Ah Holy Jesus, How Hast Thou Offended

Ah, holy Jesus, how hast thou offended

Scriptural References: first verse = Isa. 53:3, first verse = John 1:11th verse = Isa. 2 = Matt 26:21-22nd verses a total of three = John 3:16-17, John 10:14-15, and Galatians 2:20 The Christian theology of Christ’s atonement is spelled forth in the text, which draws imagery from Isaiah 53 as well as other Bible passages. Christ died on the cross as a substitutionary sacrifice for the sins of the world, according to the text. The personalizing of the passage is the most remarkable part of it: Christ died as a result of my transgression!

While the Thirty Years’ War was raging around him, Johann Heermann (b.

Lissa, Posen, 1647) penned this text during the suffering of the conflict (1618-48).

“It comes from Augustine.” According to Heermann, his piece was based on the seventh meditation from Jean de Fecamp’sMeditationes, a Latin book that has been incorrectly assigned to St.

  • Because of his personal grief and familial tragedy, Heermann was moved to contemplate Christ’s undeserved suffering.
  • Heermann began his career as a teacher before becoming a priest in the Lutheran Church in Koben in 1611.
  • In 1638, he announced his retirement.
  • He was forced to run for his life on many occasions, and he lost all of his goods on at least one of those instances.
  • According to some, he is the best hymn writer of the period between Martin Luther and Paul Gerhardt, and his work represents a shift from the objective songs of the Reformation to the more subjective hymns of the seventeenth century.
  • His hymn texts were published in collections such as Devoti Musica Cordis (1630, enlarged in 1636 and 1644), Hauss- und Hertz-Musica (1630, expanded in 1636 and 1644), andSontags- und Fest-evangelia (1630, expanded in 1636 and 1644).
  • A loose translation by Robert S.

Walmer in Kent, England, 1844; d.

That translation was initially published in five stanzas in 1897 inHymns in Four Parts, a hymn book that was republished in 1899 as the famousYattendon Hymnal, which is still in print today.

He studied medicine and worked as a physician until 1881, when he relocated to the town of Yattendon, where he died in 1902.

With the publication of The Yattendon Hymnal (1889), Bridges produced a collection of one hundred hymns (forty-four of which were composed or translated by him, with settings mostly from the Genevan Psalter, and arranged for unaccompanied singing).

Use in the liturgy: Lent, Holy Week, and the Lord’s Supper.

517, ii., Herzliebster Jesu The following are further translations: Aagh!

“I have retranslated S.

from St.

B.” The hymn was reprinted in The English Hymnal, 1906, number 70.

2.Ah, Jesu, what was Thy sin, O most lovable of creatures? There is also a very free rendition by G. R. Woodward in hisSongs of Syon, 1904, No. 31 (also available online). New Supplement to the Dictionary of Hymnology, by John Julian (1907)

Ah, Holy Jesus, How Hast Thou Offended

In the Latin passage “Ah, Holy Jesus,” ascribed to either Augustine (354-430) or Jean de Fecamp, Johann Heerman found inspiration for his song “Ah, Holy Jesus” (c.1000-1079). The poem was first written in a devotional book called Meditationes sanctorum patrum, which was produced in the fifteenth century. Heerman’s hymn rendition was originally published in his Devoti Musica Cordis, which was published about 1630. Heerman produced his hymns during the Thirty Years War, a period in which many hymn authors were contemplative and self-reflective.

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In the Latin passage “Ah, Holy Jesus,” ascribed to either Augustine (354-430) or Jean de Fecamp, Johann Heerman found inspiration for his song “Ah, Holy Jesus” (c.1000-1079). It was initially published in a devotional book calledMeditationes sanctorum patrum, which was written in the fourteenth century. Heerman’s hymn rendition was originally published in his Devoti Musica Cordis, which was published about 1630. Heerman produced his hymns during the Thirty Years War, a period in which many hymn authors were contemplative and self-reflective.

Heerman portrays the sorrows of Jesus in the lyrics, and he acknowledges his own involvement in Jesus’ death.

Heerman’s hymn, however, puts us in the direction of a right reaction, poignantly reminding us that Jesus’ death for our redemption calls for us to adoration and worship of the One who died for us.

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The time is 11:11:5. (see more) Oh, holy Jesus, what have you done to insult me?

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History of Hymns: ‘Ah, Holy Jesus’ [Jesu]

Written by C. Michael Hawn Johann Heermann was a German poet and novelist who lived in the 18th century. In the poem “Ah, Holy Jesus,” written by Johann Heermann and translated by Robert Bridges 289 hymns from the United Methodist Hymnal Ah, dear Jesus, how hast thou angered us to the point that we have feigned to judge thee in hatred? O most afflicted, thou hast been insulted by adversaries and spurned by thy own. In rare instances does a single hymn bring together so many people who were revered in their respective eras: St.

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According to several scholars, the seventeenth-century hymn “Ah, holy Jesus” is a seventeenth-century counterpart to the African American spiritual “Were You There When They Crucified My Lord?” In all situations, the singer is positioned at the foot of the cross, contemplating the significance of Christ’s suffering, thanks to the repeated use of the first-person viewpoint.

When the song “Ah, Holy Jesus” is played, it is a meditation on the circumstances leading up to the crucifixion, and it asks who is directly accountable for the Savior’s death.

This line of thought was carried on by the Pietist poets of the seventeenth-century German literary tradition.

The theology of the atonement is brought to the forefront in this song.

The German Poet and English Translation

His father, Johann Heermann (1585–1647), was the only surviving child of five children, all of whom were born in Silesia (now Poland). His mother made a promise to God that if God spared his life, he would be groomed for the ministry. Despite personal health issues, including vision problems and a throat illness that prohibited him from speaking, as well as being a victim of war, Heermann rose to become a pastor and a scholar. His health suffered greatly during the Thirty Years’ War (1618–1648), which was exacerbated by the hazards of battle, the loss of personal goods, and the ravages of disease.

(Herl, 2019, v.

281).

(Westermeyer, 2010, p.

As a devotional activity, consider contrasting the theology of Heermann’s hymn with Gerhardt’s renowned “O Sacred Head, Now Wounded.” Heermann began writing in Latin early in his career, but later switched to German, allowing him to explain his religion and theology in the language of his people.

The German text “Herzliebster Jesu, wast du verbrochen” was first published in Heermann’s Devoti Musica Cordis(1630) in fifteen four-line stanzas under the title “Ursache des bittern Leidens Jesu Christi, and Trost aus seiner Lieb und Gnade.” The text was translated into English as “Ursache des bittern Leidens Jesu Christi, and Trost nach Augustino” (“The source of Jesus Christ’s severe sorrows and the source of solace in his love and kindness.

  • “From the writings of Augustine.” Whereas Heermann was inspired by the teachings of the Church Fathers, Augustine’sMeditationes, which served as the inspiration for this hymn, is a collection of works by a number of different authors.
  • Augustine, according to recent research, Meditation VII (“An recognition that sinful man was the cause of Christ’s sorrows”) may have been written by Jean de Fécamp (c.
  • It is based on the Latin hymn “Quid commisisti, dulcissime puer, ut sic judicareris,” which means “What have you committed, dear lad, that you might be judged in this manner” (Watson and Hornby,Canterbury Dictionary, n.d.).
  • His deteriorating health forced him to abandon his medical practice and devote his time and energy to literature and hymnody instead.
  • 517).
  • The hymn is long, and Bridges opted to paraphrase a portion of it in five verses rather than attempt a comprehensive translation.
  • Watson’s “Herzliebster Jesu” (Herzliebster Jesu) was included in the popular English Hymnal(1906), which was published in the United Kingdom, and the EpiscopalHymnal(1916), which was published in the United States.
  • Rather of directly translating Heermann’s German, he more loosely paraphrases the final two stanzas, thereby carrying the theme further.

However, issues arise from the outset (first sentence). Carl Daw Jr., himself a great hymn translator, has presented a detailed and expert critique of Bridges’ translation (Daw, 2016, pp. 220–221) for the benefit of poetry enthusiasts.

The Hymn and Its Theology

The theology of Augustine “follow[s]the customary view of the Crucifixion, namely, that through His sufferings and death Jesus took upon Himself the retribution due to the sins of the world,” says hymnologist Albert Bailey. The contrite sinner, following in the footsteps of traditional Latin medieval theology, “personalizes the generic fact: it was because of my faults that He suffered” (Bailey, 1950, p. 325). According to Luke 23:20–24, the song is a response to these verses: As a result, Pilate spoke to them once more, this time expressing his willingness to free Jesus.

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In response to their third question, he explained: What has he done to deserve this punishment?

And they were there in a heartbeat, demanding that Jesus be crucified with a loud outcry.

And Pilate ruled that everything should be done according to their wishes.

A similar question appears in Meditation VII: “What had you done, O lovely innocence, to bring thee as a criminal before thy enemies’ bar?” “What had you done, O sweet innocence, to bring thee as a criminal before thy enemies’ bar?” (1818, page 23) (Augustine, 1818, page 23) (Augustine, 1818, page 23) (Augustine, 1818, page 23) (Augustine, 1818, page 23) Of course, the natural response is that Christ did not deserve to be mocked and rejected.

The subsequent stanzas are devoted to exposing the guilty culprit.

“Who is it who hath brought this upon thee?” In this case, the response is declarative rather than rhetorical: “‘Twas I, Lord Jesus, / I it was that denied thee; / I crucified thee.” A reference to the Good Shepherd (John 10:11–21), who sacrifices his life for the sake of the sheep, is made in Stanza 3.

Stanza 4 focuses on the ultimate objective of the incarnation, which is “forsalvation,” as the phrase says.

R.

73) describes the process as follows:

A Theological Word of Caution

Heermann’s German paraphrase and Bridges’ English paraphrase are both infused with specific readings of Isaiah 53. Among the influences on this song were the views of substitutionary atonement (in which Christ died as a substitute for others) and the ransom theory of atonement (in which Jesus’ death served as a ransom payment to Satan, and in doing so, God released mankind from Satan’s bonds). These conceptions of atonement were generally accepted in both the Eastern (Irenaeus and Athanasius) and Western (Augustine) branches of the early church throughout their respective periods.

  1. This perspective is derived from a much later medieval synthesis of the other beliefs, which may be traced back to Anselm and was further popularized by John Calvin.
  2. Taking the example of Christus Victor, this is a long-held belief that changed the emphasis from Christ’s death as a sort of ransom to Christ’s death and resurrection as a victory over evil that sets humanity free.
  3. This song also draws attention to a useful idea of Easter as a second Passover, which is presented in the text.
  4. Examples of this expansion of Christus Victor theology include Brian Wren’s “Christ is Alive, Let Christians Sing” (1968) and Cesáreo Gabaráin’s “Walk on, O People of God” (“Camina Pueblo, de Dios”) (1979), both of which are available on the internet.

Individual sin and its effects are important, but when this perspective is separated from God’s redemption of mankind and the critical role that the gospel of the triumphant Christ plays in conquering systemic evil of all types, it may be harmful.

The Music: HERZLIEBSTER JESU

The melody is inextricably linked to the song HERZLIEBSTER JESU, which originally appeared in Johann Crüger’s Neues volkömliches Gesangbuch: Augburgischer Confession. (Berlin, 1640) and is credited to the composer Johann Crüger (1598–1662). A four-part harmony is used in the opening phrase from Crüger’s collection: Cantus (melody), Altus (tenor), and Bassus (bass). Crüger was a leading proponent of Heermann’s writings, and he was one of the most influential. The melody appears to have been taken from a song set to Psalm 23 in theGenevan Psalter, according to the lyrics (1543).

S.

Matthew Passion and twice into the St.

Numerous hymnals have Bridges’ free translation, which may be found in many of them.

SOURCES

The Gospel in Hymns, edited by Albert E. Bailey (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1950). St. Augustine, St. Anselm, and St. Bernard, The Meditations of St. Augustine, His Treatise on the Love of God, Soliloquies, and Manual, tr. George Stanhope (London, 1818), St. Augustine, St. Anselm, and St. Bernard, The Meditations of St. Augustine, His Treatise on the Love of God, Soliloquies, and Manual, tr. George Stanhope ( (accessed January 2, 2021). Glory to God: A Companion to Carl P. Daw Jr.’s “Glory to God” (Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2016).

  • 1 is edited by Joseph Herl, Peter Reske, and John Vieker (St.
  • “Herzliebster Jesu, what have you done to me?” James Mearns, “Herzliebster Jesu, what have you done to me,” A Dictionary of Hymnology, edited by John Julian (New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 1957).
  • J.
  • “Ah, Holy Jesu, ” says J.
  • (From “How Hast Thou Offended,” The Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, published by Canterbury Press on January 1, 2021).
  • On January 1, 2021, the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology published “Herzliebster Jesu, what hast du verbrochen.” (The Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology published by The Canterbury Press on January 1, 2021).
  • C.

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Additionally, look for the information about the copyright holder. The Hymnal 1982 has 158 hymns. Oh, holy Jesus, what have you done to insult me? To hear a sample of this music, use the Play button: HarmonyMelody Oh, holy Jesus, what have you done to insult me?

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1 Ah, holy Jesus, how hast thou offended,
that man to judge thee hath in hate pretended?

This is a sample of the work you’ve chosen. To gain access to all ritesong content, please subscribe or log in if you are currently a subscriber. Music: Herzliebster Jesu, Johann Cruger (1598-1662), alt. Words: Johann Heermann (1585-1647); tr. Robert Seymour Bridges (1844-1930), alt. An exclusive reprint license for congregational use is included with the purchase of your ceremony song. This song may be printed in congregational song sheets for one-time use only, and it is not intended to be repeated.

This license does not apply to any other form of the music, including those intended for performance by a choir, organ, or other accompaniments.

Ah holy Jesus how hast Thou offended

Ah, holy Jesus, how have you offendedtha. These lyrics are �Suggest you purchase a song/hymn book containing these lyrics – may be listed in the LYRICS block on the left.
Meter: 11 11 115
Writer(s):
Trans/Adapted: Hymn Writer

Johann Heermann

1585 – 1647 (61 Years)Available on eHymnBook.org:Songs/Hymns written:19Music:1

Writer of Hymns

Robert Seymour Bridges

1844 – 1930 (85 Years)Available on eHymnBook.org:Songs/Hymns written:25Translations/Adaptions:19

Author of Hymns

Jubilate Hymns

Available on eHymnBook.org:Songs/Hymns written:89Translations/Adaptions:87Music:4

Composer of Hymns

Available on eHymnBook.org:Songs/Hymns written:16Translations/Adaptions:4Music:33

Hymn Composer is a person who writes hymns.

Robert Seymour Bridges1844 – 1930 (85 Years)Available on eHymnBook.org:Songs/Hymns written:25Translations/Adaptions:19

Writer of Hymns

Jubilate HymnsAvailable on eHymnBook.org:Songs/Hymns written:89Translations/Adaptions:87Music:4

Author of Hymns

Available on eHymnBook.org:Songs/Hymns written:16Translations/Adaptions:4Music:33

Composer of Hymns

Available on eHymnBook.org:Songs/Hymns written:16Translations/Adaptions:4Music:33
Dates: � Jubilate Hymns
Bible Refs: Lk 23:1-46;Jn 1:14;Jn 10:11;Jn 10:15;Jn 18;
Name: HERZLIEBSTER JESU
Meter: 11 11 115
Writer(s): Music Writer
Johann Cr�ger1598 – 1662 (63 Years)Available on eHymnBook.org:Songs/Hymns written:1Translations/Adaptions:1Music:23

Music Composer

Johann Sebastian Bach1685 – 1750 (64 Years)Available on eHymnBook.org:Songs/Hymns written:1Music:60

Writer of music

Available on eHymnBook.org:Songs/Hymns written:16Translations/Adaptions:4Music:33

Ah, holy Jesus, how hast thou offended (Johann Crüger)

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Andrew Sims is the editor (submitted2022-01-17). Information about the score: A4, 1 page, 55 kB Copyright: CPDL Edition notes: The hymn with harmony and underlaid words in the version published in The Hymnal 1982 is the version with harmony and underlaid words. Andrew Sims is the editor (submitted2022-01-17). Information about the score: A4, 1 page, 80 kB Copyright: CPDL Edition notes: This hymn is based on the version published in The Hymnal 1982, which includes both the music and the text.

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Title:Ah, dear Jesus, what have you done to insult me? Johann Crüger is the composer. Tune:Herzliebster Jesu (Lover of Jesus) Johann Heermann is the lyricist for this song. Robert Bridges provided the translation. 4vv is the number of voices in the song. Voicing:SATBG enre:Sacred,Hymn 10 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Language:English A cappella or keyboard are used as instruments. Firstpublished: Description:

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Englishtext Ah, dear Jesus, how hast thou offended, that man to judge thee has claimed in hatred to be? O most afflicted, thou hast been insulted by adversaries and spurned by thy own. Who was the perpetrator? Who is it that hath brought this upon thee? Unfortunately, Jesus, my betrayal hath brought thee to ruin. ’ It was I, Lord Jesus, who denied thee, and it was I who crucified thee. So, the Good Shepherd has been given for the sheep; the slave has sinned, and the Son has suffered; for our atonement, while we paid no attention, God interceded on our behalf.

As a result, sweet Jesus, because I am unable to thank thee, I adore thee and will always pray to thee, thinking on thy pity and unwavering love, which are not deserving of my gratitude.

Ah, Holy Jesus

Englishtext Ah, dear Jesus, how hast thou offended, that man to judge thee has claimed in hatred to do so? O most afflicted, thou hast been insulted by enemies and rejected by thy own. Who was the one who had done wrong? How did this happen to you? Who is to blame? And now you are undone by my betrayal, O Jesus! ’ It was I, Lord Jesus, who denied thee, and it was I who crucified you. So, the Good Shepherd has been given for the sheep; the slave has sinned, and the Son has suffered; for our atonement, God interceded, while we paid no attention.

Due to this, gentle Jesus, because I am unable to pay thee, I adore thee and will always pray to thee, thinking on thy mercy and unwavering love, despite the fact that I am unworthy.

If you cannot read music, just start the Youtube video and follow along!

John Julian’s bibliography is available online. “Oh, my Jesus, what a relief! What Have You Done to Offend Me?” Web. 04 April 2013. Hymnary.org, a service of the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship, was created in 1999 and is available online. Paul Westermeyer’s “Holy Week/Three Days” is available online. Vol. 1 of the Augsburg Fortress Hymnal Companion to Evangelical Lutheran Worship (Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Fortress Publishing, 2010), 151-54. Print.

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