Where In The Bible Does It Say Jesus Went To Hell

Did Jesus Really Descend to Hell?

When it comes to Jesus’ descent into hell, there is a statement in the Apostles’ Creed that says such. Is it true that he went there in person? —DEBRA BLACK, of Alton, Illinois, writes in to express her gratitude. “I believe that Jesus. went into hell,” according to the Apostles’ Creed, which is spoken by millions of Christians across the world every Sunday. One Christian institution, on the other hand, had to eliminate this item from a series of chapel lectures on the Apostles’ Creed a few years ago because none of the 12 professors of Bible and theology agreed with the statement.

It appears to be an echo of Acts 2:31, and it appears to be there solely to underline the point that Jesus’ death was genuine and full.

When the Apostles’ Creed was first written in English in the fifteenth century, “hell” referred to the state of hades as a whole, rather than the final condition of the lost (which Jesus referred to as gehenna), as it has always meant.

The Bible provides us with relatively little information regarding Jesus’ physical and emotional state between his death and resurrection.

  • In Ephesians 4, the Incarnation is most certainly being alluded to, while 1 Peter 4:6could be referring to any preaching of the gospel.
  • Some argue that the phrase in 1 Peter 3 should not be read literally; rather, it should be seen as a metaphor, communicating in pictorial form the concept that salvation is universal in scope.
  • Others disagree with this.
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Christ’s Descent into Hell

Many individuals have taught throughout church history that Jesus’ spirit fell into hell following His death on the cross, and this has been a popular belief for centuries. Most of those who have taught that Jesus’ spirit went to hell after His death have done so on the basis of Ephesians 4:8–10 and 1 Peter 3:18–20, and they have claimed that He went there to pronounce judgment on sinners and/or to rescue the saints of the Old Testament. In today’s world, many members of the heretical Word of Faith organization believe that the crucifixion was inadequate to atone for our sins and that Jesus additionally had to endure three days of pain and torture in hell.

  • The first time Jesus spoke to a repentant thief on the cross, he assured him that he would be with Christ in Paradise on the same day of their crucifixion (Luke 23:39–43).
  • Third, 1 Peter 3:18–20 most certainly refers to the Son of God speaking to the people of Noah’s day by the power of the Holy Spirit, according to the context.
  • The concept of propitiation, or the turning aside of the Lord’s anger, is exclusively mentioned in the New Testament in connection with Jesus’ death on the cross (Rom.
  • 2:17; 9:1–10:18; 1 John 2:2; 4:10; 5:6–11).
  • When He died, He considered His mission accomplished.
  • In fact, the scourgings of the guards, the nails driven into the palms of Christ’s hands, and the severe bodily suffering Jesus endured were all manifestations of God’s anger.

“After explaining what Christ endured in the sight of men, the Creed appropriately adds the invisible and incomprehensible judgment which he endured before God, to teach us that not only was the body of Christ given up as the price of redemption, but that there was a greater and more excellent price — that he bore in his soul the tortures of a condemned and ruined man,” writes John Calvin (Institutes 2.16.10).

Coram Deo

The sin against an infinite entity necessitates the imposition of an endless punishment in hell. The endless torment that impenitent sinners would never be able to exhaust even after an eternity in hell was experienced and expended by Jesus in a matter of hours. As the Son of God, He has the ability to do this since He is an infinite entity in his divinity as the Son of God. However, as the Heidelberg Catechism declares, it does guarantee us that we have been entirely liberated from the pain and torture of hell by faith in Jesus Christ (Q A 44).

For Further Study

QuestionAnswer Currently, there is a considerable degree of uncertainty around this subject. According to the Apostles’ Creed, which declares, “He descended into hell,” the belief that Jesus went to hell after His death on the cross is essentially derived from this verse. The Bible contains several passages in which Jesus is described as going to “hell,” depending on how the passages are interpreted. Prior to delving into this topic, it is critical to grasp what the Bible has to say regarding the realm of the dead.

  1. Sheol/hades, according to other passages in the New Testament, is a transitory realm where souls are held while they await the final resurrection and judgment.
  2. The lake of fire serves as a permanent and ultimate repository for the souls of the dead.
  3. Many people refer to both hades and the lake of fire as “hell,” which can lead to a lot of misunderstanding.
  4. As described in Matthew 11:23–18, Luke 10:15–16:23, and Acts 2:27–31, sheol/hades was a realm divided into two divisions—a region of blessing and a place of condemnation.
  5. The abodes of the rescued and the abodes of the lost are divided by a “huge gap” (or abyss in Hebrew) (Luke 16:26).
  6. The aspect of sheol/hades that deals with judgment has remained constant.
  7. Is it true that Jesus died and went to sheol/hell?

Some of the misunderstanding has originated from texts such as Psalm 16:10–11, which is translated as follows in the King James Version: “For thou wilt not abandon my soul to the depths of hell; nor wilt thou allow thine Holy One to be corrupted.

The term “the grave” or “sheol” would be a more accurate translation.

As a result, in various editions of the Bible, translators are not consistent or accurate in their rendering of the Hebrew and Greek terminology for the afterlife, hell, and the afterlife after death.

This is a profoundly unbiblical notion to have.

It was His spilt blood that was the means by which we were cleansed from sin (1 John 1:7–9).

His sacrifice for us was sin: “God caused him who had no sin to be sin for us, in order that through him we could become the righteousness of God” (2 Corinthians 5:21).

As Jesus was on the verge of death, He said, “It is completed” (John 19:30).

His soul/spirit was sent to Hades (the place of the dead).

Jesus’ agony came to an end at the time of His death.

He then anticipated the resurrection of His body and His ascension into glory, both of which would occur at the same time.

Is it true that Jesus went to hell? No. Is it true that Jesus died and went to sheol/hell? Yes. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) Is it possible that Jesus spent time in hell between His death and resurrection?

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QuestionAnswer This is a question that has caused a great deal of complication. According to the Apostles’ Creed, which declares, “He descended into hell,” the belief that Jesus went to hell after His death on the cross is largely based on this verse. The Bible contains several passages that refer to Jesus going to “hell,” depending on how they are interpreted. Prior going delving into this topic, it is critical to grasp what the Bible has to say regarding the world of the deceased. When describing the realm of the dead in the Hebrew Scriptures, the term “issheol” is employed.

  1. Sheol/hades, according to other passages in the New Testament, is a transitory location where souls are held while they await the final resurrection and judgment.
  2. When it comes to the lost, the lake of fire is the only permanent and final destination.
  3. This generates misunderstanding since many people refer to both hades and the lake of fire as “hell.” In the aftermath of His death, Jesus did not descend into a region of agony; instead, He descended into the realm of hades.
  4. It is generally agreed that Hades refers to both the abodes of the saved and those who have fallen away from God.
  5. a “vast gulf” between the homes of the rescued and the homes of the lost (Luke 16:26).
  6. Neither sheol nor hades has altered in terms of its judgmental aspect.
  7. Jesus was crucified and buried in Sheol/Hell.

Many passages in the Bible, such as Psalm 16:10–11, which are translated as follows in the King James Version, have caused some consternation.

Thou willst teach me the way to eternal life.

In this case, “the grave” or “sheol” would be a more appropriate interpretation.

When Jesus died, his body was laid in the tomb; his soul/spirit was taken to dwell with the blessed in sheol/hell.

Some believe that Jesus was sent to “hell,” or the suffering side of sheol/hades, in order to be tormented much more severely for our crimes than he already had been.

We can only be saved by Jesus’ death on the cross, which was adequate in and of itself.

The sin load of the entire human race was placed upon His shoulders while He hung on the cross in the presence of God.

Because of the imputation of sin, we may better appreciate Christ’s suffering in the garden of Gethsemane with the cup of sin that would be poured out upon Him on the cross.

We were able to put an end to his misery because of us.

Jesus did not travel to “hell” or the suffering side of hades; rather, He traveled to “Abraham’s side,” or the blessed side of hades.

There has been a price made for sin.

Jesus was crucified, but did he die in hell? No. Jesus was crucified and buried in Sheol/Hell. Yes. to:Jesus Christ: Do You Have Any Questions? Between His death and resurrection, did Jesus spend any time in hell?

Did Jesus Really Descend into Hell?

It is frequently asserted that Christ descended into hell after he died on the cross. The Apostles’ Creed, which is commonly used, states that Jesus “was crucified, died, and buried; he went into hell; on the third day, he rose again from the grave.” The expression “he fell into hell,” on the other hand, does not appear in the Bible. 1:060:00 Is it true that Jesus was sent into hell? Wayne Grudem discusses the phrase’s origins as well as what the Bible has to say about it. Please be advised that by submitting your email address, you acknowledge and agree that you will get email messages from HarperCollins Christian Publishing (501 Nelson Place, Nashville, TN 37214 USA) with information on products and services offered by the company and its affiliates.

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Large portions of the phrase’s history are clouded by a confusing backdrop.

Unexpectedly, the phrase “he descended into hell” was not included in any of the earliest versions of the Creed (including the versions that were adopted by Christians in Rome, the rest of Italy, and Africa), and it was not included until one of two versions from Rufinus, which was adopted in A.D.

  • After that, it was not included in any other version of the Creed until the year 650 A.D.
  • 650, did not believe that it signified that Christ had fallen into hell, but rather that the term merely meant that Christ had been “buried,” according to the scholarly consensus.
  • In addition, it should be pointed out that the phrase exists only in one of the two versions of the Creed that we have from Rufinus; it does not appear in the Roman version of the Creed that he kept.
  • 650 does so with a different interpretation of the term.
  • Three different interpretations have been presented throughout the history of the Christian church:
  1. While on the cross, some interpret this expression to signify that Christ was experiencing the agonies of hell. Calvin, as well as the Heidelberg Catechism, embrace this view
  2. Others, however, have interpreted it to suggest that Christ remained in the “state of death” until the time of his resurrection. This is the approach taken by Question 50 of the Westminster Larger Catechism, which states: “Christ’s humiliation after death consisted in his being buried, and remaining in his state of death, and under the power of death, until the third day
  3. Which has been expressed otherwise in these words, He descended into hell.” After everything is said and done, some have asserted that the phrase implies exactly what it appears to mean on first reading: that Christ did, in fact, descend into hell following his death on the cross.

Learn more about Jesus’ life by visiting the following websites: One Jesus, shown in four different portraits What does the Bible say about this? There are five passages that are utilized to support the fall into hell. Christ’s descent into hell is supported by five verses from the Bible, according to those who believe that he did so between his death and resurrection. 1. Acts 2:27 (Acts 2:27) Part of Peter’s speech on the Day of Pentecost, in which he quotes Psalm 16:10, “for you will not abandon me to the land of the dead, nor will you allow your loyal one to experience decay,” is included here.

This is not always the case.

2.

30:13): “Do not say in your heart, ‘Who will climb into heaven?'” and “Do not say in your heart, ‘Who will descend into hell?'” (i.e., to bring Christ down from the cross) or “Who will descend into the abyss?” (i.e., to bring Christ back to life from the dead).” However, this verse does not imply that Christ fell into hell as a result of his death.

9).

Ephesians 4:8–9 (Ephesians 4:8–9) “When I say, ‘He ascended,’ what does that signify other than that he had also plunged into the lower portions of the earth?” Paul asks.

It is initially unclear what is meant by “the lower parts of the earth,” but another translation appears to make the most sense: “What does ‘he ascended’ mean unless it also means that he descended to the lower, earthly regions?” (What does ‘he ascended’ mean except that he descended to the lower, earthly regions?) (NIV).

  • The following four words are a reasonable interpretation of the Greek text, which takes the phrase “the lower regions of the earth” to mean “the lowest regions of the earth,” which is an acceptable interpretation of the Greek text.
  • 10).
  • As a result, the passage refers to the incarnation rather than a descend into hell.
  • 1 Peter 3:18–20 (New International Version) “For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unjust, in order to reconcile you to God,” reads the text above.

As soon as he was brought back to life, he went out into the world and made proclamation to the imprisoned spirits—to those who had been rebellious long before, when God had waited patiently in the days of Noah while the ark was being constructed.” This is the paragraph on this subject that many people find the most perplexing of the entire collection.

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Some have interpreted the phrase “he went and preached to the spirits in prison” to mean that Christ went into hell and preached to the spirits who were there, either proclaiming the gospel and offering them a second chance to repent, or simply proclaiming that he had triumphed over them and that they were condemned to an eternity of torment and punishment.

Peter does not imply that Christ spoke to all spirits, but rather that he only preached to those “who had previously disobeyed.during the construction of the ark.” Such a small audience (those who rebelled during the construction of the ark) would seem to be an odd group for Christ to travel to Hell and teach to, wouldn’t you think?

  • And, if he did grant a second opportunity at redemption, why did he choose only these sinners and not all others?
  • 10:26–27), which is inconsistent with this position.
  • Peter is challenging his audience to openly witness to hostile unbelievers in their immediate environment.
  • If Peter were to preach that there is a second opportunity for salvation after death, this evangelistic image would lose its significance.
  • Is it possible that Christ was teaching to fallen angels in 1 Peter 3:18–20?
  • It is asserted that this would provide comfort to Peter’s readers by demonstrating that the demonic powers tormenting them will likewise be overcome by Christ in the end.
  • To go from (1) certain demons who committed sin long ago to (2) other demons who are currently instigating your human persecutors to (3) those demons will likewise be condemned someday to (4) as a result, your persecutors will be judged at some point, they would have to use logic.

If Peter was aware that his readers would infer all of this from the text, does it seem a stretch to conclude that he foresaw it?

In addition, how did Peter’s readers come to believe that angelic beings had sinned “during the construction of the ark”?

And (contrary to what some have claimed), if we examine all of the traditions of Jewish interpretation of the flood myth, we will find no reference of angels sinning explicitly “during the construction of the ark,” as some have claimed.

If so, would Christ’s proclamation of release to the Old Testament saints in 1 Peter 3:18–20 fit the bill?

However, it is possible to dispute whether this interpretation fully accounts for what the text truly means.

Peter does not specifically mention Old Testament Christians in general, but rather those who were disobedient “during the days of Noah, throughout the construction of the ark,” according to the context (1 Peter 3:20).

5:24; 2 Sam.

16:11; 17:15; 23:6; Ec A more satisfactory interpretation of 1 Peter 3:18–20 According to Augustine, the most satisfactory explanation of 1 Peter 3:18–20 appears to be one that was proposed (but not really defended) many years ago: the passage refers not to something Christ did between his death and resurrection, but to something he did “in the spiritual realm of existence” (i.e., “through the Spirit”) during the time of Noah.

At the same time that Noah was constructing the ark, Christ “in spirit” was teaching to the hostile unbelievers who were surrounding him.

Considering the wider context of 1 Peter 3:13–22, this reading appears to be highly acceptable. There are various moments where the comparison between Noah’s predicament and the condition of Peter’s readers is obvious. For example:

  • Obtain further information on the life of Jesus by visiting the following websites: The same Jesus in four different portraits Which passages of Scripture do you want to look at? a collection of five chapters that provide as assistance for the journey into hell A total of five Bible texts, all of which are used to support the belief that Christ truly did descend into hell between his death and resurrection, have been identified. Acts 2:27 is a good place to start. Part of Peter’s speech on the Day of Pentecost, in which he quotes Psalm 16:10, “for you will not leave me to the land of the dead, nor will you let your loyal one to experience decay,” is included here. Has Jesus entered hell as a result of this? No, this is not always the case! As a result, unlike David, who “died and was buried, and his tomb remains here to this day,” Peter uses David’s psalm to demonstrate that Christ’s corpse did not decay. 2. See Romans 10:6–7 for further information. Again, Old Testament references (from Deuteronomy 30:13) are used in these passages, which include the following two rhetorical questions: “Do not say in your heart, ‘Who will climb into heaven?'” and “Who will descend into hell?” (i.e., to bring Christ down from the cross) or “Who will descend into the abyss?’ (i.e., to raise Christ from the dead).” Christ’s descent into hell, on the other hand, is scarcely taught in this chapter. To summarize, Paul is advising people not to ask these kinds of questions because Christ is not far away—in fact, he is quite close—and that trust in him is as close as confessing with our mouths and believing with our hearts (v. 9). 3) Ephesians 4:8–9 (the book of Ephesians). “When I say, ‘He ascended,’ what does it imply unless it also means that he descended into the lower portions of the earth?” Paul asks in this passage. If so, does this imply that Christ “descended” into Hell? The meaning of “the lower sections of the earth” is first unclear, but a different translation appears to make the most sense: “What does ‘he ascended’ imply if not that he sank to the lower, earthly regions?” (What does ‘he ascended’ mean save that he fell to the lower, earthly regions? (NIV). When the New International Version uses the word “descended,” it means that Christ was born as a baby in the ground (the Incarnation). It is permissible to interpret the Greek text in this way, considering the phrase “the lower parts of the earth” to mean “the lower regions of the earth,” as in “the lower regions which are the earth.” When Paul says that the Christ who went up to heaven (in his ascension) is the same Christ who came down from heaven previously, he is referring to Jesus Christ (v. 10). It goes without saying that Christ’s “descent” from heaven took place when He became a human being. As a result, the passage refers to the incarnation rather than to a journey into hell. 4. 1 Peter 3:18–20 (New International Version). “For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unjust, in order to reconcile you to God,” reads the verse. ” He was put to death in the physical body, but he was raised to life in the spiritual body of Christ. As soon as he was brought back to life, he went out into the world and made proclamation to the imprisoned spirits—to those who had been rebellious long before, when God had waited patiently during the construction of the ark.” This is the section on this issue that many people find the most perplexing. In order to better understand this book, let us examine many questions that have been raised. Is Christ lecturing in hell mentioned in 1 Peter 3:18–20? The phrase “he went and preached to the spirits in prison” has been interpreted by some to mean that Christ went into hell and preached to the spirits who were there, either proclaiming the gospel and offering them a second chance to repent, or simply proclaiming that he had triumphed over them and that they were doomed for eternity. However, neither the passage nor its location in this context are fully explained by these readings. During the construction of the ark, Peter does not indicate that Christ taught to all spirits, but just to those who “had previously disobeyed.” It would be unusual for Christ to travel to Hell and teach to such a small number of people—those who disobeyed during the construction of the ark. Is it possible that Christ just announced his victory to these sinners and not to everyone else? What is the reason for just giving these sinners a second opportunity at redemption and not giving it to everyone? Adding to the difficulty of this position, several passages in the Bible imply that people do not have the option to repent after death (Luke 16:26
  • Heb. 10:26–27). The context of 1 Peter 3 also makes the notion of “preaching in hell” seem improbable. To witness openly to hostile unbelievers in their immediate surroundings, Peter encourages his readers. He just instructed them to “always be prepared to offer a response to everyone who asks you if you have any questions” (1 Peter 3:15 NIV). A second opportunity for salvation after death, as taught by Peter, would lessen the urgency of this evangelistic concept. A “preaching” of condemnation would also be incompatible with this. Is Christ teaching to fallen angels mentioned in 1 Peter 3:18–20? Many interpreters have postulated that “spirits in prison” refer to demonic spirits, the spirits of fallen angels, in order to provide a more satisfactory explanation for these issues. They have also stated that Christ condemned these demons. As a result, it is argued, Peter’s readers would be comforted because they will see that the demonic powers that torment them will likewise be overcome by Christ. When Peter does not directly explain this conclusion, his readers will have to go through an extremely intricate reasoning process in order to reach this conclusion. They would have to reason from (1) certain demons who sinned a long time ago were condemned, to (2) other devils are currently instigating your human persecutors, to (3) those demons will likewise be condemned eventually, to (4) as a result, your human persecutors will be judged at some point in the future, too. Once Peter’s readers understood his argument, they would say: (5) Don’t be afraid of your persecutors, as Peter says. If Peter knew his readers would read all of this into the text, does it seem a stretch to suggest that he foresaw it? Peter also stresses hostile individuals rather than devils in the context of this passage (1 Peter 3:14, 16). Who could have imagined that angels had sinned “during the construction of the ark,” as Peter’s readers did. The tale of the construction of the ark in Genesis does not contain any such information. As for angels sinning explicitly “during the construction of the ark,” we find no such reference in any of the Jewish traditions of interpretation of the flood myth, contrary to what some have asserted. It is also difficult to see how the argument that Peter is referring to Christ’s declaration of judgment to fallen angels could be convincing. Was Christ’s proclamation of liberation to Old Testament saints in 1 Peter 3:18–20 a reference to the event? Another theory is that Christ went to the Old Testament Christians after his death and declared their liberation, since they had been unable to enter heaven until Christ’s redeeming work was completed. The question is whether this interpretation appropriately accounts for what the text actually says this time around. However, it does not imply that Christ taught to those who were already believers or faithful to God, but rather to those “who formerly did not obey”—the focus is on their disobedience in the past. Peter does not specifically mention Old Testament Christians in general, but rather those who were disobedient “during the days of Noah, throughout the construction of the ark,” according to the text (1 Peter 3:20). Finally, there is no clear evidence in Scripture to lead us to believe that Old Testament believers were denied full access to the blessings of being in God’s presence in heaven when they died—in fact, several passages suggest that believers who died before Christ’s death did enter into the presence of God immediately because their sins were forgiven by trusting in the Messiah who was to come (Gen. 5:24
  • 2 Sam. 12:23
  • Pss. 16:11
  • 17:15
  • 23:6
  • Eccl More satisfactory explanation for 1 Peter 3:18–20. According to Augustine, the most satisfactory explanation of 1 Peter 3:18–20 appears to be one that was proposed (but not really defended) many years ago: the passage refers not to something Christ did between his death and resurrection, but rather to something he did “in the spiritual realm of existence” (or “through the Spirit”) during the time of Noah’s flood. At the time Noah was building the ark, Christ was teaching to the hostile unbelievers in his immediate vicinity “in spirit.” When taken in the full context of 1 Peter 3:13–22, this view is absolutely acceptable. There are various moments where the link between Noah’s circumstances and the condition of Peter’s readers is obvious.

Such an interpretation of 1 Peter 3:18–20 appears to be by far the most plausible response to a perplexing passage in the New Testament. (5) 1 Peter 4:6 – “For this is why the gospel was proclaimed even to the dead,” reads the fifth and final scripture that confirms Jesus’ journey into hell. “For this is why the gospel was preached even to the dead, that though they were condemned in the body as men, they may live in the spirit as God.” This text implies that Christ visited Hell and proclaimed the gospel to those who had died.

  • Assuming this is true, it would be the only verse in the Bible to teach that there is a “second chance” for salvation after death, and it would be in direct opposition to passages such as Luke 16:19–31 and Hebrews 9:27, which appear to plainly rule out such a possibility.
  • This is a typical interpretation, and it appears to be much more appropriate for this poem.
  • In other words, Peter is claiming that it was because of the ultimate judgment that the gospel was proclaimed to the unbelievers who had died.
  • Thus, when examined in context, we find that this final verse does not give persuasive evidence for the belief of Christ’s fall into hell.
  • There are three verses that demonstrate that Jesus did not go to hell.
  • 1.

Those who disagree argue that “Paradise” refers to a place separate from heaven, but the word is clearly translated as “heaven” in both of the other New Testament instances where it appears: in 2 Corinthians 12:4 it refers to the place where Paul was caught up in his revelation of heaven, and in Revelation 2:7, it refers to the place where we find the tree of life–which is clearly referred to as heaven in Revelation 22:2 and 14.

  • 2.
  • This means that he would not fall into hell, but would instead enter immediately into the presence of the Father.
  • Luke 23:46 (KJV) Finally, Christ’s scream, “Father, into your hands I surrender my spirit” (Luke 23:46), shows that he anticipated (right) the immediate end of his agony and alienation, as well as the reception of his spirit into heaven by God the Father (cf.
  • What happened to Jesus when he died, if he didn’t go to hell as some believe?
  • Then, on the first Easter morning, Christ’s spirit was reunited with his body, and he was raised from the dead—just as Christians who have died will be rejoined with their bodies, and they will be resurrected to new life in their beautiful resurrection bodies when Christ comes.
  • We need not fear death not only because eternal life awaits us on the other side, but also because we know that our Savior has gone through exactly the same experience that we will go through.

Learn more about Jesus’ death and resurrection by visiting this website. Learn more about Jesus’ death, the atonement, and the resurrection—as well as why all of this is important. Enroll in Wayne Grudem’s Systematic Theology online course by clicking here.

Did Jesus Go to Hell Between His Death and Resurrection?

We know from Jesus’ response to the thief that when someone dies, they are instantly brought into the presence of the Father. Luke 23:42 states: “Truly I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise,” referring to the moment of death. This remark also informs us that Jesus died and was resurrected by His Father. Beyond that, we know virtually nothing about Jesus’ whereabouts over those three days. It’s important not to read too much into a parable or narrative, as this might lead to confusion.

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Did Jesus Go to Hell? Bible Verses for this Theory

1 Peter 3:18-20 is the scripture of Scripture most frequently cited by people who believe in the existence of hell. “Because Christ also died for sins once and for all, the just for the unjust, in order that He might bring us to God, having been put to death in the flesh but made alive in the spirit; in which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison, who once were disobedient, when the patience of God waited in the days of Noah, during the construction of the ark, in which a few, namely, eight persons, were brought safely through the water.” “In which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison,” they say, referring to the verses in question.

  1. According to legend, Jesus descended into Hell and preached to the souls of the damned.
  2. There is no indication in the Bible that a lost soul who has died receives a second opportunity at redemption.
  3. However, there is another reading of this verse that is more logical.
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Interpreting the Scripture

1 Peter 3:18-20 is the portion of Scripture that believers in the hell doctrine most frequently cite. “For Christ also died for sins once and for all, the just for the unjust, in order that He might bring us to God, having been put to death in the flesh, but made alive in the spirit; in which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison, who once were disobedient, when the patience of God waited in the days of Noah, during the construction of the ark, in which a few, that is, eight persons, were brought safely through the water,” the apostle “In which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison,” they say, referring to the passage in the Bible.

According to legend, Jesus descended into Hell and preached to the souls of the damned there.

An unredeemed person that has died does not get a second opportunity, according to the Bible, which says as much.

This passage can be interpreted in a more acceptable way, though.

Other Bible Verses and Sources Used to Support the Hell Theory

Other Bible scriptures, such as Romans 10:6-7, Ephesians 4:8-9, and Acts 2:27, that have been cited to support the belief that Jesus went to hell between his crucifixion and resurrection have also caused confusion. However, as discussed in this ZondervanAcademic.com article, these verses are frequently taken out of context and given meaning that is not intended by the author. The Apostle’s Creed was later amended to include the phrase “and he fell into hell.” Did Jesus Descend into Hell Before He Was Resurrected?, a film by Garrett Kell, explored this question.

Image adapted from Randy Alcorn’s “What occurred after Jesus died?” (What happened after Jesus died?) available through Eternal Perspective Ministries, 39085 Pioneer Blvd., Suite 206, Sandy, OR 97055, phone 503-668-5200.

Where in the Bible does it speak of Jesus going to hell/hades after His death?

It is not mentioned anywhere in the Bible that Jesus would be sent to hell or Hades after His death. Is it a part of the Episcopalian creed, or something else? I’m perplexed by this. Are you able to assist me? Thank you for taking the time to read this.

Bible Answer:

The Bible informs us that once Jesus died, His spirit was taken up to heaven, also known as paradis e. We know this because Jesus informs the thief who was hanging next to Him on the crucifixion that he would be in paradise with Him that same day. “Truly I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise,” Jesus says to the thief on the cross. Luke 23:43 (NIV) (NASB) In addition, 1 Peter 3:18-19 informs us that Jesus went into hell and proclaimed victory over the spirits, which are fallen spirits, bad angels, and also known as demons, in the presence of the apostles.

1 Peter 3:18-19 (New International Version) (NASB) Take note of the fact that these spirits are imprisoned.

Christ Declared Victory Over The Satanic Hosts

Some people believe that Christ proclaimed triumph over the demons in the abyss, while others believe otherwise. One reason is that they believe Jesus presented a salvation message to the fallen angels, despite the fact that 1 Peter 3:18-19 does not state this. The Greek word for proclamation in verse 18 is not the same as the Greek word for “good news” or “the gospel,” as some translations have it. The Greek word for this is evangelion. The Greek word for proclamation iskerusso, which literally translates as “to herald” or “to perform the duties of a herald.” It is a popular term in the New Testament that conveys the sense of “announcing one’s presence.” In this particular instance, Jesus announced His achievement on the cross.

  1. Furthermore, Jesus did not need to go to hell, as some are presently teaching, in order to atone for His sins.
  2. Although he died on the cross for the sins of the world, Jesus was innocent.
  3. Scripture reminds us in Hebrews 4:15 that Jesus was.
  4. Hebrews 4:15 is a verse that states that (NASB) It is revealed in 1 Peter 3:18-19 that Jesus declared victory over the devils on the cross.

Why Christ Announced Victory

When did Jesus pay a visit to the demons that were imprisoned? “In which likewise He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison,” according to 1 Peter 3:19. Two things may be deduced from this. First, Christ appeared to the devils in the form of His spirit. The term “spirit” does not relate to the Holy Spirit, but rather to the spirit of Christ himself (1 Peter 3:18-19). Second, Christ’s visit took place within the time period following His death and resurrection. As a result, He declared triumph after His death, indicating that His sacrifice had resulted in victory (Hebrews 2:14-15).

Hebrews 2:14-15 (New International Version) (NASB) As a result, He vanquished Satan, death, and sin, and then, following His triumphant proclamation, His bodily, mortal body was resurrected and transformed into an immortal being.

OF THE GOING DOWN OF CHRIST INTO HELLAs, according to the Bible.

Christ died for us and was buried, and it is also believed that He descended into Hell as a result of His sacrifice. Articles of Religious Belief (Thirty-Nine Articles) Additionally, “He descended to the dead,” according to the Apostles’ Creed.

Conclusion:

Was it around this time that Jesus paid a visit to the devils who were imprisoned? ‘In which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison,’ according to 1 Peter 3:19. Both of the following are implied. First, Christ appeared to the devils in the form of a spirit visitations. Rather than referring to the Holy Spirit, the term “spirit” refers to the spiritual presence of Christ (1 Peter 3:18-19). Second, Christ’s visit took place in the context of His death and resurrection, as already mentioned.

  1. In order to render powerlesshim who wielded the power of death, i.e.
  2. 1 Thessalonians 2:14–15 (NASB) Because of His victory over Satan, death, and sin (as well as His pronouncement of victory), He was risen from the dead and transformed into an immortal being (John 5:28).
  3. OF THE GOING DOWN OF CHRIST INTO HELLAs, and rose again.
  4. Sacred Texts and Articles of Faith (Thirty-Nine Articles) “He descended to the dead,” according to the Apostles’ Creed.

Suggested Links:

God’s Anguish – a discourse on grief Christ’s Complete and Total Victory Over Everything Did Jesus’ physical body and spiritual spirit perish? Is it possible that Jesus descended into hell? Is it possible that Satan pulled Jesus into hell and tormented him?

Christ’s

The God I believe in is God, the Father Almighty, who is the Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary, who suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried, and who descended into hell after his death. He resurrected from the dead for a third time on the third day. Ascending into heaven and sitting at the right hand of God the Father Almighty, he will come to judge the living and the dead when the time comes.

Amen.

This raises an important question: how accurate is the Apostles’ Creed’s depiction of this issue in terms of accuracy?

Using the biblical character of Jonah as an example, Jesus proclaims in Matthew 12:40, “Just as Jonah was swallowed up by a colossal fish for three days and nights, so will be the Son of Man for three days and three nights in the center of the earth.” And it is undeniable that when Christ died, he surrendered his spirit (John 19:30).

All that is left is to determine what Scripture means when it talks of Christ descended into the depths of the earth (or the heart of the earth).

Most scholars agree that this deep part of the earth represents the netherworld (i.e., the place wherein the spirits of the dead reside) — it wasn’t until relatively recently that hell began to be associated with the specific location wherein the damned are punished for all eternity (as opposed to the general concept of “hell”).

Christians might go in a variety of ways from this point on — and that is precisely the activity in which Christ was engaged during the course of three days in the wilderness. There are three noteworthy viewpoints to consider:

  1. Christ spent his three days suffering the wrath of God
  2. Christ spent his three days proclaiming his victory over the Satanic kingdom
  3. Christ spent his three days preaching the Gospel to the Old Testament believers who lived in a separate portion of the netherworld
  4. Christ spent his three days preaching the Gospel to the Gentiles who lived in a separate portion of the netherworld

The analogy between Jonah and Christ is advantageous to the first viewpoint in this debate. It is not difficult to understand that, just as Jonah spent his time in suffering in the deep (or the grave), it is possible that Christ too spent time in suffering in the realm of the dead. The apostle Peter states in Acts 2:24 that Christ’s resurrection freed him from the clutches of death “since it was not possible for him to be held or conquered by them” — implying that Christ had been writhing in agony under the weight of death prior to his resurrection.

  1. According to the second viewpoint, Christ is shown as descending into the depths of hell to declare his victory over sin and death.
  2. Death has been conquered.
  3. This is a wonderful photograph.
  4. In this section, we will look at the third and final position, which arises from a problem with interpretation1.
  5. The most difficult question that arises from such an interpretation is one of motivation: why would Christ go out of his way to speak to individuals who had already accepted his message?
  6. It was decided that they were justified in their actions.
  7. While it is possible that Christ presented the Gospel in this manner, it does not appear to be required.
  8. The solemn and joyful responsibility of the Christian then is to let the Scriptures to speak for themselves.

Is It OK to Confess That Jesus Descended into Hell?

For those who have participated in reciting the Apostles’ Creed in your church, you’re surely familiar with the uncomfortable feeling you get when you reach to the section where it reads, “he fell into hell.” A slew of questions pop into my head. As an illustration:

  • For those who have participated in reciting the Apostles’ Creed in your church, you’re surely familiar with the uncomfortable feeling you get when you reach to the section where it reads, “He fell into hell.” Many questions come to mind as a result of this experience. As an illustration, consider:

And so forth. As a result of unanswered issues like these, some Christians choose to simply keep silent while their congregation recites this portion of the creed in their presence. Other churches have elected to remove the term entirely from their services. In fact, no other line of the Apostles’ Creed has elicited as much opposition from contemporary evangelicals as this one. In 1991, theologian Wayne Grudem published an article titled “He Did Not Descend into Hell: A Plea for Following Scripture Instead of the Apostles’ Creed,” which was published in the journal Theological Studies.

  1. As a result, if the Apostles’ Creed is at conflict with Scripture on this topic, we should plainly turn to the God-breathed source for our information (2 Tim.
  2. But even so, the Protestant doctrine of sola scriptura has never dismissed the importance of creeds and confessions.
  3. Many of the questions and answers in the Heidelberg Catechism are based on the Apostles’ Creed, which is a central part of the Catholic faith.
  4. Is there a good explanation for this in this particular instance?
  5. Emerson is a professor at Oklahoma Baptist University, the executive director of The Center for Baptist Renewal, and the author of the blog Biblical Reasoning.

As Emerson argues in his new book, “He Descended to the Dead”: An Evangelical Theology of Holy Saturday: An Evangelical Theology of Holy Saturday, in addition to being the ancient faith of the church, the doctrine of Christ’s descent is founded on a firm biblical foundation and has significant practical implications.

Therefore, it should be reclaimed by those who do not now confess, and better understood by those who do confess.

‘He Descended to the Dead’: An Evangelical Theology of Holy Saturday

290 pages, published by IVP Academic in 2019. 290 pages, published by IVP Academic in 2019. This is a book that every evangelical and Reformed pastor, especially those who lead their congregations in reciting the Apostles’ Creed, should read. Emerson’s response will not be universally acclaimed. However, it deserves to be explored, and it has the potential to offer greater unity and understanding to the body of Christ if properly implemented. Three aspects regarding Christ’s descent from the cross that I wish to highlight from Emerson’s book will be discussed in this review.

What Christ’s DescentDoesn’tMean

First and foremost, it does not imply that Jesus suffered in the fiery depths of hell. Evangelicals, for whom the phrase “into hell” immediately conjure up pictures of Jesus being tortured, would benefit greatly from simply reading the title of the book. Emerson addresses this right away in his introduction: One issue that has to be made quite clear is that, before Calvin, the phrase “descended into hell” did not imply “descended into the abode of suffering.” Although the creedal Latin differs between ad inferna (which means “descended into hell”) and ad inferos (which means “descended to the dead”), both terms were used interchangeably until the Reformation.

  • (16) I don’t hold it against anyone who refuses to acknowledge that Jesus was tortured and killed in hell.
  • Consequently, I expect that one result of Emerson’s book will be that more churches will remove a superfluous stumbling barrier by modifying the language to something like “he descended to the dead” or something like (as many churches already have).
  • 42, 58).
  • Second, it does not just indicate that Jesus was subjected to the agonies of hell on the cross.
  • When taken as a theological statement, Emerson agrees with Calvin’s position: it is magnificently true that Jesus freed us from hell by suffering the terrible torments of God’s wrath on the cross.
  • The descend, in addition to being “completely unique” (100), disrupts the narrative framework of the creed, which places the descent after Christ’s crucifixion and death, as well as burial (107).
  • As a result, Reformed readers should be aware that Emerson’s point of view differs from Calvin’s and the Heidelberg Catechism’s.
  • 50, and with Emerson’s subtleties, it may be considered simply as an enlargement of that structure (205–6).
  • In particular, I’d recommend Jeffrey Hamm’s paper “Descendit: Delete or Declare?” for confessional Reformed readers.

During the Middle Ages, ideas like these were introduced into the religion, and they are still maintained by certain Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox today. They were not part of the ancient doctrine, however, and they are certainly not found in the Bible (91–97, 109), according to Emerson.

What Christ’s DescentDoesMean

This does not imply that Jesus was tortured in the depths of hell. Many evangelicals are concerned with the book’s title alone, and the phrases “into hell” conjure up images of Jesus being tortured in their minds. In his first paragraph, Emerson addresses this issue: There is one issue that has to be made absolutely clear: “descended into hell” did not always imply “descended into the abode of agony” until the time of Calvin. However, before the Reformation, the creedal Latin differed between the phrases ad inferna (which means “descended into hell”) and ad inferos (which means “descended to the dead.” (16) It’s not my place to judge anyone who refuses to acknowledge that Jesus was crucified and tormented in hell.

  • It is hoped that the book would encourage more churches to eliminate a superfluous stumbling barrier by modifying the language to something like “he sank into the dead” as a result of Emerson’s writings (as many churches already have).
  • 42, 58).
  • First and foremost, it does not just indicate that Jesus endured the agonies of hell while on the cross.
  • In the context of a theological statement, Emerson agrees with Calvin’s point of view: it is magnificently true that Jesus freed us from hell by suffering the horrible torments of God’s wrath on the cross.
  • The descent, in addition to being “completely unique” (100), disrupts the narrative framework of the creed, which places the descend after Christ’s crucifixion, death, and burial (107).
  • Emerson’s viewpoint is in contrast with Calvin’s and the Heidelberg Catechism, which should be noted by Reformed readers.
  • 50, and with Emerson’s subtleties may be considered simply as an enlargement of that structure (205–6).
  • The essay “Descendit: Delete or Declare?
  • It also does not follow that some persons who died were given a second chance to be saved after they died, or that hell was completely cleansed of all its residents as part of a universal redemption effort.

During the Middle Ages, ideas like these were introduced into the dogma, and some Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox adherents still hold them today. They were not part of the ancient doctrine, however, and they are surely not scriptural, according to Emerson (91–97; 109).

Why Christ’s Descent Matters

It is possible that you will be astonished by how many other theological concerns this concept touches on, even if you do not ultimately agree with Emerson’s reading of the biblical texts. The chapters in Part Two deal with the relationship between Christ’s descent and concepts such as:

  • A three-tiered cosmos is assumed (56, 134
  • Cf. Phil. 2:10
  • Eph. 4:9), with Jesus visiting and conquering on each tier. Anthropology: it is based on the assumption that human souls can live in a condition intermediate to that of their bodies (146–47)
  • 164
  • See also John 19:30). Soteriology: It serves as the beginning of Christ’s exaltation, coming as it does directly after the words “It is completed” (164
  • See. John 19:30).
See also:  Who Are Jesus Parents

These chapters clearly demonstrate the scholarly nature of the work. In contrast, the novel “He Descended to the Dead” opens and concludes with a pastoral heart (6–9, 208). Due to the fact that Christ’s ascension forces us to comprehend that he does not just understand what it is like to die. As a result, he understands what it’s like to be dead, to live in that blissful but unnatural condition of unclothed-ness (2 Cor. 5:4), and to dwell among the spirits of the dead. In the Bible, Jesus’ death and resurrection took place over three days and nights in the heart of the earth (Matt.

  • 1:17, 2:16, and Luke 24:45).
  • Also also Matthew 12:40, Matthew 16:31, Matthew 27:63, Esther 4:16 and Esther 5:1).
  • He has experienced what it is like to be dead.
  • And when we or our loved ones find ourselves on the verge of death, we may take consolation in the knowledge that our Savior has already been there and done it.
  • 1:18).
  • Do not remain mute the next time the Apostles’ Creed is being recited in your church.
  • Because the one who endured death on your behalf has now climbed to the highest realms and is even now preparing for his last descend into hell (1 Thess.

Did Jesus Actually Descend into Hell?

In the Christian church, there has always been a hot button issue that comes up every so often. This issue is concerned with the question of whether or not Jesus went to hell. There are schools of thinking that believe He did and schools of thought that believe He did not. Scripture does not provide a straightforward response to this topic; nevertheless, with more study, a more complete understanding can be gained. In some parts of the world, Christianity has always been viewed with suspicion, and this is no exception.

The outcome of these conferences was a collection of creeds that served as expressions of religious belief.

The Nicene Creed and the Apostles’ Creed are the two most well-known creeds in the Christian church, and they are both written in Latin.

Both creeds express similar ideas, however the Apostles’ Creed contains the phrase “he fell into hell,” whereas the Creed of the Holy Spirit does not contain this phrase. The image is courtesy of Getty Images/Kesu01.

Where Did The Idea of Jesus Descending to Hell Originate? And Did Jesus Descend to Hell?

The Apostles’ Creed is an enlarged form of the Old Roman Creed, which was in use as early as the second century and was adopted by the Church of Rome. The grounds for the formation of the Apostles’ Creed are not well understood by academics. Historically, early church leaders believed the credo was penned by the apostles themselves, although we don’t know for sure. That Jesus had gone into hell is thought to have been added later, about AD 390, to the Bible. This would have occurred at the same time as a bishop by the name of Apollinarius was giving a lecture.

  1. During the Council of Constantinople in 381 AD, this dogma was formally rejected and condemned.
  2. It was during the Council of Nicaea in AD 325 that the Nicene Creed was formulated.
  3. Constantine desired for the Christian church to have a declaration of faith that would unify all of the denominations under one roof.
  4. Apart from the establishment of these creeds, there are scripture passages that are held up as proof that Jesus was crucified and afterwards resurrected.
  5. Together with Ephesians 4:9, this passage contributes to the development of the belief that Jesus may have gone into hell following his death on the cross.

Understanding the Language and Meaningof the Apostles Creed

It is vitally crucial to be able to comprehend the language of a paper. A person must be familiar with the language and understand the meaning of the terms in that language. When there is a miscommunication, the entire meaning of a document or statement might be altered. Christians and researchers today must recognize that writings from the early church were written in a variety of languages that can be difficult to decipher and interpret. When it comes to translating Hebrew or Greek into English, we must proceed with caution.

  1. This term literally means “hell,” but it refers to the current version of Hell.
  2. The New Testament has a reference to hell written in the Greek language.
  3. The “abode of the dead” is difficult to translate from Greek to English because it is described by only two words.
  4. This term refers to a place of final punishment or a physical location.
  5. The phrase “he descended into Hell” is included in the Apostles’ Creed, and it is written in the Greek language as “Hades.” The Greek term for death, Hades, alludes to the condition of being dead.
  6. Kenneth West, a theological researcher, describes this in the following remark about 1 Peter 3:18-22.
  7. This is a transformation that has occurred as time has progressed.
  8. More specifically, the term “hell” came to refer to the location where Satan resides.

This was not what hell was like according to the languages of the Bible. Many churches nowadays do not say the Apostle’s Creed, which is a sad state of affairs. The ones who still do so often do so without including this statement. Photo courtesy of Aaron Burden via Unsplash.

Did Jesus Descend to Hell?

The gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke provide accounts of the events that occurred soon after Jesus’ death. Each report provides a vivid and understandable explanation of the events that took place. The Bible tells us that Jesus cried out and surrendered His spirit in Matthew 27:50-53. Then the curtain of the sanctuary came crashing down, and the ground shook violently. The tombs of the saints were revealed when the rocks were divided. As recorded in Mark 15:38, “Then the curtain of the Temple was split in half from top to bottom.” According to Luke 23:44-45, It was now around midday, and because the sun’s light had departed, darkness fell over the entire country until three o’clock.

  • Daniel, Elijah, and Zechariah all foretold of an earthquake and a period of darkness, which he describes in detail in his narrative of the event.
  • It is referenced in all three narratives, which demonstrates the significance of this event in human history.
  • Located in the Temple, it was suspended above and above the entrance to the Holy of Holies.
  • Aaron was permitted to enter the tent of meeting on the Day of Atonement, according to Exodus 26.
  • The Israelites were not permitted to enter the presence of the Lord at their leisure.
  • Is it possible that Jesus went to hell?
  • It had been decided to make the ultimate sacrifice.
  • Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/Tanya Sid

Why Do Some People Think Jesus Descended into Hell?

The concept that Jesus went into hell is still held by many Christians today, although many have called this belief into doubt. Some people are unable to comprehend this notion for whatever reason. Fr. Sev Kuupuo explains why Jesus descended to hell and what the aim of His descent was: “Jesus went to Hell in order to release souls who had been imprisoned for a long period of time.” The mission of Jesus’ ascension into Hell was to bring about the release of the holy people of the Old Testament.

He had to save the holy people of the Old Testament who were waiting for Him in Abraham’s bosom as well as the rest of the world.

In conclusion, those who believe that Jesus descended into hell believe that He did so in order to save souls and to fulfill the sacrifice for our sins on the cross. It is not a notion that He traveled to that location and stayed for a time. Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/Tomertu

Why Do Some People Believe Jesus Did Not Descend into Hell?

Many different reasons are used by those who profess their opinion that Jesus did not descend into hell in order to support their position. The most widely held belief is that Jesus was God manifested in human form. He is the one who created the area we know as hell. He forbade Satan from enteringheavent and living in hell for the rest of his days. After all, if God created hell and decided its purpose, how could he possibly visit it? Wasn’t Jesus a holy figure who had no business being in this place?

They have comprehended the significance of this sentence.

How Should Christians Respond to This?

There are numerous possible responses to this topic, and each answer will be shaped by the individual’s viewpoint. The fact that Christians do not live in Greek culture makes it difficult for them to understand what is meant by this remark. They are unable to communicate in Greek. We just do not understand what some terms in Greek mean. Our answer should be to devote the necessary time to studying the Scriptures. Investigate the Biblical languages in greater depth. Inquire of your pastor or a fellow believer in Christ about anything.

According to John Jones of the First Presbyterian Church, “no confessional declaration should be confirmed unless the affirmer understands what the statement entails.” According to its appropriate interpretation, the Apostles’ Creed expresses a fundamental theological truth.” It has been suggested that the Apostles Creed contains a sentence that is problematic among certain Christians.

Before taking a position on anything, we must first conduct thorough research.

He was executed by hanging on a cross.

The brilliance of this is that he did not remain in that location.

Sources:

Millard J. Erickson’s “Introducing Christian Doctrine” was published in 1992 by Baker Publishing Group in Grand Rapids, Michigan. “The Veil Was Torn in Two,” by Daniel M. Guertner, is available online. Having a strong desire for God. The 19th of April, 2019. (Retrieved on March 4, 2020) . Kenneth S. Wuest’s Word Studies in the Greek New Testament is available online. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1973. Credit for the image: Getty Images/nu1983 The author, Ashley Hooker, works as a freelance writer while also homeschooling her two children, ministering alongside her husband as he serves as the pastor of a rural church in West Virginia, and writing about her Christian faith.

When Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey wreaked havoc on the United States, she traveled to Mississippi and Texas with the North Carolina Baptist Men’s Missionary Society.

She also traveled to West Virginia and Vermont to share the Gospel with others. Her desire is to spend her time writing and spreading the love of Christ to everyone she comes into contact with.

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