Why I Hate Religion But Love Jesus Book

Why I Hate Religion But Love Jesus – Jefferson Bethke

What if I told you that Jesus came to put an end to religious beliefs? Was it possible that voting Republican was not His stated goal all along. What if I told you that being a Republican does not always imply being a Christian? And just because you label certain individuals as blind does not imply that you have the ability to see. To put it another way, if religion is so fantastic, why has it been the cause of so many wars? Why does it construct massive cathedrals while failing to provide food for the poor?

However, in the Old Testament, God specifically refers to religious people as prostitutes.

They are unable to resolve their issues, so they choose to conceal them.

The trouble with religion is that it never gets to the heart of the matter.

  • As an example, let’s dress up the outside and make it appear pleasant and tidy.
  • Now, I’m not condemning; I’m only stating that you should refrain from putting on a false front.
  • You understand that logic is unworthy in every other element of your life, don’t you?
  • You see, this was also me, but no one appeared to be on to what I was up to.
  • See, I was planning on going to church on Sunday, but Saturday was starting to fade.
  • As you can see, I’ve spent my whole life constructing this façade of order.
  • Because if grace is water, then the Church should be a vast ocean of love and compassion.

That means I don’t have to hide my failure, and I don’t have to hide my fault from anyone.

As a result, even though I was God’s opponent and surely not a fan, He looked down at me and said, “I want.

Man.” As a result, Jesus despised religion and labeled those who practiced it as idiots.

Please understand that I adore the church, that I adore the Bible, and that I do believe in sin.

Keep in mind that He was derided as a glutton and a drinker by religious leaders.

Now that we’ve gotten back to the issue, one thing that must be mentioned is how Jesus and religion are on opposing ends of the spectrum.

As you can see, one is the remedy, while the other is an infection.

Religion can make you blind, but Jesus can make you see clearly again.

The quest for God is symbolized by religion, whereas the search for God is symbolized by Christianity.

Not on the basis of my own merits, but only on the basis of Jesus’ obedience.

His grace, I suppose, is based on the fact that he took what we had all earned.

Moreover, He took all of your guilt upon Himself and buried it in the grave.

This is why I’m kneeling at the cross, calling out, “Come on, there’s still room.” So, religion is something I despise. In fact, I despise it on a physical level. Because I think that when Jesus stated, “It is finished,” He truly meant it.

Amazon.com: Jesus > Religion: Why He Is So Much Better Than Trying Harder, Doing More, and Being Good Enough (Audible Audio Edition): Jefferson Bethke, Jefferson Bethke, Thomas Nelson: Audible Books & Originals

Accept the promise of being fully known and sincerely loved in place of lifeless, dry rule-following, and embrace it. When Jefferson Bethke published a passionate and controversial poem titled “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus” in 2012, he became a household name. The four-minute video of Bethke’s spoken-word performance became an instant success, garnering seven million views on YouTube in the first forty-eight hours (and more than 24 million views within a year) and becoming a viral sensation.

JesusReligion delves more into the striking contrasts that Bethke created in the poem – contrasts such as those between teeth gritting and grace, rule and love, performance and peace, despair and hope – and explains how he came to draw them.

When it comes to his calling, Bethke readily admits that he isn’t a preacher or theologian, but rather a typical, twenty-something, soul-starved seeker who cried out for something more meaningful than the life he had chosen.

Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus – Wikipedia

“Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus”
Songby Jefferson Bethke
Released January 10, 2012
Length 4: 03
Producer(s) Matthew Robertson
Music video
“Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus”onYouTube
Music video
” Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus ” onGodTube

Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesusis a popular video made by Christian speaker Jefferson Bethke, who gained renown after uploading his work to YouTube and GodTube under the screenname bball1989. As of this writing, the video has achieved more than 34 million views. The video’s central focus is “the difference betweenJesus and false religion,” as stated in the title. Bethke explained the goal of his film in the text that appeared beneath it: A poem I created in order to draw attention to the distinction between Jesus and bogus religious beliefs.

  • When it comes right down to it, Jesus’ message and Good Newsofthe Cross are in direct conflict with self-righteousness and self-justification.
  • This poem captures the essence of my quest to uncover the truth.
  • Pride because you created a list and were able to complete it while acting better than everyone, or sorrow because you were unable to complete your own list of rules and felt unworthy of God.
  • Jefferson Bethke expressed his displeasure with individuals who used his film to attack the Church, claiming that “His vehicle for reaching out to a lost world is the Church.

It’s the equivalent of a fiancé declaring his love for his future spouse but his hatred for her children: “I adore Jesus, but I despise the Church.”” Nonetheless, the video’s creator indicated that he wished to draw attention to the legalistic tendencies that are common in many places of worship.

It’s kind of, sort of, and not really “Kevin DeYoung, who had spoken with Jefferson Bethke about it and the video after composing it, contributed to this article.

Popularity

On January 10, 2012, the four-minute film had gotten 6 million views in the first three days following its publication. It had also received 64,000 comments. By the 23rd of January, the film had been seen over 16 million times. Jefferson Bethke’s films “Sex, Marriage, Fairytales,” “Sexual Healing,” and “Death Of Yolo” are among his most popular works, having received over 6 million, 5.2 million, and 1.9 million views, respectively, on YouTube.

References

  1. A viral video titled “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus” has sparked a faith debate, according to abRavelle Mohammed of The Christian Post. The video, titled “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus,” is available on YouTube. “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus: Posted by ‘bball1989’ on GodTube.com” ab”Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus: Posted by ‘bball1989’ on GodTube.com” Crosswalk.com. retrieved on January 13, 2012
  2. Retrieved on January 13, 2012
  3. YouTube
  4. Archived atGhostarchive and theWayback Machine: Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus || Spoken Word.YouTube
  5. Archived atGhostarchive and theWayback Machine: Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus || Spoken Word. The Christian Post published an article by Ravelle Mohammed titled “‘Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus’ Viral Video Sparks Faith Debate” on January 13, 2012. The Church is referred to as Jesus’ bride
  6. The Christian Post published an article by Ravelle Mohammed titled “‘Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus’ Viral Video Sparks Faith Debate” on January 13, 2012. Bethke makes it clear that he is devoted to the church
  7. Kevin DeYoung is a writer who lives in New York City “Is Jesus an atheist who despises religion? In a way, sort of, and not really “. The Gospel Coalition is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the gospel of Jesus Christ. It was retrieved on October 27, 2013
  8. Ileana Llorens’s article “‘Why I Hate Religion But Love Jesus’ Creates Controversy on YouTube” was published on January 12, 2012. This article appeared in the Huffington Post on January 13, 2012, and is titled “‘Why I Hate Religion But Love Jesus:’ Controversial YouTube Video Goes Viral.” The International Business Times is a publication dedicated to international business. The date was January 13, 2012, and the date was retrieved on January 13, 2012. The video, which was published to YouTube on January 10 and has received more than 64,000 comments, is on the verge of reaching 6 million views
  9. Poetry on “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus” by an anonymous poet. A video sermon by rapper/poet Jeff Bethke entitled “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus” was posted on YouTube on January 23, 2012, and was subsequently removed from YouTube on January 27, 2012. Archived atGhostarchiveand theWayback Machine:Sex, Marriage, Fairytales || Spoken Word.YouTube
  10. Archived atGhostarchiveand theWayback Machine:Sex, Marriage, Fairytales || Spoken Word.YouTube
  11. Archived atGhostarchiveand YouTube is a subsidiary of Google. YouTube. Archived from the original on January 13, 2012
  12. Archived atGhostarchive.com and theWayback Machine:Death Of Yolo || Spoken Word.YouTube
  13. Archived atGhostarchive.com and theWayback Machine:Death Of Yolo || Spoken Word.YouTu

External links

  • You may see the video Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus on YouTube.

Why ‘I Hate Religion, But I Love Jesus’ Is So Popular

A still from the video by Jefferson Bethke. The most popular video on YouTube right now is a 5-minute spoken-word composition titled “Why I Hate Religion, But I Love Jesus,” which is available in both English and Spanish. The video, which was shot by 22-year-old Seattle resident Jefferson Bethke and released on Jan. 10 has been seen more than 18 million times since it was first uploaded. “If religion is so magnificent, why has it been the cause of so many wars?/ Why does it construct enormous churches while failing to feed the poor?” asks Bethke in his speech.

  1. So what is it about this particular version that has gone viral?
  2. However, its unforgettable message owes perhaps in part to the format in which it was written.
  3. (MORE: Paul explains why morning routines are a source of creativity-sapping.) Ballads and epics are examples of oral forms that occur in every culture and date back to the time before written language was invented.
  4. After all, most of the signals we get are either forgotten or, if they are passed on, they are altered beyond recognition, as psychologists’ examinations into the evolution of rumors have demonstrated.
  5. All of this needs take place over a long period of time.
  6. It is more common for tales to be passed down through generations to depict specific deeds rather than abstract notions.
  7. They are sung or chanted in a group.
  8. Rubin’s own research revealed that when two words in a ballad are connected together by rhyme, contemporary college students recall them better than when the phrases are not linked together by rhyme.
  9. Book Tunes is a partnership between educational entrepreneur David Sauer and hip-hop musician Andy Bernstein (who goes by the stage moniker Abdominal).
  10. The Scarlet Letter, written by Nathaniel Hawthorne, is the subject of the duo’s most recent offering: a rap adaptation of the novel.
  11. The rap version of Hester Prynne’s story is being given in collaboration with SparkNotes, the study aid company owned by Barnes & Noble, which is claimed to be interested in rap versions of other classics, such as Shakespeare’s plays.

Book Tunes, not to mention Jefferson Bethke, have already found out how to maximize the long-term impact of this format. MORE: Jon Meacham explains why challenging Romney’s religious beliefs is detrimental to all of us.

Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus By Jefferson Bethke.

Is it necessary to be a Christian in order to love Jesus? Or do you have to rely on Jesus alone to save you? Both of these poems, written in guileful compositions of language and emotion, reflect the same devotion and adoration for their savior, Jesus, and are juxtaposed because of this. Jefferson Bethke’s poem, “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus,” expresses his belief that you may love Jesus and proclaim your commitment to the lord without being loyal to a bunch of “man-made” religious organizations (Bethke 2012).

  • What distinguishes these two poems as comparable yet distinct is their capacity to maintain their style in today’s current environment, despite their similarities.
  • To persuade his profound believe in loving Jesus without having to be tied down to a religion that dictates your acts or inactions, Jefferson Bethke’s poetry is filled with a bewildering array of metaphors and rhymes, as demonstrated by his poem.
  • He believes that the church should be brimming with grace for everyone, good and evil, but that it only shelters decent people, not the ones who are in most need of help and comfort from the church.
  • “Let’s dress up the outside so they seem lovely and clean, but it’s hilarious, since that’s what they used to do to the mummies while the corpse rotted below,” Bethke says in another metaphor (Bethke 2012).
  • additional stuff to be displayed.
  • This is done in order to draw attention to the strong thoughts and emotions she has for her Christian faith.
  • Wimmer’s poetry, in contrast to Bethkes’ poems, are straightforward and easy to comprehend for the reader, allowing them to comprehend what she is witnessing as well.
  • The author use repetition to arouse the reader’s interest and to establish a rhythm that will be remembered.
  • All throughout the poem, she uses rhyming to express herself: “When I declare I am a Christian/I don ‘t talk of this with pride/ I’m revealing that I stumble/needing God to be my guide” (Christian, lines 5–8).
  • Wimmer use catchy words that are repeated and rhymed in order to emphasize and magnify the message she is expressing, which in turn burns the phrases into our minds.

An alternative interpretation of Wimmer’s rhyme is as follows: “When I claim I am a Christian/I do not seek to judge/I have no authority/I just know I am loved.” (From “Christian” to “Christian”).

Jefferson Bethke – Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus

Jeff Bethke’s poemJesusReligionwas created in 2012, and it was first featured in a four-minute film titled, Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus, which was released in 2012. There were 7 million YouTube views in the first 48 hours (and more than 23 million in the first year) and it actually became an overnight success. An avalanche of reactions ranged from enthusiastic to outraged in response to the statement, which went viral on social media. It also served as inspiration for his book, JesusReligion: Why He Is So Much Better Than Trying Harder, Doing More, and Being Good Enough (Jesus Religion: Why He Is So Much Better Than Trying Harder, Doing More, and Being Good Enough).

  • According to the Bible, Jesus encountered the greatest amount of hostility from the most pious individuals of his time.
  • Religion is oriented on man, but Jesus is centered on God.
  • Religion either ends in triumph or in a state of sorrow.
  • While with Jesus, however, you may experience modest confident delight because He represents you rather than you representing yourself, and His sacrifice is flawless, putting us in perfect standing with God!
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“Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus” Analysis and Critique

This week, I saw that a particular video was being shared a lot on Facebook, so I decided to view it. Despite the fact that I understood where Jefferson Bethke (the author of the poem and the guy featured in the film) was coming from and what he was trying to say with his words, I was still a little uneasy watching this movie. Many persons, many of whom are evangelical in outlook, appear to be delighting in this video (even “The Resurgence” featured it on their website, which may be seen here).

And, to be quite honest, I agree with many of the points raised by these Catholics in their objections.

Here is the video that has garnered so much attention and prompted so much debate: Word document of Jefferson Bethke’s poetry uploaded on Vimeo, along with the same video.

What is Bethke referring to as “religion”?

The fact that he does not define religion is extremely harmful to his overall goal. It’s true that include a definition of “religion” at the beginning of his film would have been an odd addition, but my critique is nevertheless legitimate. What exactly does he mean when he says “religion”? Assuming that what he is referring to is the assumption that one’s connection with God is contingent on one’s performance, then much of what he says is valid. However, if he is referring to the genuine Church and its theology, he is completely incorrect.

  1. A poem I created in order to draw attention to the distinction between Jesus and bogus religious beliefs.
  2. When it comes right down to it, Jesus’ gospel and his good news of the Cross are in direct conflict with self-righteousness and self-justification.
  3. This poem captures the essence of my quest to uncover the truth.
  4. Pride because you created a list and were able to complete it while acting better than everyone, or sorrow because you were unable to complete your own list of rules and felt “not good enough” for God.
  5. Take note of the phrase “fake religion.” Consequently, when he speaks about religion in this video, it appears like he is talking to counterfeit religion rather than genuine religion.
  6. However, none of this constitutes real religion.
  7. Despite the fact that they appear to be religious, these practices are not pure and undefiled religion (James 1:27), and they are absolutely something that Christians must oppose.

As a result, many people get the erroneous impression of what he is condemning (and I don’t blame them).

In conclusion, his usage of the term “religion” demonstrates poor diction and word choice.

If he had chosen a different set of words, he could have communicated his message more successfully.

True Biblical Christianity is, in many ways, a religion; it has dogma, morality, and an organizational structure.

Consequently, Christianity is not a religion in the traditional meaning of the term if religion is defined as being performance-based by nature (but such a definition is unusual).

According to this viewpoint, reality is subjective and, as a result, all faiths are fundamentally the same.

Finally, if one defines religion as erroneous, man-made belief systems that are in opposition to the one genuine teaching of the Bible, it is clear that Christianity is not a religion by that definition.

“Jesus came to abolish religion”?

Jesus “came to eliminate religion” is a theologically laden phrase that would almost certainly elicit a lot of discussion among theologians. As to whether he is referring to Judaism (which was obviously a God-established religion—just look at Leviticus) or to his own peculiar definition of “religion,” which is virtually synonymous with the concept that one’s connection with God is based on his performance, I’m not sure which it is. He has created a can of worms that I am not going to explore at this time if he is referring to the first scenario.

How does Bethke feel about Matthew 5:17, in which Jesus clearly states “Do not imagine that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them”?

Furthermore, claiming that Jesus came to abolish religion and is opposed to religion appears to be at odds with Jesus’ own words in Matthew 16:18, in which He speaks about how He will build His Church (which is something religious, depending on how you define “religious” of course), which is something religious.

Is this not, in many people’s eyes, a religious practice?

Interesting logic and argumentation

The term “interesting” refers to anything that is unsatisfying or unusual. For instance, I’m not sure how to It is because I was God’s opponent and surely not a fan that he looked down on me and said, ‘I want that man!'” which leads Bethke to argue in his following words, “Which is so different from religious people, and why Jesus called em idiots,” that his salvation does not depend on him, but on Him. God’s rescuing him is distinct from the salvation of religious people, and this is why Jesus labeled them foolish.

“Remember He was dubbed a drunken and a glutton by’religious men,'” he added at another point, leading Bethke to conclude, “But the Son of God never endorses self-righteousness, not now and certainly not then.” I don’t understand how those two statements are in opposition to one another.

I get that it is poetry; yet, it should make logical sense and progress in a logical manner (although I am confident that Bethke has an explanation for what he was referring to in these instances).

The church: hospital, museum, or both?

As Bethke puts it, “the church is not a museum for excellent people, but rather an institution that provides hospitality to the broken.” Is it not true, however, that the church is meant to be both in many ways? Could it be that the church serves as a welcoming environment for the broken, and that it then takes the once broken individuals and sees them built up so that the church may be transformed into a museum displaying good people? When the church closes its doors to sinners, I have an issue with that.

  • He sought out to those who were considered social and religious misfits (i.e., prostitutes, lepers, tax collectors).
  • They were not professing believers in the traditional sense.
  • As a result, when people ignore the idea that the church is supposed to maintain high standards of purity, I have serious concerns about them.
  • This is necessary in accordance with the notion of church discipline.
  • (1 Cor 5).
“Jesus said ‘done’; religion says ‘do’”?

Scripture makes it abundantly evident that Christ’s atoning sacrifice on the cross completed redemption once and for all (also known as the “done” Bethke alludes to). It should be noted, however, that this is not mutually exclusive from the slew of directives issued by the apostles and other New Testament authors (also known as multiple “do” declarations) following Christ’s crucifixion and resurrection (also known as “done”). The “done” does not rule out the possibility of “doing.” In many ways, the “done” is what pushes us to continue to “do” our jobs.

“Religion says ‘slave’”?

In fact, the apostle Paul stated in Romans 6 that both the unsaved and the saved are under the authority of the law. They simply serve different lords (one is wickedness, while the other is holiness), and hence serve separate masters.

Republicanism?

In the opening of his film, he makes some interesting remarks on Republicanism that don’t really appear to help his aim or topic. They are correct, yet they are strange statements to make.

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Conclusion

In general, the message he was attempting to convey is a positive message. However, the manner in which he delivered it might have been more polished and well-thought out. In fact, the entire movie has an emerging church feel to it—a postmodern approach to Christianity that, among other things, attempts to remove any religious flavor from Christianity (such as doctrine and the importance of being involved in a church). Given that Bethke has stated that he loves the Church and what it teaches, I don’t believe this is what he is attempting to promote (i.e.

As Christians, though (and this includes me), we must be cautious about what we say and how we say it, taking into consideration how people around us would understand us (i.e., what is their definition of the word “religion”?) I frequently hear individuals say, “I have a relationship, not a religion,” which is a statement that we may apply to ourselves.

See the follow-up essay to this one, titled “Why I Don’t Hate ‘Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus,'” for more information.

Analyzing ‘Why I Hate Religion, but Love Jesus’

I was exploring the web for a video that I needed for class, but YouTube seemed very certain that I would choose to watch one titled, “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus,” rather than anything else. It sounded like something a college theology professor would be interested in, so I took it on. A couple of weeks later, at the conclusion of our first session of the semester, a young guy approached me and asked if I had watched the video. I was delighted to say yes, and he expressed his gratitude.

  1. When the sermon is directed towards preachers, it is apparent that the assembly is prepared to listen.
  2. Unfortunately for you, it’s a bit on the lengthy side.
  3. Grammar is something that this young man despises much more than religion: What if I told you that Jesus came to put an end to religious beliefs?
  4. Because being a Republican does not inherently imply being a Christian, and just because you label certain people blind does not imply that you are blind yourself.
  5. Why does it construct massive cathedrals while failing to provide food for the poor?
  6. God, on the other hand, refers to religious people as prostitutes in the Bible’s Old Testament.
  7. People have a tendency to make fun of God’s people.

They are unable to resolve their problems, so they attempt to conceal them, without realizing that this is like to spraying perfume on a coffin.

Let’s spruce up the outdoors and make everything appear pleasant and organized.

That is exactly what they do to mummies, as the corpse rots under the surface.

I’m just warning you to be cautious about putting on a phony persona, because it’s an issue if people only know that you’re a Christian because of a small piece on your Facebook page that says so.

If you say you play for the Lakers merely because you bought a jersey, you are ludicrous.

On Sundays, I’d go to church, but on Saturdays, I’d be exhausted and unable to attend.

I’ve spent my entire life maintaining this façade of order, but now that I’ve come to know Jesus, I take pride in my frailty.

After all, the church is not a museum for nice people; it is a hospital for the broken.

There is no need for me to conceal my wrongdoing because my salvation is not dependent on my efforts.

Since I was God’s opponent and obviously not a fan, God looked down upon me and declared, “I want that man!” This is in stark contrast to religious people, which is why Jesus referred to them as idiots.

Now, please allow me to clarify: I adore the church, I adore the Bible, and I believe in the existence of sin.

Remember that “religious men” referred to Him as an alcoholic and a glutton for punishment.

Now that we’ve returned to the subject, one thing that I believe is important to emphasize is how Jesus and religion are on opposing ends of the spectrum.

Because religion commands it, Jesus commands it to be done.

Religion binds you, but Jesus sets you free.

This is what distinguishes religion from Jesus as two distinct groups.

As a result, salvation is offered to me without charge.

Because he wore the crown of thorns and blood poured down his cheeks, he was crucified.

He paid the price for all of your guilt and then buried it in the tomb, which is why I’m standing at the cross right now, begging, “Come on, there’s room for one more.” Knowing that I despise religion, to the point where I genuinely dislike it, I think that when Jesus shouted “It is done,” He truly meant it.

  • Moreover, I smugly observed in my mind that he performs far more than his fair share of religion-preaching, espousing the notion of salvation via faith alone.
  • After a few minutes of research, I realized that the young guy is himself an evangelist, one who is just as intent on offering a religious system as anybody else.
  • That does not reflect poorly on him, since he has discovered a method to carry out a gospel duty, which is to create all things new in Jesus Christ.
  • In this particular instance, he has gone out to young people, capitalizing on their innate skepticism about authority and establishments.
  • My age belies my need for religion, and I’d want to explain to you why I so strongly need it, and indeed why I can’t find my way to Christ without from it.
  • When I was in junior high, at the very least, and definitely without a female to call my own, I came across a photograph in a newspaper, cut it out, and stuck it in my billfold, right next to the image of my girlfriend.
  • My admission is more than a bit sad, to be honest.

An ink and pen drawing of a princess from the Prince Valiant comic series was used to create the image.

That was fantastic!

We all behave in the same way.

We treat Christ in the same way.

The point is that, once we’ve gotten Christ into our heads, we can’t help but project our own perspectives, biases, and fantasies onto him.

When the Beloved comes to us in the form of Spirit, we can’t help but respond.

I need them to think and act in ways that are different from mine.

I need them to introduce me to a Jesus who is a little different from the one I am familiar with because, whoever else my Jesus might be, if he is nothing more than a projection of myself, he cannot possibly be my savior.

We develop by becoming more open to things that are different from ourselves, to things that broaden our perspectives and challenge our comfort zones.

It is not the case that all of these points of view have converged into some sort of muddle.

” As you can see, I’m trying something new!

(See also Is 43:19.) It is in the mystery we call the Church, where my Christ and your Christ both yield to an ever-new Church, that the promise of Isaiah is renewed on a daily basis. Rev. Terrance W. Klein is a minister in the United Methodist Church.

“Why I Hate Religion, but Love Jesus” – Responses from a Preacher, a Muslim, and…Kermit?

On February 4, 2012, in the category So, last month, I wrote a massive answer to 22-year-old Jeff Bethke’s viral video ‘Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus,’ titledJesusReligion’s Relationship Status: In a Relationship with Jesus,’ which was published on YouTube. It’s a difficult situation. (And, by the way, it got picked up by the Huffington Post– congratulations!) In it, I provide a fairly in-depth examination of why so many people were drawn to – and turned away from – the video. I spilt a lot of pixels in the process, and I promise you that you will not be subjected to such a barrage in the future.

The first of these is as follows: This is, I believe, a voice-over by John Lynch, who is a member of the bandTruefaced and the co-author of the novelBo’s Cafe, among other things.

So far, everything has been excellent.

Andrew Jones on why you shouldn’t be (AJ also offers this vulgar document produced for Barry Taylor@ Fuller), and Integral trickster on why you shouldn’t be Continuing Stuart Davis’s deconstruction of the religion/spirituality dichotomy, he writes: Stuart, in my opinion, is as amusing as he is astute in his observations.

There is no indication that Stu’s Christmas hope for a response from Harris, Dawkins, Maher, or Hitchens (RIP) has been met.

For the final word, here is a comment to the film from a young Muslim.

(I can see it now – religious battles of the future will be waged not with swords, but with combat rapping!) I suppose that’s a positive step in the right direction.) I am confident that the interfaith connections I have developed with my Muslim friends at theDivan Center while sharing excellent cuisine are far more courteous.

Indeed, in two weeks, we’ll be discussing the Godhead from a variety of views, which will be interesting.

Alas.

But, while I have you here, I’d like to point you that the Truefaced crew also created the following contentious trailer: Heavily debated because he decries politicized celebrity religious conflicts that serve to sell a large number of books.while promoting for a book, to be precise.

Still, how many Christian celebrities can you identify among those portrayed in this image? Lastly, I’ll leave you with Stu interviewing Kermit the Frog on the latter’s sexuality and spiritual practice, which was recorded when Kermit was on tour promoting The Muppet Show. Enjoy!

‘Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus’ Viral Video Sparks Faith Debate

On January 10, 2012, Jefferson Bethke, a spoken word artist, was featured in his internet video “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus,” which was uploaded by Jefferson Bethke Productions. | (Image courtesy of YouTube) In a YouTube video that has received more than 6 million views and prompted hundreds of comments on the genuine nature of faith, a young internet evangelist hopes to epitomize the message that Jesus does not equal “religion.” The video, titled “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus,” was published to YouTube on January 10 and has now surpassed all previous records for most views.

  • Jefferson Bethke describes his “quest to learn this truth – the difference between Jesus and fake religion” in the video, which has become widely famous and appears to have sparked some controversy.
  • “Why, if religion is so magnificent, has it been the cause of so many wars?
  • “Religion calls Jesus a slave, but Jesus calls him a son.” “While religion binds you to your beliefs, Jesus releases you from them.
  • He claims that many Christians are likewise guilty of putting on a “fake appearance.” “The trouble with religion is that it never gets to the heart of the matter,” says the poet.
  • He says that this is why salvation is available for anybody to accept — forgiveness is his and not something earned through “effort, but only through Christ’s obedience.” “I’m quite aware that I despise religion, and that I literally despise it,” he says.
  • Bethke makes it clear that he respects the church and the Bible, but that he wishes to draw attention to the hypocrisy and legalism that can be found in many places of worship.
  • I had absolutely no intention of doing anything like that.” “The Church is Jesus’ bride, therefore use caution when referring to His wife,” he said.
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The church is His vehicle for bringing His message to a lost world.

It’s the equivalent of a fiancé declaring his love for his future spouse but his hatred for her children: “I adore Jesus, but I despise the Church.” We are all under the protection of grace.

It’s an accomplishment that looks to be well on its way as the video continues to garner views and comments.

“Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus,” Bethke’s spoken word endeavor to exalt Christ, has elicited a range of emotions, with some expressing appreciation and others expressing hatred for Bethke’s spoken word effort to honor Christ.

“Isn’t it clear that you people don’t get it?

The Christian faith is not seen as religion, but rather as a personal relationship with God, according to many Christians “One of the viewers shared their thoughts. ‘Before any of you make any erroneous judgements about the video, be certain that you are correct.’

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  • He is shown in the internet film “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus,” which was posted on January 10, 2012, by spoken word artist Jefferson Bethke. | The image is courtesy of YouTube. This movie, created by a teenage internet evangelist, is intended to epitomize the idea that Jesus does not equal “religion.” The film has received more than 6 million views and sparked hundreds of comments about the actual nature of faith on YouTube. Uploaded on January 10, the video, titled “Why I Hate Religion But Love Jesus,” has now become the most-watched video on YouTube. Jeffery Bethke describes his “quest to learn this reality – the difference between Jesus and fake religion” in the video, which has become widely famous and appears to be contentious. It is the poet who inquires, “What if I told you that Jesus came to eliminate religion?” “In light of this, why has religion been the cause of so many battles throughout history? Why does it construct massive cathedrals while failing to provide adequate food for the poor.” VIDEO OF “WHY I HATE RELIGION, BUT LOVE JESUS” CLICK HERE TO WATCH As he continues, “religion proclaims slave, Jesus proclaims Son.” “Religion binds you, but Jesus releases you from its bonds. Jesus, on the other hand, allows you to see clearly.” For Bethke, who describes himself as “creating this mask of neatness,” he has spent his entire childhood masquerading like a religious kid while getting drunk and watching pornography. The author accuses a large number of Christians of doing the same. It is the poet’s contention that “religion never gets to the heart of things.” “It’s basically behavior modification in the form of a long list of duties — for example, let’s dress up the outdoors and make it appear lovely and tidy.” ” The church, he asserts, “is not a museum for nice people
  • It is a hospital for the broken,” which means that he “does not have to conceal my failure, I do not have to hide my sin” because “it does not depend on me, it does depend on Him.” God is searching for man, according to Bethke, who describes himself as a “messed up person hooked to grace.” Religion, on the other hand, he argues, is man’s search for God. In his explanation, he describes how salvation is free for the taking – forgiveness is his and not something earned through “effort, but only by Christ’s obedience.” And he goes on to say, “I know how much I despise religion, and I literally despise it.” ‘Because I think Jesus meant it when He said ‘it is finished,'” I explain. Bethke makes it clear that he respects the church and the Bible, but that he wishes to draw attention to the hypocrisy and legalism that can be found in many places of worship, according to him. On Friday, he posted the following on his Facebook page: “You should exercise caution if you want to use my video to disparage “the church.” The last thing I intended to do was to do anything like that.” According to him, “The Church is Jesus’ bride, therefore use caution when referring to His wife.” “In the same way that a regular male has every right to be enraged when you insult His wife, it makes me shudder when I consider how much more serious the offense is when it is directed against His wife, Mary. It is through the church that He seeks to bring His message to a lost generation. Sinners’ asylum is a facility for those who have committed sin. It’s the equivalent of a fiancé declaring his love for his future spouse but his hatred for her children: “I adore Jesus, but I despise the Church,” We are all under the protection of God. Take your eyes off of Him and on to the ground.” It is said that he loves Jesus and is only attempting to make Him well-known in his home state of Washington. According to the number of views and comments the video has received, it looks to be well on its road to success. Christian hip-hop producer Matthew Robertson is behind the video, which was created by CIKProductions (Christ is King Productions). “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus,” Bethke’s spoken word endeavor to honor Christ, has elicited a range of reactions, with some expressing respect and others expressing disgust for her efforts. Only on the YouTube page has the film received over 66,000 comments
  • Many more have been left on Facebook pages and Christian and mainstream news websites that have featured Bethke’s work as part of their coverage. “Don’t you see what I’m talking about, dudes?! The Christian faith is not seen as religion, but rather as a personal relationship with God, according to some Christians “as stated by one of the viewers ‘Before any of you make any incorrect conclusions about the video, double-check your facts.’

“Because of religion, an increasing number of individuals are turning away from Christianity. A connection with Christ and knowing him as your Lord and Savior, rather than religion, is what will get you into paradise, according to the Bible “Another user shared their thoughts. One viewer, on the other hand, expressed concern: “You believe in Jesus, but you don’t attend church? Jesus drew a crowd of people together. As the Cross depicts, Christianity emphasizes community rather than individual interaction.

Auburn, Washington, and claims he has “a love to deliver the life-changing Gospel of Jesus Christ to the inner city.” Bethke is married and has two children.

The poem was initially written for a poetry open mic at Pacific University, where it was performed.

Response to Bethge’s WHY I HATE RELIGION BUT LOVE JESUS

Kevin DeYoung’s response to the situation Before I say anything more, I’d want to point out that Jefferson Bethke appears to be a honest young guy who wishes to spread awareness of God’s shocking grace. “I adore Jesus, I’m addicted to grace, and I’m just a screwed up person trying to make Him famous,” he writes on his Facebook page, and I have no doubt that he is speaking the truth. If I had the opportunity to meet Jefferson in person, I’m confident that I would appreciate his honesty and enthusiasm.

  • This video is the type of stuff that many younger Christians like seeing and listening to.
  • Is this, however, correct?
  • Bethke’s portrayal of the atmosphere, and in my opinion, the perplexity, of a large number of serious, young Christians is flawless.
  • That is, after all, the entire idea of the poem.
  • Religion, according to Bethke, is a man-made endeavor to gain God’s favor.
  • Religion is based only on the law and not on the gospel.
  • Religion, on the other hand, is not like that.
  • Words, on the other hand, are still important, and we shouldn’t just define them whatever we like.
  • It is no longer news that Jesus despises arrogance and hypocrisy.
  • When people hear the word “religion,” they immediately think of laws, rituals, doctrine, pastors, priests, and religious organizations.
  • We adore the Jesus who despises organized religion.

Tom has been writing on religion – in its broadest sense – for years in the Journal of Religion. Tom’s background as a retired pastor, along with his insatiable interest for religious subjects, will make for an always thought-provoking investigation. Tom Holmes has contributed to this article.

‘Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus’ Creator Surprised by Critical Response Videos

– – – – – – – – – – – “What if I told you that Jesus came to put an end to religion?. And just because you label certain individuals as blind does not imply that you have eyesight yourself?. To put it another way, if religion is so fantastic, why has it been the cause of so many wars? Why does it construct massive cathedrals while failing to provide food for the poor?” It is these words that are taken from the YouTube video Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus, which has gone viral in biblical proportions due to its professional production.

The contentious rap has been seen more than 18 million times in only a few weeks, and it has been credited with sparking a modern discussion on an age-old question: what does it mean to be a Christian?

“Authenticity is important to my generation,” Bethke continued.

Bethke, who lives with his roommate on a bunk bed and works as a social worker with impoverished children, has suddenly become a very big thing.

Churches and institutions all throughout the country have expressed interest in having him lecture and perform.

Not everyone is a fan of the show.

“Now, none of us are perfect sinners all at the same time, but Christ and Religion, man, you can’t truly disconnect,” explains one of the participants.

Bethke said that he had not anticipated such significant negative reactions.

I’ve been accused of being a phony instructor.

therefore, yes, I was taken aback by the response “he explained.

His latest statement indicates that not all of his passages should be read literally at all times.

“My intention is to create something that ruffles feathers and sparks dialogue, with grace and Jesus at the center.” People are conversing, to be sure.

Bethke has also become a member of a new generation of Christians who are more concerned with social justice than with party politics, which has emerged during this election year.

What if I told you that being a Republican does not always imply being a Christian?” According to Bethke in the video.

Bush, want to be known for more than just opposing gay marriage and abortion.

“The elder generation.

” “However, my age occasionally falls into the trap of believing that we simply do not think or preach about truth.” Bethke isn’t finished yet.

And he expressed a desire to establish a church where he might serve to his flock in the future. A church that isn’t going to fit into any mold. Watch “Nightline” tonight at 11:35 p.m. ET/10:35 p.m. CT for the complete story.

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