Where Did Jesus H Christ Come From

Why Do People Say “Jesus H. Christ,” and Where Did the “H” Come From?

After taking into account the patterns of each of these sources, the following information on John appears to be quite reliable. It is believed that he was born somewhere in Judea (most likely in the town of En Kerem, which has been in existence from at least 530ce) to Zechariah, a priest of the order of Abijah, and his wife, Elizabeth, who may have been a relative of Mary, the mother of Jesus. His formative years were spent in the Judaean desert, where monastic groups, such as the Essenes (a severe Jewish sect that flourished from approximately the 2nd centurybce to the 1st centuryce), and individual hermits frequently trained the young in their own principles.

In the lower Jordan valley, he was active in the area extending from “Aenon near Salim” (near modern N’blus) to a point east of Jericho.

His objective was to reach out to people from all walks of life and from all levels of Jewish society.

Several issues about the significance of John’s message are still being contested, including the following: In Matthew 3, John declares, “He who comes after me is mightier than I,” which might allude to God himself, a human messiah, or a transcendentdivine person.

  • Penitentfasting, which went above and above the requirements of Jewish Law, and specific prayers were common among John’s disciples.
  • Despite the fact that John, like past prophets, had an inner circle of disciples, baptism was not a requirement for membership in this group.
  • It was scarcely conceived as a sacrament in the Christian sense, delivering forgiveness, or as a new people, embracing both Jews and Gentiles, preparing for God’s eventual reign, nor as a substitute for Judaism.
  • A rite signifying man’s reunification with divinity and return to his heavenly home—a sacrament of salvation and rebirth—is also unprovable.
  • Other baptizing groups were discovered around the same time and place as John’s, but none of these numerous and little-known baptisms can be demonstrated to have been inspired by John’s.
  • John’s baptism most likely meant an anticipatory surrender to the future global judgment, which was symbolized by a second “baptism” by the Holy Spirit in a river of fire.
  • Jesus’ baptism by St.
  • Photos courtesy of Photos.com/Thinkstock Herod Antipas, the king of Galilee and central Transjordan, imprisoned John sometime after he baptized Jesus.

After divorcing his first wife, the daughter of KingAretas IVof theNabataeans, an adjacentArabpeople, Herod married (illegally, according to Jewish Law) Herodias, the divorced wife of his half brother, after divorcing his first wife, the daughter of KingAretas IVof theNabataeans, an adjacentArabpeople.

John’s execution very definitely occurred before Aretas’s triumph over Herod in 35–36, a victory often regarded as divine revenge on Herod for the death of John.

It is likely that John’s disciples were able to collect and bury his remains, and that they honored his grave. From 360 onwards, the customary burial location in Sebaste (formerly Samaria), near “Aenon by Salim,” has been documented.

Jesus H. Christ – Wikipedia

After taking into consideration the patterns of each of these sources, the following information on John appears to be reasonably reliable. He was born somewhere inJudaea (centered at En Kerem from at least 530ce) to Zechariah, a priest of the order of Abijah, and his wife, Elizabeth, who was perhaps a relative of Mary, the mother of Jesus. His formative years were spent in the Judaean desert, where monastic groups, such as the Essenes (a severe Jewish sect that flourished from approximately the 2nd centurybce to the 1st centuryce), and individual hermits often trained the young in their own principles.

  1. He was active in the region of the lower Jordan valley, from “Aenon near Salim” (near modern Nblus) to a position east of Jericho.
  2. His objective was to reach out to Jews from all walks of life and from all social classes.
  3. Several issues about the significance of John’s message are still being discussed, including: In Matthew 3, John adds, “He who comes after me is mightier than I,” which might allude to God himself, a human messiah, or a transcendentdivine person.
  4. Penitentfasting, which went above and above the requirements of Jewish Law, and specific prayers distinguished John’s adherents.
  5. Although John had an inner circle of disciples, unlike past prophets, baptism was not a requirement for membership in this group.
  6. It was scarcely conceived as a sacrament in the Christian sense, giving forgiveness, or as a new people, encompassing both Jews and Gentiles, preparing for God’s future reign.
  7. It is also unprovable that it was a rite signifying man’s reunion with divinity and return to his heavenly home—a sacrament of salvation and rebirth—that took place.

There were many more baptizing groups discovered about the same time and place as John’s, but none of these diverse and little-known baptisms can be demonstrated to have been inspired by John’s.

John’s baptism most likely indicated not so much an expected admittance into the kingdom of God as it did an anticipatory surrender to the approaching global judgment, which was pictured as a coming second “baptism” by the Holy Spirit in a river of fire.

John the Baptist, as seen in an Armenian evangelistary (1587).

His crime was far from the innocuousmoralmessage that Josephus portrays it to be, nor would his message, as presented in the Gospels, have had a much more immediate political impact.

Herod was undoubtedly concerned about the possibility that his Jewish subjects might band together with his semi-Arab subjects to form a united front against him as a result of John’s condemnation of this marriage.

According to the Gospels, John’s death occurred before Jesus’ death; any higher degree of chronological certainty is dependent on the dates of Jesus’ ministry and death.

It is likely that John’s disciples retrieved and buried his remains, and that they honored his grave. The customary burial location in Sebaste (formerly Samaria), near the town of “Aenon by Salim,” has been documented from 360.

History

Around the year 1855, Alexander Campbell Although the exact date of the first usage of the term is uncertain, Mark Twain (1835–1910) noted in his autobiography that it was in widespread use even when he was a boy. The following is the story of a practical joke played on a revival preacher by Twain’s friend in 1847, when he was working as a printer’s apprentice, as told by Roger Smith (1994):Twain recalls a practical joke played on a revival preacher when he was working as an apprentice in a printing shop that Alexander Campbell, a famous evangelist who was visiting Hannibal at the time, hired to print a pamphlet of his sermon During a routine review of the galleys, Twain’s fellow apprentice, Wales McCormick, discovered that he needed to make place for some dropped words, which he accomplished by abbreviating Jesus Christ on the same line to J.

  • C.
  • Fill fill the blanks with whatever you choose.” And the puckish McCormick went over and beyond: he set up Jesus H.
  • At least according to Smith (1994:331-2), the phrase “Jesus H.
  • Additionally, the term is identified as belonging to American English by Quinion, a British author who published in 2009.

Stress pattern

Several authors have emphasized the importance of placing a strong emphasis on the letter “H,” linking it in various ways to the practice of expletive infixation. Its lengthy survival, according to Quinion, must be due in large part to its cadence, as well as the way in which an exceptionally high stress may be placed on the H. In addition, it might be viewed as an example of emphatic infixing that closely corresponds to the models of words such as abso-bloody-lutely and tribu-bloody-lation. A linguist named Dwight Bolinger made similar observations when he mentioned “Jesus H.

In the words of Horberry, “the great accent on the H somehow enriches the rhythm of its host sentence.

Etymology

Even while swearing by the name of Jesus Christ has been standard practice for many years, the specific origins of the letterH inthe expressionJesus H. Christremain a source of conjecture. While other interpretations have been advanced, the divine monogram of Christian symbolism is the most frequently acknowledged as the source of the symbol’s origin. The sign, which is formed from the first three letters of the Greek name of Jesus (H), is transliterated iota-eta-sigma, which can appear as IHS (with lunate sigma), JHS (with lunate sigma), or JHC (with lunate sigma) (“J” was historically a mere variant of “I”; seeJ).

Particularly intriguing would be the “JHC” variation, which would allow for the interpretation of the “H” as part of a name.

Folk etymology

While the foregoing is the most likely origin of the “H,” there is still the matter of folk etymology, which is the notion shared by ordinary people (which is not necessarily historically true) as to where the “H” originates from (which is not always historically correct). There is a possibility that the name “Harold” is the source of this variation form; indeed, Smith (1994:32) mentions that it is the basis of a variant version known as “Jesus Harold Christ.” The nickname “Harold” may have originated from a common mistake (often made by youngsters) of the words “Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name,” which appears in the Lord’s Prayer.

Variants

The number of alternative versions, most of which have the letter “H” changed with something longer, is enormous. A person named “Jesus Harold Christ” is referenced above (which means “Our Father, who art in Heaven, Harold be thy name.”). Smith mentions Jesus Holy Christ, Jesus Hecking Christ, and Jesus H. Particular Christ, among other names for Jesus. Dictionary of Slanglists published by Green’s Slanglists, Inc. Jesus H!, Jesus H. Crow!, Jesus H. Johnson!, Jesus H. Mahogany Christ!, Jesus hopping Christ!, Jesus Johnnycake Christ!, Jeezus K.

  1. Johnson!, Jesus H.
  2. Reist!
  3. Christ is risen from the dead!
  4. Christ!
  5. Christ!
  6. As far as Smith is concerned, the simple fact that there are so many different spelling variations contributes to the sense of comedy (and outright blasphemy) that is inherent in “Jesus H.
  7. stand for?

Notes

  1. In Adams, Cecil (June 4, 1976), “Why do people say “Jesus H. Christ”?” in The Straight Dope (retrieved August 1, 2008), the author asks “Why do people say “Jesus H. Christ”?” The irony is in the seemingly haphazard selection of the letter “H,” which has no biblical validity whatsoever. Horberry (2010:26) points out that using a middle initial would give the impression that “Christ” was Jesus’ final name, which is not the case
  2. For further information, seeJesus (2010:26). See “Variants” below for further information about comedy
  3. “At that time, the ordinary swearers of the region developed a unique method of accentuating the Savior’s name when they were profaning it.” According to the context of Twain’s comment (which is included here in the main text), he was referring to the historical figure “Jesus H. Christ.” Harriet Elinor Smith is the editor of this work (2010) Mark Twain’s autobiography is available online. The University of California Press (Berkeley) has a page number of 458
  4. Smith (1994:332). For further information, see also R. Kent Rasmussen’s “Wales McCormick,” in The Critical Companion to Mark Twain: A Literary Reference to His Life and Work (Infobase Publishing, 2007), page 786
  5. Draper (1993) provides more information, stating that the printing business served as the printing site for the Hannibal Courier. Avoiding the letter “J. C.” necessitated the resetting of three of the sixteen pages
  6. Quirion (2009)
  7. Bolinger (1986:84-85)
  8. Horberry (2010:25)
  9. Green’s Dictionary of Slang
  10. AbcSmith (1994:332)
  11. AbcSmith (1994:332) See, for example, for web attestations of the misconception
  12. And
  13. “Jesus H. Christ!, excl. — Green’s Dictionary of Slang” is the result of a machine search of the internet for terms occuring in the frame “Jesus Christ”, both h-initial and more widely, as reported by blogger “Tenser” at
  14. “Jesus H. Christ!, excl. greensdictofslang.com. The date is March 16, 2021.
See also:  What Does It Mean That Jesus Is King

References

  • (1986)Intonation and its parts: melody in spoken English. Dwight Bolinger’s dissertation. Stanford University Press is located in Stanford, California. The following extract is available to read online at Google Books: The novel Albee, written by Stephen J. Bottoms, is titled Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Cambridge University Press
  • Cassidy, Frederick G. (1995), “More on Jesus H. Christ,” American Speech, 70: 370
  • Draper, Mark (1993), “Alexander Campbell,” article in Christie Graves Hamric (ed.) The Mark Twain Encyclopedia
  • Cassidy, Frederick G. (1995), “More on Jesus H. Christ TaylorFrancis
  • Falvey, Kate
  • TaylorFrancis (2010) “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” is a play by Edward Albee that has dark comedy. Dark Humor, edited by Harold Bloom and Blake Hobby, is available online. Roger Horberry of Infobase Publishing and Roger Horberry of Infobase Publishing (2010) How to make business jargon come to life, even if it looks fine on paper A C Black is the initials of the author’s surname. The following excerpts are available to read online at Google Books: Lennox, Doug (2013)Now you know everything about everything Dundurn. It is possible to read the following excerpt on Google Books: Quinion, Michael (2009) Why is Q Always Followed by U? : Word-Perfect Answers to the Most-Asked Questions About Language. In the United Kingdom, Penguin is known as “Penguin” and “Penguin UK” is an abbreviation for “Penguin United Kingdom.” Ian Ransom’s book, Waiting for the Rapture, was published in 2006. iUniverse
  • Salinger, J. D. (1951) The Catcher in the Rye (The Catcher in the Rye). Little, Brown and Company
  • Roger Smith, New York (1994). “The H of Jesus H. Christ” is an abbreviation. American Speech, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 331–335. https://doi.org/10.2307/455527

External links

  • Michael Quinion’s explanation on WorldWideWords (which supports the IHC idea) is below. Harold, that is thy name! (This number has an interesting relation to the Epistle of Barnabas(9:6-7)(written between 70 and 190 AD), which states: “The eighteen is I (=ten) and H (=eight) – you have Jesus.”

The Grammarphobia Blog: The ‘H’ in ‘Jesus H. Christ’

Q: What does the “H” in the phrase “Jesus H. Christ” stand for? It’s clear that it’s not a middle initial, so why is it included? A: There have been a slew of hypotheses put out concerning the origin of the “H” in “Jesus H. Christ,” which is one of a number of expletives or exclamations that make use of the name of God. Possibly, it derives from a monogram consisting of the first three letters of the Greek word for Jesus, which is the most plausible explanation. In Greek, the name “Jesus” is written in capital characters while “o” is written in lowercase letters.

  • Why does one version of the monogram conclude with a “S” while another version ends with a “C”?
  • For example, the sigma in is in the center and at the conclusion of the sentence.
  • The IHS form is more prevalent than the IHC variant, which The Catholic Encyclopedia describes as a rare “learned abbreviation” (a learnt acronym).
  • Furthermore, it serves as the insignia of the Society of Jesus, a Jesuit religious organization that was founded in 1540.
  • Christ” first appeared in print in the late nineteenth century.
  • A seemingly amusing usage of the word was cited in an anonymous Texas newspaper, according to the source, which read: “At Laredo the other day, Jesus H.
  • Voicing a conversation between the Adam and Eve characters in a scenario that takes place in the Garden of Eden: Wife.

How those apples have been pecked!

Man.

Christ hears your statements, He will inform his Father, who will reprimand you.

The phrase was first heard by Mark Twain, who was working as a printer’s apprentice in Missouri in the mid-1800s.

into Jesus H.

Christ” is used as “an oath or as a forceful cry of astonishment, incredulity, dismay, or the like” when referring to Jesus Christ.

Christ, holy leaping Jesus Christ,” among other things.

That 1906 passage in Mark Twain’s Autobiography, which was published in 1924, 14 years after the author’s death and with an introduction by Albert Bigelow Paine, is DARE’s first example of a quotation from a living author.

We’ll add a few words to the citation to put the statement in its appropriate context: Towards the end of the night about five o’clock the cook would call out: “Come bullies, come bullies, come bullies, turn out.” Some people would be fine with him, and they would just go back to their seats.

Christ, do you want to sleep there all day?” and so on.

If you’re interested in learning more, we’ve covered a variety of additional idioms that refer to or hint to God in previous entries from 2015, 2012, 2011, and 2008. Donate to the Grammarphobia Blog to assist in its ongoing operation. Also, be sure to check out our books on the English language.

Jesus H Christ – Meaning & Origin 2022 (Term explained)

What exactly does the name Jesus H Christ mean? An allusion to Jesus Christ, the promised Messiah of the Christian faith. Jesus H. is an acronym that stands for Jesus H. As an expletive remark, Christ is used to express surprise, rage, or exhilaration in response to something unexpected. Christians believe that the holy figure Jesus Christ did not originally have the middle name “H.”, and thus using his name in a profane or offensive manner is deemed blasphemy. When people refer to themselves by this name, they frequently apply additional pressure to the “H.” While some have speculated that the H represents the word “holy,” others have argued that it represents the word “Harold.” Some have even suggested that it has something to do with the way the name “Jesus” is written in Greek characters.

Origin

What does the nameJesus H Christ signify exactly? An allusion to Jesus Christ, the promised Messiah of the Christian religion. Jesus H. is an acronym that stands for “Jesus the Messiah.” As an expletive remark, Christ is used to express astonishment, indignation, or enthusiasm in response to other people’s actions. Christians believe that the holy figure Jesus Christ did not originally have the middle name “H.”, and thus using his name as a form of vulgarity or offense is deemed blasphemy. It is common for individuals to place extra pressure on the “H” when they use this name.

Spread and Usage

What was the method through whichJesus H Christ spread? Native English people employ the term as a slur and an exclamation point in their speech. Additionally, it may be used in a hilarious manner, and, like many other things, it has become popularized in the internetmeme world, particularly in erroneous allusions to true religious figures.

External References

Published:04/01/2020 by|Updated:04/01/2020 | 1,201 views | Published:04/01/2020 by Please report a mistake.

Urban Dictionary: jesus H. christ

An alternative to the person of Jesus Christ. There are a variety of reasons why the H is included. Some believe it represented the word “Holy,” while others believe it represented the word “Harold” because of the phrase “Our Father, who art in heaven, Harold be thy name.” Other hypotheses about the origin of the H. include: 1. The letter H stood for haploid, which means that Jesus does not have a human father. 2. It is reminiscent of the H in the IHSlogo, which may be found on a variety of Christian memorabilia.

It is “Iesous” in the Greek language, with the E sound represented by the Greek letter eta, which appears like a H on the page.

3.

The problem is that the inscription is typically presented asINRI: Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum, which is incorrect (J.C., King of the Jews). Jesus H. Christis a term that is the same as “Jesus Christ,” but with the letter H put in, most likely for humorous purposes.

Where Does the “H” Come From in “Jesus H. Christ”

a non-Christian alternative to the Christian religion Many factors contribute to the addition of the H. According to some, it represented the word “Holy,” while others claim that it represented the word “Harold” because of the phrase “Our Father who art in heaven, Harold be thy name.” Further speculations on the H.’s etymology include: Because Jesus is a haploid (without a human father), the letter H was used to represent this. 2. It is reminiscent of the H in the International Hospitals Society emblem, which may be seen on a variety of Christian items.

  1. As an abbreviation of “Jesus” in classical Greek letters, IHS has been around since the beginning of Christianity.
  2. Eventually, the unexplained character was recognized as Jesus’ middle initial after being handed on to Christian Romans, for whom a H was just an H.
  3. The problem is that the inscription is commonly presented asINRI: Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum, which is not accurate in every case (J.C., King of the Jews).
  4. Christis a statement that is the same as “Jesus Christ,” but with the letter H put in, most likely for hilarity, to make it more humorous.
Resources

Twitter is a great place to keep up with the conversation. Although the thoughts stated in this article are purely those of the author, World Religion News does not always agree with or endorse them.

See also:  Who Jesus Says I Am

Jesus H. Christ mystery: Shock theory reveals origin of letter H – Where did it come from?

Twitter is a great place to keep up with the discussion. Although the thoughts stated in this article are purely those of the author, World Religion News does not always agree with or support them.

Theory explain where phrase ‘Jesus H. Christ’ came from

  • A hypothesis asserts that the letter ‘H’ came from the name ‘Jesus H. Christ,’ and that this is incorrect. It is thought that the mistake is due to a Latin abbreviation of the Greek spelling of Jesus, which only included the first three Greek letters, which was employed in the Latin shortening. As a result, the Greek spelling of “o” was abbreviated to “JHC,” but centuries later, the “I” was mistaken for a “J,” and the abbreviation was justified by the “J” denoting “Jesus” and the abbreviation “C” denoting “Christ,” with the letter “H” denoting the beginning of his middle name. Examples of the phrase ‘Jesus H. Christ’ have been found in current times on the internet, but it has also been reported as far back as Mark Twain’s writings.

There’s a hypothesis that says the letter “H” came from “Jesus H. Christ,” but it doesn’t hold up under scrutiny. Some claim that the mistake stems from a Latin abbreviation of the Greek spelling of Jesus, which only utilized the first three Greek letters, which was used in the Latin shortening; however, this is not confirmed. Although the Greek spelling was abbreviated to “IHC,” centuries later the “I” would be mistaken for a “J”; “JHC” was therefore justified, with the “J” standing for “Jesus” and the “C” standing for “Christ,” with the “H” serving as the beginning of his middle name.

Christ’ can be found online in current times, but they can also be found in works dating back to Mark Twain.

Why do folks say “Jesus H. Christ”?

A hypothesis claims to disprove the origin of the letter ‘H’ from the name ‘Jesus H. Christ.’ It is thought that the mistake stems from a Latin abbreviation of the Greek spelling of Jesus, which only included the first three Greek letters, which was used in the Latin shortening. Although the Greek spelling was abbreviated to “IHC,” centuries later the “I” would be mistaken for a “J”; “JHC” was then justified, with the “J” standing for “Jesus” and the “C” standing for “Christ,” with the “H” serving as the beginning of his middle name; Examples of the phrase ‘Jesus H.

Christ’ have been found online in recent times, but they have also been reported as far back as Mark Twain.

“Jesus H. Christ”: Why “H”?

“Jesus H. Christ!” exclaimed the crowd. We’ve all heard that term at some point in our lives, maybe as far back as most of us can remember. In fact, if you’re anything like me, you probably didn’t even notice it (though you could have found it disagreeable because it’s considered a minor kind of obscenity at the time) and were never interested in finding out where it originated from or why the middle initial was “H.” To us, it was nothing more than a slang phrase that was only used in the United States.

  1. In September 2016, I embarked on a trip around the coast of Spain’s southernmost peninsula.
  2. “Jesus H.
  3. In Spain, perhaps?
  4. Because of this, I realized there was a lot more to that “strictly American slang term” than I had previously realized.
  5. The majority of my information for this page came from two Wikipedia articles: Because I’ll be summarizing a lot of material, you may use those links to get further information and references.

Christ, the expression appears to be uniquely American, and it was already in common use by the nineteenth century, as evidenced by a Mark Twain story that took place while he was working as a printer’s apprentice in 1847 (copied here from that article):recounts a practical joke a friend played on a revival preacher while Twain was an apprentice in a printing shop that Alexander Campbell, a famous evangelist who During a routine review of the galleys, Twain’s fellow apprentice, Wales McCormick, discovered that he needed to make place for some dropped words, which he accomplished by abbreviating Jesus Christ on the same line to J.

  1. C.
  2. Fill fill the blanks with whatever you choose.” And the puckish McCormick went over and beyond: he set up Jesus H.
  3. It goes on to claim that the expression’s use fell, at least in print, until roughly 1930, but that it then began to be used more regularly again from 1970 until the current day, according to the article.
  4. An explanation for this decision appears to be found in an ecclesiastical art form known as the Christogram (alternatively known as “divine monogram”), such as the “JHC” that I had seen in Cádiz, Spain.
  5. Furthermore, the name “Jesus Christ” itself developed into a rich source of such symbolism.
  6. These symbols can be seen on priests’ and ministers’ robes, on church flags, as well as in inscriptions and paintings.
  7. Of course, because the New Testament was written in Greek, those Christograms are based on Greek characters, with some transliterations into Roman letters thrown in for good measure (what modern English uses).

Spoiler alert: If you have a keen eye, you will note that the capital eta (“”) resembles a Roman “H,” and as a result, you should be able to predict where this is going.

It was the first thing I saw since I had studied Greek in college, and it was the first thing I noticed.

To make it, you just superimpose the first two letters of chi over each other; however, either the chi is made smaller or the rho, which is more usually lengthened so that the chi does not hide the rho, is used.

Or, at the very least, you will begin to see it in churches today.

And then there’s a family of Christograms that really contribute to the formation of the letter “H” in the phrase “Jesus H.

The Christogram “JHC” that I observed in Cádiz, as well as the Christogram “JHS” that appears on the robes of the Archbishop of Canterbury in The Crown, both fit into this category.

Here are two instances, the first of which is contemporary and the second of which is medieval: So, what’s the deal with the variations?

Isn’t it true that the “J” in German still behaves in the same way?

As a result, the name of Jesus was altered from, albeit the German pronunciation of “Jesu” is more closer to the original Koine Greek pronunciation than the English pronunciation.

In order for a “S” or a C to appear, the process must be repeated several times.

Now pay close attention to the final sigma, “.” You may see the beginnings of the Roman “S” in that shape, but with a different proportioning scheme.

That is why I suggested that you utilize the first two and last letters of the Greek alphabet, because the final sigma is quite similar in appearance to the letter “c.” However, it has been discovered that there is more to it than that.

It turns out that during the Hellenistic period (4th and 3rd century BCE), the symbol used for carving inscriptions was reduced to a C-shaped shape, which was more common at the time.

According to some sources, the Cyrillic alphabet, which was used by Russian and other Slavic languages, was based largely on the Greek alphabet; in fact, the Cyrillic letter C, which is used for the “s” sound in Russian and other Slavic languages, appears to have originated from this lunate sigma.

  • However, the middle initial, the eta (“”), remains Greek in each of the variations.
  • According to Wikipedia (H), the letters “H” and “H” were acquired by the Greeks and the Latins from the Phoenicians, who had acquired them from earlier sources.
  • If you’re interested in learning more about Russian, you should know that the Cyrillic letter “H” for the “n” sound is not related to the Greek letter.
  • The Cyrillic letter “H” just depicts the final conclusion of a procedure that was only a transient item in Greek to begin with.
  • Christ” came from the IHC family of Christograms, particularly the one that I had seen in Cádiz, Spain, “JHC,” which on the surface appears to be somebody’s initials, namely those of “Jesus H.
  • The “X” represents the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the word “Christ,” which is written as a capital “C” in English.
  • The following “explanation,” which is based on a biology joke, is given in the original Wikipedia article: Facetious etymology is employed.

In order to provide context for the joke’s scientific origins, seePloidy.

Virgin birth, scientifically known as Parthenogenesis, is a true phenomenon that has been witnessed in nature.

However, this is not the case with mammals.

If meiosisis is not used in the parthenogenetic mechanism that is being used, the offspring will be complete clones of the mother.

As a result of the fact that all of the parthenogenetic kids would be complete clones of their mother, it would follow that they would all be girls.

Armed with this knowledge (and a healthy dose of levity), we can easily see that the Virgin Birth offers a significant challenge to fundamental Christian theology and tradition.

Jessica Christ, what are you talking about?

As a result, Christian teaching is a big cover-up designed to conceal the reality that Jesus Christ was a woman from us.

Christ, cites an article written by Roger Smith as its primary source (The H of Jesus H.

American Speech 69:331-335, 1994).

Apparently, “Harold” is an alias: Even if this is the most likely source of the letter “H,” there is still the issue of folk etymology, which is the sense shared by ordinary people (which is not necessarily historically correct) about where the letter “H” comes from, which must be addressed.

When this sentence is read incorrectly, it might be misinterpreted as referring to the Deity’s name (“thy name is.”) rather than the correct meaning, which is “may thy name be sanctified.” Due of the phonetic similarities between the words hallowed (IPA) and Harold, there might be some mistake (IPA).

  1. What was Smith’s conclusion as a result of this?
  2. Christ,” according to Smith, is full of fun – and blasphemy – because of the sheer number of spelling variations on the title character’s last name.
  3. stand for?
  4. Spread the word and have fun!
  5. In my initial research, I had independently noticed how similar the Greek letter eta (“H”) looked to the English letter “H.” As I recall, this was a coincidence.
  6. Christ: While other interpretations have been presented, the divine monogram of Christian symbolism is the most frequently acknowledged as the source of the symbol’s origin.
  7. The symbol is derived from the first three letters of the Greek name of Jesus ().
  8. Smith proposes the following idea for how this learned-sounding abbreviation may have served as the foundation for vulgar slang: it was observed by ordinary people when it was worn as an adornment on the vestments of Anglican (or, in America, Episcopal) clergy.
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Despite the fact that I don’t recall it having any effect on my thoughts on the subject at the time, I now strongly suspect it was this experience that led me to learn about the lunate sigma – I had taken two semesters of Koine Greek in university and later a semester of classical Greek in the mid-70s without ever having heard of a lunate sigma.

However, there are numerous other explanations for this, as well as for many other questions, such as why West Coast Swingis danced in a slot (my personal favorite explanation is the drunken sailors on liberty in Long Beach, Calif).

Trying to figure things out is always entertaining. I hope I’ve piqued your interest and given you something to think about. Spread the word and have fun! The first time this image was uploaded was on March 9, 2017. The most recent update was made on December 3, 2020.

Who is Jesus H. Christ?

Given that I’ll be summarizing a lot, you can use those links to find additional information and sources. According to the Wikipedia article,Jesus H. Christ, the expression appears to be uniquely American, and it was already in common use by the nineteenth century, as evidenced by a Mark Twain story that took place while he was working as a printer’s apprentice in 1847 (copied here from that article):recounts a practical joke a friend played on a revival preacher while Twain was an apprentice in a printing shop that Alexander Campbell, a famous evangelist During a routine check of the galleys, Twain’s fellow apprentice, Wales McCormick, discovered that he needed to make room for some dropped words, which he accomplished by abbreviating Jesus Christ on the same line as J.

  1. C.
  2. Christ and printed out all of the pamphlets, which was a first for the puckish McCormick!
  3. Neither the actual origin nor the true reason for choosing “H” as the middle initial are known to us today.
  4. Christian religious symbols were created as early as 312 CE based on letters used to identify Christ; for example, the Alpha-Omega ( ) symbol was derived from the phrase “I am alpha and omega” in Revelation, which means “I am first and foremost” (verses 1:8, 21:6, and 22:13).
  5. Jesus’ monograms or divine monograms were born out of this phenomenon, which is actually quite common, though I doubt that most people are even aware that they exist, let alone that they are known as such.
  6. Take, for example, the coronation scene in Netflix’s The Crown, where we can see the “JHS” Christogram on the back of the Archbishop of Canterbury’s robe (see below).
  7. For the Greek word “Jesus Christ,” the letter “H” is written in all capital letters: It is written in mixed case as follows: It is possible to draw inspiration from both directions when creating Christograms.
  8. TheChi-Rho, formed from the first two letters of the Greek letter “,” is an early Christogram (“Christ”).
  9. It also appears to be the most common at the moment (at least based on my personal experience), and can be found in both Catholic and Protestant congregations alike.
  10. However, either the chi is made smaller or the rho, which is more commonly elongated so that the chi does not obscure the rho, are used to create this symbol: I’m confident that now that you’ve seen it, you’ll recall that you’ve seen it in the past.

One of the earliest Christograms is theIX monogram, which combines the first letters of both words, the iota from and the chi from, and superimposes them over one another as follows: As an illustration, the following is taken from a sarcophagus from the late third century AD in Constantinople.

After that, there’s a whole family of Christograms that actually contribute to the “H” in “Jesus H.

These are based on the first two and final letters (or the first three letters, depending on how you think about it) of the word ‘adventure’.

These individuals are members of the IHS family of individuals.

When it comes to the letter “J,” it is straightforward because the letters “I” and “J” in Latin were virtually interchangeable, particularly when followed by another vowel, in which case it became a palatal sound very similar to the initial “Y” in English (eg, yard, yellow, Yiddish, yoke, Yule).

  • In this case, the iota (“”) could be transformed into a “J” by Latinizing it.
  • As a result, the name of Jesus was changed from, though the German pronunciation of “Jesu” is much closer to the original Koine Greek pronunciation than the English version.
  • In order for a “S” or a C to appear, the process must be repeated several times in order to be successful.
  • Now pay close attention to the final sigma, “” There are elements of the Roman “S” visible in that form, albeit in a different proportion.
  • As a result, I advocated for the use of the first two and final letters of, because the final sigma is very similar in appearance to the letter “c.” There is, however, more to it than that, as it has been discovered.
  • It turns out that during the Hellenistic period (4th and 3rd centuries BCE), the symbol used for carving inscriptions was simplified to a C-shaped shape, which is consistent with other evidence.
  • Because the Cyrillic alphabet, which was used by Russian and other Slavic languages, was based primarily on the Greek alphabet, it appears that the Cyrillic letter “C” for their “s” sound came from this lunate sigma.

As a result, the IHS/JHCfamily of Christograms range in appearance from being entirely Greek to having one Roman letter and two Greek letters to having two Roman letters and one Greek letter, among other variations.

Although it appears to be a coincidence that the Greek letter “H” looks similar to the English letter “H,” I discovered that there is a little more to it while doing research for this page.

It was used by the Phoenicians to represent a sound similar to the English letter “H.”.

Also, in case you are unfamiliar with Russian, the Cyrillic letter “H” for the sound of the letter “n” is not related to the Greek letter “n.” In fact, the “nu” (“”), which looks exactly like the Roman “N,” was a borrowing from the Greek language.

This final result of the process, which was only a transient thing in Greek, is represented by the Cyrillic letter “H.” Taking our thesis back to its genesis, it appears to be highly likely that the “H” in “Jesus H.

Christ.” In addition, the abbreviation Xmas is quite widespread.

The word Xmas has been used as an acceptable shorthand for almost half a century, contrary to the modern popular notion that it originated as a secular attempt to eliminate the Christian tradition from Christmas by “taking the ‘Christ’ out of Christmas.” When faced with such ill-conceived concerns, my standard answer has been to declare that we must restore the “X” to the word Christmas.

  1. If you want to know what inspired the joke’s scientific foundation seePloidy.
  2. Birthing a virgin, referred to as Parthenogenesis in science, is a true phenomenon that has been witnessed in nature, primarily in invertebrates, though it has also been reported in some fish, amphibians and reptiles, as well as in birds on rare occasions.
  3. Aside from that, the genetics of gender in reptiles is significantly different from those of mammals, as an example (ie, X and Y chromosomes).
  4. In addition to being entire clones of their mother, all parthenogenetic kids would be female since they are all full clones of their mother.
  5. By using this information and adding adequate amounts of humor, we can easily see that the Virgin Birth offers a significant challenge to fundamental Christian theology and tradition.
  6. Jessica Christ, what are you talking about.
  7. In other words, Christian teaching is a big cover-up designed to conceal the truth that Jesus was a woman from the general public.
  8. Christ, cites an essay by Roger Smith as a source for the information it provides (The H of Jesus H.
  9. American Speech 69:331-335, 1994).
  10. According to “Harold,” Even though this is the most likely origin of the “H,” there is still the matter of folk etymology, which is the sense shared by ordinary people (which is not always historically right) as to where the “H” originates from, which has to be addressed.

When this sentence is read incorrectly, it might be misinterpreted as stating the name of the Deity (“thy name is.”) rather than the correct meaning, which is “may thy name be honored.” Due of the phonetic similarities between the words hallowed (IPA) and Harold, there might be some mistake (IPA).

In light of this, what is Smith’s conclusion?

Christ,” according to Smith, is full of hilarity – and blasphemy – because of the sheer number of spelling variations present.

stand for?

Those middle “H” initial has a variety of folkloric interpretations.

Alternatively, it’s possible that I came across this in the Wikipedia article,Jesus H.

The divine monogram of Christian iconography is the most frequently accepted derivation, despite the fact that numerous other interpretations have been advanced.

It can be written as IHS (withlunate sigma), IHC (withlunate sigma), JHS (withlunate sigma), or JHC (withlunate sigma) (“J” was historically a mere variant of “I”; see J).

The “JHC” variation would be particularly prone to the “H” being interpreted as part of a name.

In any case, I personally feel that Christograms and the Greek letter are the most plausible sources of that middle initial’s occurrence.

Experimenting with different solutions is always enjoyable. I hope I’ve piqued your interest and gotten you thinking. Enjoy and spread the word. On March 9, 2017, the first upload was made. 3rd of December, 2020 (update)

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