Why Didn T Nicodemus Follow Jesus

Who Was Nicodemus in the Bible & Was He Saved?

According to John 3, Nicodemus was a Pharisee, a member of the Jewish ruling council, who came to Jesus in the middle of the night with a question for him. He heard an answer that would be hidden in the minds of Christians for decades to come.

Jesus Teaches Nicodemus: You Must BeBorn Again

Now there was a guy named Nicodemus who belonged to the Pharisees and was the ruler of the Jews. When this man came to Jesus in the middle of the night, he told him, “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher sent by God, since no one can do the marvels that you perform unless God is there with him.” When he asked Jesus about it, he received the following response: “Truly, truly, I say to you, until one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.” “How is it possible for a man to be born when he is old?” Nicodemus inquired.

Is it possible for him to enter his mother’s womb a second time and be born?” According to Jesus’ response: “Truthfully, really, I say to you, unless one is born again of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God.” When the body gives birth to anything, it is called flesh, and when the Spirit gives birth to something, it is called spirit.

  • The same holds true for everybody who is born of the Spirit.” “How are these things possible?” Nicodemus inquired of him.
  • Indeed, I say to you, we speak of what we know and offer witness to what we have witnessed, yet you do not benefit from our testimony.
  • Except for the Son of Man, no one has ever risen into heaven except for him who descended from heaven.
  • (See also John 3:1-15)

Nicodemus’ Secret Conversation with Jesus

Throughout John 3, Nicodemus acknowledges that God must have sent Jesus as a result of all of the miraculous wonders that he did. In his response, Jesus gets right to the core of the problem, saying, “. no one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born again” (John 3:3). Nicodemus, pondering both figuratively and practically, wonders how anybody can be born twice (John 3:4). Jesus resumes the discourse with Nicodemus, instructing him on the importance of being born of the Spirit (John 3:5-8).

John 3:12 – Jesus bemoans the fact that Nicodemus cannot seem to understand such a lofty notion as heaven, and he turns to an Old Testament account (Numbers 4-9), which a Pharisee was almost certain to have heard previously, in order to explain how one might be born again and go to paradise.

“For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whomever believes in him may not perish but have everlasting life,” John says in the context of Nicodemus’s tale.

In fact, God did not bring his Son into the world in order to condemn the world, but in order to save the world through him.” (See also John 3:16-17.)

Nicodemus was Not a Spy

Nicodemus’ motivations have been called into doubt by certain researchers. They stated that he came on behalf of the Sanhedrin as a type of snoop, with the mission of tricking Jesus into delivering an official response based on the questions he would pose. After all, Nicodemus uses the first-person plural to express himself (” We know You have come from God as a Teacher “). However, there are three issues with this approach.

  1. In light of the fact that other Jewish authorities confronted Jesus in the open, Nicodemus would not have needed to sneak through the night to see Jesus
  2. Yet, he did not inquire and instead stated that Jesus was a Teacher from God. To be sure, Nicodemus later reveals himself to be a believer when he arrives with Joseph of Arimathea to prepare Jesus’ body for a proper Jewish burial (John 19:39)
  3. But, more importantly, Nicodemus later reveals himself to be a believer when he comes to prepare Jesus’ body for a proper Jewish burial (John 19:39).

Nicodemus was Honestly Seeking God

The most likely explanation is that Nicodemus, while not entirely convinced of Jesus’ divinity at the time, had witnessed the marvels performed by Jesus. He devised a strategy for seeing Jesus by comparing what he understood about the Old Testament with what people expected to happen when the Messiah came. As a result, he arrived sincere in his search for God. By the time of Jesus’ crucifixion, Nicodemus had gained the confidence to share his newfound faith with the rest of the world. According to Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary, “and though he arrived by night, subsequently he openly acknowledged Christ as his Lord and Savior.”

What Else Does the Bible Say About Nicodemus?

Nicodemus warned a group of unbelieving Pharisees in John 7:50-51 about the consequences of unjustly taking Jesus. Afterward, in John 19:39, after Jesus had been killed, Nicodemus joined forces with Joseph of Arimathea to bury Jesus in accordance with Jewish tradition. He brought “a combination of myrrh and aloes weighing around seventy-five pounds,” according to the Bible (John 19:39). Adapted from Alfred Edersheim’s The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah (Book III, Chapter VI) and from the lecture notes of Dr.

Photograph courtesy of Unsplash/JamesColeman.

Did Nicodemus Follow Jesus? (Exploring The Chosen with Youth)

Just so you know, I get a commission from qualifying purchases made via some of the links on this page as an Amazon Associate. This has no impact on the materials that I am highlighting for you today. It simply means that when you make purchases using the links provided below, you will pay the same amount you would have paid if you had located the things yourself, but I will earn a little cash fee as a thank you for assisting you in your search. Nicodemus with Jesus on the roof; from: 7 of the Gospel of John With The Chosen, we reach the conclusion of Nicodemus’ trip, when he finally sees Jesus and the two of them have their famous “born again” discussion.

  • The scenario also served to remind me of the particular importance of a long-running series such as The Chosen.
  • The Chosen, in the course of adapting this conversation between Jesus and Nicodemus for the screen, makes a number of (smart) adjustments.
  • A lot more back and forth occurs in The Chosen, as Jesus allows Nicodemus to speak at numerous times and expands upon his comments.
  • Nicodemus is also shown to be much more overtly receptive to what Jesus says in The Chosen than he is in the Gospel of John, to the point where he appears to have reached a rather high Christology as a result of what Jesus says.
  • The dialogue between Jesus and Nicodemus is not properly concluded in the Gospel of John, which is a significant flaw in the narrative.
  • Jesus’ comments are given as such in some translations, however in other versions, they are presented as commentary from the narrator (John 3:16-21).
  • Regardless matter how one evaluates the discussion around verses 16-21, it is still unclear where the connection between Jesus and Nicodemus stands at the conclusion of Jesus’ comments.
  • To have a program like The Chosen break off the action as suddenly as John does would be a source of frustration for the audience.
  • Immediately after inviting Nicodemus to accompany him, Jesus allows him several days to think about his decision.
  • The viewer is left to question where he is spiritually and how his inability to follow Jesus would effect his perspective of Jesus in the future as a result of his actions.

Nicodemus converses with Mary, stating that there is a lot to dive into here with youth. It will be our goal to examine how the ambiguity of Nicodemus’ spiritual situation is suggested by both the Gospel of John and the novel The Chosen, albeit in quite different ways.

Intro to The Chosen Episode 7:The Mystery of Nicodemus

To begin, ask your pupils the following questions:

  • Have you ever had a difficult time determining whether or not someone truly believed in Jesus Christ? Why

It could be beneficial to begin by providing a personal example from your own life. Perhaps you could share a story about a buddy who would attend to church but never appeared to take it seriously, or about a family member who claimed to believe in God but you weren’t sure if they truly grasped the Gospel. Now, explain to your children and grandchildren:

  • Sometimes we act as though individuals can be categorized into only two categories: those who believe in Jesus and those who do not believe in Jesus, respectively. In real life, we all know that categorizing individuals isn’t always as simple as it appears. Many people are intrigued in Jesus and may feel that he is unique in some manner, but they are not yet ready to place their whole confidence in him as their Savior. During Jesus’ lifetime, there were several “seekers” who behaved in this manner. They witnessed the miracles that Jesus did and recognized that he must have been a prophet of some sort, but they were not yet ready to place their whole confidence in him. When Jesus and Nicodemus, a respected Pharisee scholar, have a discourse about being “born again,” it has become one of the most famous interactions between Jesus and a seeker.

Now read John 3:1-21: “I am the Word of God.” Now there was a guy named Nicodemus who belonged to the Pharisees and was the ruler of the Jews. When this man came to Jesus in the middle of the night, he told him, “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher sent by God, since no one can do the marvels that you perform unless God is there with him.” When he asked Jesus about it, he received the following response: “Truly, truly, I say to you, until one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.” “How is it possible for a man to be born when he is old?” Nicodemus inquired.

Is it possible for him to enter his mother’s womb a second time and be born?” According to Jesus’ response: “Truthfully, really, I say to you, unless one is born again of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God.” When the body gives birth to anything, it is called flesh, and when the Spirit gives birth to something, it is called spirit.

  • The same holds true for everybody who is born of the Spirit.” “How are these things possible?” Nicodemus inquired of him.
  • Indeed, I say to you, we tell of what we know and bore witness to what we have witnessed, but you do not accept our words or listen to our testimony.
  • Except for the Son of Man, no one has ever risen into heaven except for him who descended from heaven.
  • Nobody is doomed if they believe in him; nevertheless, everyone who does not believe is already condemned, since he has not placed his faith in the name of the only Son of God (John 3:16).
  • As a result, the light has been turned off.

Rather, whomever does what is right enters into the light, so that it may be plainly seen that his deeds have been carried out through faith in God.” (John 3:1-21, English Standard Version) After reading, I would make it clear to your pupils that you will not be able to get into all of the fine intricacies of what Jesus is saying during your lesson.

Instead, your attention is drawn to the relationship that he is having with Nicodemus. Inquire of your children:

  • What do you suppose Nicodemus believes about Jesus before you start this talk with him? How much faith does he have, on a scale from 1 to 10, and why? What is Nicodemus’ demeanor like during the conversation? What is he thinking when he asks these questions? Is he genuinely interested? Defensive? I’m just perplexed
  • Nicodemus ends up believing what, exactly, you believe about Jesus at the end of the talk. On a scale from 1 to 10, how much has his faith grown, dropped, or remained the same?
See also:  How To Describe Jesus?

Make the following points clear to your children:

  • You may have noticed that the dialogue abruptly ends and is instantly replaced with another narrative. In actual life, Nicodemus most likely reacted to what Jesus said, but John does not include that information. We’re supposed to be dubious about Nicodemus, just as we’re frequently unsure about where “seekers” are and how much they believe in Jesus
  • Nicodemus appears just a couple of more times in the Bible. A gathering of chief priests and Pharisees, the majority of whom are hostile to Jesus, is where he will make his next public appearance. It is decided to arrest Jesus, and some guards are dispatched to do so
  • However, the soldiers return empty handed.

Continue reading John 7:45-52: The officers then approached the chief priests and Pharisees, who inquired of them as to why they had not brought him with them. “No one has ever spoken in such a manner as this individual!” the police responded. “Have you been fooled as well?” the Pharisees questioned of them. Any of the authorities or Pharisees seem to have put their faith in him. “However, this mob of people who are ignorant of the law is cursed.” “Does our law judge a man without first giving him a hearing and understanding what he does?” Nicodemus, who had previously gone to him and who was now one of them, asked them in front of Nicodemus.

“Look around and see whether any prophets are emerging from Galilee.” (John 7:45-52, English Standard Version) Following the reading, I would like to pose the following question to your youth:

  • What stage do you believe Nicodemus is at in his quest to come to faith in Jesus Christ? Where does he stand on the religion spectrum
  • What are the obstacles that impede Jesus from trusting in Jesus more completely

In this scenario, there is a great deal of uncertainty. Whether Nicodemus defends Jesus because he truly believes in him and is attempting to support him in a covert manner without drawing attention to himself, or whether he is still on the fence regarding Jesus but just wants to be fair, remains a mystery. In either instance, the text makes it plain that the other Pharisees and chief priests are furious with him just for wishing to give Jesus a fair hearing, and they are justified in doing so.

Make it clear to your children that Nicodemus appears in a last scene in the Gospel of John, and have them read the following passage: Following these events, Joseph of Arimathea, who had been a follower of Jesus but had kept his discipleship a secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the corpse of Jesus, which Pilate granted.

Nicodemus, who had earlier been at Jesus’ home in the middle of the night, had also arrived, bearing a combination of myrrh and aloes weighing around seventy-five pounds.

A garden had grown up around him, and in the garden was a new tomb, into which no one had yet been placed.

As a result, because it was the Jewish day of Preparation, and because the tomb was near by, they placed Jesus there to rest.

  • This chapter establishes a link between Nicodemus and another Jewish follower, Joseph of Arimathea. Because of his dread of the Jewish authorities, Joseph continued to be a follower of Jesus in secret. Joseph and Nicodemus bury Jesus’ body together, according to the text. Nicodemus delivers a collection of burial goods that would have cost a fortune if purchased alone.

Now, put this question to your children:

  • What stage do you believe Nicodemus is at in his spiritual journey? Where does he stand on the religion spectrum

Now, return your discourse to The Chosen and bring out to your pupils the following points:

  • Nicodemus is the star of this episode of The Chosen, which is airing right now. It is planned that we will see his “born again” discussion with Jesus. It’s possible that you’ll notice that the show alters some aspects. Take it easy and don’t get too worked up over it. Pay attention to the character of Nicodemus. Consider this: where does he stand in his spiritual journey? What percentage of the time does he believe it? We’ll have a more in-depth discussion following the program.

Viewing The Chosen Episode 7

Because to COVID constraints, my youth group was forced to view The Chosen online using the Zoom platform. You may watch episode 7 on YouTube by clicking here. Those who wish to escape the advertisements (there are a lot!) and the requirement to watch it can do it on Amazon. While viewing The Chosen, I offered a few passing comments in the chat room, but I tried to avoid doing too much instructive talking. Instead than seeing The Chosen as an elaborate preaching example, I wanted it to be enjoyable for the young people who would be watching it.

For the most part, I just confirmed who the characters were, and every now and then, I briefly explained a reference or allusion that had been unclear to me when I was a teenager.

Discussing The Chosen Episode 7

To get the conversation started, ask your students the following questions:

  • In your opinion, how did the episode turn out? What was it that stood out to you
  • There were a few things that stood out about the “born again” debate. What level of faith do you think Nicodemus has based on the way The Chosen presents this scene? How certain are you that Nicodemus will follow Jesus?

I’d want to draw your kids’ attention to the following:

  • As depicted in The Chosen, Nicodemus reacts to Jesus by emphasizing his faith – not just in Jesus’ ability to perform miracles, but also in Jesus’ identity as the Son of God who has been sent to deliver redemption to his people. Remember how we discussed this scenario in the Gospel of John just a few minutes ago? At that moment, we didn’t have a strong indication of what Nicodemus thought in himself. It was more vague
  • We merely had to make educated guesses. Despite the fact that Nicodemus expresses his faith in Jesus much more explicitly in The Chosen, the film still puts us in the dark about how far his faith goes. He appears to be unsure about his ability to make the sacrifices required to follow Jesus – and we’ll see what happens in the following episode. Nicodemus is one of those buddies that comes along every now and again. Their faith in Jesus may be expressed to a certain extent, but it is difficult to determine how deep their faith extends.

To bring the topic to a close, ask your children:

  • Was there anything in particular you noticed in Jesus’ response to Nicodemus as a seeker? What kind of relationship should we have with our friends who appear to be searchers but may not be fully committed believers

Have blog entries on The Chosen, like as this one, assisted you in better understanding The Chosen or in exploring it with your ministry or family members? Would you consider making a little donation to help me continue my writing career? It’s quite simple to accomplish this with my Buy Me a Coffee account. Thank you very much! If you like this post, you might be interested in some of my other writings on The Chosen, which include studies of how the program adapts major biblical figures as well as guidance on how to lead your youth group in examining each episode of The Chosen Seasons 12 through 14.

Beyond The Chosen

  • In Defense of The Chosen and Other Christian Movies, Books, and Media (Part 1)
  • In Defense of The Chosen and Other Christian Movies, Books, and Media (Part 2)
  • In Defense of The Chosen and Other Christian Movies, Books, and Media (Part 3)
  • Investigating the World of the Bible
  • Is the Person You’ve Selected Correct? Is it biblical in nature? Season 2 Controversy (Jesus, the Bible, and the Process of Inspiration)
  • The Chosen Season 2 Controversy (Jesus, the Bible, and the Process of Inspiration)
  • Imagining Mary Magdalene (5 More Bible Adaptations While You Wait for The Chosen Season 2)
  • Imagining Mary Magdalene (5 More Bible Adaptations While You Wait for The Chosen Season 2)
  • Imagining Mary Magdalene

Adapting Biblical Characters Series

  • The Virgin Mary appears in The Chosen ***Season 2***
  • Judas appears in The Chosen ***Season 2***
  • JamesJohn appears in The Chosen***Season 2***
  • Nicodemus appears in The Chosen
  • Mary Magdalene appears in The Chosen ***Season 2 Update***
  • Matthew appears in The Chosen
  • Simon and Andrew appear in The Chosen ***Season 2 Update***
  • Jesus appears in The

Exploring The Chosen with Youth

  • ‘The Chosen’ Season 2 Reflection P1: What is the story of The Chosen Season 2? ‘The Chosen’ Season 2 Reflection P2: What was the story of The Chosen Season 2? (PlotsTheme)
  • Season 1, Episode 1 Guide: The Beloved Disciple
  • Season 2, Episode 2 Guide: Philip, Nathanael, and Matthew
  • Season 3, Episode 3 Guide: Life Among the Disciples of Jesus
  • Season 4, Episode 4 Guide: Simon the Zealotthe Man at the Bethesda Pool
  • Season 5, Episode 5 Guide: Mary’s Demons Episode 6 Guide: Mercy, Not Sacrifice
  • Episode 7 Guide: Quintus Returns
  • Episode 8 Guide: Judas, Matthew, and the Sermon on the Mount
  • Episode 9 Guide: Judas, Matthew, and the Sermon on the Mount
  • ‘The Chosen’ Season 2 Reflection P1: What is the story of The Chosen Season 2? ‘The Chosen’ Season 2 Reflection P2: What was the story of The Chosen Season 2. (PlotsTheme)
  • Season 1, Episode 1 Guide: The Beloved Disciple
  • Season 2, Episode 2 Guide: Philip, Nathanael, Matthew
  • Season 3, Episode 3 Guide: Life Among the Disciples of Jesus
  • Season 4, Episode 4 Guide: Simon Zealot, the Man at the Bethesda Pool
  • Season 5, Episode 5 Guide: Mary’s Demons Quintus Returns
  • Episode 8 Guide: Judas, Matthew, and the Sermon on the Mount
  • Episode 6 Guide: Mercy and Not Sacrifice
  • Episode 7 Guide: Mercy and Not Sacrifice

Posts on the Nature of Adaptation

  • 17 Influences on Bible Art and Adaptations (Part 1)
  • 17 Influences on Bible Art and Adaptations (Part 2)
  • 17 Influences on Bible Art and Adaptations (Part 3)
  • 17 Influences on Bible Art and Adaptations (Part 4)

Youth Ministry and the Arts

  • The importance of drawing in youth ministry, even for those who are not artists
  • There are six reasons why the arts are essential for reaching out to Generation Z. Creativity and the arts may be infused into youth ministry in a variety of ways. Resources for Engaging Scripture in a Creative Way
  • Bibles for Artists
  • Bibles for Writers
  • Bibles for Teachers. Using Project-Based Learning, Bible Art, and Generation Z to Transform Youth Ministry
  • 7 Ways Project-Based Learning Can Transform Youth Ministry
  • Project-Based Learning, Bible Art, and Generation Z: Cultivating Biblical Literacy through Bible Adaptation Projects
  • Project-Based Learning, Bible Art, and Generation Z: Cultivating Biblical Literacy through Bible Adaptation Projects

Nicodemus, the mystery man of Holy Week

He came to Jesus in the middle of the night, slipping away to see the guy who was doing the miracles. He was a powerful Pharisee and a member of the Sanhedrin, the Jewish ruling council, which he served for many years. He wasn’t meant to hang around with the ragtag group of people who followed Jesus. Nicodemus, on the other hand, needed to know: Was the charming Galilean for real? The following are some of Jesus’ most renowned teachings, as recorded in the Gospel of John: Nobody can glimpse the kingdom of God until they have been “born again,” as he explained to Nicodemus in his sermon.

  • Those lines are still often used today — just look at the swarms of John 3:16 placards that can be found at sporting events — but the man to whom they are addressed, Nicodemus, remains a bit of a mystery.
  • Nicodemus is revered as a saint in both the Eastern Orthodox and Catholic faiths.
  • Others Christians, on the other hand, describe him as a coward who has kept his religion hidden.
  • In the Gospel of John, he is only referenced a total of three times.
  • Later, Nicodemus informs the Pharisees that, according to Jewish law, Jesus should be given an opportunity to be heard before he is executed.
  • The History channel’s “The Bible” miniseries, which concludes on Easter Sunday (March 31), gives Nicodemus a more prominent role, portraying him as Jesus’ most formidable adversary among the Jerusalem Pharisees.
See also:  What Does Jesus Means

Until the arrival of Nicodemus, the majority of Jesus’ disciples had been “ordinary people,” according to Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI in his book “Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week.” The former pope says that Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea were “two highly recognized representatives of Israel’s educated class who had not yet ventured to confess their discipleship” to Jesus.

In the words of Buchanan, “I felt it would be interesting to examine a possible route for this individual.” “What was it that drew him to Jesus that night to ask honest questions?” says the narrator.

Nicodemus feels compelled to seek out Jesus, who was gaining popularity for his miraculous healings at the time.

‘Because of his education, the way he thinks, and the way he seeks a clear-cut response from Jesus,’ Buchanan said, “he’s a figure that modern Christians can identify to.” Nicodemus was perplexed by Jesus’ mysterious statement, which said that individuals must be “born again.” This remark continues to perplex Christians today.

  1. Despite the fact that Nicodemus is not on the minds of many current evangelicals, they are extremely concerned with his discussion with Jesus in the Gospel of John, according to Timothy Larsen, a professor of Christian philosophy at Wheaton College in Illinois.
  2. “Evangelicals have historically given a great deal of thought to when this happened,” Larsen said of the experience of being born again.
  3. Scholar Rosamond Rodman contends that the freed slaves who migrated to Nicodemus, Kansas, after the Civil War wanted rebirth as well, a goal that predates the arrival of Colson.
  4. Rodman, on the other hand, contends that the town’s founders had good grounds to commemorate the biblical character.

According to Rodman, “Nicodemus comes to Jesus in the same way that African-Americans came to the Bible: at night and in secret, rightly fearful of the repercussions.” According to Benedict and other Christians, however, the tale of Nicodemus does not conclude in darkness, but rather in light.

In his letter, Benedict says, “The amount of the balm is remarkable and well exceeds any typical proportions.” “This is a funeral fit for a king.” Copyright: If you have any questions about copyright, you should contact the item’s distributor, Religion News Service LLC.

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Nicodemus: Was he born again? — Evergreen Valley Church

Tim Wood is the author of this piece. In John 3, Jesus and Nicodemus have the discussion that will be remembered for a long time. Jesus explains to Nicodemus that the only way to perceive and enter the kingdom of God is through the process of rebirth. There is nothing in John 3 that suggests that Nicodemus became a Christian on that particular day. Consequently, the most important issue is: Did Nicodemus become a disciple of Christ? And the answer to that question is, indeed, affirmative. The evidence is found in John 19:38-42.

  • As a result, he arrived and removed his body.
  • They removed the corpse of Jesus and wrapped it in linen cloths and spices, as was the Jewish tradition at the time of Jesus’ death.
  • 42So, because it was the Jewish day of Preparation, and because the tomb was close by, they put Jesus there.” Joseph and Nicodemus do two acts that indicate that they had been resurrected.
  • That is an extraordinary act of bravery and daring on the part of the speaker.
  • They are well aware of the hazard.
  • This is quite likely the most manly thing that Joseph and Nicodemus have ever done in their lives.
  • They remove the bloodied and battered body and anoint it before wrapping it in preparation for interment.

Seventy-five pounds, to be exact.

The act of anointing a body and preparing it for burial was traditionally thought to be a woman’s responsibility.

Why?

Joseph and Nicodemus, on the other hand, have been through something that makes them not feel humiliated about doing this.

However, they are no longer concerned with their social standing or station.

They have a deep affection for the One who died on the cross for them.

In comparison to any other time in their lives, they are considerably more brave and far more modest, far more confident and far more delicate and personal.

They’ve been reborn in a sense.

You have confidence because you have realized that you are more loved by God than you could have ever imagined.

Our Lord’s suffering on the cross demonstrates to us how much God loves us while also emphasizing how dreadful sin is. Religion will never be able to do this. Nicodemus can provide you with further information.

Nicodemus – Wikipedia

SaintNicodemus
Nicodemus helping to take down Jesus’ body from the cross (The Deposition, byMichelangelo)
Defender of Christ
Born Galilee
Died Judea
Venerated in The Catholic ChurchEastern Orthodox ChurchOriental Orthodox ChurchAnglican ChurchLutheran Church
Canonized Pre-Congregation
Feast 2 August (Eastern Orthodox ChurchByzantine-rite Catholic Churches) 3 August (Roman-rite Catholic Church)Third Sunday ofPascha(Eastern Orthodox ChurchByzantine-rite Catholic Churches) 31 August (Roman-rite Catholic Church)
Attributes Pharisee
Patronage Curiosity

Nicodemus (; Greek: o, translit.Nikódmos) was a Pharisee and a member of the Sanhedrin, and he is named in the Gospel of John in three different places:

  • He initially comes to Jesus in the middle of the night to discuss Jesus’ teachings (John 3:1–21)
  • Then he meets Jesus again the next day to discuss Jesus’ teachings (John 3:1–21). It is the second time that Nicodemus is said that he tells his fellow members of the Sanhedrin (the Jewish court system) that the law demands that a person be heard before being condemned (John 7:50–51)
  • The final character to appear is Nicodemus, who arrives after theCrucificationof Jesus to bring the traditional embalming spices and to assistJoseph of Arimathea in preparing the corpse of Jesus for burial (John 19:39–42).

It is believed that an apocryphal work bearing his name—theGospel of Nicodemus—was written in the mid-4th century, and it is mostly a reworking of the earlierActs of Pilate, which describes theHarrowing of Hell. Ochser and Kohler (in an article in The Jewish Encyclopedia) and other historians have argued that Nicodemus may be the same person asNicodemus ben Gurion, who is recorded in the Talmud as a wealthy and popular holy man claimed to have had magical powers. Those who disagree with this interpretation point out that the biblical Nicodemus was probably an older man at the time of his encounter with Jesus, whereas Nicodemus ben Gurion arrived on the scene 40 years later, during the Jewish War.

In John’s Gospel

Nicodemus, like Lazarus, does not belong to the tradition of the Synoptic Gospels and is only addressed by John, who devotes more than half of Chapter 3of his gospel and a few lines of Chapter 7to Nicodemus, and who references him for the final time inChapter 19. It is revealed that Nicodemus is a Pharisee who comes to visit Jesus in the middle of the night the first time he is mentioned. According to the scriptures, Jesus traveled to Jerusalem to participate in the Passover festival. The moneychangers from the temple were ejected and their tables were thrown to the ground during his visit to Jerusalem.

Because no one could achieve the miracles you are performing unless God was present with them.” (See also John 3:2).

Then there’s a dialogue with Nicodemus about what it means to be “born again” or “born from above” (Greek: v) and what it means in practical terms: In his discussion with Nicodemus, the idea of being actually born again from one’s mother’s womb is explored; nonetheless, most theologians agree that Nicodemus understood Jesus was not speaking about literal rebirth.

  • ‘You cannot mean that a guy is going to be born for the second time after entering his mother’s womb the first time.
  • In response to the “ateacher of Israel,” Jesus expresses amazement, possibly sarcastically, that he does not comprehend the notion of spiritual rebirth: 3:10–11 (John 3:10-11.) Is it possible that you are a master of Israel and are unaware of these things?
  • KJV Nicodemus is described by James F.
  • In Chapter 7, Nicodemus counsels his colleagues, who are referred to as “the chief priests and the Pharisees,” to listen carefully and thoroughly before reaching a judgment on Jesus.
  • Nonetheless, it seems likely that he had some kind of influence on the Sanhedrin during his time there.

Nicodemus must have been a wealthy man, according to Pope Benedict XVI, who writes in his bookJesus of Nazareth: Holy Week that “the quantity of thebalm is enormous and transcends all natural proportions, indicating that this is a royal funeral.”

Veneration and liturgical commemoration

Nicodemus is revered as a saint in the Eastern Orthodox Churches as well as the Catholic Church. Several churches, including the Eastern Orthodox and Byzantine-rite Catholic churches, commemorate Nicodemus on theSunday of the Myrrhbearers, which is celebrated on theThird Sunday of Pascha (i.e., the second Sunday after Easter), as well as 2 August, the date on which it is believed that his relics, as well as those of Stephen the Protomartyr and Gamaliel, were discovered. The feast of the discovery of their remains is commemorated on the next day, August 3, according to the traditional Roman-rite Catholic liturgical calendar.

In Ramla, the Franciscan Order built a church dedicated to Saints Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea under the patronage of the saints.

Legacy

Nicodemus appears significantly in medieval images of the Deposition, in which he and Joseph of Arimathea are seen taking the dead Christ from the cross, typically with the assistance of a ladder, and burying him in the tomb. Like Joseph, Nicodemus became the subject of several religious traditions during the Middle Ages, notably in association with massive crosses, which he shared with Joseph. His carvings of theHoly Face of Lucca and theBatlló Crucifix were said to have been aided by angels, with the face in particular receiving divine help, and therefore becoming examples ofacheiropoieta (angelic assistance).

In poetry

The presence of Nicodemus in Henry Vaughan’s poem “The Night” is essential because it helps to develop the poem’s description of the night’s connection with God.

In music

In the Lutheran prescribed readings of the 18th century, the gospel passage of Jesus’ meeting with Nicodemus in the middle of the night was allocated to the Sunday before Trinity. Johann Sebastian Bach produced many cantatas for the event, the most notable of which being O heilges Geist- und Wasserbad, BWV 165, composed in 1715 and based on a libretto by the court poet in Weimar, Salomo Franck, and remaining faithful to the gospel. In 1937, Ernst Pepping produced an Evangelienmotette (moteton gospel text) for the characters Jesus and Nikodemus.

Tim Curry recorded a cover version of the song for his debut album, Read My Lips, in 1978.

A very casual version of the connection between Nicodemus and Jesus may be found in the song “Help Yourself” by The Devil Makes Three, which is available on iTunes. Nicodemus is mentioned in the second stanza of the song “Help yourself,” which was performed by The Devil Makes Three (band).

In literature

In Persuaded: The Story of Nicodemus, author David Harder tells the story of Nicodemus, a real fictitious character from Greek history. With the goal of maintaining historical and scriptural accuracy, Harder based his novel on events and timetables found in the pages of the Passion Translationversion of the Bible. He also brought biblical characters to life in a realistic story with the goal of keeping his book historically and scripturally accurate.

During the Protestant vs. Catholic struggle

A person adhering to a Church other than the one that was prominent in a region during the fight between Protestants and Catholics in Europe from the 16th century to the 18th century ran the risk of harsh punishment – and in many cases, the chance of losing their lives. As a result of this development, the word ” Nicodemite ” came to be used, which is often a derogatory term to refer to someone who is accused of publicly misrepresenting their genuine religious views by showing deceptive appearances and concealing true convictions.

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United States

People who belonged to a Church other than the one that was locally dominant faced harsh punishment, and in some cases, even death, during the European religious wars between Protestants and Catholics from the 16th to the 18th centuries. It was at this point that the word ” Nicodemite ” came to be used, which is often a derogatory term to describe someone who is accused of publicly misrepresenting their genuine religious views by presenting a fake appearance and concealing true convictions. In his 1544 work, Excuse à messieurs les Nicodemites, John Calvin is credited with coining the phrase.

Gallery

  • A person adhering to a Church other than the one that was prominent in a region during the fight between Protestants and Catholics in Europe from the 16th century to the 18th century ran the possibility of harsh punishment – and in many cases, the chance of death. At that time, the word ” Nicodemite ” came to be used to refer to a person who is accused of publicly misrepresenting their genuine religious convictions by presenting a fake appearance and concealing their true beliefs. The phrase is believed to have been coined by John Calvin in his 1544 work Excuse à messieurs les Nicodemites. According to Calvin, who was an outspoken opponent of all forms of saint adoration, the fact that Nicodemus became a Catholic saint in no way absolved him of his “duplicity.” The word was initially used to refer to crypto-protestants — Protestants who were concealed in a Catholic milieu – but it has since been applied more generally.

See also

  1. See, for example, David Flusser’s Jesus (Jerusalem: Magnes, 2001), 148
  2. Idem’s ” Gamaliel and Nicodemus “, JerusalemPerspective.com
  3. Zeev Safrai’s “Nakdimon b. Guryon: A Galilean Aristocrat in Jerusalem” in The Beginnings of Christianity (ed. Jack Pastor and Menachem Mor
  4. Jerusalem: Yad Ben-Zvi (1991). The Gospel of John is a collection of stories about a man named John who lived in the first century AD. InterVarsity Press, Leicester, p. 186
  5. Richard Bauckham, “Nicodemus and the Gurion Family,” Journal of Theological Studies, vol. 47.1 (1996), pp. 1–37
  6. Nicodemus is a work by James F. Driscoll. The Catholic Encyclopedia.Vol. 11.New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1911. 13 December 2014
  7. AbcBurke, Daniel.Nicodemus, The Mystery Man of Holy Week, Religious News Service, 27 March 2013
  8. A 144–45, 472–73
  9. “Henry Clay Work Biography”.notablebiographies.com
  10. Overell 2004, pp. 117–18
  11. Livingstone 2000
  12. “Nicodemus National Historic Site”, National Park Service
  13. Martin Luther King Jr., Martin Luther King Jr., Martin Luther King Jr., Martin Luther King Jr., Martin Luther King Jr., Martin Luther King Jr., Martin Luther King Jr., Martin Luther King Jr., Martin Luther King Jr., Martin Luther King Jr (16 August 1967). Speaking at the Eleventh Annual SCLC Convention, “Where Do We Go From Here?” was the topic of the address. University of Stanford’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute (MLK Jr. R&E Institute). It was retrieved on the 30th of November, 2018.

References

  • Cornel Heinsdorff: Christus, Nikodemus, and the Samaritanerin in the city of Juvencus. Cornel Heinsdorff: With an Annotation on the Lateinische Evangelienvorlage (= Untersuchungen zur antiken Literatur und Geschichte, Bd.67), Berlin/New York 2003
  • With an Annotation on the Lateinische Evangelienvorlage (= Untersuchungen zur antiken Literatur und Geschichte, Bd.67), Berlin/New York 2003

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related toNicodemus.
  • Nicodemus is mentioned in the Jewish Encyclopedia and Butler’s Lives of the Saints as “St. Nicodemus.”

Why did Nicodemus not follow Jesus?

Come and see what I’m up to, and all of your questions will be addressed. “Come with me and follow me.” As a result, Nicodemus’ decision, based on his fear, not to follow Jesus would constitute a setback in both his conflict between faith and fear, as well as his struggle with doubt. Is it possible that Jesus has a brother? Jesus’ brothers, James, Joseph/Joses, Judas/Jude, and Simonas are mentioned in both the Gospel of Mark (6:3) and the Gospel of Matthew (13:55–56) as being the son of Mary.

  • He arrived at Jesus’ house in the middle of the night, sneaking in to see the man behind the miracles.
  • He wasn’t meant to hang around with the ragtag group of people who followed Jesus.
  • Bible Gateway is a website that provides access to the Bible.
  • Now there was a guy named Nicodemus who belonged to the Pharisees and was a member of the Jewish ruling council.

He approached Jesus in the middle of the night and said, “Rabbi, we recognize you as a teacher who has come from God. If God were not present, no one could accomplish the miraculous signs that you are currently performing.”

What was Jesus last name?

See what I’m up to and all your questions will be addressed. Bring your friends and family with you. As a result, Nicodemus’ decision, based on his fear, not to join Jesus would constitute a setback in both his battle between faith and fear, as well as his battle against doubt. And if so, do you think Jesus has a sibling? Jesse, Joseph/Joses, Judas/Jude, and Simonas, brothers of Jesus (the son of Mary), are mentioned in the Gospels of Mark (6:3) and Matthew (13:55–56). What brought Nicodemus and Jesus together?

  1. Pharisee of great stature, he was a member of the Sanhedrin, which served as the religious leadership of the Jews.
  2. What does the Bible have to say about Nicodemus in light of all of that?
  3. A guy called Nicodemus, a member of the Jewish ruling council, belonged to the Pharisees at this point.
  4. Because no one could accomplish the miraculous feats that you are performing unless God was present.”

Did Jesus have a twin?

It has recently been discovered that Jesus had a twin brother, who is known as the apostle Thomas, and that it was Thomas, rather than Christ, who was seen following the claimed resurrection.

Does Nicodemus follow Jesus?

Recent discoveries suggest that Jesus had a twin brother, known as the apostle Thomas, and that it was he who appeared to the disciples following the purported resurrection of Christ, rather than Jesus himself.

What did Nicodemus learn from Jesus?

Nicodemus has his first appearance in the Bible in John 3, when he goes in search of Jesus at night. That nightfall, Nicodemus heard from Jesus that he needed to be reborn, which he duly became. The Chief Priests and Pharisees then sought to have Jesus imprisoned for fraud roughly six months before his death on the cross.

What can we learn from the life of Nicodemus?

What did Nicodemus take away from his encounter with Jesus? Nicodemus was the “teacher of teachers” at the beginning of the story, yet he did not comprehend what it meant to be born of the Spirit. Nicodemus, on the other hand, sought out Jesus in order to receive answers to his sincere questions. In his studies, he discovered that being “religious” and understanding the Scriptures would not get him admittance into paradise.

What is Jesus full name?

It was written in Hebrew that Jesus went by the name of Yeshua, which translates to Joshua in English. So, how did the name “Jesus” come to be given to us?

What does the H stand for in Jesus?

Christ”. Other interpretations include the letter “H” standing for “Holy” or “Harold” (from misquoting the Lord’s prayer as “Our Father, who art in heaven, Harold be thy name.”), as well as footnotes and footnotes. Jesus H. Christ – according to Wikipedia.

Did Jesus have a child?

Christ”. Other interpretations include the letter “H” standing for “Holy” or “Harold” (resulting from misquoting the Lord’s prayer as “Our Father, who art in heaven, Harold be thy name.”), as well as footnotes and footnotes.

Jesus H. Christ is a fictional character created by the fictional character Christopher Nolan.

Did Jesus have a wife?

Mary Magdalene, Jesus’s wife, is referred to as According to one of these manuscripts, referred to Mary Magdalene as Jesus’ friend and said that Jesus loved her more than the other disciples. This document is known as the Gospel of Philip.

How many will go to heaven according to the Bible?

In accordance with their interpretation of Scripture, such as Revelation 14:1-4, Jehovah’s Witnesses believe that exactly 144,000 devout Christians will ascend into heaven to rule alongside Christ in the kingdom of God.

What date is Jesus birthday?

But by the fourth century, we have allusions to two dates that were generally acknowledged — and are still also honored — as Jesus’ birthday: December 25 in the western Roman Empire and January 6 in the Eastern Roman Empire (especially in Egypt and Asia Minor).

What happened to Nicodemus in the Bible?

The Jews then stripped him of his post, beat him, and drove him from Jerusalem, where he was greeted and housed by his kinsmen Gamaliel in his country residence until his death, after which he was laid to rest alongside the remains of St. Stephen.

What is the meaning of Nicodemus?

The name Nicodemus is predominantly a male given name of Greek origin that translates as “Victory of the People.” In the Bible, Nicodemus is a Jewish leader and Pharisee who confronted Jesus about his claim to be a born-again believer. In addition, there is a surname.

Who climbed the tree to Jesus?

Jesus was travelling through Jericho on his way to Jerusalem. There was a wealthy tax collector named Zacchaeus who served as the city’s principal tax collector. Zacchaeus was a little man who desired to meet Jesus, so he scaled a sycamore tree to get his wish.

What happened to Nicodemus after his encounter with Jesus?

The Jews then stripped him of his post, beat him, and drove him from Jerusalem, where he was greeted and housed by his kinsmen Gamaliel in his country residence until his death, after which he was laid to rest alongside the remains of St. Stephen.

What happened to Nicodemus?

The Jews then stripped him of his post, beat him, and drove him from Jerusalem, where he was greeted and housed by his kinsmen Gamaliel in his country residence until his death, after which he was laid to rest alongside the remains of St. Stephen.

What Zodiac is Jesus?

Because the account of Christ’s birth coincides with this day, many Christian icons for Christ include the astrological sign of Pisces, the fishes, into their designs. The figure of Christ himself embodies many of the temperaments and personality features associated with the Piscean zodiac sign, and as such is regarded as an archetype of the Piscean sign.

Who is the Son of God?

Jesus is referred to as “son of God,” whereas followers of Jesus are referred to as “sons of God.” It is ascribed to Jesus as a nod to his status as the Messiah, or Christ, the King whom God has chosen as his representative (Matthew 26:63).

What is Jesus’s number?

In Christian numerology, the number 888 signifies Jesus, or more precisely Christ the Redeemer, as the number 888 depicts him. This representation may be justified either through gematria, by calculating the letter values of the Greek transcription of Jesus’ name, or as a counter-value to 666, the number of the beast, depending on how you look at things.

What is the name of Jesus wife?

Mary Magdalene is the wife of Jesus.

Who is Lucifer’s father?

Lucifer was described as “the mythical son of Aurora and Cephalus, and the father of Ceyx” by certain sources.

In poetry, he was frequently depicted as ushering the coming of day. Lucifer is the Latin term that corresponds to the Greek name Phosphoros. Both in prose and poetry, it is used in the astronomical meaning of the word.

Who is the son of Jesus?

They say that the Aramaic inscriptions reading “Judah, son of Jesus,” “Jesus, son of Joseph,” and the name “Mariamne,” which they believe to be Mary Magdalene, collectively retain the record of a family group that included Jesus, his wife Mary Magdalene and son Judah.

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