Why Did They Want To Kill Jesus

Why Did the Religious Leaders Want to Kill Jesus?

According to the New Testament, the religious leaders despised Jesus to the point that they arrested Him, tried Him, and brought Him before Pilate to be sentenced to death for His actions. What was it that made them so enraged with Jesus that they desired to see Him executed? There were a variety of reasons why they desired Jesus’ death. There were a number of aspects of Jesus’ character that infuriated the religious authorities. These are among them.

  1. What He claimed
  2. What he did
  3. What he said
  4. His challenge to their religious system
  5. His threat to their way of life
  6. The individuals with whom He interacted
  7. And the people with whom He interacted It was his lack of regard for their religious traditions that bothered me.

The religious leaders were enraged by these six items on the list above. As a result, they want to see Jesus put to death. We shall take each of these arguments into consideration. 1. The claims of Jesus outweighed the authority of the authorities. Whenever Jesus declared Himself to be the Messiah, it implied that His authority trumped their authority. He said that the religious authorities did not believe Him, and they were outraged that some of the people did. They inquired, “Have any of the rulers or Pharisees placed their faith in him?” However, this mob of people who do not understand the law is cursed (John 7:48, 49).

However, the leaders’ hostility and envy were heightened as a result of the attention Jesus was receiving.

  1. 2.
  2. Aside from the religious authorities, Jesus’ actions enraged them as well.
  3. The miracle was evident, considering that the man was demon-possessed as well as blind and deaf.
  4. As a result, their “official” explanation for Jesus’ power was that it originated from Satan.
  5. 3.
  6. Jesus was also a danger to their religious structure, which they viewed as a menace.
  7. The Bible relates that on two separate occasions, He entered the temple precincts and drove out the moneychangers, according to the accounts.

And he discovered people who were selling oxen, lambs, and doves in the temple, as well as the money changers who were sitting at their tables.

Jesus posed a threat to their way of life in four ways.

The relationship between the Jews and the Romans was in shaky shaky shape.

He was enraged by the people with whom he interacted.

Those in authority were brimming with self-importance and arrogance.

In response to one Pharisee’s observation that Jesus allowed a woman to wash His feet, he remarked, “If this man were a prophet, he would know who and what type of woman this lady this is who is touching him, for she is a sinner” (Luke 7:39).

“When the Son of Guy came eating and drinking, they exclaimed, “Look, a gluttonous man and an intoxicated man, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!” 11:19) in the Bible.

When Jesus hung out with these people, it upset the Pharisees and other religious leaders who were accustomed to being in charge.

Jesus Showed Little Respect For Their Customs And Traditions The religious authorities were particularly enraged by Jesus’ lack of regard for their religious traditions, which was more than anything else.

He was well aware that these were regulations imposed by humans rather than rules originating from God.

God had instructed that the Sabbath be observed as a day of rest from labor and a time of worshiping the Lord Almighty.

When Jesus saw how they had distorted the Sabbath observance, he was very saddened and enraged.

They, on the other hand, remained mute.

Then Jesus performed a miracle in their midst, healing a man.

They came to the conclusion that the actual Messiah would never do something like that.

They were sure that Jesus would have to die for their sake.

The religious authorities did not wish to send Jesus to death for any reason that was divine or moral in their eyes.

They were adamant about not hearing the truth of God.

In the first place, the assertions he made indicated that he possessed higher power than they.

Because of the supernatural miracles that he performed, which revealed his greater power, they desired him dead for another reason.

He visited the temple and expressed his displeasure with the procedures.

They were apprehensive about how the Romans might react.

Their urge to kill him stemmed mostly from a lack of regard for their religious traditions, which they felt compelled to do so. This is especially evident in regards to Jesus’ attitude toward the Sabbath day. Every one of these factors led to their nefarious intention to have Jesus crucified.

Why Did the Religious Leaders Want to Kill Jesus? by Don Stewart

QUESTION 4: The Betraying, Trial, and Death of Jesus According to the New Testament, the religious authorities despised Jesus Christ to the extent where they seized Him, tried Him, and brought Him before Pilate for a death sentence. What was it that made them so enraged with Jesus that they desired to have Him executed?

There Are Many Reasons They Wanted Jesus Dead

There were a lot of aspects of Jesus’ character that upset the religious authorities. Included amongst these were the following:

  1. What He claimed
  2. What he did
  3. What he said
  4. His challenge to their religious system
  5. His threat to their way of life
  6. The individuals with whom He interacted
  7. And the people with whom He interacted It was his lack of regard for their religious traditions that bothered me.

The religious leaders were enraged by these six items on the list above. As a result, they want to see Jesus put to death. We shall take each of these arguments into consideration.

1. Jesus’ Claims Outweighed Their Authority

Whenever Jesus declared Himself to be the Messiah, it implied that His authority trumped their authority. He said that the religious authorities did not believe Him, and they were outraged that some of the people did. They inquired, “Has any of the rulers or of the Pharisees placed their faith in him?” No! However, there is a curse on these gang of criminals who are completely ignorant of the law. (John 7:48,49 New International Version) The religious leaders felt that part of the crowd’s beliefs were based on their own lack of understanding.

The religious leaders were motivated to assassinate Jesus because of their jealously.

2. His Deeds Outraged the Religious Rulers

Whenever Jesus declared Himself to be the Messiah, it implied that His authority surpassed theirs. He said that the religious authorities did not believe Him, and they were enraged that some of the people did. They inquired as to whether any of the rulers or Pharisees had placed their faith in him. No! A curse, however, has been placed on this rabble, which is completely ignorant of the law. According to the New International Version of the Bible, John 7:48 and 49 It was considered by the religious leaders that some members of the throng held their beliefs because they were naive.

The religious authorities were motivated to assassinate Jesus because of their envy for him.

3. Jesus Was a Threat to Their Religious System

Jesus was also a danger to their religious structure, which they viewed as a menace. He drew attention to the hypocrisy that was associated with their method of practice. The Bible relates that on two separate occasions, He entered the temple precincts and drove out the moneychangers, according to the accounts. The following occurrence is recorded by John: It was the time of year for the traditional Passover celebration, and Jesus traveled to Jerusalem to participate. Among the merchants in the Temple area were those who were selling oxen, lambs, and doves for sacrifice, as well as money changers who were behind their counters.

Sheep and oxen were driven away, and the money changers’ coins were spilled all over the floor when they were forced to turn their tables over.

Then his followers recalled a prophesy from the Scriptures: “A burning desire for God’s temple boils inside me,” as prophesied by Isaiah.

(John 2:13-17 New International Version) He asserted that he had greater control over the temple than they did. This infuriated them to the point where they demanded His death as a result.

4. Jesus Was a Threat to Their Way of Life

The religious authorities desired Jesus’ death for political reasons, according to historians. The relationship between the Jews and the Romans was in shaky shaky shape. The idea of a Messiah who may lead a revolt against Rome was not something these people were enthusiastic about. According to the account, one of them, called Caiaphas, who happened to be the high priest that year, yelled out, “You know absolutely nothing! ” You are unaware that it is preferable for you that one man die for the people than that the entire nation perishes.” (John 11:49,50 New International Version) The fact that Jesus had acquired the favor of the people made him fear that the Romans might interfere.

5. The People with Whom He Socialized Outraged the Religious Rulers

Those in authority were brimming with self-importance and arrogance. They were very pleased with themselves since they did not associate with “sinners.” There was no way they could accept that the actual Messiah would mingle with with a large group of people. He was furious when he witnessed Jesus allow a woman to wash His feet, and he was not the only one. When the Pharisee who had invited Him noticed this, he said to himself, “This man, if He were a prophet, would know who and what manner of woman this is who is touching Him, for she is a sinner.” Luke continues, “If this man were a prophet, this man would know who and what manner of woman this is who is touching Him, for she is a sinner.” (Luke 7:39 New King James Version) The fact that Jesus would allow this to take place only served to further convince these religious leaders that He was not the promised Messiah after all.

It was mentioned by Jesus: “When the Son of Man came eating and drinking, they said to themselves, “Look, a glutton and an intoxicated man!

(Matthew 11:19 New Revised Standard Version) The religious leaders felt that by avoiding sinners, they were demonstrating their righteousness.

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6. Jesus Had a Lack of Respect for Their Traditions

The religious authorities were particularly enraged by Jesus’ lack of regard for their religious traditions, which was more than anything else. Jesus completely disregarded these customs, which they had meticulously observed. He was well aware that these were regulations imposed by humans rather than rules originating from God. Jesus’ contempt for Jewish norms about the Sabbath, on the other hand, was the source of the greatest fury. God had instructed that the Sabbath be observed as a day of rest from labor and a time of worshiping the Lord Almighty.

When Jesus saw how they had distorted the Sabbath observance, he was very saddened and enraged.

Mark takes down the following information about this particular episode: When he addressed his opponents, he posed the following question: “Is it permissible to perform good things on the Sabbath, or is it a day for inflicting harm?” “Does today represent a day to save life or a day to destroy it?” They, on the other hand, were deafeningly silent.

When the man reached out his hand, he said, “Reach out your hand.” When the gentleman held out his hand, everything returned to normal!

They couldn’t stand the thought of being healed on the Sabbath any longer.

There was no delay in their response: the Pharisees hurried out and quickly plotted with the Herodians against him, plotting how to eliminate him. Mark 3:6 (New Revised Standard Version)They were certain that Jesus had to die.

They Had No Godly or Righteous Motive

To summarize, the religious authorities did not wish to send Jesus to death for any reason that was divine or virtuous in nature. Ultimately, it was their deceit, pride, and arrogance that led them to bring Jesus before Pilate to be executed by beheading. They were adamant about not hearing the truth of God.

Summary – Question 3Why Did the Religious Leaders Want to Kill Jesus?

According to the New Testament, the religious authorities desired Jesus Christ’s death for a variety of reasons, none of which were just in their intentions. The following are some of the unjustified explanations for this. In the first place, the statements made by Jesus indicated that His authority was superior to theirs. This was something that the religious authorities could not tolerate. They were unable to accept that He was the true Messiah, and as a result, they rejected His assertions.

  • These religious authorities were unable to ignore the marvels that had taken place.
  • Jesus was also a danger to their religious structure, which they viewed as a menace.
  • He asserted that His authority was superior to theirs in this manner.
  • Furthermore, these religious elites viewed Jesus as a danger to their own way of life.
  • As a result, Jesus had to die in order to save the country from being extinct.
  • Indeed, these men were unable to grasp how the true Messiah would associate with “sinners” in the manner that Jesus did.
  • More than anything else, it was their lack of regard for their religious traditions that drove them to want to kill Him in order to punish Him.
  • Their resistance to Jesus’ breaking of their human-made conventions, such as healing on the Sabbath, was too much for them to bear.
  • Every one of these factors led to their nefarious intention to have Jesus crucified.
  • As a result of their rejection of Jesus Christ, these religious leaders effectively abandoned their sole chance of salvation from their sins.

Why Did They Kill Jesus?

For a variety of reasons, according to the New Testament, religious authorities wanted Jesus Christ dead—none of which were morally correct. The following are some of the unjustified justifications for this action: In the first place, the statements made by Jesus indicated that His authority was greater than theirs. This could not be accepted by the religious authorities. His assertions were rejected because they could not accept that He was the true Messiah. A demonstration of His higher authority was proven by the miracles that He performed.

  1. Being that they were against the notion that Jesus was the Messiah, they came to the conclusion that His miracles were performed by the devil’s forces.
  2. He went to the temple and expressed his displeasure with the prevailing procedures within.
  3. This was something they couldn’t tolerate.
  4. They reasoned that the evidence He had acquired would prompt the Romans to arrive and expel them from their homeland.
  5. To prevent the extinction of the human race, Jesus was forced to die.
  6. As a matter of fact, these men were baffled as to how the true Messiah would associate with “sinners” in the manner that Jesus did.
  7. More than anything else, it was their lack of regard for their religious traditions that motivated them to want to murder Him.
  8. Jesus’ healing on the Sabbath, which went against all of their human—made customs, was too much for them to bear.
  9. All of these factors contributed to their nefarious intention to have Jesus crucified and executed.

However, as previously stated, none of the justifications were inspired by God to begin with. Rather of accepting Jesus Christ as their sole option for redemption from sin, these religious leaders chose to reject him outright.

Why did people want to kill Jesus, and why did God let them?

Here’s everything you need to know: The aim of the people was to have Jesus killed, but God’s plan was for Jesus to die in the place of believing sinners. During His time on earth, Jesus’ miracles and teachings demonstrated that He was God’s Son, sent to seek and redeem wayward people from their sins. However, not all sinners place their faith in Jesus. In reality, some individuals throughout Jesus’ lifetime were hostile toward Him! Their desire to kill Jesus stemmed from their refusal to acknowledge that Jesus was the Son of God and, consequently, to turn from their sins.

  • Actually, God had a plan for Jesus’ execution on the cross all along!
  • More than a thousand years before the birth of Jesus, God revealed in His Word, the Bible, that His Son would suffer and die in order to pay the penalty that sinners deserve.
  • Truth According to the Bible “Men of Israel, pay attention to what follows!
  • God performed miracles, wonders, and signs among you as a result of Jesus’ sacrifice.
  • God had prepared for a long time that Jesus would be handed up to you.
  • You nailed him on the cross, didn’t you?
  • “Because of what Christ has accomplished, God has been pleased to reconcile all things to himself.
  • God brought about reconciliation by the shed blood of Christ and his death on the cross “(See Colossians 1:19–20 for more information.)

Romans are to blame for death of Jesus

Among religious specialists and laypeople alike, the soon-to-be-released Mel Gibson film “The Passion of the Christ” is causing quite a commotion in the media. Many people believe the film contains anti-Semitic implications. Although the Jews are often believed to have been involved in Jesus’ death, according to Dr. Frank K. Flinn of Washington University in St. Louis’ department of religious studies, the Romans are truly to blame for the death of Jesus. Frank Flinn is a songwriter and musician from the United Kingdom.

“Crucifications could only be authorized by the Roman authorities, and they frequently did so on a brutal, mass scale.” In the opinion of Flinn, an expert on Catholicism, Gibson’s film appears to merge all of the gospel stories about the Passion into one epic, a made-for-the-big-screen story that fails to show how opinions about the Jews’ role in the crucifixion have changed dramatically over time, as has been shown in other films about the Passion.

  1. The author points out that our oldest accounts of the crucifixion, such as the Gospel of Mark, which was written about 60-70 C.E., make it apparent that Pilate was the one who ordered Christ’s execution.
  2. “Matthew, most likely as a result of inter-Jewish competition, places the ultimate responsibility fully on the shoulders of the Jewish leadership,” Flinn explained.
  3. When it came to Jewish persecution and murder throughout the Middle Ages, the label “Christ-killers” became a rhetorical club to legitimize the ghettoization, persecution, and slaughter of Jews.
  4. A Guide to Taking in the Show Mel Gibson’s next film Written by Frank K.
  5. In his books The Jewish War and Jewish Antiquities, Josephus, the Jewish historian, records several incidents.
  6. Only the Roman authorities had the authority to order crucifixions, and they did it on a brutal and enormous scale on a regular basis.
  7. The first Galilean disciples of Jesus regarded him as a prophet similar to Elijah, who wandered the Galilean hills healing the sick and reviving the dead, as did the prophet Elijah.
  8. Sadducees and Pharisees were among the Jewish leaders who owed their positions to their patron-client relationship with the Roman rulers (notice the word “some”).
  9. In addition to the teachers and prophets in rural Galilee and the Dead Sea Scrolls community at Qumran, other Jewish groups and individuals either rejected or rebelled against the corrupt relationship between Jerusalem and Rome.
  10. Along with the Temple tax, this tax was collected for Rome by the Temple officials, who distributed it to tax farmers.
  11. Due to the annual ordinance of Jubilee, it should have been possible for the rich in Jerusalem to restore this territory to the original tribes, but they failed to do so.

According to Leviticus 19:4, “render unto Caesar” means “return to Caesar” his own coin with Caesar’s image on it (a blasphemy to the pious Jew!) and “return to God” what is God’s, which is the land itself, which God ultimately owns and which God gave directly to Israel in the covenant (Joshua 24:13)!” The message of Jesus was both spiritually and politically dangerous, first to the Roman rulers and then, secondary, to their client appointees in Jerusalem, who were first threatened by it.

  1. The Gospel of Mark, the earliest Gospel we know, was written between 60 and 70 CE.
  2. Matthew and Luke were written considerably later, in the year 80-95, and show a wide range of interests and points of view.
  3. Aside from his status as a Jewish disciple of Jesus (Antioch being the site of the first use of the term “Christian”), Matthew also comments on the era following the fall of Jerusalem in 70 CE, when tensions broke out between rabbinic Yavneh Jews and Jewish followers of Jesus.
  4. It’s possible that the rabbis weren’t all that successful.
  5. (I constantly point out to my pupils that a Christian may attend any Jewish Sabbath service and participate fully in all of the prayers with complete religious commitment.) Matthew goes to great lengths to disassociate himself from the actions of the Roman authority.
  6. Perhaps as a result of intra-Jewish competition, the phrase “His blood be upon us and our offspring” is added to place the ultimate responsibility squarely on the shoulders of the Jewish leadership (Matthew 24:25).
  7. The Gospel of Luke and the Book of Acts should be read together as a single piece of literature.
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We can now use the name “Christian,” which appears for the first time in Acts 11:26, but the term was probably definitely coined as a derogatory slur in its original context.

Against the backdrop of Roman criticism, Luke is attempting to defend Christianity against the charge of “superstition” leveled against it.

The paragraphs about Jesus being crowned with thorns and being mocked have been omitted.

“But Jesus hedelivered over to theirwill,” says Luke, elaborating on Pilate’s guilt (Luke 23:26).

In its present form (ca.

100-110 CE) is that John does not place the blame for Jesus’ death solely on Pilate, or Pilate’s Jewish authorities, or even the Jewish authorities alone, but on “Jews” collectively (John 19:12).

The stage is laid for the later, tragic accusation that “the Jews murdered Jesus,” despite the fact that John does not state so explicitly.

It was not until after Constantine established a complete break with Judaism as such that the term “Christ-killers” was coined to describe these individuals.

Bishop John Chrysostom of Constantinople (ca.

By the Middle Ages, the label “Christ-killers” had evolved into a linguistic club used to legitimize the ghettoization, persecution, and death of Jews around the world, particularly in Europe.

My argument establishes a chronological order for determining who was responsible for Jesus’ killing, as well as the appropriate terminology for each stage: Romans Leaders of the Romans and Jews The High Priest, the Scribes, and the Elders/Romans Chief Priest, Scribes, Elders, and the general populace/Pilate (sort of) Jews are a group of people who live in a community that is surrounded by other Jews (in general) “Stiff-necked Individuals” “Christ-killers.” According to what I’ve read about Mel Gibson’s movie in published accounts, it appears to be similar to many other films about Jesus in that it combines all of the gospel tales about the passion into a single narrative.

As I’ve demonstrated above, the different gospels express very different messages.

This makes it seem eerily similar to the infamous traditional Catholic Oberammergau Passion Play in Germany, which was in its original form grossly stereotyped and anti-Semitic in its content.

But, to be fair, we’ll have to wait until the film is released before we can find out.

Jesus Brought Peace and Love into the World. Why Did People Want to Kill Him?

It was for one primary reason that those who wanted to assassinate Jesus did so: they did not want to relinquish control of their lives to Him. To put it another way, they came to the realization that if Jesus was the Son of God (as He claimed), they would be unable to continue living their lives as they had been. Consider the case of King Herod, for example. After arriving in Jerusalem, the three kings of the Jews had only one question: where might they locate the newly crowned King of the Jews?

  • As a result, he made a serious attempt to have the little kid assassinated, which resulted in his family being forced to leave to Cairo.
  • Despite His miracles and teachings, they refused to accept Him as their Savior and Lord.
  • They resisted, and ultimately they persuaded Pilate to sentence Him to death.
  • We want to be in charge of our own life, and we don’t want to cede that power to Jesus.
  • Christ, on the other hand, has not changed, and neither has His ability to forgive and rescue us.

Turn your life over to Christ.Here’s how.

It is believed that no trial or death in history has had such a dramatic effect as Jesus’ trial and execution in Roman-occupied Jerusalem two thousand years ago. But, more importantly, was it an execution or a judicial murder, and who was to blame? Beginning with Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem on a donkey, the tale opens with the Galilean rebelJesus, who is consciously fulfilling a prophesy in the Hebrew Bible about his advent as Messiah. He’s surrounded by a throng of admirers. Following that, Jesus enters the Temple, the center of Jewish Judaism, and assaults money-changers, accusing them of defiling a sacred space.

Jesus is captured in the Garden of Gethsemane and brought before Caiaphas before being judged by the Roman Governor.

Caiaphas

Caiaphas was in an advantageous position. Caiaphas was a master political manipulator and one of the most powerful men in Jerusalem at the time of Jesus’ death. As High Priest of the Temple, he’d already lived 18 years (the average High Priest only lasts 4), and he’d formed a solid alliance with the Roman forces in control of the temple complex. Caiaphas was well-connected to everyone who mattered. At the time, he was the de-facto king of the whole Jewish community around the world, and he intended to maintain it that way.

The argument against Caiaphas is that he arrested Jesus, tried him in a kangaroo court, and condemned him on a religious charge that bore the death sentence. This is the basis for the death penalty.

What were Caiaphas’ motives?

Caiaphas’ power was threatened by Jesus. Caiaphas could not afford to allow any upstart preacher to get away with challenging his authority, especially at such a sensitive time of year as Passover was approaching. This was the most important Jewish holiday, and academics estimate that over two and a half million Jews would have gathered in Jerusalem to celebrate the occasion. Caiaphas did not want to be seen as a fool.

Jesus threatened Caiaphas’ relationship with Rome

Caiaphas’ power foundation was the Sanhedrin, the ultimate Jewish council that ruled over both civil and religious law in the time of Jesus. It was comprised of 71 members, the majority of whom were chief priests, and Caiaphas presided over its proceedings. There were enormous benefits for the effort, since contemporary archaeologists have revealed that Caiaphas and his companions lived luxurious lives in homes that were vast and elaborately adorned. However, the Sanhedrin was only able to rule because the Romans granted them permission, and the only way to keep the Romans pleased was to maintain order in society.

In other words, if Jesus was causing difficulty, it was causing trouble for both Caiaphas and Pilate – and trouble for Pilate was still trouble for Caiaphas, as well.

Jesus threatened the Temple’s income

Jesus was also posing a danger to a valuable source of revenue for the Temple’s priests. When it came to simple concerns like cleansing and the remission of sins, the Temple equipment brought in tremendous sums of money. Archaeologists have unearthed 150 mikvehs in the area surrounding the Temple of Solomon. Mikvehs are ceremonial baths that Jews take to cleanse themselves before participating in any religious activity. People who were ritually unclean could not enter the Temple, and practically everyone who arrived in Jerusalem for Passover was regarded to be ritually unclean.

  • The mikvehs were under the supervision of the priests, who charged people to use them.
  • Jesus felt the whole thing was a load of nonsense.
  • The Temple’s apparatchiks have received some bad news.
  • If this gets out of hand, it might spark a riot in the Temple.
  • Jesus stormed into the Temple and accused the moneychangers and dealers of sacrificial doves of extortion and of turning the Temple into a den of thieves, according to the Gospel of Matthew.
  • And God, as every Jew was well aware, has the authority to do so – he had shown this many times before.

Jesus was doing this in the Temple, in front of a large audience, and with no regard for Caiaphas or his staff in the least. He needed to do something to demonstrate that he was still in charge, and he needed to do it soon; Jesus was on a roll, and no one could predict what he would do next.

What Caiaphas did

You don’t get to be High Priest unless you’re capable of making difficult decisions and seeing them through to completion. A gathering of the chief priests was summoned by Caiaphas as it became clear that Jesus had to be stopped. According to Matthew’s Gospel, Caiaphas informed them that Jesus would have to be slain. This was something that the priests were not entirely certain about. If Jesus were to be executed, there may be rioting. Caiaphas, on the other hand, received his judgment and put it into effect immediately.

We may disapprove of certain of Caiaphas’ self-interested motivations, such as maintaining his wealth and power base, but this does not amount to a crime of any kind in our eyes.

The man was a well-known rebel, and he was risking public order at a time when enormous and turbulent crowds were thronging the streets of New York.

The rigged trial

Caiaphas had stepped over into the wrong side of the law at this point. He arranged the trial in his favor. Caiaphas took on the positions of chief judge and prosecuting attorney, which are often incompatible. Scholars are familiar with the laws that applied to Jewish trials during that time period, and the trial of Jesus defied several of those norms, including the following:

  • It took place at night since Jewish trials were required to take place during the day. A feast day had been observed, which was not permitted. Despite the fact that it took place at Caiaphas’ house, it should have taken place in the council chamber.

Caiaphas’ trial did not go according to plan. To establish that Jesus had threatened to demolish the Temple, which would have been treason and an offense against God, he would have to produce evidence. The witnesses, on the other hand, couldn’t agree on what Jesus had said. As a result, the accusation was dismissed. Caiaphas made the decision to see if he could trick Jesus into saying something he shouldn’t have. He confronted Jesus with a direct question: “Are you the Son of God, the Son of the Most High, the Son of the Most Holy?

  1. It’s sufficient.
  2. The other members of the Court are in agreement.
  3. There was only one problem: the court lacked the authority to carry out executions.
  4. Actually, there are two issues: first, blasphemy against the God of the Jews was not considered a crime under Roman law, and second, unless Caiaphas can come up with anything better, it may not be enough to persuade the Romans to execute Jesus unless he can come up with something better.
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Caiaphas’s fate

Caiaphas was dismissed from office shortly after Jesus’ death and retired to his farm in Galilee, where he lived in peace.

The case against Pontius Pilate

What was Pilate’s reasoning for executing Jesus when he thought him to be guiltless? Pilate was the Governor of Judea, which was a province of the Roman Empire at the time of Jesus’ death. He had 6,000 crack troops with him and another 30,000 on standby in neighboring Syria, according to reports.

When it came to keeping Rome happy, Pilate had total authority, including the power of life and death, as long as he kept the peace with the people. The argument against Pilate is that he judged Jesus not guilty, but ordered his execution in order to maintain public order and maintain the peace.

The two Pilates

We don’t know what Pilate was like in his personal life. The Bible portrays him as a weak but innocent guy who did not want to put a man to death who he felt was innocent, but who caved in to political pressure because he was weak. Some historians, however, are of the opposite opinion. Philo, who was writing at the time, described Pilate as cold-blooded, harsh, and merciless. He was presumably a typical Roman with a contempt for any other civilization, believing that the Jews were not nearly as civilized as the Romans were.

What were Pilate’s motives?

Pilate was determined to maintain the status quo. His ability to administer the province smoothly and effectively was critical to his future advancement in the Roman Empire. He had 6,000 soldiers on standby to preserve the peace in a metropolis with a population of 2.5 million Jews, which he commanded. The religious leaders, whose cooperation he required in order to live a peaceful life, urged him to put Jesus to death, and there was an angry throng clamoring for Jesus’ blood. It was conceivable that releasing Jesus would have sparked a riot, and Pilate may have lost control of the city and probably the entire province.

Passover

Despite his best efforts, Pilate failed to maintain the balance of power in Rome. The seamless and effective operation of the province was critical to his future advancement in the Roman Empire. For keeping the calm in a metropolis with a population of 2.5 million Jews, he relied on 6,000 soldiers on standby. An furious throng was baying for Jesus’ blood, and the religious leaders, whose cooperation he required for a peaceful existence, urged him to put Jesus to death. Pilate may have lost control of the city, and perhaps even the province, if he had allowed Jesus to be freed from his imprisonment.

A trial for treason

Instead of beginning with the conviction for blasphemy, Caiaphas asserted that Jesus was guilty of sedition, which was later overturned. Caiaphas said that Jesus believed himself, or that his supporters believed, or that people believed that he was the King of the Jews. The crime against Rome was a capital offense, and Pilate was obligated to deal with it, whether he wanted to or not. The rumor spread quickly throughout Jerusalem, claiming that Jesus of Nazareth was being tried for his life. Crowds began to form, some of whom were undoubtedly members of a mob organized by the Temple officials; this was exactly what a Roman governor looking for a quiet Passover did not want.

  1. Jesus didn’t say much or didn’t say anything at all.
  2. There was just no proof to support Jesus’ claims.
  3. The ruling infuriated the audience, who erupted in chants calling for Jesus’ execution on the cross.
  4. The alternative, on the other hand, was the execution of an innocent man.
  5. In ancient times, there were Passover amnesty laws in place, which authorized the Roman governor to free a prisoner during the holiday.
  6. They called for Barabbas to be liberated from his prison cell.

In his verdict, Pilate pronounced Jesus to be innocent and sentenced him to death by crucifixion. In front of the throng, he symbolically washed his hands, as if to assure them that he was not responsible for Jesus’ death.

Pilate’s fate

Pilate was summoned to Rome in order to face prosecution for his ruthless treatment of Jews, but the Emperor Tiberius died before the trial could take place, and Pilate was never prosecuted. It is believed that he committed suicide in 37 AD, not long after the crucifixion had taken place. In Christian belief, Pilate and his wife finally converted to Christianity, according to the Bible.

The case against Jesus

Did Jesus have any idea what he was getting himself into during the events leading up to his execution? Many scholars think that Jesus himself was the one most responsible for the killing of Jesus, more so than anybody else in history. There is a substantial amount of evidence to imply that everything he did was premeditated and that he was fully aware of the repercussions of his decisions.

Jesus’ motive

Jesus had a genuine belief that he was on a mission from God, and everything he did was in the service of that mission’s fulfillment.

Acting out the prophecy of the Messiah

When it comes to the events of Holy Week, it appears that Jesus is purposefully carrying out the prophesy in Hebrew scripture about Israel’s rightful ruler, the anointed one, the Messiah, who would come at long last to be God’s agent to rescue Israel. Even while his entry in Jerusalem on a donkey was a fulfillment of prophecy, it would not have been sufficient reason to have Jesus crucified on its own.

Attacking the religious establishment

When Jesus arrived to the Temple, he began not just a direct attack on the moneychangers’ business activities, but also a symbolic attack on the structure of the Temple itself. Jesus was well-versed in the religious traditions of his day, and he was well aware of the potential ramifications of his acts. He understood what it meant to declare the Temple’s destruction and to assert that a new kingdom, the Kingdom of God, was developing in its place. Jesus was well aware that the authorities would take action against him in due course, and he was well aware that the penalty would almost certainly be death.

But Jesus continued to put himself in harm’s way, staying in Jerusalem and celebrating the Passover with his disciples despite the threat.

In the midst of their meal, Jesus alluded to the bread they were eating as his broken body, and the crimson wine they were drinking as his spilled blood, as he sat with his disciples.

One of the Gospels records Jesus telling Judas, “Do what you have to do, but don’t take too long doing it.”

Jesus sweats blood

The account of Jesus’ night in Gethsemane provides compelling medical evidence that lends credence to the argument that he understood exactly what he was doing. It was at this place that Jesus was struck with a terrifying sense of uncertainty – was death, after all, what God had planned for him? He pleaded with God to save him from his predicament. It was at that point, according to St. Luke, who was himself a doctor, that Jesus sweated droplets of blood into the path in front of him. Doctors are aware that little blood veins supply the sweat glands that are found throughout our bodies.

The medical word for this condition is haematohydrosis, which means “blood sweat.” If Jesus had known what he was in for, he would have been unable to endure the tension, which would have caused him to break out in hives and sweat blood.

So was Jesus guilty of his own death?

Not in the sense of remorse that the majority of people would comprehend. A soldier who embarks on a mission that is almost guaranteed to result in death is a brave guy, not a coward or a criminal. However, Jesus was not culpable in the same way that Caiaphas and Pilate were. He remained true to his calling, even though it resulted in death.

The plot against Jesus (Matthew 26: 3–5) – The death and resurrection of Jesus – CCEA – GCSE Religious Studies Revision – CCEA

From the beginning of Jesus’ mission, there had been an increase in hostility toward him. This stage has been reached as a result of the ongoing battle with religious leaders. The chief priests and the elders, who were among Jesus’ adversaries, convened in secret in the house of Caiaphas, the high priest, to devise a plan to assassinate Jesus. The city of Jerusalem was thronging with Jews who had journeyed to the city to celebrate Passover. It was the religious authorities’ fear that the people would riot if they arrested Jesus at Passover that prevented them from arresting him.

His disciples, as well as a few others, were present.

Because of the high expense of the perfume, the disciples reacted violently to it.

The woman was accustomed to receiving negative feedback from others.

The anointing of Jesus was a foreboding sign of his impending death.

According to Jesus, the woman’s deeds were “good and lovely,” and “it is a fine and beautiful thing that she has done for me.” During his crucifixion, he was attempting to convey to the disciples what was going to take place.

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