Why Did Jesus Say The Father Is Greater Than I

If Jesus was God, why did He say, “The Father is greater than I” in John 14:28?

QuestionAnswer It was during the upper chamber conversation that Jesus spoke the words “the Father is greater than I,” which has a broader significance in that it refers to the promise of the Holy Spirit to the disciples following Jesus’ resurrection. Because Jesus claims to be executing the Father’s will on a number of occasions, it appears as though He is in some way subordinate to the Father. The argument then becomes, how can Jesus be equal to God since, according to His own admission, he is subject to God’s will in everything?

Jesus was momentarily “made lower than the angels” (Hebrews 2:9) during his incarnation, which relates to his social standing.

Because of this, Jesus was entirely human and “made lower than the angels” for all intents and purposes.

Jesus did not lose His divine character by taking on human humanity; God cannot cease to be God because God cannot cease to be God.

  1. That question is answered in Philippians 2:5-11, which is the book of Philippians.
  2. Christ “reduced himself to naught.” There has been more ink spilled on this sentence than nearly any other statement in the Bible.
  3. Another point to examine is the fact that subservience in role does not always imply subservience in essence or spirit.
  4. The employer has the authority to impose requirements on the employee, and the employee has the duty to comply with such requirements.
  5. In the end, though, both individuals remain human beings who share the same basic humanity.
  6. The fact that one is an employer and the other is an employee makes no difference in terms of the fundamental equality of these two persons as human beings in their fundamental nature.
  7. All three persons of the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit) are basically equal in nature; that is, they are all divine in their origin.
  8. The Father directs the Son, and both the Father and the Son command the Holy Spirit, according to the Bible.

As a result, the “greatness” referred to in this passage is related to function rather than substance. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) After all, if Jesus were God, why did He state in John 14:28, “The Father is greater than I”?

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Why Did Jesus Say My Father Is Greater than I?

The following comment was given by Jesus. You must have overheard me telling you, ‘I’m going away, and I’ll come to you.’ If you truly cared about me, you would have delighted in the fact that I am going to the Father, since the Father is greater than I am (John 14:28). As a result of this statement, many people have concluded that Jesus is somehow less important than God the Father. This, however, is not what Jesus stated at the time. He was not making a comparison between his own nature and that of God the Father.

  • When he arrived on Earth, he was in a less advantageous position.
  • This is referred to as His humiliation in certain circles.
  • Have the same attitude toward yourself that Christ had toward you.
  • He humbled himself by becoming submissive to the point of death, even death on a cross, after being discovered in the guise of a human being (Philippians 2:5-8).
  • Paul wrote a letter to the Philippians, which was a continuation of his thoughts.
  • Summary As a result of Jesus’ statement, “My Father is greater than I,” some have concluded that he was of a lower nature than God the Father.
  • It does not make any allusion to his fundamental character.

If Jesus is God why did He say, “My Father is greater than I”?

Because if Jesus is God, why did He declare in John 14:28, “You have heard Me tell to you, ‘I am going away and coming back to you,'” if He is God? If you truly loved Me, you would be glad that I said, ‘I am going to the Father,’ because My Father is greater than I am.

Bible Answer:

The first step in addressing the issue, “If Jesus is God, why did He say, ‘My Father is greater than I?” is to acknowledge that Jesus is not God. The first step is to recognize Jesus as God.

After that, we need to comprehend what Jesus was getting at when He said, “My Father is greater than I.” Two assertions that appear to be at odds with one another are not always at odds. His statement in John 14:28 is explained in detail in the next section.

Jesus Was and Is God

The Bible’s overarching message is that Jesus is the Son of the Living God. To the contrary, Jesus has already declared Himself to be and to be God earlier in the gospel of John. I But He said, “My Father is working until now, and I also am working,” as recorded in John 5:17-18. It was for this reason that the Jews were even more determined to murder Him, because He was not only breaking the Sabbath, but he was also calling God his own Father, thereby elevating himself to the status of God in their eyes.

The Bible states in John 8:58-59 that Jesus proclaimed to them: “Truly, truly,” he continued, “I tell you that I am the same as Abraham before he was born.” In response, they gathered stones to throw at Him, but Jesus quickly disguised himself and fled from the temple grounds to the outside world.

  • He used the word “to be” to announce that He was forever existing, which was a powerful statement.
  • He is the one and only Jehovah God.
  • “I have shown you many excellent acts from the Father; for which of them are you stoning Me?” Jesus responded to their question.
  • Those who are perplexed by Jesus’ remark, “I and the Father are one,” should take note of the fact that the Jewish authorities were not perplexed.
  • The second time Jesus made a similar comment was in John 14:9, when He stated to Philip, “Have I been with you for such a long time, and yet you have not come to know Me?
  • Jesus is God, just as the Father is God, according to John 14:9 (NASB).

Jesus Was Also a Man on Earth

Before making the remark, “the Father is greater than I,” in John 14:28, Jesus made a series of statements that He was and is God, including the following: I’m sure you’ve heard that I told you, ‘I’m going away, and I’ll come to you.’ If you truly loved Me, you would have delighted in the fact that I am going to the Father, since the Father is greater than I.” 14:28 (John 14:28) As a result, how should we interpret His statement?

  1. Without a doubt, Jesus is not contradicting Himself here.
  2. God the Father was greater than Jesus Christ while He was on earth in a human form, and this is the answer.
  3. God the Father was greater than Jesus Christ throughout His stay on earth in a human form.
  4. Concerning His Son, who was born of a descendant of David according to the flesh, who was declared the Son of God with authority by his resurrection from the dead, according to the Spirit of holiness, Jesus Christ our Lord.
  5. (NASB) Romans 1:3-4 is a biblical passage.
  6. Consider the passages in Hebrews 1:5-9, which teach that Jesus is God, and Hebrews 2:9, which declares that Jesus was placed lower than the angels for a brief period of time when He became a human being.

As stated in Hebrews 2:9 (NASB), Philippians 2:5-8 reveals that Jesus humbled Himself by becoming a man and dying on the cross for our sins.

My Father Is Greater Than I

This assists us in comprehending the phrase “the Father is bigger than I.” When it came to God the Father, He was superior because He was present in heaven in His splendour, however when it came to Jesus, He was made a bit lower than the angels because He was present on earth in human flesh (Hebrews 2:9). God the Father was greater in the sense that Jesus, as the God-man, had humbled Himself when He became a man, demonstrating His superiority. God the Father was superior in the sense that God the Father had the obligation to make all of the decisions, whereas Jesus was dedicated to complete and total obedience to the will of the Father (Philippians 2:7-8; Hebrews 2:9, 14).

We were promised that Jesus would demonstrate what it looked like.

Conclusion:

God the Father was superior in terms of authority, responsibility, and position, but he was not superior in essence. Jesus’ divinity had not been revoked.

Suggested Links:

Jesus Is the Son of God Is it true that just the human aspect of Jesus was crucified? What is the significance of Philippians 2:5-8? – Jesus existed as both God and man. Is Jesus the same person as God in terms of character?

How is the Father Greater than Jesus while also Equal?

There are many questions concerning the relationships that exist between members of the Trinity. The chapter of John 14 is frequently at the top of the list. In this case, I believe James White’s explanation is beneficial. I’m sure you’ve heard that I told you, ‘I’m going away, and I’ll come to you.’ It is possible that you did not rejoice because I was going to the Father since the Father is greater than I if you had loved Me” (John 14:28). If you ask someone who doubts Christ’s deity, there is probably no text that comes to their mind faster than John 14:28.

  1. The majority of the time, we simply see a portion of this paragraph cited.
  2. “I am nothing compared to the Father.” Isn’t that a succinct statement?
  3. It doesn’t get any easier than that, does it?
  4. What is the significance of Him referring to the Father as being greater than He is?
  5. He had already informed them that He was returning to the presence of the Father.
  6. Why?
  7. We can quickly perceive what the term “larger” refers to as a result.

Why would that be a reason for celebration?

He would no longer be wandering the dusty roads of Galilee, surrounded by sin, disease, and sorrow, but instead would be walking the streets of Jerusalem.

Instead, He would be seated at the right hand of the Father in the presence of the entire universe.

By taking on human flesh, the Son had deliberately (Philippians 2:6) relinquished His divine prerogatives and humbled himself before God the Father.

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Even if the disciples had not considered the consequences of Jesus’ remarks, they would have been delighted to learn that He was traveling to such a location.

Instead, they were preoccupied with themselves and their own requirements, rather than with the exaltation of their Lord. –James White, in his novel The Forgotten Trinity

What Did Jesus Mean When He Said, “The Father Is Greater Than I”?

The theology of the Trinity is riddled with contradictions. During his time on earth, Jesus stated that the Father was superior to him, referring to his transitory status on the planet. Points to Consider:

  • God dwells eternally in three separate people, according to the theology of the Trinity: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Take note of the words that are in italics. When we say that God is one, we are referring to his being or essence, not to his existence. As Christians, we refer to God as three distinct individuals, or trinity. The idea of the Trinity asserts that each person is endowed with all the characteristics of God in equal measure. Despite this, there is a fundamental difference in the way the three individuals interact to one another and operate in the outside world. “Equal in being, but inferior in role” is a simple statement that encapsulates this concept perfectly. Philippians 2:6-8
  • Hebrews 2:9
  • Philippians 2:6-8
  • The arrival of the Son of God on the world was marked by a unique occurrence. As the everlasting Second Person of the Trinity, Jesus Christ added a human nature to his previously existing God-nature. He did not become only human, but rather was both fully God and fully human at the same time
  • When Jesus said that the Father is “greater than he,” he was not referring to the Father’s inherent being or attributes
  • When Jesus said that the Father is “greater than he,” he was not referring to the Father’s inherent being or attributes. He was not acknowledging that he was inferior than God in any way. His transient function and self-imposed constraints on this planet, on the other hand, were being referred to. As a result of his death and resurrection, Jesus would depart from the world and relinquish all of his restraints, restoring him to full divine rights once more. 14:28 (John 14:28)

Discussion:

  1. What are your initial thoughts on this subject? What was it that stood out to you
  2. Describe the theology of the Trinity in your own words, if possible. Do you really believe it? Take a look at Philippians 2:6-8. What what does it mean for Jesus to have “renounced his divine rights”
  3. Take a look at John 17:5. It’s not clear what it means to say that Jesus and the Father shared “the glory” before the world started. Suppose someone asked you what the verse John 14:28 meant. What would you tell them? Is there something you need to do as a result of today’s discussion?

Why Does Jesus Say That the Father Is Greater Than He If the Members of the Trinity Are Equal?

The Trinity Dome is a structure in the shape of a cross. Image courtesy of J. Lippelmann of the Catholic Standard An often-asked question, especially around the time of Trinity Sunday, has its roots in the following verse from John’s Gospel: Even if you didn’t love me, you would be relieved that I am going to the Father, since the Father is far greater than I can ever be (Jn 14:28). The reason for this is a little perplexing because we are taught that each Divine Person of the Blessed Trinity enjoys the whole of the divine essence and is equally worthy of adoration and glory.

What was His point?

However, this is not the case.

As an illustration,

  • As St Augustine put it, “Let us confess then the twofold substance of Christ, the divine, which is equal to the Father, and the human, which is inferior.” Let us acknowledge the divine and human essence of Christ, which are both equal to the Father. Christ, on the other hand, is both, not two, but one Christ: otherwise, the Godhead is a quaternity, not a Trinitarian Godhead. As a result, He says, “If ye loved Me, ye would rejoice when I said, “I go to the Father,” because human nature should rejoice at being taken up by the Only Begotten Word and made immortal in heaven
  • At the earth being raised to heaven and dust sitting incorruptible at the right hand of the Father
  • And at the earth being raised to heaven and dust sitting incorruptible at the right hand of the Father.” When one realizes that his own nature is eternal in Christ, and hopes that He Himself will be immortalized by Christ, who could not be ecstatic about it? (Quoted in the Catena Aurea at John 14:28)
  • Didymus the Blind said that when Jesus says “greater,” he is implying that his divinity can be matched to the Father’s because they are both made of the same essence, but that the Father is greater because the Son accepted a body. The Son’s nature is regarded to be less than the Father’s nature inasmuch as the Son became man (Fragments on John at 14)
  • Hilary of Poitiers wrote, “By the birth of the Son, the Father is declared greater than the Son. “. It is in this way that the Son, born of the Father, is taken back to the glory of the Father(On the Trinity, 9:56)
  • Theodoret of Cyr had Jesus speak, stating, “Sometimes I claim that I am equal to the Father, and at other times I say that the Father is greater than me.” The fact that I am both God and a human person is not a contradiction
  • Rather, it is an illustration of my dual nature. I was speaking from the flesh, not from the person of the Divinity, when I said that the Father is greater than I was (Dialogue 1:56)
  • If you want to know how the Father is more than I was, look at the context of the passage.

As a result, the first answer is unambiguous: Jesus is equal to the Father in His divine nature, but He is inferior to the Father in His human nature. Even within the Trinity, however, it is conceivable to talk of a special greatness of the Father in a qualified fashion provided the context is understood correctly. While all three parts of the Trinity are co-eternal, co-equal, and equally divine, the Father is known as thePrincipium Deitatis, which means “Principal of the Divine Principle” (the Source in the Deity).

The Father is thePrincipium, the Son eternally proceeds from Him and is eternally begotten by Him (Jn 8:42); the Holy Spirit eternally proceeds from the Father and the Son as if they were two principals (Jn 8:44); the Holy Spirit eternally proceeds from the Father and the Son as if they were two principals (Jn 8:44); and the Holy Spirit eternally proceeds from the Father and the Son as if they were two principals (Jn 8:44).

  • (Jn 15:26).
  • In regards to these processions, the Athanasian Creed states the following: No one has created or begotten the Father; he is neither created nor born.
  • The Holy Spirit is a gift from the Father and the Son; he was not formed, nor created, nor conceived, but rather he is a gift that comes from them.
  • Thomas Aquinas describes the Trinity in lyrical terms: “Genitori, Genitoque.
  • compar at laudautio.” In this way, although the Persons of the Trinity are equal, there is an order to the processions within the Trinity.
  • It is possible that Jesus is speaking of the Father as greater in the sense that He always accomplishes what is pleasing to His Father from a devotional standpoint.
  • He is always mentioning Him and directing attention to Him.

Jn 5:19 says that I do what I see Him doing, and what I know pleases Him (Jn 5:30). As God, we have just one will; as humans, my human will and His human will are one and the same thing. What I intend to undertake is a result of His inspiration. “I do what I believe is in accordance with His will.”

“MY FATHER IS GREATER THAN I”

What is it about the line “My Father is greater than I” in John 14:28 that is so contentious? When a 4th century heretic named Arius claimed that if God the Father is greater than Jesus, then Jesus must be a creature and not God, those who denounced Arius stated as one of their counter-arguments that because Jesus was fully man and fully God during His earthly ministry, He must have been comparing only His humanity, and not His divinity, to God the Father, as one of their counter-arguments In the centuries since, generations of cults that deny Jesus’ divinity have repeated Arius’ heresy, and generations of Christians who have denounced them and Arius’ heresy have included many who have repeated the argument that Jesus must have been comparing only His humanity to God the Father in this verse, among others.

Do they have a point?

The first is that throughout His earthly career, Jesus, who was both completely God and totally human at the same time, declared, “My Father is greater than I,” not, “My Father is bigger than only my humanity.” To add insult to injury, claiming that someone is greater than only one aspect of yourself is really a snub, implying that the other person isn’t greater if the other aspect of yourself is taken into consideration.

Third, the passage’s context forbids Jesus from suddenly speaking solely about His humanity: “‘I am going to the Father,’ for My Father is greater than I” (John14:28); was Jesus intending to return to God the Father in heaven simply in His humanity and not as God the Son as the passage suggests?

It is true that heresy cannot be eradicated by deviating from the path of truth; rather, it must be confronted with what the Bible teaches, and the Bible has much to say about and demonstrate the divinity of Jesus (e.g.,The Word became Flesh,Before Abraham was I AM,I And My Father Are One,My Lord and My God,Jesus feeds 5000,Fear Not,Lazarus Come Forth,Resurrection of Jesus).

  1. “From forever to everlasting, You are God,” Jesus says in John 1:1, and one of God’s qualities is that He is eternal, which indicates that He has no beginning and no end: “From everlasting to everlasting, You are God” (Psalm 90:2).
  2. Is it possible that God the Father was the one who brought God the Son into being or gave him birth?
  3. What differentiates God the Father from God the Son?
  4. “The LORD our God, the LORD is one!” said the prophet.
  5. Does this make sense?
  6. Is it fair to give God the Father more credit than God the Son?
  7. Is God the Father deserving of greater reverence than God the Son?
  8. If such is the case, in what manner is God the Father “greater” than God the Son?
  9. As a result, God the Father is in a “better” position in their relationship from which to have “sent”God the Son into the world to save it, and then to get word of the mission’s “accomplished,” not that this was news to Him in the first place (seeSon of God).
  10. “For by Him all things were made, whether in the heavens and on the earth, both visible and invisible, whether thrones or lordships or rulers or authority,” says Jesus, our almighty Creator.

It is not His own magnificence that is diminished by His claim that God the Father is “greater,” but rather His humility that is enhanced by this confession.

John 14:28, “The Father is greater than I.”

I’m sure you’ve heard that I told you, ‘I’m going away, and I’ll come to you.’ If you truly loved Me, you would have delighted in the fact that I am going to the Father, since the Father is greater than I am.” (See also John 14:28.) Jesus stated that the Father was greater than He was not because Jesus was not God, but rather because Jesus was also a man, and as a man, He was in a lesser position than the Father was.

  • He was “. created to be a little lower than the angels for a short period of time.” (See also Hebrews 2:9).
  • Jesus was not denying that He was the Creator of the universe.
  • Jesus is both God and man at the same time.
  • He had incorporated human nature into his being (Col.
  • He transformed into a guy willing to die for others.
  • According to the Bible, a husband is superior to his wife in terms of position and power, but he is neither better or worse than his wife in terms of nature or character.
  • As a result, Jesus was not denying that He was the Son of God.
  • 4:4-5).
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Scriptures Quoted:

  1. According to Philippians 2:5-8, “Have this attitude in yourselves that was also in Christ Jesus6 who, although He existed in the form of the Father, did not regard equality with the Father as something to be grasped,7 but humbled Himself by taking the form of a bond-servant and being made in the likeness of men.” 8 And, having been discovered in human form, He humbled Himself by becoming submissive to the point of death, even death on a cross.” The Bible states in Col. 2:9, “For in Him all the fullness of Deity dwells in bodily form,” and in Gal. 4:4-5, “But when the fullness of time came, God sent forth His Son, born of a woman, born under the Law,5 in order that He might redeem those who were under the Law, that we might receive the adoption as sons.” For example, Heb. 2:9 reads, “But we do see Him who has been made for a short time lower than the angels,” referring to Jesus, who was crowned with glory and honor as a result of His suffering and death so that, by the mercy of God, He may taste death for everyone.

In John 14:28, what did Jesus mean when he said “my Father is greater than I?”

Any parent is entitled to deference 1from his son as a result of his position as a father, and this deference includes honor (). The children were instructed by Moses to “honor your mother and father.” 3As a result, the Lord Jesus Christ declared, “I honor my Father.” 4One way in which a son shows regard to his father is by calling him as “sir.” 5It was because of this occurrence that the Lord Jesus Christ approached the scribes and inquired, 635 Jesus responded when he was teaching in the Temple by saying, “How do the scribes claim that the Christ is the son of David?

36Because David himself, speaking by the Holy Spirit, said, “Yahveh said to my lord, “Sit at My right hand until I make your enemies your footstool.” ” 37 As a result, David himself addresses him as ‘lord.’ “How can it be that he is his son?” says the father.

Since David is his father, the Messiah’s son (i.e., descendant), the Messiah, is expected to offer David the reverence that David is due him.

Despite this, David addresses his descendent as “my lord” (i.e., my sir). Throughout this tale, the reverence that any son owes to his father is demonstrated. A distinct issue would be answered as to why David shows reverence to his son rather than his son showing deference to David.

Deference does not preclude equality of nature

In saying that “my father is greater than I” (v v), Jesus is saying nothing more or less than any other son would say about his own father in the same situation. Despite this, the natures of the son and father remain the same. Take, for example, Adam and Seth, who both have the same nature: That is, both individuals possess the attribute of “humanity,” or the quality of being human. Seth, on the other hand, would naturally declare of Adam, “My father is greater than I.” Similar to this, Jesus claims that his father (God the Father) is superior to him, despite the fact that both the Lord Jesus Christ (the Son) and God the Father have the same nature:.

Instead than stone him because they misunderstood him, they were prepared to do so due to their disagreement with his allegation.

Eternal Filial Subordination

“The Son is less than the Father owing to his humanity,” according to traditional Trinitarian doctrine. 9According to divinity, equal to the Father; less than 10according to humanity, equal to the Father Equalis Patri secundum divinitatem et minor Patri secundum humanitatem This idea, on the other hand, that the Son is only less than (i.e., subservient to) the Father because of his humanity, i.e., because of his incarnation, is contrary to Scripture. First and foremost, it is written that God the Father sent His Son into the world to save humanity.

  1. Steven Scherrer, a Roman Catholic priest, expresses his thoughts on the subject in the following way: 12The Father sent the Son into the world to save the world.
  2. A paternal-filial connection, in which the Son, while one in essence with the Father and hence equal with him in divinity is still sent by the Father and submissive to him, is characterized by an authority-submission dynamic and a paternal-filial relationship.
  3. Not in his essence or character, in which he is identical to his Father, but rather in his relationship with him as Son, is the Son’s subjection to his Father established.
  4. And this was true from the beginning of time, not simply while Jesus was a human being on earth.

John’s gospel, where Jesus is described as having been sent by the Father, for example: If the Son was sent into the world by the Father before the incarnation, then this occurred before to the incarnation, and the paternal/obedient filial bond between father and son existed prior to the incarnation as well as after.

  • What I’m talking about isn’t simply about Jesus as a human being who is subservient to his Father in his human form.
  • When we consider the Son’s exaltation, when he was glorified with the glory that he had with the Father before the creation of the world, 15and then ascended to Heaven, we would conclude that he is no longer less than or subordinate to the Father.
  • Even after his elevation and ascension, the Son is still referred to as being inferior to the Father in Scripture.
  • The fact that there is only one God, the Father, and one Lord Jesus Christ is commonly chanted in religious circles.
  • 19 Ultimately, 20the Son submits his dominion to the Father, and even at that point, according to the apostle Paul, 2128But when everything is subjected to him, then the Son himself shall also be reduced to Him who subjected everything to him, so that God is the source of all things.

This clearly demonstrates that the Son is subservient to the Father, regardless of whether or not he has taken on human form. The Son must thus be alluding to filial submission rather than just to a subordination that existed before the incarnation when he declares the Father is greater than him.

Summary

While he acknowledges his ontological equality with God the Father, the Lord Jesus Christ stresses his filial subordination () by saying, “My(not “our”) father is greater than me.” Remember from previously in the fourth gospel that it was those very same words (“my Father”) that the Jews interpreted of the Lord Jesus Christ as claiming equality with God the Father.

Footnotes

1 Dictonary of the Oxford English Dictionary: deference (n.): 3. Courteous consideration shown to a superior or a person who deserves respect; the demonstration of a willingness to surrender to the demands or wishes of another. to, for, or as a result of 2 Greek is an abbreviation for “greek language.” 3 The LXX version of Exodus 20:12 reads, “O ye of little faith, see, I am a child of God.” 4 John 8:42: « » (Italian for “I am”). 5 “Sir,” being an English term, has Latin equivalents:dominus (LewisScott, p.609,dominus, B., 5) or the Aramaic loanword adon (Alcalay, p.24, adon); Greek: adon (LSJ, p.1013, adon, B., b); Hebrew: adon (Alcalay, p.24, adon); Hebrew: .

  1. 2:6–9) 98John 5:17–1 (KJV) the 89th Athanasian Creed ed10minor Patreis is an abbreviation for compariso.
  2. 11John 3:16 is a biblical passage.
  3. 8:61 (II Cor.
  4. 1.

References

“The Subordination of the Son,” by John V. Dahms, et al. The Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society (JETS) published a third issue in September 1994, with pages 351–364. Steven Scherrer is the author of this article. The Death of Jesus Christ as a Vicarious, Sacrificing, and Atoning Sacrifice: How We Benefit from His Death iUniverse, New York, USA, 2010. Bruce Ware is a writer and poet. Relationships between the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, as well as their roles and relevance.

PLEASE NOTE: Unless otherwise stated, all English translations of foreign-language literature are my own work.

John 14:28 You heard Me say, ‘I am going away, and I am coming back to you.’ If you loved Me, you would rejoice that I am going to the Father, because the Father is greater than I.

New International Version (New International Version) I said, ‘I’m going away and I’m coming back to you,’ and you heard me say it. Even if you didn’t love me, you would be relieved that I am going to the Father, since the Father is more bigger than I am myself. New Living Translation (New Living Translation) You should keep in mind what I told you: I’m leaving, but I’ll be back to see you. If you truly cared about me, you would be delighted that I am going to my heavenly Father, who is far greater than I am myself.

  • But you did not.
  • The fact that I am going to the Father would bring you joy if you truly loved Me.
  • The Literal Bible of the Bereans You heard me tell you, “I’m going away and I’m coming to you,” and you took it as a compliment.
  • But you didn’t.
  • If you truly loved me, you would delight in the fact that I said, “I go unto the Father,” because my Father is far greater than I am.
  • Me saying to you, ‘I am going away and returning back to you,’ is something that you have heard.
  • The New American Standard Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.
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If you truly loved Me, you would have delighted in the fact that I was being taken to the Father, since the Father is greater than I am.

NASB 1977 (National Association of School Boards) I’m sure you’ve heard that I told you, ‘I’m going away, and I’ll come to you.’ It is possible that you would have rejoiced if you had loved Me, since I am going to the Father; because the Father is greater than I am.

It is because I am going to the Father that you would have rejoiced if you loved Me.

The Christian Standard Bible is a translation of the Bible in the Christian tradition.

Even if you didn’t like me, you would be happy that I was going to the Father, since the Father is far greater than I am.

If you truly loved Me, you would have delighted in my ascension to the Father, knowing that the Father is greater than I.

The American Standard Version is the version used in the United States.

But you did not love me.

If you truly care about me, you should be relieved that I am returning to the Father, for he is far greater than I am.

Translation of the Good News You may have overheard me remark to you, ‘I’m leaving, but I’ll be back to see you.’ If you truly cared about me, you would be relieved that I am returning to the Father, who is far bigger than I am.

Standard Version in its literal sense You must have heard me say to you, “I’m going away, and I’m coming to you.” In the event that you had loved Me, you would have rejoiced when I stated, “I go to the Father,” knowing that My Father is greater than I am.

You heard me tell you, ‘I’m going away and I’ll get back to you,’ and you believed me.

NET Bible is an abbreviation for Networked Information Technology.

Even if you didn’t love me, you would be relieved that I am going to the Father, since the Father is far larger than I am in importance.

The New Heart English Bible is a translation of the New Heart Bible.

Weymouth The New Testament is a collection of writings that were written during the years of ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad “In your presence, you overheard me remark to you, “I’m leaving, but I’m also coming to you.” If you truly loved me, you would have delighted in the fact that I was being taken to the Father, since the Father is greater than I.

The English Bible for the Whole World You’ve heard me say, ‘I’m going away, and then I’m coming to you.’ If you had loved me, you would have rejoiced when I said, “I’m going to my Father,” because the Father is greater than I.

Young’s Literal Translation of the Text If ye had loved me, you would have rejoiced when I said to you, “I go away, and I come unto you.” If ye had loved me, you would have delighted when I said, “I go on to the Father, since my Father is greater than I.” Translations in addition to the above.

  1. Do not allow your hearts to be worried, and do not allow yourself to be terrified.
  2. 29 You’ll trust me because I’ve told you before it happens, so when it does happen, you’ll be ready to believe me.
  3. 10:29 (John 10:29) It is My heavenly Father, who has given them to Me, who is greater than anything else.
  4. John 14:2 (KJV) There are several rooms in my Father’s house.
  5. John 14:3 (KJV) And if I go ahead and make a space for you, I will return and welcome you into My presence, allowing you to be where I am as well as you can be.
  6. Because I am going to the Father, he will be able to accomplish much greater things than these.
  7. Paul writes in Philippians 2:6 that Who, while living in the form of God, did not believe equality with God to be something to be grasped, was the author of the book of Genesis.

You recall my telling you that I was going to leave you and then return to you.

Revelations 14:3,18 Moreover, if I go and prepare a place for you, I will return and bring you into my own home, so that where I am, they may be as well.

If.

Psalm 47:5-7 (KJV) God has risen with a resounding cry, and the LORD has sounded with the blast of a trumpet.

I’m leaving.

16:16 (John 16:16) Because I am going to the Father, you will not see me for a little period of time, and then you will see me again for a short period of time.

Father.

John 10:30,38 (KJV) My Father and I are one.

(28)Ye have heard what I have said to you before.

(See, for example, John 14:19-20.) If ye truly cared for me, ye would be overjoyed.

Their grief at His death was primarily selfish, as is the case with all grief for people who have gone to be with God, no matter how insignificant we believe it to be.

It was also a practical solution for them.

– These words have naturally become the subject of debate throughout the history of the Church, dividing those who deny and those who believe that the Son is “very God, of the substance of the Father, begotten before all worlds” from those who deny and those who believe.

The claim that the Father is greater than the Son simply in terms of the human character of the Son has been made by some who affirm the divine nature; nevertheless, this is not the case in this passage.

The following passages are examples of such texts:John 14:16; John 17:5; 1 Corinthians 3:23; 1 Corinthians 11:3; 1 Corinthians 15:27-28; Philippines 2:9; Philippians 2:11, and notably the Note on John 5:19 and subsequent verses.

If we attempt to envision a man saying, “God is bigger than I,” we immediately get the impression that the One who uttered them was claiming for Himself that He was genuinely God in the first place.

28.- Verse 28 is the final verse.

The disciples are to put their worries and fears aside because of (1) the numerous mansions that he is preparing; (2) the fact that he was the “Way” to the Father; (3) the fact that they had experienced a theophany in him;.

Greek You’ve heard it before.

Meἐγὼ(egō) a personal or possessive pronoun in the nominative case 1st Person Pronoun SingularStrong’s 1473:I, the first-person pronoun, is a good example of this.

SingularStrong’s 2036:Answer, bid, bring word, and command are all possible.

The phrase “I’m leaving,” or “I’m leaving,” is in the present indicative active in the first person singular.5217:to Strong’s leave, depart, begone, die.

and(kai)ConjunctionStrong’s 2532: and, even more importantly, specifically.

ἔρχομαι(erchomai) Indicative of the Present Tense Middle of the road or passive For example, 1st Person SingularStrong’s 2064: “Come, go.” toπρὸς(pros) Preposition Strong’s 4314: to, toward, and with.

Hymas is a personal / possessive pronoun that is used in the accusative.

Ifεἰ(ei) ConjunctionStrong’s 1487:If is an example of a conjunction.

You adored this particle.

Perhaps it comes from agan, which means “to love.” Personal / Possessive Pronoun – Accusative – Me, (me) Strong’s 1473:I, the first-person pronoun, is the first-person singular.

ἐχάρητε(echarēte) Aorist Indicative Passive Aorist Indicative Passive – 2nd Person PluralStrong’s 5463:A primary verb; to be ‘cheer’ful, i.e.

πορεύομαι(poreuomai) Indicative of the Present Tense Middle of the road or passive – 1st Person Pronoun SingularStrong’s 4198 is as follows: To travel, journey, go, and die are all words that come to mind.

It is a more developed form of pro; it is a preposition of direction; it means “forward to,” or “toward.” theτὸν(ton) Strong’s 3588:the, the definite article, is an accusative masculine singular adverbial.

Father,Πατέρα(Patera) The noun accusative masculine singularStrong’s 3962:Father, (Heavenly) Father, ancestor (in the spiritual sense), elder (in the literal sense), senior (in the figurative sense).

This includes all of the inflections of the feminine he as well as the neuter to; the definite article; and the.

It is, it exists.

I exist in the first person singular present indicative; it is a protracted form of a primary and deficient verb; it is in the first person singular present indicative.

I.μού(mou) Possessive Personal Pronoun – Genitive Form 1st Person Pronoun Singular Strong’s 1473:I, the pronoun in the first person.

Return to the previous page GladGreaterHeardLovedMind RejoiceRejoiced Continue to Next Page GladGreaterHeardLovedMindRejoiceRejoiced Links John 14:28 (New International Version) John 14:28 New Living Translation ESV translation of John 14:28 John 14:28 New American Standard Bible John 14:28 King James Version 14:28 (John 14:28) BibleApps.com Biblia de John 14:28 Paralela Chinese translation of John 14:28 French translation of John 14:28 Revelation 14:28 (Catholic Bible) Gospels of the New Testament: 14:28 (John 14:28) You recall how I told you, ‘I’m sorry’ (Jhn Jo Jn)

Is the Father Greater than Jesus?

The divinity of Christ is demonstrated by John 17:5 and other scriptures. However, John 14:28, which states “The Father is greater than I,” has been a subject of contention among skeptics. Was Jesus a lesser God than the other gods? Was Jesus on an equal footing with the Father, or was he a sort of junior God, holding the qualities of deity but falling short of the overall picture of the divine that the Old Testament paints? One of the numerous scriptures in the Bible that plainly reveals that Jesus completely shared the divine qualities and as such is deserving of worship is John 17:5.

If the assertion in this verse is correct, how does John 14:28’s meaning change as a result?

In this chapter, the disciples are distraught because Jesus has informed them that he would be leaving them.

As a result, if people truly understand and love Jesus as he deserves to be loved, they will be relieved that he is returning to the world where he is truly greater than all other things.

The statement “The president of the United States is greater than I” does not imply that the president is a being with ontological superiority to the one who makes the statement.

We are all equal in terms of being human beings.

D.

Carson.

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