How Did John The Baptist Know About Jesus

Verse by Verse Ministry International

John the Baptist is reported as saying the following in John 1:

John 1:30 “This is He on behalf of whom I said, ‘After me comes a Man who has a higher rank than I, for He existed before me.’John 1:31 “I did not recognize Him, but so that He might be manifested to Israel, I came baptizing in water.”John 1:32 John testified saying, “I have seen the Spirit descending as a dove out of heaven, and He remained upon Him.John 1:33 “I did not recognize Him, but He who sent me to baptize in water said to me, ‘He upon whom you see the Spirit descending and remaining upon Him, this is the One who baptizes in the Holy Spirit.’John 1:34 “I myself have seen, and have testified that this is the Son of God.”

Take note that John the Baptist himself claims that he did not identify Jesus or understand Jesus’ identification as the Messiah until after he witnessed the Spirit descend and abide on Jesus following Jesus’ baptism by John the Baptist. Based on John’s own account, we must conclude that he was unaware of Jesus’ true status as Messiah until after he had baptized him in the Jordan. On the other hand, we find the following in Matthew’s Gospel:

Matt. 3:13Then Jesusarrived from Galilee at the Jordan coming to John, to be baptized by him.Matt. 3:14 But John tried to prevent Him, saying, “I have need to be baptized by You, and do You come to me?”Matt. 3:15 But Jesus answering said to him, “Permit it at this time; for in this way it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness.” Then hepermitted Him.Matt. 3:16 After being baptized, Jesus came up immediately from the water; and behold, the heavens were opened, and he saw the Spirit of God descending as a dove and lighting on Him,Matt. 3:17 and behold, a voice out of the heavens said, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well-pleased.”

According to Matthew’s narrative, John the Baptist was hesitant to baptize Jesus at first because he recognized Jesus’ greater status in the hierarchy of deities. John suggested that Jesus should baptize him instead, showing that John was aware of Jesus’ status as the Messiah. Is this a contradiction to John’s version of events? No, there isn’t any inconsistency here. First and foremost, it is important to note that Matthew’s version never specifies how John came to know about Jesus’ identity.

  • So when John responds, “I have need to be baptized by you,” he was just accepting Jesus’ greater status in terms of righteousness over John.
  • Remember that John and Jesus were cousins who were born six months apart and most likely grew up together, thus Jesus’ superior righteousness must have been obvious to John even at that young age.
  • In his heart, John saw that Jesus was far more righteous than he was, which is why he cried that Jesus should instead be baptized by him.
  • John finally realized that Jesus was the Messiah!
  • Even though John the Baptist did not realize Jesus was the Messiah until after the baptism, he regarded Jesus as the most virtuous of the two brothers.

When did John the Baptist know that Jesus was the Messiah?

Is it possible that John did not identify Jesus until the Holy Spirit descended and stayed on Him? Isn’t it true that this happened more than a month before Jesus’ temptation? Why, therefore, was John unable to identify him among the crowd when the Sadducees and Pharisees arrived to capture him? What was the reason for John’s failure to identify Jesus till the next day?

Bible Answer:

Prior to John the Baptist revealing that he did not know who was the Messiah, Jesus was baptized by him and tested in the desert by the angel of the Lord. The events recorded in John 1:24-28 took place after Jesus had been baptized and tempted in the desert, respectively. According to this scripture, some Pharisees had approached John and inquired whether He was the Christ, Elijah, or the Prophet. It was John who informed them that he was neither the Christ nor Elijah nor the Prophet. Following that, John saw Him approaching him and revealed to everyone that He was the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.

  1. Because Jesus resided in Galilee and was a relative of John the Baptist, it seems likely that John the Baptist was aware of Jesus’ existence.
  2. The confrontation between Jesus and the professors in the temple court in Jerusalem was most likely well known throughout the priesthood at the time of Jesus’ death.
  3. Nonetheless, he had concerns about Jesus, just as many others would have had and continue to have now.
  4. In the sentence above, it is inferred that this is the case.
  5. As a result, God provided John with a sign.
  6. During Jesus’ baptism, John revealed that he recognized Jesus as a holy man (Matt.

3:15), but he did not recognize Him as the Messiah (Matt. 3:15). However, when the sign came and the Holy Spirit descended upon Jesus at His baptism, John realized that Jesus was the promised Messiah. The fact that John saw this must have made him feel extremely happy.

Conclusion:

After he was arrested and sentenced to prison, John’s misgivings resurfaced. When John sent his disciples to Jesus, they inquired as to whether He was the One. Jesus instructed his followers to return to the apostle John and inform him of the marvels that Jesus was accomplishing. God continues to unveil marvels to us today! He accomplishes this in a variety of ways for various people so that we are aware that He is present. May the Lord continue to bless you.

Suggested Links:

The Baptism of Jesus and the Testimony of John

Did John the Baptist Know Jesus?

Brant Pitre contributed to this article. The third of January, 2020 Learn more about The Mass Readings Explained Transcript by reading the following article: What do you think about the following question? This one has been a source of consternation for me for quite some time. Immediately after describing his testimony of the Holy Spirit descended upon Jesus, John states, “I myself did not know him. ” What could that possible signify, given that John is Jesus’s cousin, you might wonder. As it turned out in this particular instance, I had to turn to the Church Fathers for clarification, and I went back to the living tradition of the Church to see how some of them articulated it.

  • John Chrysostom, an ancient Church Father who lived in Constantinople in the late fourth / early fifth century and was a member of the Eastern Orthodox Church, pointed out something that I had previously overlooked.
  • The Gospel of Luke 1:80, after telling the narrative of the birth of John the Baptist and the blessing of his father Zechariah, makes this extremely crucial statement about John the Baptist at the very end of the story.
  • The scriptures state that the kid grew and became strong in spirit while living in the desert until God revealed himself to Israel.
  • He was neither born or raised in Jerusalem.
  • As a result, despite the fact that they were linked and that they were cousins, John and Jesus would not have grown up together.
  • Various academics have pointed out that the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, as well as the writings of Josephus, have led us to believe that there was a community of Essenes living around the Dead Sea.
  • It was an ancient Jewish group that adhered to the principle of celibacy.

We know from Josephus and other sources that they did, in fact, adopt and raise children from other people while living in the monastic society, despite the fact that they did not marry or have children there.

If you look at Europe, it is common for monastic communities to raise young boys, particularly those who have been abandoned by their parents, or for parents to pledge their kid or daughter to a monastery or convent, where they would then be nurtured alongside the monks and nuns.

They would raise their children in the desert, and some modern academics believe that this is exactly what occurred to John the Baptist and his family.

We don’t know for a certainty; this is just conjecture on our part.

In the Bible, it is made very clear that he grew up in the desert, and that he remained there until his appearance in Israel.

To be clear, as St.

They were completely unfamiliar with one another.

And he didn’t grow up knowing him as a member of his family or as a buddy of his.

He didn’t know him then because of a family connection, but because of a supernatural revelation.

And according to St.

He didn’t even recognize his cousin when he saw him.

It’s an intriguing chapter, to be sure, but what’s going on at Jesus’ baptism by John the Baptist in this specific Gospel is really rich, as you can see in this particular Gospel section.

Finally, on the final issue, what is John’s testimony like?

The fact that the Holy Spirit descended on Jesus and that he will be the one who performs the baptism with the Holy Spirit is a testimony to the fact that Jesus received the Holy Spirit.

“There is one who is coming who will be mightier than I.,” John declares.

He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit after I have baptized you with water.” So, what exactly is John’s testimony in this verse about?

That Jesus is the one and only one. Jesus is the one who everyone has been looking forward to from the beginning of time. He is the Messiah, he is the Lamb of God, he is the one who takes away the sins of the world, and he is the Savior, to name just a few of his titles.

How on Earth Did John the Baptist Not Know Jesus? – Grace Evangelical Society

Brant Pitre contributed to this post. The third of January in the year 2020. Find out more about The Mass Readings Explained Transcript by reading the following: I’m not sure what to make of the following question. For a long time, I was perplexed by this one. The apostle John said after describing his testimony of the spirit descended upon Jesus, “I myself did not know him.” So, what exactly does this signify, given that John is Jesus’ cousin? As it turned out in this particular instance, I had to turn to the Church Fathers for clarification, so I went back to the living tradition of the Church to see how some of them expressed it.

  • John Chrysostom, an ancient Church Father who lived in Constantinople in the late fourth / early fifth century and was a member of the Eastern Orthodox Church, brought my attention to something that I had overlooked.
  • The Gospel of Luke 1:80, after telling the narrative of the birth of John the Baptist and the blessing of his father Zechariah, makes this extremely crucial statement about John the Baptist at the very end of the story.
  • The scriptures state that the infant grew and became strong in spirit while living in the desert until the day of his revelation to Israel.
  • In fact, he was neither born or raised in Jerusalem.
  • Consequently, John and Jesus, despite the fact that they were connected and cousins, would not have grown up in the same household.
  • Various historians have pointed out that the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, as well as the writings of Josephus, has led us to believe that there was a community of Essenes living near the Dead Sea.
  • An ancient Jewish sect that practiced celibacy was known as the Order of the Sacred Heart.
  • We know from Josephus and other sources that they did, in fact, adopt and raise children from other people while living in the monastic society, despite the fact that they did not marry or have children themselves there.
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Throughout Europe, it was common for monastic communities to raise young boys, particularly those who had been abandoned by their parents, or for parents to dedicate their child or daughter to a monastery or convent, where they would then be raised alongside the monks and nuns, if you looked at the data.

  1. They would raise their children in the desert, and some modern academics have speculated that this is what occurred to John the Baptist and his family during his lifetime.
  2. The reality is that we do not know for certain; this is just guesswork.
  3. Throughout the Bible, it is stated unequivocally that Jesus grew up in the desert, and that he remained there until his revelation to Israel.
  4. As another early Church Father, St.
  5. Both of them were completely unfamiliar with the other.
  6. And he didn’t grow up knowing him as a member of his family or as a friend of the family either.
  7. Not through blood relationship, but by heavenly revelation, he was acquainted with him at that time.

And according to St.

By sight, he had no idea who his relative was.

It’s an intriguing section, to be sure, but what’s going on at Jesus’ baptism by John the Baptist in this specific Gospel is quite rich, as you can see in the paragraph above.

Lastly, what is John’s testimony on this final point?

The fact that the Holy Spirit descended on Jesus and that he would be the one who performs the baptism with the Holy Spirit is evidenced by his presence here.

“There is one who is coming who will be mightier than I.,” John declares.

His baptism with water will be followed by his baptism with the Holy Spirit.” So, what exactly is John’s witness in this passage?

Read on. The fact that Jesus Christ is the only way to salvation All of humanity has been looking forward to Jesus’ arrival. He is the Messiah, he is the Lamb of God, he is the one who takes away the sins of the world, and he is the Savior, to name just a few titles for him.

Did John the Baptist Know Jesus Was the Messiah?

A biblical contradiction has been asserted between John 1:29–36 and the parallel passages of Matthew 11:2–3 andLuke 7:19–20, according to some scholars. “Did John the Baptist have any idea that Jesus was the Christ?” Given the possibility of a problem, it’s important to ask: “Did John the Baptist realize that Jesus was the Messiah?”

John’s Testimony of the Lamb of God

At one point in his career, while in the Jordan desert, John the Baptist was outspoken in expressing his own inferiority to the future Messiah (John 1:23–281), and that the coming Messiah was greater than he (John 1:23–281). As soon as Jesus arrived at the Jordan River to be baptized, John quickly declared that Jesus was the Lamb of God who had come to take away the sins of the world. Additionally, he acknowledged Jesus as the Son of God (John 1:29–34). Two of his followers were then led by the Spirit to the location of Jesus (vv.

41).

The Disciples of John Struggle with the Lifestyle of Jesus

After John was imprisoned, his followers brought him up to date on the mission of Jesus through letters and phone calls. Then, either as a result of John’s prodding or, more likely, as a result of their own initiative, the followers of John approached Jesus and inquired as to why Jesus’ disciples did not fast as frequently as they did (Matthew 9:14). We do not know what prompted John and/or his disciples to ask this question, but in the expanded context (as well as in the parallel passages of Mark 2:16–20 and Luke 5:29–35), the Pharisees had just inquired as to why Jesus ate with tax collectors and sinners (Luke 5:29–30) and even attended great feasts (Luke 5:29–35).

Matthew 9:15 records his response to the disciples of John, who inquired as to whether or not the companions of the bridegroom might fast while the bridegroom was there with them.

Perhaps John, while imprisoned, learned that Jesus was attracting big audiences, feasting at wealthy people’s homes, and not requiring his disciples to fast (or pray as frequently) as he and his disciples had in the past (Luke 5:33).

Despite this, he continued to hear of Jesus’ popularity and the support he received from wealthy donors and tax collectors—people who were widely regarded as traitors to the country of Israel.

John the Baptist’s Question

Then, after some time has passed, John’s followers bring Jesus another message from John, this time inquiring if Jesus is the prophesied Messiah (“the one who is to come”) or if they should search for someone else in his place. Matthew 11:2–3 and Luke 7:19–20 are examples of parables. So here’s when the seeming inconsistency comes into play. John, who had been so certain that Jesus was the Christ, the Son of God, earlier in his mission, now appeared to be having some reservations about it. Before we can even begin to address the issue of doubting, we must first examine John’s practices from earlier in his ministry to see if they might cast any more light on the situation.

Take note that it was John who pointed out Jesus to two of his followers (John 1:35–37), and he showed no anxiety that they had abandoned him to pursue Jesus.

However, John’s reaction to this was to repeat that he was not the Messiah, but rather that Jesus was, and that Christ must grow while he decreases in importance.

This does not appear to be the reaction of someone who is concerned about his or her own position being jeopardized. Neither was it the case of someone who questioned Christ’s ministry.

The Friend of the Bridegroom

Even in response to the query of John’s followers concerning fasting, we can see that John preemptively answered it with terms that were similar to those that Jesus would use later when he responded. “He who possesses the bride is the bridegroom,” John stated while still in the Jordan desert, “but the friend of the bridegroom, who stands and hears him, rejoices tremendously because the bridegroom’s voice is heard.” As a result, this delight of mine has been realized” (John 3:29). It’s possible that John was thinking about the long chapter of Isaiah 61–62, in which the imagery of the groom and bride is utilized in combination with Messianic prophesies twice (Isaiah 61:10, Isaiah 62:5).

As a response to the followers of John’s query about “fasting,” Jesus compared his own disciples to John’s former sentiment on the subject.

This suggests that John had not instructed his followers to approach Jesus with this issue, but that they had done so on their own initiative, and very possibly at the suggestion of the Pharisees, in light of what has been revealed.

Could John’s Question About the Messiah Have Been Asked for His Disciple’s Sake?

If we consider the passages in Matthew 11:2–3 and Luke 7:19–20 in light of the fact that John had previously guided his own disciples to Jesus (John 1:35–36), may this inquiry that John had his disciples ask not have been an example of leading others to the Messiah in the same way? Most likely it was not for his personal pleasure that John dispatched these disciples with this inquiry, but rather for theirs: to eliminate all doubt and uncertainty from their minds regarding Jesus’ identity as the promised Messiah.

John may have anticipated that Jesus, when confronted with this issue, would respond with unmistakable proof that he was, in fact, the Christ; after all, isn’t that exactly what Jesus did?

Possible Reasons for Doubt?

Possibly, because he was the precursor of the Messiah, John expected Jesus to free him from jail, or he anticipated that by this time, Jesus would have publicly declared himself Messiah and King of Israel. There is also the possibility that John the Baptist, when imprisoned (and this was probably more than a year later than his words reported in John 1:29–36), began to question if Jesus was the Messiah. We must consider this option. As the precursor of the Messiah, he may have expectedJesus to free him from jail, or he may have anticipated that by this timeJesuswould have publicly announced himself as Messiah and King of Israel.

  1. However, even if this is a possibility, we must keep in mind that John never publicly denied Jesus, nor did he accuse anybody of doing so.
  2. In addition, he did not launch a smear campaign against anyone or express his own opinions on who he believed should be the Messiah.
  3. Even in the middle of his own reservations, he deferred to Jesus (if this hypothesis is correct).
  4. As a result, Jesus referred to him as the greatest prophet and the messenger of God, with the responsibility of preparing the way for Jesus’ mission.
  5. John had passed away (and maybe it did both).
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There are two possibilities: either the imprisoned John was experiencing a moment of weakness (rather than an outright rejection or denial of Christ), or he wished his disciples to have a personal encounter with Jesus in the hopes that they would follow him after his death was imminently approaching.

It seems possible that John the Baptist’s final question for Jesus had the same impact as his earlier questions, which directed Andrew and another disciple to Jesus. After all, as followers of Christ, isn’t it our responsibility to direct others to Jesus?

Did John the Baptist know Jesus as the Messiah? Do Matt 3:14 and John 1:33 conflict?

You’ve posed a pretty interesting question. I believe the problem is more a product of the translation than it is a result of the original content. The King James Version reads, “And I knew him not.”, which implies that John did not personally know Jesus, and it is possible that he had never heard of Him. This appears to be a remote possibility. Once John 1:33 is read as “I did not identify Him (as the Messiah),” the majority of the difficulty is resolved in part. You may recall that some of those who came to John to be baptized did so in a hypocritical manner (Matthew 3:7-12).

  • It is recorded in the Gospel of John that when Jesus came to him, he did not know for certain that Jesus was the Messiah.
  • As a result, John is not claiming that he was unaware of Jesus or His life, but rather that he had not yet received definite heavenly assurance that Jesus was the Messiah.
  • When Matthew depicts Jesus’ arrival at the location where John was baptizing, it is clear that John was aware of Jesus’ presence (something a correct translation of John 1:33 does not contradict).
  • It was because of this feeling of superiority in Jesus that John protested, stating that instead of being the one who should be immersed, the one who was being baptized should be the one who should be baptized.
  • According to what I’ve read in Matthew 3, John never complains on the grounds that Jesus is unquestionably the Messiah, but rather on the grounds that Jesus is more virtuous than he is, that Jesus is his spiritual superior.
  • KJV John 1:33 (NIV) However, he who sent me to baptize with water also instructed that the person upon whom thou shalt see the Spirit descend, and remaining on him, is that person who baptizeth with the Holy Ghost.

NIV John 1:33 (NIV) It is possible that I would not have recognized him had it not been for the fact that the one who sent me to baptize with water informed me, ‘The one on whom you see the Spirit descend down and remain is he who will baptize with the Holy Spirit.’ NAS John 1:33 (NIV) When I didn’t know who He was, He explained that He was the one who sent me to baptize in water.

In other words, it is He who baptizes with the Holy Spirit.

Did John the Baptizer Know Jesus or Not?

Early in Jesus’ ministry, John the Baptizer made one of the most beautiful and striking statements about Jesus of Nazareth that can be found anywhere in the Bible: “Behold! Jesus of Nazareth!” “Behold, the Lamb of God who wipes away the sin of the whole world!” (See also John 1:29). In the aftermath of this wonderful, redeeming declaration, however, John makes two points that have proven to be contentious for some. The following is what he had to say about Jesus: “I did not know Him but desired that He should be revealed to Israel, so I came baptizing with water.

  • 1:31-33, emphasis added.
  • (See Matthew 3:14 for more information.) If John did not already know who Jesus was, why would he say something like this?
  • Is it possible that John the Baptizer knew Jesus or not?
  • My first and second cousins are people I’ve never met, despite the fact that I’ve heard my parents talk about them for many years and have never met them myself.
  • Furthermore, when John “developed and became strong in spirit,” he spent the most of his time “in the deserts until the day of his manifestation to Israel,” according to Scripture (Luke 1:80, emp.
  • As a result, it’s possible that John never encountered Jesus before His baptism.
  • John must have known something about Jesus, or else he would not have been so hesitant to baptize Him in the first place.
  • Even though John appeared to think that Jesus was the Messiah before anybody else did, as J.W.
  • 107).
  • Many of the people must have known Jesus, yet none of them realized that he was the Messiah until after his death.

It’s safe to say that John the Baptist had a general understanding of who Jesus was; however, in order to serve as the official forerunner and announcer of Jesus, as well as the heaven-sent witness (John i.6,7), it was necessary for him to receive from God, through personal revelation as described here, an indubitable and absolute knowledge of Jesus’ Messiahship.

  1. It is not enough to rely on hearsay evidence to prove that Jesus is the Son of God.
  2. added).
  3. Is this not, as some skeptics claim (cf.
  4. 73), a contradiction in terms?
  5. In the first instance, people believe that all inquiries are being posed in order to gain knowledge.
  6. There are many different reasons why people ask questions.
  7. “What are you wearing?” can be one of the questions they’re asked to draw attention to something.

Etc.

Skeptics also believe that John’s faith was unwavering throughout his life.

We were reminded, as McGarvey did, that John’s “wild, free existence was suddenly curtailed by the unpleasant boredom of captivity.

We must also recall that his inspiration died with the ministry on whose behalf it was granted, and that it was only the man John, and not the prophet, who inquired into the matter” (p.

in orig.).

Could it be that Jesus did not save His forerunner?

“And lucky is he who is not offended as a result of Me,” Jesus says in answer to John (Matthew 11:6).

Job 13:15).

His “strength is made perfect in weakness” as the saying goes (2 Corinthians 12:9).

He most certainly did.

When John baptized Jesus, he became the first person to recognize Him as the Son of God.

Though John’s confidence in the Coming One may have been tested for a brief period during his captivity, the prophet’s interrogation of the Coming One is in no way indicative of a discrepancy.

John 10:35), which contains brief biographies of many devout, but flawed, persons. “There has not risen among those born of women a greater than John the Baptist,” according to Matthew 11:11, although even he was not without flaws and shortcomings.

REFERENCES

As early as the beginning of Jesus’ career, John the Baptizer uttered one of the most beautiful and striking statements about Jesus of Nazareth that can be found anywhere in the Holy Scriptures: “Behold! “Behold, the Lamb of God, who wipes away the sin of the world! Jesus said this in John 1:29. In the aftermath of this wonderful, redeeming declaration, however, John makes two points that have proven to be controversial among some. The following is what he had to say about Jesus: “I did not know Him but desired that He should be revealed to Israel, so I came baptizing with water.

While I was unaware of Him, He who sent me to baptize with water explained to me that “‘On Him you see the Spirit descending and abiding on Him, this is He who baptizes with the Holy Spirit’.” (1:31-33, emphasis added) 1 Corinthians 13:31-33 When one considers that (1) he was a relative of the Messiah (Luke 1:36, 57-60), and (2) he attempted to dissuade Jesus from having him baptize Him by stating, “I require Your baptism, and You are coming to me,” one wonders how John could have been unfamiliar of Jesus’ persona and character.

  • (Matthew 3:14; Mark 10:45) If John did not already know who Jesus was, why would he say something like that?
  • Is it possible that John the Baptizer knew Jesus?
  • Even though I’ve been hearing my parents talk about them for years, I’ve never met any of my first and second cousins, who happen to be first and second cousins.
  • To add insult to injury, when John “increased in stature and strength of spirit,” he was “in the wilderness” until “the day of his revelation to Israel” (Luke 1:80, emp.
  • As a result, it is possible that John had never encountered Jesus before His baptism.
  • The fact that John was reluctant to baptize Jesus indicates that he knew something about Jesus.
  • Even though John appeared to think that Jesus was the Messiah before anybody else did, as J.W.
  • 107).
  • The fact that so many people must have known Jesus, but none of them realized that he was the Messiah, speaks volumes.

It’s safe to say that John the Baptist had a general understanding of who Jesus was; however, in order to serve as the official forerunner and announcer of Jesus, as well as the heaven-sent witness (John i.6,7), it was necessary for him to receive from God, through personal revelation as stated here, an indubitable and absolute knowledge of Jesus’ Messiahship.

  • It is not enough to rely on hearsay evidence to prove that Jesus is the Son of the Living God.
  • added).
  • (Matthew 11:3; John 14:6) After all, John already knew that Jesus was the Christ, the Son of God, so why would he ask such a question?
  • 73), a contradiction in terms?
  • First and foremost, they believe that all inquiries are being asked in order to gain information and understanding.
  • For a number of reasons, people may pose questions to you.
  • “What are you wearing?” could be a question that they are asked to draw attention to.

Etc.

Skeptics also believe that John’s faith was unwavering throughout his lifetime.

We were informed by McGarvey that John’s “wild, unfettered existence” had been curtailed by the “irksome boredom of captivity.

We must also recall that his inspiration died with the ministry on whose behalf it was granted, and that it was only the man John, not the prophet, who inquired about the matter” (p.

in orig.).

Can you imagine Jesus being unable to save His forebear?

“And lucky is he who is not offended as a result of Me,” Jesus says in answer to John’s question (Matthew 11:6).

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Job 13:15).

As the saying goes, “through weakness, one’s strength is made perfect” (2 Corinthians 12:9).

Did John the Baptizer know who Jesus was?

Many people have misread John’s words, which some have seen as being in opposition with one other.

All throughout John’s ministry, he repeated this message from Heaven.

To recap, keep in mind that the Bible’s authors wrote an error-free, inspired book (2 Timothy 3:16-17; 2 Peter 1:20-21; cf.

John 10:35), which contains brief biographies of several devout, but flawed, persons. “There has not risen among those born of women a greater than John the Baptist,” according to Matthew 11:11, although even he was not without flaws and failings.

When did John The Baptist know Jesus was God’s Chosen One according to John 1?

Rather, John was asserting that Jesus had received recognition as the Messiah not from him (John), but from heaven, in the same way that we do not perceive or recognize a person’s identity, such as an old acquaintance or relative, but rather that Jesus had received recognition as the Messiah not from him (John), but from heaven itself. The Greek term is used in the same manner that we use the word “recognize” in English, for example, when you are “recognized” in a police line-up as the suspect who committed the crime (identification), or when you are “recognized” by the Dean of the College for great academic success (distinction).

No, he is not ignorant of the fact that Jesus is unique (identity), but rather that the official identification of Jesus as the Messiah does not come from John, but rather from God (distinction).

This is demonstrated in John 1:26, where John accuses the Pharisees of failing to recognize the person within their midst who is the anointed (similar to failing to recognize an old acquaintance); and again in this passage, where John denies that he is the one who is making the formal recognition of Jesus as the Christ (similar to failing to recognize an old acquaintance) (instead that distinct recognition is coming direct from heaven).

Consequently, these two sides of the definition of appear in this chapter.

Because John was the prophet through whom heaven made this recognition, it was not John who “recognized” Jesus as the Christ, but rather God in heaven who made this acknowledgment.

The voice from heaven (God) is announcing that Jesus is his son, to put it another way.

30 This is the One in whose behalf I stated, ‘After me comes a Man who has a greater rank than I, because He existed before me.’ (I said, ‘After me comes a Man who has a higher rank than I.) Despite the fact that I did not recognize him, I came to baptize in water so that He may be manifested to Israel.” ‘I have seen the Spirit descend as a dove from heaven and remain upon Him,’ John declared.

  • 34 “This is the Son of God, as I have personally witnessed and witnessed and attested.” This view is supported by the fact that Jesus made quite clear that John was not the source of his authority, despite the fact that John had attested to his authority as the Christ.
  • 33You have dispatched John, and he has confirmed that everything you have said is true.
  • 35He was the lamp that was blazing and shining, and you were willing to exult for a time in the light of his presence.
  • 37 And the Father, who sent Me, has confirmed that I am who I say I am.
  • Despite the fact that they had not seen the dove and had not heard the voice from heaven announcing his anointing, it was still John who had testified to them of this reality.
  • The miracles performed by Jesus were superior to those performed by Moses, as evidenced by the fact that Jesus cured the blind, which was not recorded in the Hebrew Bible, and, of course, that Jesus walked on water whereas Moses had to divide the waters.
  • Consequently, Jesus asserts himself to be “Christ” based on his acts and the truth obvious from heaven, which John had seen and heard and who, as a result, had attested to the validity of Jesus’ claims.
  • As previously stated, the Scribes declined to answer Jesus’ questions.

Why did John the Baptist say he didn’t know Jesus?

St. John the Baptist is a saint who was born in the year. Shutterstock Question:Why did John the Baptist claim he was unaware of Jesus’ existence? Were they not related in some way? He must have known who Jesus was. What exactly is happening here? • Amy Nelson, from Portland, Ore. Answer: The section in St. John’s Gospel where St. John the Baptist says twice: “I did not know him” is most likely what you’re referring to (Jn 1:31, 33). The possibility that John and Jesus, despite being cousins, did not know each other appears to be remote at the moment.

  1. John the Baptist used to think of Jesus as nothing more than a cousin, an ordinary carpenter, and an average man.
  2. A gift from the Holy Spirit, this new vision is accompanied by a special anointing that allows John to see the depths and heights of Jesus’ splendor as he has never seen them previously.
  3. “He is considerably more than his modest outward look ever reflected.” John is taken aback by his own exposed magnificence.
  4. The realization that everyone of us possesses a hidden glory that we must learn to recognize is likewise a challenge for us to face.
  5. We are one-of-a-kind and irreplaceable in the eyes of God and his purpose for us and others.
  6. Because every human being is loved by God and was directly willed into existence by God, we must recognize and respect the dignity of every human being.
  7. One day in paradise, we will undoubtedly be able to appreciate the exquisite wonder and dignity of every human person in a way that has never been seen before.

Land of milk and honey

In the Bible, the Promised Place is described as a land flowing with milk and honey. What does this mean? I was there last year, and it didn’t appear to be that way to me at all. It was a drab and barren landscape. Is there a difference between now and then, or am I misinterpreting the texts? Buffalo, New York resident Harold Hanson Answer:There are various possible approaches to answering this question. First and foremost, the Holy Land has a biosphere that is extremely complex. Simply traveling 10 kilometers can signify the difference between being in the Judean hill region’s wooded hill country and being in the Judean desert’s arid heartland.

  1. To the east of Jerusalem, the landscape descends 3,500 feet, and we move from lush forests and lush grass to a parched, parched desert, where Jericho and the Dead Sea are to be found.
  2. In addition, like in many Mediterranean regions, there is a dry season from May to August, which is an issue to consider.
  3. Things are lush and productive during the wet season, which runs from September to April.
  4. Finally, it is possible that the Holy Land was wetter and greener during biblical times than it is today.
  5. A broad deforestation, according to some experts, took place, particularly during the period of the Jewish battle with the Romans (AD 66-70), when numerous trees were cut to build siege engines and ramparts.
  6. Realistically, it was both an ecological disaster and a dreadful conflict, in which more than a million people perished, in the truest meaning of the word.
  7. Trees, of course, help to retain moisture and maintain a stable and rich topsoil.

Pastor of Holy Comforter-St. Cyprian Church in Washington, DC, and writer for the Archdiocese of Washington, D.C., he may be found on the Archdiocese of Washington, D.C.’s official blog, blog.dcarchdiocese.org. Questions can be sent to [email protected]

Did John the Baptist Know Jesus?

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Question:

Is it possible that John the Baptist and Jesus were close kin to one another?

Answer:

The extent to which John the Baptist and Jesus were acquainted remains a matter of debate. While Mary and Elizabeth were certainly acquainted (Luke 1:39), the Gospel does not provide any indication as to how close they were or if their children would have spent much time together when they were younger. There are a variety of reasons why Jesus and John the Baptist may not have spent a lot of time together in the first place. It’s possible that Mary and Elizabeth were not very close and did not spend much time together outside of family events.

  1. Perhaps, as a result of Herod’s massacre, both families concluded that it was better to keep their distance from one another.
  2. In the Gospel of Matthew, on the other hand, when John first saw Jesus, he immediately declared himself unfit of baptizing him (Matt.
  3. It’s also conceivable that, while John was aware of who Jesus was and that Jesus was on an unique mission from God, he did not completely comprehend the ramifications of what he was witnessing until the Holy Spirit came upon Jesus in the form of a dove and explained everything to him.
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Did John the Baptist know that Jesus was Messiah?

Is it possible that John the Baptist and Jesus were acquainted to some degree or another? However, while Mary and Elizabeth were certainly acquainted (Luke 1:39), the Gospel does not provide any indication of how close they were or if their children would have spent much time together as youngsters. The fact that Jesus and John the Baptist did not spend much time together might be attributed to a number of different factors. Possibly, Mary and Elizabeth did not have a strong bond and did not spend much time together outside of family functions.

Possibly, as a result of Herod’s massacre, both families came to the conclusion that it was better to maintain their distance from one another.

However, in the Gospel of Matthew, when John first saw Jesus, he declared himself unfit of baptizing him, and the rest is history (Matt.

Although John was aware of Jesus’ identity and the fact that he had been assigned a particular mission by God, it is conceivable that John was unaware of the full ramifications of what he was witnessing until the Holy Spirit came upon Jesus in the form of an ox.

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