What Is The Kingdom Of God According To Jesus

What, When, and Where Is the Kingdom of God?

Over 80 times throughout the New Testament, the phrase ‘Kingdom of God’ (also known as ‘Kingdom of Heaven’ or ‘Kingdom of Light’) is used to refer to God’s kingdom. The majority of these allusions are found in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. While the specific word “God’s Kingdom” is not present in the Old Testament, the reality of God’s Kingdom is articulated in a manner that is comparable to that found in the New.

Key Takeaways

  • One way to describe the Kingdom of God is as the eternal state in which God is sovereign and Jesus Christ reigns forever
  • There are more than 80 references to the Kingdom of God in the New Testament alone. The teachings of Jesus Christ are centered on the Kingdom of God
  • Hence, The Bible refers to the Kingdom of God by several other titles, including the Kingdom of Heaven and the Kingdom of Light.

The fundamental focus of Jesus Christ’s message was the coming of the Kingdom of God on the earth. But what exactly does this statement mean? Is the kingdom of God a geographical location or is it a spiritual reality that exists right now? Who are the subjects of this kingdom, and what is their history? In addition, does God’s kingdom exist now, or is it only to be found in the future? Let’s look for solutions to these issues in the pages of the Bible.

The Kingdom of God According to the Bible

When it comes to kingdoms, God reigns preeminent in the universe, with His Son, Jesus Christ, as its ruler. It is acknowledged and obeyed that God has authority in this kingdom, and that his will is followed. Unlike the notion of a national kingdom, the concept of a Kingdom of God is more concerned with kingly authority, reign, and sovereign control than it is with physical space, territory, or political issues. Ron Rhodes, Associate Professor of Theology at Dallas Theological Seminary, provides the following concise explanation of the Kingdom of God: According to Colossians 1:13, God’s present spiritual dominion over His people (Colossians 1:13) and Jesus’ future reign in the millennial kingdom (Revelation 20).

Jesus and the Kingdom

The ministry of John the Baptist started with the announcement that the kingdom of heaven was near (Matthew 3:2). When Jesus took over, it was as follows: “From that point on, Jesus started to preach, saying, ‘Repent, because the kingdom of heaven is at hand.'” (Matthew 4:17, English Standard Version) In the following passage, Jesus instructs his followers on how to enter the Kingdom of God: “Not everyone who calls out to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven; only the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven will enter the kingdom of heaven.

  • (Matthew 7:21, English Standard Version) The parables are a type of metaphor.
  • (Matthew 25:31-34; Mark 10:34) In John 18:36, Jesus declared, “My reign is not of this world.
  • For this reason, Jesus rejected the use of worldly fighting to achieve his purposes.
  • Sometimes the Bible refers to the Kingdom of God as a present reality while other times as a future realm or territory.
  • Therefore, men may enter into the realm of God’s reign in its several stages of manifestation and experience the blessings of His reign in differing degrees.

But the Kingdom is here now. There is a realm of spiritual blessing into which we may enter today and enjoy in part but in reality the blessings of God’s Kingdom (reign).”

Summary of the Kingdom of God

For simplicity’s sake, the Kingdom of God can be defined as the realm in which Jesus Christ rules as King and God has absolute control over all things. This Kingdom exists (in part) in the lives and souls of the redeemed now, and it will exist in perfection and fullness in the future, as well as in the present.

Sources

  • The Gospel of the Kingdom, or the Gospel of the Kingdom, Ron Rhodes’ Bite-Size Bible Definitions are based on the work of George Eldon Ladd’s Theopedia.

What Is the Kingdom of God? Understanding Its Meaning

The Bible’s Old and New Testaments both reference the Kingdom of God at various points in time. As a Christian, it is critical to comprehend the meaning of this term, which can be perplexing to both Christians and non-Christians alike. Would you know what to say if someone asked you what the kingdom of God meant? Would you be able to explain it to them? Because the kingdom of God is not about eating and drinking but about righteousness, peace, and pleasure in the Holy Spirit, Paul explains. Romans 14:17 is a verse that says Let us examine the phrase’s original Greek and Hebrew meanings, as well as the other expressions that appear throughout the Bible, what it means to seek first the Kingdom of God, and how to live and pray with the Kingdom of God in mind.

OriginMeaning of The Kingdom of God

From the arrival of Jesus Christ to inaugurate the kingdom through the end of redemptive history and the establishment of the Church, we have a clear picture of the Gospel. It is addressed in the Scriptures in various distinct ways throughout the Old and New Testaments: Matthew 6:33, Mark 1:14-15, and Luke 4:43 are all references to the “kingdom of Christ,” which is defined as the “kingdom of God.”

  • “The kingdom of heaven,” according to Matthew 13:41 and 20:21
  • “the kingdom of Christ and God,” according to Ephesians 5:5
  • “the kingdom,” according to Mark 11:10
  • “the kingdom of heaven,” according to Matthew 3:12 and 4:17
  • And “the kingdom of God,” according to Matthew 13:29.

No matter how the words Christ, God, and heaven are phrased differently in different parts of the Bible, all of them express the same notion in different ways. Listed below are three aspects that the Kingdom of God entails. On earth and in heaven, the reign of Jesus Christ is established. 2. The benefits and advantages that accrue as a result of living under Christ’s authority 3. The people who are the subjects of this kingdom, or the Church To what extent was the concept of the Kingdom of God critical to the success of the mission?

Jesus Christ himself not only stated, “I am the way, the truth, and the life,” “The coming of the kingdom of God is imminent.

“I will not drink again of the fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it anew in the kingdom of God,” Jesus said at the Last Supper, referring to the resurrection (Mark 14:25).

Why Does Matthew Use “Kingdom of Heaven” Instead of “Kingdom of God”?

Throughout the Gospel of Matthew, we see Matthew use the phrase “kingdom of heaven” to allude to the declaration of Jesus Christ’s rule and the good news of His reign, as well as the announcement of His death and resurrection. He does this out of respect for the Jews, who are forbidden from speaking the hallowed name of God in public. No difference in theology or meaning exists between the kingdom of God and heaven; Matthew is just employing an indirect word to show respect for the reader’s intelligence because intelligence is a virtue.

What Does It Mean to “Seek First the Kingdom of God”?

Matthew 6:33 says, “But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things will be added to you.” This is a passage that every Christian should memorize and recite often. Prayer is what Jesus instructed us to practice “Your kingdom has come to pass. Your task has been completed. As it is in heaven, so it is on earth” (Matthew 6:10). This is a prayer for the day when God will bring heaven to earth and establish His dominion over all of creation on the globe. God’s plan for the planet Earth is still in the works.

So it is something that will happen in the future.

This is the time when Jesus is in command.

In the kingdom of God, when you submit to His authority and allow Him to direct your life, you are in the presence of God.

Praying “The Kingdom Come”

If you choose to pray in this way, here is how: “‘Our Father in heaven, hallowed be Your name; Your kingdom come; Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.'” Please provide us with our daily bread today. Let us ask you to forgive us our debts, just as we have forgiven our creditors. “And do not lead us into temptation, but preserve us from the wicked one,” the Bible says. Matthew 6:9-13 is a biblical passage. Our prayers are taught to us in what is generally known as the “Lord’s Prayer,” in which we are taught to pray not only for God’s will to be done in our lives, but also for God’s saving Gospel to be preached across the world.

Then we are asked to be witnesses of Jesus, to tell others about Him, and to remain completely submitted to His purpose for our life, which is the last call.

When he asked Jesus about it, he received the following response: “Truly, truly, I say to you, until one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.” 3:3 (John 3:3) Easton’s Bible Dictionary (excerpts from the book) First and foremost, R.C.

Harvest Ministries’ Greg Laurie contributed to this article.

What Is the Kingdom of God?

Consider the following scenario: someone approaches you and asks, “What is the kingdom of God?” What would you say in response? An simple way to answer this question would be to point out that a kingdom is defined as the region over which a monarch governs. Considering that we believe that God is the Creator of all things, we must conclude that His kingdom extends over the entire globe. As a result, the kingdom of God manifestly exists wherever God reigns, and because He reigns everywhere, the kingdom of God manifestly exists everywhere.

  1. The New Testament, on the other hand, is attempting to communicate something else.
  2. We witness it again as Jesus walks on the scene and makes the same proclamation as the first time.
  3. Obviously, John the Baptist and Jesus were referring to something more than just the notion of the kingdom of God when they spoke of it.
  4. God’s designated Messiah will govern over this kingdom, and he will be more than simply the Redeemer of His people; he will also be the ruler of their realm.
  5. Just before Jesus was going to depart from this world at the conclusion of His life, His followers had the opportunity to ask Him one more question.
  6. (See Acts 1:6b.) This is a question that I can easily understand Jesus being a little perplexed about.

“It is not your responsibility to know the times or seasons that the Father has established in His own power.” But when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, you will gain power, and you will be witnesses to Me in Jerusalem, and throughout Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth” (Acts 1:7–8).

  • What exactly was He trying to say?
  • Was He referring to a spiritual reality that takes place in our souls, or was He referring to something else entirely.
  • Consequently, during His earthly mission, Jesus made statements such as “If I drive out demons with the finger of God, definitely the kingdom of God has arrived upon you.” “If I cast out demons with the finger of God, surely the kingdom of God has come upon you” (Luke 11:20).
  • How could the kingdom be on the people’s doorstep or within striking distance of them?
  • When He arrived, Jesus marked the beginning of God’s reign on earth.
  • Then, as He ascended into heaven, He went there to be coronated, to be invested as the King of kings and the Lord of lords, among other things.
  • Christ reigns supreme at this very moment.

God’s anointed Son has been granted complete control over all things in heaven and on earth (Matt.

On an invitation from the Czechoslovak government, I traveled to Eastern Europe in 1990 to give a series of lectures in three countries: first in Czechoslovakia, then Hungary, and lastly Romania.

As it turned out, as our ramshackle train approached the Romanian border, two guards boarded the vehicle.

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They demanded that we take our bags down from the luggage rack and open them, and they were really harsh and disrespectful in their demands.

When he looked over, he observed that one of the women in our group was holding a paper bag in her lap with something poking out of it.

“Can you tell me what’s in the bag?” Afterwards, he unzipped the bag and took out a Bible from it.

Then he came to a complete halt and gazed at me.

Then, with a smile, he revealed that he was not Romanian.

3:20a).

“Leave these guys alone,” he murmured to his subordinates as he walked away.

“They’re Christians,” I say.

It was during my last year of seminary, while serving as a student pastor at a Hungarian refugee church in Western Pennsylvania, that I had a crisis on this topic.

I received a donation of an American flag for the church, which I placed in the chancel, directly across from the Christian flag.

“Well, the law of our nation mandates that any flag shown beside the American flag must be positioned in a subordinate position to the American flag,” he said further.

“This has to be rectified.” Anyone who has spent time living outside of this nation understands how amazing it is here.

I was thinking about this while I listened to this elder speak, and I couldn’t help but wonder how the Christian flag could be submissive to any national flag.

First and first, I am a Christian, and then I am an American.

As a result, I was in a pickle.

So I had a simple solution to the problem: I simply removed both flags from the church.

What is it that we are praying for when we make this request?

Each petition is linked to the petitions that came before it.

Clearly, God’s kingdom will not and cannot come to this globe unless and until the name of God is revered as a sacred name.

According to John Calvin, it is the church’s responsibility to make the unseen kingdom visible.

The only way the kingdom of God will be seen in this earth before Christ returns is if we demonstrate it by living our lives as citizens of heaven and subjects of the King. This passage is taken from R.C. Sproul’s book, The Prayer of the Lord.

The Kingdom of God

What is the nature of the kingdom of God? As stated in the New Testament, “seeking” the kingdom of God is something that should come before all other pursuits; it is something that may be “entered” or “gone into,” and, perhaps most frighteningly, it is something that can be “taken away.” A “secret” that must be revealed to us by God, the kingdom of God is something that Jesus portrays as “at hand” or “coming close.” It is something that Jesus claims is “at hand” or “has come near.” Although it is “within you,” it is also a kingdom in which Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, all of the prophets, and countless people from all over the world will live; it is something that can only be entered “through many tribulations,” and it is something that the unrighteous will not inherit; it is “good news,” which must be “proclaimed,” and it is something that no one can see unless they have been “born again.” It is something that no one can see unless they have been To be more specific, what exactly is the kingdom of God?

When it comes to grandeur and strength, David states in 1 Chronicles chapter 29: “The greatest of these is yours, O LORD, along with glory, triumph, and majesty, for you have created everything in the heavens and on the earth.” “The kingdom belongs to you, O LORD, and you are elevated as the supreme ruler over everything.” Consequently, the kingdom of God is, in one sense, the truth that God is the supreme ruler over all things.

  • In this way, whether we like it or not, we are all citizens of God’s kingdom, regardless of our beliefs.
  • That’s why Jesus instructs His disciples to pray to God, “Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven,” in the same way that He does in heaven.
  • People continue to choose to disregard His Word, and sin and death continue to wreak havoc on our lives.
  • Jesus used a parable to help us grasp the nature of the kingdom of God better.
  • And with what do I want to compare it?
  • It all starts with something little, benign, and virtually invisible (such as a mustard seed), and it will one day develop into something enormous—and extremely visible—when the time comes.
  • Interestingly, Jesus compares “faith” to a mustard seed, which is a powerful metaphor.
  • As a result, it is the mechanism through which the kingdom of God “grows,” one individual at a time.
  • The kingdom of God is “inside you,” as Jesus states in Matthew 6:33.

Also true on a more general level is the fact that Though God’s people appear to be a relatively small presence in the world — like a mustard seed, to use an analogy — that presence is growing and growing, and one day, as the prophet Habakkuk predicts, “the earth will be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the LORD as the waters cover the sea,” God’s people will be “filled with the knowledge of the glory of the LORD as the waters cover the sea.” What will be the mechanism via which this will occur?

In Acts chapter 1, Jesus responds to the question.

In responding to the gospel in faith, individuals are admitting and submitting to the kingly reign of God one by one as they react to the gospel message.

His reign will have been established. In the same way that it is now in heaven, it will be the same on earth.

What is the kingdom of God?

In what way does the kingdom of God differ from other kingdoms of the world? As stated in the New Testament, “seeking” the kingdom of God is something that should come before all other pursuits; it is something that may be “entered” or “gone into,” and, perhaps more frighteningly, it is something that can be “taken away.” In his teachings on the kingdom of God, Jesus states that it is “at hand” or has “drawn close.” He often refers to it as a “secret” that must be revealed to us by God.

The kingdom of God is something that can “belong” to you or be “received,” and yet it is also a kingdom in which Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, all the prophets, and countless people from all over the world will live; it is something that can only be entered “through many tribulations,” and it is something that the unrighteous will not inherit; it is “good news” that must be “proclaimed,” and it is something that no one can see unless they have been “born The kingdom of God, then, is defined as follows: “Yours, O LORD, is the grandeur and the power and the glory and the triumph and the majesty, because everything that is in the heavens and on the earth is yours,” David declares in 1 Chronicles chapter 29.

  • “The kingdom belongs to you, O LORD, and you are elevated as the supreme ruler over all.” Consequently, the kingdom of God is the truth that God is the King of all things in one sense.
  • To paraphrase Abraham Kuyper, there is not a square inch in the entire sphere of our human life over which God, who is Sovereign over all, does not scream out, “Mine!” God, who is Sovereign over all, has declared, “Mine!” again and over again throughout history.
  • In order to accomplish this, Jesus instructs His followers to pray to God, “Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.” But it’s apparent that not everyone or everything has yet bowed to God’s kingly reign, even though He is indeed the King of all creation.
  • People are called to “seek” the kingdom of God, as well as to “enter” the kingdom of God, for this reason.
  • Jesus used a parable to help us comprehend the nature of the kingdom of God.
  • ” In terms of comparison, what do you think it should be?
  • Jesus is implying that the kingdom of God is something that is always expanding and developing.

When you think about God’s kingdom, what comes to mind is a little thing.

In essence, the message is that we can only enter the kingdom of God via trust in Jesus Christ alone.

As soon as a person places their confidence in Christ, even if it may not appear to be a huge issue on the surface, that person has already began the process of being transformed and renewed from the inside out.

That individual’s obedience to Christ’s kingly rule has begun, and it will continue to develop within him or her like a mustard seed until that person becomes fully like Christ.

In Acts 1, Jesus responds to the question.

In responding to the gospel in faith, individuals are accepting and submitting to the kingly reign of God one by one, as they react to the gospel.

After that, his dominion will have come to be established. In the same way as it is now in heaven, everything will be the same on earth.

What Is the Kingdom of God?

Transcript of the audio “The kingdom” is a major motif in Jesus’ teachings. The word “kingdom” appears 126 times in the Gospels, according to the ESV version. However, the term “kingdom” is only referenced 34 times throughout the rest of the New Testament, causing Christopher from the United Kingdom to write in to ask about it. “ Hello there, Pastor John! Thank you for your fantastic APJ podcast, which I thoroughly enjoyed. I’m astounded that you can devote so much time and effort to answering such intricate and tough inquiries for complete strangers like me!

In contrast, there appears to be virtually little reference of ‘the kingdom’ from Acts onwards and throughout the epistles.

Is it the church, or is it something more significant?” I’m hearing two critical inquiries: (1) What is the nature of the kingdom of God?

Allow me to offer a few words regarding each of those inquiries.

Rule and Reign

My opinion is that the most significant thing I could say about God’s kingdom that would help people make sense of all of the other meanings is that God’s reign— R-E-I-G-N — is the fundamental meaning of the term kingdom in the Bible, which is God’s sovereignty over all of creation. Creating a realm and people are both part of the process by which the kingdom of God comes to be established, but the kingdom of God is not identical with either the realm or people. “God determined that the most glorious manifestation of the kingdom of God would be revealed in a crucified and rising king.” Consider the following passage from Psalms 103:19: It says in the Bible, “The Lord has set his throne in heaven, and his reign rules over everything.” In the wordkingdomasrule, you may hear the essential meaning of the term.

All things are governed by his kingly rule, which is represented by his kingdom and his reign on his throne as the ruler of the universe.

Saving Sinners

Since God’s aim for the world is to rescue a people for himself and to recreate the world for that people, his kingly reign entails a rescuing and a redeeming activity on the part of those who are under his dominion. It is for this reason that the arrival of the kingdom is referred to as “good news” in the New Testament. God, the king, is coming into the world in a new way — via Jesus — to establish his saving rule and to bring salvation to all people. First and foremost, he has triumphed over sin, Satan, and death in the hearts of his people and in their interpersonal relationships.

Then Christ returns a second time and brings the rule to a close by establishing a new heavens and a new earth on the earth.

Already, but Not Yet

As Jesus reveals the teachings of the kingdom in the Gospels, the image that emerges is one that is both now and still in the future. As a matter of fact, when he claims that the mystery of the kingdom has arrived, he means that it has arrived in the form of presence without completion. Take, for example, the Lord’s Prayer, where you may hear the future dimension of the kingdom expressed as “Your kingdom come” (Matthew 6:10). That is something we should pray for on a daily basis. Lord, bring the kingdom to me.

  • Bring your kingdom with you.
  • “The dominion of the crucified and rising Christ should be emphasized today,” says the author of the book.
  • But Jesus was well aware that it would not arrive quickly.
  • “Pray for it,” he advises.
  • It hasn’t arrived yet.
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“It’s not going to happen right now, but it’s already here, upon you, and at your fingertips.” It is God’s rule — his sovereign activity in the world to redeem and deliver a people, and then at some point in the future to complete it and entirely regenerate his people and the cosmos — that is what the kingdom of God is all about.

Trading the Throne for a Cross

In the Gospels, when Jesus reveals the teachings of the kingdom, you get the impression that it is both present and yet to be realized. The mystery of the kingdom has really arrived, and this is what Jesus means when he says that the kingdom is here but not yet completed. “Your kingdom come,” for example, may be heard in the Lord’s Prayer, which speaks of the future component of the kingdom (Matthew 6:10). On a daily basis, we should pray for it. The kingdom has come to you, O God. Unfortunately, things aren’t quite as we’d like them to be.

Invade people’s lives, my life, and the globe with the full force of your dominion!

However, Jesus was well aware that it would not arrive soon after that.

God’s kingdom is near; repent, because the time has come.” As a matter of fact, he is more specific about it in Luke 11:20, saying, “If it is by the finger of God that I drive out demons, then the kingdom of God has arrived upon you.” Even more specifically, the Bible states in Luke 17:21, “Behold, the kingdom of God is inside your walls.

“Pray for it,” he says.

That time hasn’t come yet.

It is God’s rule — his sovereign activity in the world to redeem and deliver a people, and then at some point in the future to complete it and entirely regenerate his people and the cosmos — that is what the kingdom of God is about.

The Risen One Is Lord

It was possible to perceive with crystal clarity after the resurrection what the disciples couldn’t see during his lifetime because of the resurrection. In other words, the most glorious manifestation of the kingdom of God would be a crucified and rising king. The significance of what was taught about the kingdom during Jesus’ lifetime is not diminished in any way as a result of the transformation that takes place in the world. However, it does shift. Indeed, it places the emphasis squarely on the monarch himself, who is now seen as the crucified and rising Lord of the world.

Throughout the epistles, there is a fresh focus on the fact that Jesus is Lord, which is more emphatic than before.

It’s not simply that he has arrived; he will continue to arrive.

Allow the taste of apostolic application of the kingdom of Jesus to permeate our teaching as we share it with the churches and the world.

What Is the Kingdom of God? 10 Things Christians Need to Know

And God will add all of these things to you if you seek first His kingdom and His righteousness, not the other way around.” (Matthew 6:33; Luke 6:33) The kingdom of God was one of the most talked-about topics in Jesus’ day, yet it’s still a difficult notion for many believers today to understand. The definition would most likely vary depending on who you questioned and how many people were involved in the discussion. “My kingdom does not belong to this world,” Jesus said. If my kingdom had been of this earth, my servants would have been engaged in battle so that I would not be captured and sold into slavery by the Jews.

  1. How frequently, as Christians, do we take time to talk about God’s kingdom and keep it at the forefront of our thoughts?
  2. “The term “kingdom” is regarded to be dynamic in character in both the Old Testament and the New Testament, and it refers largely to the rule or reign of a king.
  3. It is therefore preferable to interpret the phrase “kingdom of God” as “rule of God” in the great majority of occasions.
  4. So, what exactly is it?
  5. The kingdom of God, on the other hand, does not exist as a physical location.

God’s dominion is forever, as well, since God is eternal. In the Kingdom of God, there is no such thing as time or space. Listed below are ten themes related to the kingdom that are critical for every believer to comprehend: Photo courtesy of Unsplash

What is Meant by the Kingdom of God? 10 Things to Know

And God will add all of these things to you if you seek first His kingdom and His righteousness, says the Bible. The Bible says (Matthew 6:33). One of Jesus’ most often discussed topics was the kingdom of God; nonetheless, it is still a difficult notion for many Christians today to understand. The definition would most likely vary depending on how many individuals were asked to define it. ‘My kingdom does not belong to this world,’ Jesus responded. Even if my dominion had been of this world, my servants would have been engaged in combat to ensure that I was not captured and sold into slavery to Jews.

  • What we don’t talk about is God’s kingdom and how often we maintain it at the forefront of our minds as believers.
  • “The term “kingdom” is believed to be dynamic in character in both the Old Testament and the New Testament, and it refers principally to the rule or reign of a king in both Testaments.
  • As a result, it would be preferable to interpret the phrase “kingdom of God” as “rule of God” in the great majority of cases.
  • Now Tell Me About It.
  • There is no genuine geographical location known as the kingdom of God.
  • In the same way that God is everlasting, so is His dominion.
  • The following are ten notions regarding the kingdom that every believer should be familiar with: Unsplash provided the image.

1. “Kingdom of God” is seen many times in the New Testament.

In the New Testament, the term “Kingdom of God” is frequently heard and seen. In the four Gospels, the term or reference of the “Kingdom of God” or the “Kingdom of Heaven” comes around 86 times, according to some scholars. In addition, it is mentioned throughout the Bible, from Acts to Revelation. On the subject of the Kingdom of God, we find a few guidelines and definitions in those texts. The Gospel of Matthew 5 and 7 contain teachings from Jesus on how to enter the Kingdom, and later in chapter 12, Jesus speaks of the “truth” regarding the Kingdom of God.

He also speaks of the importance of sharing the Kingdom with the disciples and, eventually, of conveying the Kingdom to those who have been blessed by the Father. Featured image courtesy of Thinkstockphotos.com

2. There have been a few opinions on what exactly it is.

A much of the New Testament is devoted to the concept of “Kingdom of God.” As some analysts have pointed out, the phrase or reference to the term “Kingdom of God” or the phrase “Kingdom ofHeaven” appears a total of 86 times in each of the four Gospels. Additionally, it is mentioned throughout the Bible from Acts through Revelation. A few guidelines and definitions for the Kingdom of God may be found in those writings. In Matthew 5 and 7, we see Jesus speak about how to enter the Kingdom, and later in chapter 12, we see Jesus speak about the “truth” of the Kingdom of God, which is defined as the “good news” of the Gospel of John.

Thinkstockphotos.com provided the image.

3. The Kingdom of God is not an actual location.

It’s natural to think of the Kingdom of God as a physical location or location in time. After all, the word “kingdom” conjures up images of a vast, physical location or plot of land. In the same way that Jesus taught via parables, he also used a word that the people of that time could comprehend. Some eschatologies and others, on the other hand, believe that the kingdom of God will reveal itself physically at some point in the future. Others believe it is a spiritual kingdom that has already manifested itself on the planet.

It is not located in a structure, a location, or a church.

4. The Kingdom of God is not heaven.

This is an often misunderstood concept. It is believed that the Kingdom of God, also known as Heaveni, is literally heaven. Various points of view can be held on this (and much of this stems from the fact that Jesus himself used the terms “Kingdom of God” and “Kingdom of Heaven” interchangeably), but many Christians believe that the Kingdom of God is a divine dominion over both heaven and earth. When Jesus teaches us to pray the Lord’s prayer, he says: “Your kingdom come. You have accomplished what you set out to do on earth as it is in heaven.” Christians are praying for God’s rule to come—a reign that will not be of this world, as the phrase “not of this world” implies.

God’s rule extends beyond and beyond the heavens and the earth.

5. The Kingdom of God not the church.

The Kingdom of God does not consist only of the church. Because God’s rule extends over all things (point 4), the Kingdom encompasses more than simply the local church. Instead, the church is intended to serve as a window through which people might view life in the Kingdom. The church’s role is to “model”God’s rule by demonstrating mercy and justice while also surrendering to God’s sovereignty. As John Piper explains, “The kingdom generates a realm, and the kingdom develops a people, but the kingdom of God is not identical with either its realm or its people.” As opposed to this, Christians are those who are preparing for the Kingdom of Heaven and demonstrating to others what that Kingdom will look like when God is there.

Jesus instructs us to prepare for the Kingdom by repenting of our sins (Matthew 4:17). Featured image courtesy of Thinkstockphotos.com

6. It is a promise of things yet to come.

The return of Jesus is also a component of the Kingdom of God. It is said in Revelation 11:15 that “the kingdom of the world has become the kingdom of our Lord and of his Messiah, and He has been given authority to reign over all the earth forever and ever.” This indicates that the work of God’s Kingdom is not yet completed. The majority of Christians believe that the Kingdom of God has already arrived and that more is on its way or has yet to arrive. In Piper’s words: “Sin has to be resisted, Satan has to be defeated, sickness has to be prayed over and moaned under (Romans 8:23), and death has to be borne until the second coming of the King and the completion of the kingdom.” We can be a member of the Kingdom in today’s world, but the advent of Christ heralds the beginning of a new Kingdom, which we shall be a part of in the years to come.

7. It is the power of God.

Due to the fact that God governs over all, the Kingdom of God is a visible representation of his authority. God rules, according to D.A. Carson, a research professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. “Everything, everyone, every occurrence, every object, every matter, every idea is ultimately subject to that sovereignty,” Carson adds. There are a number of incidents in the Bible that attest to the might of the Kingdom of God. Jesus performed miracles and drove out devils.

Death is defeated on the cross later, and the power of resurrection is demonstrated – all aspects of God’s Kingdom that become apparent when we realize that God has complete authority over all things.

Featured image courtesy of Thinkstockphotos.com

8. It can be a mystery.

Due to the fact that God governs over all, the Kingdom of God is a physical representation of his authority. God rules, according to D.A. Carson, a research professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. “Everything, everyone, every occurrence, every object, every substance, every idea is eventually subject to that sovereignty,” Carson adds. There are incidents in the Bible that attest to the might of the Kingdom of God. Healing and expulsion of demons were two of Jesus’ abilities.

See also:  What Does Jesus Really Look Like

Death is defeated on the cross later, and the power of resurrection is demonstrated – all aspects of God’s Kingdom that become apparent when we realize that God has complete authority over all things.

Thinkstockphotos.com provided the image.

9. The Kingdom of God is one of the main messages of Jesus.

The major topic of Jesus’ message is the establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth. In the book of Luke, Jesus states that he must “preach the good news of the Kingdom of God to all nations.” In order to convey the message, he employed parables to illustrate the subject’s enigmatic nature. In one, the Parable of the Sower, Jesus tells the story of a man who spread seeds, some of which were devoured by birds, some of which landed on rough terrain, and others of which were burnt or thorned. After everything was said and done, seeds that fell on healthy soil produced a harvest.

In another story, Jesus talks of a man who sown excellent seed and saw it flourish.

In response to one of his slaves’ inquiry as to whether he desired the weeds pulled, the owner said that removing the weeds would also uproot the excellent wheat.

Instead, they would both be harvested at the same time, and the weeds would be burnt while the wheat was being gathered and stored. In this passage, Jesus painted a picture of the Kingdom of God that would be revealed on the Day of Judgment. Featured image courtesy of Thinkstockphotos.com

10. We are meant to prepare for the Kingdom.

Christians learned how to display the Kingdom of God by looking at Jesus’ life. He demonstrated goodness and grace, as well as the ability of God’s might to vanquish darkness and death. He demonstrates what the Kingdom of God is like. He also informs believers that they are responsible for spreading the good news of the Kingdom (the great commission). Christian preparation for the portion of the Kingdom of God that has not yet come is accomplished in this manner. “The hour has come, and the kingdom of God has come near; repent and believe in the gospel,” says Mark 1:15.

Our mission is to minister to the entire globe until Jesus returns for the last victory and completes his reign.

What Does “the Kingdom of God Is within You” Mean Exactly?

In the term “the kingdom of God,” the author describes a vision that is crucial to God’s decision to send his Son to reconcile us with ourselves and with one another. The expression refers to a new global order in which we carry out God’s plan for the earth. It is a difficult spiritual notion to understand, one that perplexed the disciples and continues to perplex Christians to this day, according to the Bible. As an additional assurance that you will be living in God’s kingdom, the gospel of Luke’s encouraging assertion that the kingdom of God is within you is included (Luke 17:21).

A century after Jesus’ crucifixion, Luke and Paul wrote to the early church, seeking to clarify the significance of the phrase “the kingdom of God is with you.” During the course of the Gospel of Luke, the phrase “kingdom of God” appears 32 times, which is more than in any of the other three Gospels combined.

Only two references to the kingdom of God are found in John’s Gospel, with one reference to a “kingdom” in John 18:36: I responded that my kingdom is not of this world; if it were of this world, then my servants would battle so that I would not be handed to the Jews; but, this is not the time for my kingdom to be established at this time.

Luke—a close friend and ally of Paul (who wrote in 2 Timothy 4:11 that “Only Luke is with me”), a medical doctor, and most likely a Gentile and wealthy Roman official—recorded Jesus’ ministry on earth for Gentiles and the rest of the world in the first century A.D.

New Christians and doubters alike needed to comprehend God’s purpose, namely how God will build his kingdom via the life, death, and resurrection of His son Jesus.

Professor and historian James Dunn of the United Kingdom questions in an essay published in 2011: “Was Jesus talking about a historical kingdom, a political kingdom, one that existed beyond physical space realities, or one that existed beyond history?” This essay will make an attempt to provide answers to these issues, using Scripture as a guide.

What Is the Meaning of “the Kingdom of God Is within You“?

A kingdom conjures up images of enormous riches, material richness, and a kind monarch above it all. Luke, because of his high social standing and financial security, was able to write about the subject of a kingdom. The term “kingdom” can also refer to a dominion, or an area where a sovereign has authority. The Jews were disappointed in Jesus as a messiah; He did not live up to the expectations they had placed in him for ages. In his teachings, Jesus frequently made statements that were in direct opposition to Jewish Pharisees’ law-quoting doctrine.

  • Relationships, compassion, and individual attention were and continue to be the focus of Jesus’ mission, as seen by his use of the phrase “the kingdom of God is within you.” One such ministry in my city, the Supper House Ministry, exemplifies the kingdom of God in action.
  • “When she visited Supper House, she discovered a ‘community of hearts’ who were also prepared to pray for her,” according to the report.
  • What a blessing it is to be a part of this ministry!
  • The Holy Spirit instructs us on God’s way of life and how to carry out His goals on this planet.

What Is the Context ofLuke 17:21?

The middle portion of Luke’s Gospel has a large number of parables, which are stories that Jesus used to describe His kingdom on earth. Some of Jesus’ parables make a strong point about the emptiness of wealth and power, while others stress the kindness of God. In The Great Banquet, a host invites individuals living on the streets when higher-status guests are unable to attend due to scheduling conflicts (Luke 14:15-24).

  • When Jesus instructs his followers not to be concerned about material matters because God would supply abundantly (Luke 12:27-24), the Lilies of the Field are invoked.

Another story that Jesus taught his followers illustrates the distinction between collecting earthly riches and earning Godly insight and understanding. The Rich Fool parable, found in Luke 12:15-21, tells the story of a man who is anxious about where to keep his enormous supply of grain. The rich man’s vanity is revealed by Jesus. “ Then He warned them, saying, “Be careful! Keep an eye out for any signs of greed; life does not consist in an excess of material stuff.” In addition, Jesus told them the following parable: “The land of a particular wealthy man produced a bountiful crop.

It is impossible for me to preserve my harvests.'” “This is what I’m going to do,” he continued.

And I’ll think to myself, “You’ve got plenty of grain stored away for a long period of time.” Enjoy life to the fullest; eat, drink, and be happy.” “However, God rebuked him, saying, ‘You idiot!

So, who will be the recipient of the gifts you have arranged for yourself?’ “ This is what will happen to those who accumulate wealth for themselves but are not wealthy in the eyes of God.” With a bigger house, a flashier automobile, and more intricate “things,” the parable of The Rich Fool readily transfers into a modern culture focused with accumulating worldly possessions rather than spiritual progress.

“It’s all about the stuff,” says the author of the tale.

This has always been the case, dating back to the days when God guided the prophet Samuel in selecting the first king of Israel (I Samuel 16:7).

According to all of Luke’s Gospel’s parables, “true riches” are spiritual in nature rather than material in nature (Luke 16:11).

The Jewish Pharisees challenge Jesus to explain himself in Luke 17:21, which takes place in the setting of the Jewish community. According to Jesus, belonging to the kingdom of God is more vital than adhering to Jewish law while having a cup of tea.

What Are the Characteristics of God’s Kingdom?

One of the parables that Jesus gave his followers illustrates the difference between collecting earthly riches and attaining Godly insight and understanding. This guy is anxious about where to keep his huge supply of grain in the parable of the Rich Fool found in Luke 12:15-21. The rich man’s folly is revealed by Jesus. “ “Be on your guard!” He warned them. Remember to be on the lookout for any signs of greed; life does not consist in an excess of material things.” In addition, Jesus told them the following parable: “The land of a particular rich man produced a bountiful crop.

  1. Nowhere to keep my produce,’ I explain.
  2. And I’ll think to myself, “You’ve got plenty of grain stored away for a long period of time.
  3. If such is the case, who will benefit from what you have planned for yourself?
  4. With a larger mansion, a flashier automobile, and more intricate “things,” the fable of The Rich Fool easily transfers into a current culture focused with accumulating worldly possessions rather than spiritual development.
  5. In Jesus’ parables, the heart of the people is more important than their social standing or physical appearance.
  6. Our hearts are visible to God and His kingdom is within us because He sees what is deep within us.
  7. All of these parables lead straight to the concluding remark in Luke 17:21, which states that “the kingdom of God is in you.” God’s presence within you guides your loving and compassionate deeds, as well.
  8. The kingdom of God, Jesus suggests, is more essential than respecting Jewish regulations when it comes to taking a sip of tea.

What Does ‘the Kingdom Is within You’ Look like if the Kingdom Is Here but Not Yet?

As Luke points out, Jesus is referred to as “the path into the kingdom.” Our sins had already removed us from God’s presence before to Jesus’ death on the cross; God, who is light, cannot coexist with darkness because He is light. Jesus was the one who brought light into the earth. The following passages from Mark 1:14-15 show how Jesus prepares the road for our salvation: “The moment has arrived,” he stated emphatically. “The kingdom of God has come quite close to us. “Repent and put your faith in the good news!” When we repent and believe in Christ, we are made joint heirs with him (Romans 8:17).

  1. We helped him establish his rule over the planet.
  2. God utilizes us to bring light to the world by allowing us to share our gifts in the present moment with others.
  3. In the meantime, we look forward to the arrival of the last kingdom of God.
  4. The Lord Jesus Christ, who has the ability to bring everything under control, will convert our humble bodies so that they will be like his gorgeous body, and we joyfully anticipate his arrival as our Savior from that place” (Philippians 3:20-21).
  5. All things will be added to you if you seek first God’s kingdom and his righteousness, says the Bible (Luke 12:31).
  6. She is a former high school English teacher and editor who now works on writing projects from her home in West Michigan, where she appreciates the woods, water, dogs, and time spent with family and friends.
  7. Part of a wider resource collection that includes popular Bible verse phrases and quotations, this item can be found here.

It is our goal that they may assist you in a better understanding of the meaning and purpose of God’s Word in respect to your current life situation and circumstances.

  • Do unto others what you would have them do unto you
  • The truth will set you free. Take care of your heart
  • Show love to one another
  • The Meek Are Bless

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