Why Was Jesus Called The Lamb Of God

What does it mean that Jesus is the Lamb of God?

QuestionAnswer According to John 1:29 and John 1:36, when Jesus is referred to be the Lamb of God, it is referring to Him as the only acceptable and ultimate sacrifice for sin. We must begin with the Old Testament in order to comprehend who Christ was and what He accomplished. The Old Testament contains predictions about the advent of Christ as a “guilt sacrifice,” which we must consider in order to comprehend who Christ was and what He accomplished (Isaiah 53:10). In reality, the entire sacrificial system created by God in the Old Testament prepared the way for the advent of Jesus Christ, who is the perfect sacrifice that God would offer as atonement for the sins of His people, as revealed in the New Testament (Romans 8:3; Hebrews 10).

Several prominent Jewish sacrifices sprang to mind when John the Baptist referred to Jesus as “Lamb of God who wipes away the sin of the world” (John 1:29).

Due to the proximity of the Passover feast and the sacrifice of the Passover lamb, the first thing that comes to mind is the Passover lamb.

It was also one of the most important religious festivals in the world.

  • It is His blood that covers those who have been sacrificed in order to safeguard us from the angel of (spiritual) death.
  • In the temple, a lamb was slaughtered twice daily, in the morning and the evening, for the sins of the people (Exodus 29:38-42).
  • It is true that the moment of Jesus’ death on the cross corresponds to the hour of the evening sacrifice in the temple.
  • Of course, the individual in question was none other than Jesus Christ, also known as “the Lamb of God.” The concept of a sacrifice system may sound alien to us now, but the concept of payment or restitution is still one that we can readily grasp and comprehend.
  • We are also aware that the Bible teaches that we are all sinners and that none of us is righteous in God’s eyes (Romans 3:23).
  • Consequently, the only hope we have is that He would make it possible for us to be reconciled to Himself, which He accomplished by sending His Son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross.
  • He achieved eternal life for us by His death on the cross as God’s perfect sacrifice for sin, followed by His resurrection three days later.

In 1 Peter 1:18-21, we are told that God Himself has supplied the offering that atones for our sin as part of the beautiful good news of the gospel: “God Himself has provided the offering that atones for our sin.” You understand that it was not with perishable commodities such as money or gold that you were rescued from the empty way of life handed down to you from your forebears, but rather with the valuable blood of Christ, a lamb without spot or flaw.” He was selected before the foundation of the world, but he was exposed to the world in these final days for your benefit.

Your faith and hope are in God because of him, for God resurrected him from the grave and exalted him, and so your faith and hope are in God.” Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) When scripture says that Jesus is the Lamb of God, what exactly does that mean?

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9 Reasons Jesus is Called the Lamb of God

Many adults and children find it difficult to comprehend the notion of the Lamb of God. A lamb is an endearing, sweet, and innocent creature to see. When we talk about lambs in the Bible, however, we normally refer to them as sacrifices that are offered to atone for the sins of the people. This has been demonstrated during the Passover. It’s also used in relation to Jesus and His death, as we’ll discover. Today, I’m looking forward to discussing nine reasons why Jesus is referred to be the Lamb of God, as well as what it implies.

Why is a lamb being killed for sins?

My guess is just as good as yours as to why the Lord chose a lamb as his sacrifice. Perhaps this is due to the fact that they were the closest animal to the Israelites at the time and in the society in which they lived, and thus symbolized a creature without flaws. We see the lamb utilized as a particular, dedicated animal throughout God’s Word, regardless of the cause for its usage. Abraham and Isaac are the first people in the Bible to mention God giving a lamb for sacrifice, and this is the first time we see this mentioned.

  • God had promised a lamb, but instead gave an adult ram as a substitute.
  • The lamb appears once more in the account of the Passover, when the Israelites are told to slaughter a lamb and brush the blood from its carcass on their doorframes.
  • The blood of the lambs provided salvation for God’s people.
  • There are nine allusions to the Lamb in the book of Revelation, each of which reveals to us Christ in His victory.
  • Because of this symbolism, we may have a better knowledge of who He is and why His sacrifice brought redemption to me, you, and everyone else who believes.

Deeper Understanding

When we comprehend Jesus as the Lamb of God, the Bible literally jumps off the page at us. The personal dimension of the Gospel becomes more apparent when we engage more of our senses in our reading of the Bible, as described in this article. The Word of God grows more alive as time goes on. Instead of seeing it in black and white, we see it in full color. God’s plan for our existence involves a great deal of symbolism, as well as numerous chances to join our hearts, brains, spirits, and bodies — in other words, ALL of our senses – with the Truth!

He’s on his way to get you.

You are the reason why Jesus had to die on the cross for our sins.

All of the sins of the world, as well as all of your sins Today, I’d want us to look at the relationship between the symbolism and the meaning of the LAMB in both the Old Testament and the New Testament, and how they are related.

1 – He was born in Bethlehem

In Bethlehem, lambs were bred by the Levites (priests). They offered lambs as sacrifices at the temple. Furthermore, it was the shepherds who were the first to pay a visit to Jesus after He was born. The lambs to be sacrificed were delivered to the priests. It’s amazing to think that the announcement of Christ’s birth was delivered first to the Levitical priests. Most likely, they were unaware of the tremendous honor that the Lord had bestowed upon them by selecting them to be the first to receive the Lamb of God.

Jesus proclaimed that He is theBread of Life (Luke 6:35).

2 – John the Baptist

Jesus was referred to be the Lamb of God by John the Baptist, a priest descended from the Levitical line. The lambs for sacrifice were identified by the priests. The announcement of Jesus’ identify to the world was made by John, who had power because of his priestly heritage. The baptism that we witness John the Baptist conduct in John 1 symbolized the process of going down and then rising again. It is important to note that when this statement was made at the site of baptism (John 1:29), the people responded in a far different way than we do.

  • It is said in the Bible that a lamb would be led to slaughter as a symbol of sin sacrifice and peace sacrifices (Leviticus 23:19). Themessianic lambs would be led to slaughter (Isaiah 53). the link to the Passover Lamb in the book of Exodus
  • The imagery of escape from servitude

3 – He fulfilled the story of Abraham and Isaac

  • Abraham accompanied by two men rode on a donkey. During Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem before to His crucifixion, two disciples went to obtain the donkey for Him
  • Abraham took his kid with him (his firstborn and only son of Sarah). When Isaac inquired about the whereabouts of the sacrifice lamb, Abraham said that God will supply. God provided His own Son to be the sacrificial lamb, taking our place on the altar. Isaac carried the wood to the slaughterhouse on his back, as a sign of respect. In order to prevent his own crucifixion, Jesus carried the cross on his back, since God knew Abraham’s heart was clean. God intervened and supplied a ram for the family. (Fun fact: During its first year, a sheep is referred to as a lamb.) A female lamb is transformed into a ewe, and a male lamb is transformed into a ram.) On Mount Moriah, God sacrificed His Son as the Lamb of God’s ultimate sacrifice for sin, just as Abraham had done with his son on Mount Sinai. On the same mountain, Jesus was given up as a sacrifice.

4 – Jerusalem

To give to the high priest, all lambs were required to be carried to Jerusalem (from where they were bred in Bethlehem) and sacrificed. Jesus rode into Jerusalem on a donkey and proceeded to the temple to offer sacrifices. He cleaned it in order to make way for a genuine, pure, and faultless sacrifice.

5 – The Passover Lamb

At Passover, the lamb is chosen by the family’s patriarchal figure. Furthermore, Jesus was chosen by our Father. The Lamb of God, to use a biblical term. According to the Passover rules, each household is allowed one lamb. All those who belong to Christ are members of one family.

6 – 4 days

The inspection of the Passover lamb takes four days. For four days, the inhabitants of Jerusalem put Jesus through his paces, interrogated him, and challenged him in the same way. Pharisees, Sadducees, and other religious leaders are among those who have risen to prominence.

7 – Spotless

Jesus was completely without flaw or defect. Spotless refers to being pure and without fault. From a physical standpoint, we regard it as being free of sickness, disease, and skin blemishes. Neither sickness nor imperfections could be seen on his skin, which was flawless. It signifies “without guilt” or “harmless” in a spiritual sense. He caused no damage to anyone and just spoke God’s Word when necessary.

8 – The times of sacrifice

The sacrifices took place in the morning and the evening hours. These times correspond to the hours of 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. on our local time zones’ clocks. By 3 p.m., the Passover lambs had been slaughtered. (Remember, each household was allowed to sacrifice one lamb, so there was a lot of sacrificing going on.) At 9 a.m., the hour of the morning sacrifice, Jesus was nailed on the cross for the first time.

He passed away just before the evening sacrifice was to begin. The sun remained obscured from midday to 3 p.m., at which point He passed away. (See Matthew 27 and Mark 15 for examples.) Every commandment in Exodus 12 was carried out completely by Jesus. Each and every one of you!

9 – One-year-old lamb

A lamb was regarded to be in the peak of its life when it was born. Jesus was regarded to be in the prime of His life when he was 33 years old and only three years began his ministry. There is so much in the Bible that points to Jesus as the Lamb of God who was sacrificed! There’s a lot more to this topic than I can address in this piece. I think the primary message has been conveyed: Jesus was the sinless, immaculate Lamb of God who died on the cross to pay the penalty for our sins for all time.

  • It’s entirely up to you!
  • Have you accepted Him as such as a result of repenting of your sins and placing your trust in Him to save you?
  • This is the ultimate sacrifice.
  • In the Bible, Jesus is referred to be THE LAMB OF GOD, who takes away mankind’s sins.
  • If you could tell me how you’re commemorating the Lamb of God on this day when we celebrate His resurrection, that would be wonderful!

What Does it Mean that Jesus Is the Lamb of God?

The names of God provide us with significant information about God’s character. This is true of Jesus’ titles as well, and we hear a lot about Jesus being the Lamb of God, especially during the Easter season. Continue reading to find out more about why Jesus is referred to be “the Son of David” and the enormous ramifications this holds for us today. Lambs are typically depicted as downy white creatures frolicking in rolling green meadows or being carried gently in the arms of their shepherd in our minds’ eye.

In spite of the fact that it is one of the most sympathetic depictions of Christ found in the New Testament, the term “Lamb of God” would have conjured up considerably more terrible images in people’s minds who heard John the Baptist welcome Jesus with these words.

Isn’t it true that the horrific sacrifice of an innocent animal had served as a stark illustration of the repercussions of breaking the Mosaic law?

When we pray to Jesus as the Lamb of God, we are praying to the One who freely lay down his life in order to bear the penalty for our sins as well as the punishment for the sins of the entire world in his own body.

(From Ann Spangler’s book, Praying the Names of God, an extract is offered.) Scripture verses to remember: “Behold, the Lamb of God, who wipes away the sin of the world!” exclaimed John as he saw Jesus approaching him and remarked. John 1:29 (NIV)

What Does Lamb of God Mean?

We will need to go back into the history of the Old Testament and the environment in which it was written in order to connect the dots for this question. Animal sacrifices may be found throughout the Old Testament, in all of the books of the Bible. These blood offerings served as a brief reprieve from the consequences of sin. When you read Leviticus 4:35, you receive a clear image of the procedure and the goal. This procedure will cleanse the people from their sin, bringing them into right relationship with the Lord, and they will be forgiven.” (Italics mine.) National Geographic Traveler Consequently, the objective of animal sacrifice and sacrifices was sanctification, righteousness (i.e., being in the right relationship with God), and pardon.

  1. It is only through the shedding of blood that forgiveness may be obtained.” Overall, this was life under the law: the people understood that if sin existed, a sacrifice would be required to bring them back to God.
  2. Lambs are distinguished by their white coats, and white is a color that represents purity and cleanliness.
  3. He, too, was sinless, faultless, and free of all faults and flaws.
  4. And, in the same way that lambs were killed for sin, Christ would be sacrificed for our sins.
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Why is Jesus Called the Lamb of God?

When it comes to summing the solution to this issue, Romans 8:3 does a fantastic job. “Because of the weakness of our sinful nature, the law of Moses was powerless to redeem us,” the passage says. As a result, God accomplished what the law could not. He sent his own Son in a body that was similar to the bodies that we sinners had. Furthermore, God put a stop to sin’s power over us by offering his Son as a sacrifice for our sins in that body. All of the Old Testament’s offerings were intended to provide a temporary covering for sin.

Israel would continue to perpetrate the same crimes over and over indefinitely.

Jesus, the Lamb of God, was our once-and-for-all sacrifice, and his blood offering satisfied God’s requirement for a blood offering.

This allusion to Christ as the “Lamb” of God is made because Jesus was a perfect gift of purity and cleanliness on behalf of the Father.

Where Is the Name Lamb of God Found in the Bible?

John 1:29 is one of the most well-known passages in the Bible where this reference to Jesus may be found. “Behold, the Lamb of God who wipes away the sin of the world!” exclaimed John the Baptist upon seeing Jesus. It is also used once again in John 1:36, when John cries it once more, prompting two followers of John to accompany Jesus on the way. These passages provide a clear insight of the character and mission of Jesus Christ. The book of Revelation also makes multiple allusions to “the Lamb” in the context of the end of the world.

“And they defeated him because of the blood of the Lamb,” says Revelation 12:11 of the Romans. “The Lamb’s book of life,” according to Revelation 21:27, is also mentioned. Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/KristiLinton

Why Does It Matter that Jesus is the Lamb of God?

If we read a report on the news about an animal sacrifice, we would very certainly be in uproar in American society. Despite the fact that it is frowned upon nowadays, the thinking behind it is not uncommon in our society. Due to the fact that we all comprehend the concepts of payment and reparation, no matter where we originate from or where we live. If we want something, we must be willing to pay for it. Furthermore, if we damage property or commit an error, we should make good on our mistake by compensating ourselves with something valuable to us, such as money or time.

Prior to the sacrifice of the Lamb of God, our ability to maintain our right standing with God was contingent on our ability to make a personal sacrifice.

We now have direct connection to the Father because of Jesus’ sacrifice.

We Can Draw Near to God because of the Blood of the Lamb

“And thus, dear brothers and sisters, we can confidently enterHeaven’s Most Holy Place because of the blood of Jesus,” says the author of Hebrews 10:19-22, explaining the significance of Jesus’ sacrifice. By His death, Jesus provided a fresh and life-giving route into the Most Holy Place, allowing people to experience the presence of God for the first time. And, since we have a great High Priest who is in charge of God’s house, let us enter the presence of God with pure hearts, totally believing in His power to save us.

(Italics mine.) National Geographic Traveler Similarly, the Bible’s James 4:8 begins with the words “Come near to God, and He will draw near to you.” It is only by the sacrifice of the Lamb of God that we may come close to God.

Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/zoom-zoom

We Can Draw Near to God because of the Blood of the Lamb

“And thus, dear brothers and sisters, we can confidently enterHeaven’s Most Holy Place because of the blood of Jesus,” says the author of Hebrews 10:19-22, explaining the significance of Jesus’ sacrifice. By His death, Jesus provided a fresh and life-giving route into the Most Holy Place, allowing people to experience the presence of God for the first time. And, since we have a great High Priest who is in charge of God’s house, let us enter God’s presence with pure hearts, totally believing in Him.

(Italics mine.) National Geographic Traveler Similarly, the Bible’s James 4:8 begins with the words “Come near to God, and He will draw near to you.” It is only by the sacrifice of the Lamb of God that we may come close to God.

The upshot of growing closer to God is the beginning of our faith and the discovery of a path out of the cycle of sin and death.

What Does It Mean for Me That Jesus is The Lamb of God?

It implies that you have a valid cause to worship. This is the only reason we worship, other from the fact that we are in awe of God, and Jesus’ sacrifice is what makes that amazement even more profound. Ever gone to a worship performance or even seen one on television when the people were going completely crazy? If so, you’re not alone. Individuals are seen performing various acts of dance and singing as well as sobbing or fleeing and expressing just about every other emotion they can think of.

When you see anything like this, it means that people are cognizant of the gravity of what Jesus accomplished on the cross.

You’re free to go there right now.

Declarations of Worship with Scriptures:

You, Jesus, have taken my place. (1 Peter 3:18) I am able to direct my thoughts and prayers directly to the Father at this time. (See also John 16:23) You have made me a conqueror over sin because you have prepared a way for me to walk on it. The Bible says (1 John 3:6-7) You love me, and now I have the ability to love others through you. (19:19) (1 John 4:19) You transformed me into something completely different. 2 Corinthians 5:17 (New International Version) There is nothing I could possibly do to prevent you from falling in love with me.

  1. (12:11-12) 1 John 5:11-12 Your ways are greater than mine, and you will teach me new things now that I am open to them.
  2. Find whatever it is that makes you feel grateful the most.
  3. You may now break free from any shackles because of Jesus.
  4. Closing your eyes and connecting with God through thankfulness in whichever way you are led is all that is required now.
  5. You are cherished.

A Prayer to Our Lamb of God

‘Jesus, our PreciousLamb of God,’ says the Father. Thank you, Lord, for dying in my place and receiving the punishment that my sins deserve. Thank you for making it possible for me to pray directly to God as a result of your efforts – you have torn the curtain in half and opened the path for us. Because of your death, I am able to approach God with confidence, completely relying on Him. Your blood has washed away my sins. Thank you very much, Jesus! Due to the fact that you are our Lamb of God, you have made it possible for us to be changed from our sin.

  • You, on the other hand, have defeated sin, and it is no longer in control of my life.
  • I am able to sleep peacefully because of your sacrifice.
  • I pray that I will be able to live a life that is worthy of the calling you have given us.
  • You have transformed me into something completely different.
  • Please assist me in dying to myself and living for you.
  • Please assist me in living in the light of that love.
  • Kyle Blevins is a family guy who lives just outside of Chattanooga, Tennessee, with his wife and two boys.

Mr.

His writing is driven by a desire to restore hope to people and to link them to Jesus via his ministry.

This page is part of ourNames of GodSeries, which features the most frequently encountered names and titles of God recorded in the Bible.

This is our prayer for you: that you would meditate on these truths and find hope as you rest in the promise of God’s presence, no matter what circumstances you are facing.

Son of Man – This is the name that Jesus chose for himself.

What Does the Term “Abba Father” Mean and Why Is It Important?

What does the name El Shaddai mean? What is the origin of the name? What Is the Meaning of Yeshua? Jesus’s given name in the Bible

Why is Jesus called the “Lamb of God?”

For us to comprehend why Christ is referred to as the “Lamb of God,” we must first grasp the significance of the Passover feast. Remember that the Israelites were enslaved by the Egyptians around 1250 BCE. The cry of His people was heard by Almighty God, who, according to Exodus 2:24, “heard their groaning and was mindful of His promise with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.” God sent Moses to free His people from their shackles of slavery. Pharaoh’s heart remained untouched even after Moses had accomplished nine miracles for him.

  • The Angel of Death would “passover” the homes that had been protected by the blood of the lamb, but he would take the lives of the firstborn children who had not been protected by the blood of the lamb.
  • The Messiah was described by the prophets in terms of this picture of the lamb.
  • Although the metaphor is double, it implies that the Messiah would be both the sacrificial lamb who would atone for sin and the suffering servant who would serve him.
  • Philip was speaking to an Ethiopian eunuch who was reading this identical verse from Isaiah, it is noteworthy that he explained how the scripture pertained to Christ and how He had fulfilled it (Acts 8:26ff).
  • Just as John the Baptizer was about to herald the arrival of the Messiah at the River Jordan, Jesus appeared before him, prompting him to exclaim, “Look!

“Whoever want to be great among you must serve those who are less fortunate than himself,” Jesus declared after prophesying His agony, death, and resurrection for the third time: “Whoever seeks to be first among you must fulfill the needs of those who are less fortunate than himself.” The Son of Man, for example, has come not to be served by others, but to serve, and to sacrifice His own life as a ransom for the many” (Matthew 20:26-28).

  • In the Passion Narratives of the Gospels, the iconography of the “Lamb of God” becomes more apparent.
  • John’s gospel, Pilate sentenced Jesus to death at noon on the preparation day for Passover (John 18:28; John 19:14), which coincided with the hour at which the priests began slaughtering Passover lambs in the temple.
  • After Christ’s death, the soldier put his lance into our Lord’s chest, piercing the heart of our Lord, and blood and water poured forth (John 19:34), which have traditionally been taken as symbols of the life-giving sacraments of Holy Communion and Baptism.
  • At the cross, Jesus, the innocent and blameless sufferer, bears the burden of all of our sins on His own shoulders.
  • He, in his capacity as Priest, makes Himself available on the altar of the cross.
  • While the Passover lamb was slain and roasted before being eaten, our Lord rose from the grave, defeating both sin and death in one single act of sacrifice.
  • He has established a new, perfect, and eternal covenant through the shedding of His own blood.
  • Peter encouraged, “Realize that you were saved from the useless way of life your fathers handed down to you, not by any diminishable quantity of cash or gold, but by Christ’s blood above all price, the blood of a spotless, unblemished lamb.” The Bible says (I Peter 1:19).

Revelation emphasizes this concept by depicting the Lamb surrounded by angels, “living beings,” and elders, all of whom exclaimed, “Worthy is the Lamb who was slaughtered to inherit power and riches, knowledge and strength, honor and glory, and acclaim!” (See Revelation 5:12 for further information.) As the King of kings and Lord of lords (Revelation 17:14), Jesus will be triumphant over the forces of evil and will invite the righteous to the bridal feast of the Lamb (Revelation 19:9), which will be held in heaven to commemorate the union of the Church (the new Jerusalem) with the Lord.

As a result, theAgnus Dei is sung at the fraction, which is the breaking of the consecrated Host, as a sign of respect.

John Chrysostom (d.

This idea is reinforced once again as the priest raises the shattered Host and proclaims, “This is the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world; blessed are those who are summoned to His supper.” (Alternatively, a literal translation of the Latin phrase “Happy are those who are invited to the feast of the Lamb” would be more appropriate, since it would better match the imagery of Revelation.) As we celebrate the mysteries of the Mass, we turn our attention to the Lamb who was crucified, died, and rose again for the redemption of the world.

We must assemble around the altar of the Lamb, offering to Him our own hearts and committing to be His slaves, in order to receive Him and become wedded to Him in the Holy Eucharist, as described in the Gospel of John.

Why is Jesus called the Lamb of God?

Jesus’ names are frequently symbolic, and they assist us in both gaining a deeper respect for and learning more about who He truly is. “The Lamb of God” is one of the titles given to Jesus Christ, and it carries a profound amount of symbolism with it. A simple explanation of what this title signifies and why a lamb was selected to represent the Savior will be attempted in this article. “He was tormented and afflicted, but He did not open His mouth; He was taken to the slaughter like a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before its shearers is silent, so He did not open His lips,” said the prophet Isaiah, long before the Lamb of God was born in Bethlehem and laid in a manger (Isaiah 53:7NKJV).

  1. While it is true that Jesus has all of these characteristics (meek, humble, and willing to submit to the will of the Father), the degree of symbolism goes far deeper than this.
  2. There are specific requirements in the Mosaic Law, such as that the sacrifices must be “a male without blemish” (Leviticus 1:3NKJV), that they must be the firstling or firstborn of one’s flocks (Numbers 18:17), and that they must have no broken bones (Exodus 12:46).
  3. The lambs were slaughtered and then consumed as part of a ceremonial banquet.
  4. During the Jewish festival of Passover, the identical practice was followed.
  5. Moses was informed by God that He would be traveling to Egypt as a result of the wrongdoing of Pharaoh and the Egyptians.
  6. Although God would not know who lived in the home if the doorpost was painted with lamb’s blood, God would recognize them and spare their firstborn child if the doorpost was painted with lamb’s blood (Exodus 12).
  7. Jews count the days from sundown to sundown, and Jesus presided over a Passover dinner with his apostles as the Passover celebrations got underway in Jerusalem.
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Using the most symbolic means conceivable, Jesus demonstrated His status as God’s ultimate defense against Satan, who takes pleasure in sin and death.

The Lamb of God is identified as Jesus Christ.

Prior to His death, none of his bones had been shattered (John 19:36).

He exhibits meekness and humility, and he is ready and eager to surrender to the will of his Father.

While all sacrifices, including the Passover, assisted ancient Israel in looking forward to the greatest event that has ever occurred on the face of the planet, the Lord’s Supper assists us in looking back on the same event.

He explained to the apostles who were there on that holy night that the bread represented His flesh and the wine represented His blood. Neither was forced to give up their lives as a sacrifice for all of humanity (Matthew 26:26-28).

Jesus the Lamb of God

Is it anything you’ve tried to make a lamb cake for your Easter celebrations? Have you ever seen a piece of art that depicts a lamb waving a triumphal banner? The use of the lamb as a symbol for Christ may be traced back to the Old Testament. For thousands of years, mankind have offered sacrifices to God in the form of animals. They assassinated them and sacrificed them to God. When it came to animal sacrifice, the lamb was the most popular choice among Jews. Every day, a lamb was sacrificed at the Temple of Jerusalem.

  • Exodus is a biblical narrative that tells of how God led the Israelites out of Egypt, where they were slaves, and into the territory of the Promised Land.
  • A lamb or a goat was killed and the blood of the animal was applied on the doorposts of the Israelites’ homes, ensuring that their firstborn would be protected.
  • Before they went, the Israelites ate the lamb as part of a feast.
  • To this day, the Jews commemorate this night with the celebration of the Feast of Passover.
  • The shank of lamb is one of the dishes served on the Seder plate.
  • When it comes to redemption, we are reminded in 1 Peter 1:18-19 that “you were ransomed.
  • The soldiers who executed Jesus after his crucifixion did not break his legs in order to kill him since he was already dead.

“Christ, our paschal lamb, has been sacrificed,” Paul writes (1 Corinthians 5:7).

We are rescued from death because of his blood.

He offered us the hope that we would one day reach our promised country, paradise.

According to the Gospel of John, it was John the Baptist who bestowed upon Jesus the title “Lamb of God.

At least 29 times in the Book of Revelation, the Lamb is referred to by name.

A lamb appears to John in a vision. Four living creatures and twenty-four elders prostrate down before the Lamb, praising him for having bought all mankind with his blood (Revelation 5:9). Let us beg for forgiveness from the Lamb of God, who takes away our sins.

Why is Jesus Called the Lamb of God? A Christian Study

What is the significance of Jesus being referred to as the Lamb of God in the Bible? What exactly is the importance of this factual statement?

Behold the Lamb of God

John the Baptist was well aware of who the Lamb of God was and for what purpose he had been sent to earth. When John noticed Jesus approaching, he exclaimed, “Behold! “I am the Lamb of God who wipes away the sin of the world” (John 1:29), says the Bible. This comment is reaffirmed the next day by John, who writes, “And gazing at Jesus as He went, he exclaimed, “Behold the Lamb of God” (John 1:35)!” John may not have fully comprehended Jesus’ mission since he showed some skepticism (Luke 7:20), but he comprehended enough to recognize that Jesus was the prophesied Messiah and that there is no forgiveness except from the pouring of blood.

This flawless Lamb died in the place of the blemished and faulty, and this sacrifice only needed to be performed once, and it would be completed once and for all (Heb 10:12).

How the Lamb was Slain Before the Earth Existed

Even though we read in the Scriptures about Jesus being referred to as the Lamb of God, there is one reference to Him that many people find difficult to believe when they see it with their own eyes. The Bible declares in Revelation 13:8 that “all who dwell on the earth must worship him, whose names are not recorded in the book of life of the Lamb slain from before the foundation of the world.” This includes those who are not Christians. Two things we note here are that those who are not saved are not included in the book of life, and those who are saved are included in the book of life.

This Lamb of God was also slaughtered “from the foundation of the world,” according to the Bible.

He perceives things as already existing or as having already transpired in his mind.

In reality, God knew that a sacrifice would be required even before the universe was created, which is why Jesus is believed to have been “slain before the foundation of the world.” Keep in mind that this is not the revelation of John, but rather the revelation of Jesus Christ, as recorded in the Book of Revelation.

Led to the Slaughter

The majority of the time, I have witnessed lambs being carried to the slaughterhouse and even after they are shorn, they are deafeningly quiet. Perhaps they are remaining quiet because they are terrified of something. Even though lambs are exceedingly nervous before being sheared (having their wool removed), they go entirely quiet once the shearers get their hands on them. They don’t appear to be putting up much of a fight. They merely remain still, mute, and subject to the shearer’s will and commands.

Eventually, he was brought to the slaughterhouse.

He stayed still, confident that God’s justice would be served.

In other words, Jesus was “like a sheep.led to the slaughter, and like a lamb before its shearer remains silent, so he opens not his lips” (Acts 8:32), and He was predicted thousands of years before He came to earth (Isaiah 53:7).

The Lamb Without Blemish

Lambs that were to be slain in the Old Testament had to be completely without defects (Ex 12:5), and it is for this reason that Jesus, who was innocent, was referred to as the Lamb of God without spot or wrinkle. “Believers were redeemed from the empty way of life handed down to you from your forefathers, but with the precious blood of Christ, a lamb without blemish or flaw,” according to 1 Peter 1:18-20. While he was selected before the beginning of the universe, He has just now been exposed for your sake.” Peter emphasizes once more that the Lamb of God was “without blemish or imperfection” and that He was “selected before the foundation of the world” in this passage.

This Lamb was chosen for us before we were even born, before the earth was created, and before the fall in the Garden of Eden.

This implies that God was well aware that people would fall and that a Redeemer would be required.

Conclusion

Lambs that were to be slain in the Old Testament had to be completely without flaws (Ex 12:5), and it is for this reason that Jesus, who was spotless, was referred to as “the Lamb of God without blemish.” According to 1 Peter 1:18-20, believers “were redeemed from the empty way of life handed down to you from your forefathers, but with the precious blood of Christ, a lamb without blemish or flaw.

” While he was selected before the beginning of the universe, He has just now been exposed for your benefit.” Peter emphasizes once more that the Lamb of God was “without flaw or imperfection” and that He was “selected before the foundation of the world” in his sermon.

Prior to the creation of the world and the fall of Adam and Eve, this Lamb was chosen for us.

He was chosen before the planet was created.

This Lamb must be greater than the sacrifices of the Old Testament, because those sacrifices had to be repeated year after year and never truly atoned for sins because animal blood was not sufficient to clear the guilty, and they had to be repeated over and over again, day after day, for a period of hundreds of years (Heb 10:-4) This flawless Lamb died in the place of the blemished and faulty, and this sacrifice only needed to be performed once, and it would be completed once and for all time (Heb 10:12).

Another Reading:Why Does God Test Us? Why Can’t We Test Him? A Bible Study

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Why is Jesus Called the Lamb of God?

The words “Behold the Lamb of God who wipes away the sin of the world” spoken by John the baptist helped to identify Jesus as the Messiah. (See also John 1:29) It is clear from a cursory summary of a portion of the Old Testament that he chose his words with intention. God provided Israel with a sacrifice system that served as the foundation for the majority of their religious practices. The giving of animal sacrifices by the priests was inextricably related to the crimes of the people, as was the practice of circumcision.

Then why were they made available?

Jesus Our Substitute

The sixteenth chapter of the book of Leviticus is devoted to the subject of ‘the scapegoat.’ The priest would take two goats, one of which would be sacrificed as a sin offering for the people’s sins, and the other of which would be used as a scapegoat. It was customary for the priest to place his hands on the goat’s head, over which he would confess the sins of the entire country. He would then chase the goat into the bush, where he would die. Symbolically, the innocent goat was used as scapegoat for the people, and his expulsion symbolized the expulsion of those who had sinned on behalf of the entire nation.

Our sins were thrown on the Lord’s shoulders, and his atoning death washed away those sins.

It is the same reality that is expressed by the apostles Peter and Paul: “God caused him who had no sin to be sin on our behalf.” In addition, “He personally bore our sins in his son on the cross.” (2 Corinthians 5:21).

In order to convey this message, Jesus is referred to as “the Lamb of God who wipes away the sins of the world.”

Lamb of God – Wikipedia

This article is about the topic of Christian theology as it pertains to Christianity. Agnus Dei is a Latin liturgical prayer that may be found here. See alsoLamb of God (disambiguation) (disambiguation). The title “Lamb of God” (Greek: o, romanized: Amns toû Theoû; Latin:Agnus Dei,Ecclesiastical Latin:) is given to Jesus in the Gospel of John, and it is derived from the Latin phrase “Lamb of God.” When John the Baptist sees Jesus and cries, “Behold the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world,” it is recorded in John 1:29.

According to Christian faith, the divine Jesus volunteered to be crucified on the cross at Calvary as a proof of his complete obedience to the will of his divine Father, and as a “agent and servant of God” in the work of removing the sins of the world.

The Book of Revelation contains various depictions of a lion-like lamb who rises to deliver triumph after being slain by the dragon.

See also:  Jesus, Oh What A Wonderful Child Gospel

When Isaac inquired of his father Abraham, “Where is the lamb for the burnt offering?” in Genesis 22, the binding of Isaac foreshadowed the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and Abraham responded, “God himself will provide the lamb for the burnt offering, my son,” the binding of Isaac foretold the Gospel of Jesus Christ (Genesis 22:7-8).

  • thornbush).
  • Furthermore, the lamb metaphor corresponds to the imagery of Psalm 23, which shows God as a shepherd guiding his flock (mankind).
  • It is customary for the Catholic Mass to include the Latin version, Agnus Dei, as well as translations of the Latin text.
  • It is also utilized in the liturgy and as a type of contemplative meditation, among other things.
  • In visual representations, the lamb has most frequently been shown since the Middle Ages as a standing haloed lamb with one foreleg cocked “carrying” a flag with a red cross on a white background, though it has been represented in a variety of different ways as well.

Gospel of John

The titleLamb of Godfor Jesus first occurs in the Gospel of John, with the proclamation: “Behold, the Lamb of God who wipes away the sin of the world” inJohn 1:29, and the title is confirmed the next day inJohn 1:36, both of which are in the New International Version. The second time that Jesus is referred to as the Lamb of God is in the presence of the first twoapostlesof Jesus, who immediately follow him and call him asRabbi with reverence, and who later in the story bring more disciples to meet him.

According to the artist’s initial vision (right), the character has remarkably humanoid characteristics, including distinct ears and forward-facing eyes that appear to be looking directly at the panel’s viewer.

Jesus says in John 1:34, “I have testified to you that this is the Son of God.” The descent of the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove in John 1:32, when seen from a Christological viewpoint, strengthen one another in establishing the divine aspect of the Person of Christ, according to the gospel of John.

This theme is built upon in other proclamations such as “this is indeed the Saviour of the world,” which is uttered by the disciples in John 20:28.

Book of Revelation

The Book of Revelation has around twenty-nine allusions to a lion-like lamb (“slain yet standing”) who brings triumph in a way reminiscent of the resurrected Jesus Christ, according to the Greek text. In the book of Revelation (5:1–7), only the lamb (who is of the tribe of Judah and the root of David) is judged fit to receive the judgment scroll from God and to break the seals on the scroll of judgment. According to Revelation 5:6, the lamb refers to theSeven Spirits of God, which first appear in Revelation 1:4 and are connected with Jesus, who holds them in his hands together with seven stars, as described in the previous verse.

Seudat Chiyat HaMatim, or the wedding feast of the righteous of every country (people), according to Jewish eschatology, will be held when the messiah and his wedding guests will feast on the flesh of theLeviathan, according to Jewish eschatology.

In Revelation 21:14, it is said that the lamb has twelve apostles.

Having bowed to the will of the Father and been murdered on the cross, the lamb has now been entrusted with the judgment of all people.

Christology

John’s “agentChristology,” in which sacrifice is undertaken as an agent of God or as a servant of God in order to achieve ultimate triumph, corresponds nicely with the image of God as the Lamb of God. The concept of a sacrificial lamb who rises triumphantly as the Resurrected Christ was used often in early Christian thought. Examples include the following from 375Saint Augustinewrote: “Why did he choose a lamb as the object of his ardor? Because he was put to death despite the fact that he had done nothing wrong.

Because, by being killed, he defeated death.

Because his innocence will outlast all time.

Because his might is eternal, as well as his majesty.” The Christology of Saint Anselm of Canterbury, written in the 11th century, explicitly distinguishes the Lamb of God from the Old Testament idea of ascapegoat, which is a person who is subjected to suffering for the crimes of others without being aware of or consenting to it.

According to John Calvin, Jesus could have argued for his innocence during his trial before Pilate and while at Herod’s Court, but instead he remained mostly silent and submitted to crucifixion in obedience to the Father, knowing his role as the Lamb of God.

Sergi Bulgakov argued in modern Eastern Orthodox Christology that the Father determined the role of Jesus as the Lamb of God before the creation of the world by taking into consideration the scenario that it would be necessary to send The Son as an agent to redeem humanity disgraced by the fall of Adam, and that this is a sign of His love for humanity.

Various Christological frameworks, ranging from the interpretation of Old Testament allusions to those found in the Book of Revelation, have been used to develop theories concerning the appropriate symbolism for the Lamb of God.

According to one view, Leviticus16:1–4 represents the sacrifice of a scapegoat, and Romans 3–25 represents the atonement, while another view draws parallels between the Paschal Lamb in Exodus12:1–4 and John 1:29–36, and yet another symbolism is based on Revelation 5:5–14, in which the lamb is depicted as a lion who destroys evil.

In contrast to an unsuspecting scapegoat, they see Jesus to be making a conscious sacrifice as an agent of God.

As a result of this parallel, humanity’s sins were wiped away by the blood of the Lamb at the time of a new baptism, thereby redeeming it from the fall of Adam.

Liturgy and music

TheAgnus Deiis the invocation to the Lamb of God that is sung or read during thefraction of theHost in theMass of the Roman Rite, as well as in theEucharisto of the Anglican Communion, the Lutheran Church, and theWestern Rite of the Eastern Orthodox Church, among other places. Pope Sergius I (687–701) is credited with introducing it into the liturgy for the first time. Many composers have set the words of the Agnus Dei to music, generally as part of a larger Mass composition.

Art

In the Sacred Heart Church (Berlin), a carving of the Lamb of God withvexillum dates from 1898. Since the Middle Ages, an Agnus Dei has been a visual portrayal of Jesus as a lamb, generally bearing a standard or banner with the cross over his chest. This is generally placed on the lamb’s shoulder and kept in place by the right foreleg of the lamb. Often, a white banner with a red cross (similar to the St George’s Cross) will be hanging from the cross, however the cross itself may be portrayed in a variety of various colors.

  • This is a reference to the imagery seen in the Book of Revelation5:1–13, and the following verses.
  • The emblem emerges extremely early in the history of early Christian art.
  • The Moravian Church utilizes an Agnus Dei as their seal, with the surrounding inscription, as a representation of their faith.
  • It is important to note that, despite the ancient origins of this representation of Jesus as the Lamb of God, it is not employed in the liturgical iconography of the Eastern Orthodox Church.
  • However, the use of the title “Lamb of God” to refer to Jesus is not opposed by anybody.

Heraldry

A Paschal Lambis a charge that is used in heraldry, such as the crest of theDavie Baronets, and is blazoned with the following: A lamb for the feast of the Passover In most coats of arms, this charge is depicted as a lamb standing with its body facing thedexter (viewer’s left), with a nimbus, and with its head facing forward (or turned looking backwards to thesinister, termedreguardant), holding under its right foreleg a flagpole tipped with a small cross, resting at a diagonal angle over its shoulder, and flying a banner bearing theCross of St.

George (except

Catholic sacramental

An Agnus Dei is a disc of wax, imprinted with an image of Jesus as a lamb wearing a cross, that is consecrated by the pope as a sacramental object in the Roman Catholic Church. These were frequently set in jewelry, and they might be worn around the neck on a chain or as a brooch, depending on the style.

Gallery

Wikimedia Commons has media related toAgnus Dei.
  • Binding of Isaac
  • Jesus as the center of Christian belief
  • Lion of Judah
  • Suffering servant
  • And more.

References

  1. AbcBulgakov 2008, p. 263
  2. AbcdDeme 2003, pp. 199–200
  3. AbcdGlabach 2007
  4. AbcdCullmann 1959, p. 79
  5. Ab (n.d.). “Guide to the Jewish Wedding.” aish.com (American Institute of Jewish Studies). On 14 October 2021, Hirsch, Emil G
  6. Kohler, Kaufmann
  7. Schechter, Solomon
  8. Broydé, Isaac were able to get a hold of the information they needed (n.d.). Jewishencyclopedia.com has a page devoted to “Leviathan and Behemoth.” 14 October 2021
  9. DeHaan 1998, page 103
  10. Witherington 2003, page 27
  11. Sadananda 2004, page 281
  12. WeinrichOden 2005, page 72
  13. AbOld 1998, page 125
  14. AbEdmondson 2004, page 90
  15. Bulgakov 2008, page 129
  16. Rahner 1975, page 74
  17. Lieuwen, Reader Daniel
  18. (n.d.). “The Lives of the Saints of the Orthodox Western Church.” orthodox.net. Thurston 1907
  19. Randel 2003, page 28
  20. Atkinson 1975, page 14
  21. Montegue-Smith 1968, page 232
  22. Atkinson 1975

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