog.) Image courtesy ofDiego PHonUnsplash

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