Where Was Capernaum In Jesus Time

Capernaum

Capernaum, located in northern Israel’s Galilee region, is a Biblical settlement. It is located in close proximity to other significant Christian sites in Israel. There are several of these, including Bethsaida, the Mount of Beatitudes, and Tabgha, as well as the Jordan River and the city of Tiberias, which are all located on the northern coast of the Sea of Galilee. The settlement of Kfar Nahum (Talhum in Arabic) now exists on the site where the ancient city of Capernaum once stood. Every year, hundreds of pilgrims and visitors from all over the globe come to this location to pay their respects.

History of Capernaum

Capernaum was one of the most important trading centers in the Gennesaret region during biblical times. It was a thriving and affluent section of Palestine, with a population of around 1,500 people, the most of whom were fisherman. On the Via Maris, a large number of passengers, caravans, and tradesmen passed through Capernaum. Historically, it served as a major commerce route linking Damascus in the north to Cairo in the south. Today, a mile stone from the Via Maris route may still be found at Capernaum.

The fact that Capernaum did not exist in the Old Testament can be attributed to its late foundation.

Capernaum in the New Testament

Although Jesus was born in Bethlehem, raised in Nazareth, and preached in Jerusalem, it was during his crucial Galilean Ministry years that he spent the majority of his time in Capernaum, where he performed the majority of his miracles. As a result, Capernaum became his home, and the Bible refers to it as Jesus’ “own city.” After being tempted in the wilderness, according to Matthew 4:13, Jesus left Nazareth and went to live in Capernaum, according to the Bible. Here Jesus met James, John, Peter, and Andrew, all of whom were fishermen, as well as Matthew, a tax collector, all of whom would become his followers.

Visiting Capernaum

Capernaum is a popular destination for tourists who come to Israel to see the country’s historical and religious landmarks. While it is feasible to travel to the site on your own, our Highlights Around the Sea of Galilee Tour is the most comprehensive approach to see the site and its surroundings.

The Ancient Synagogue

It was in the synagogue of Capernaum that Jesus delivered the Sermon on the Mount of Olives (John 6:35-59), in which he said, “Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day.” Although dating the synagogue has been difficult, many assume that the synagogue from this period was constructed of black basalt rock and that it currently sits beneath a more contemporary building.

Jesus would routinely deliver sermons at this synagogue (John 6:59, Luke 4:33).

The centurion is credited with ordering the construction of the synagogue (Luke 7:3).

It is estimated that the old synagogue was destroyed and then replaced in the year 200AD.

It is made of white stone, as opposed to the distinctive black basalt rock that is utilized for the other Capernaum structures. Some of the stucco work, frescoes, and motif carvings on the walls, as well as inscriptions in Greek and Aramaic honoring the synagogue’s patrons, may still be seen today.

The Church and House of Peter

Researchers discovered an early Christian dwelling in Capernaum that was supposed to have been Peter’s residence at the time. Jesus is said to have healed Peter’s mother-in-law here (Matthew 8:14-16), and it is believed that he resided in this house during his time in Capernaum. This is the location where Christ healed a paralytic who was lowered into the church from the ceiling (Mark 2:1-12). Following Jesus’ death, the house was transformed into a place of worship. It differs from other houses due to a number of structural modifications.

  1. There are several inscriptions in Greek, Armenian, Spanish, and Latin on the old stones, which date back thousands of years.
  2. There is a glass floor, which allows you to see the antique original church below you while inside.
  3. Believers can sit on the stone seats in the old synagogue where Jesus would have sat and stroll the streets where he would have walked.
  4. In 2000, Pope John Paul II paid a visit to this important Christian pilgrimage destination.

Kfar Nahum

Kfar Nahum is the location of a Franciscan monastery and a Greek Orthodox church in modern times. There are also the remnants of numerous old stone dwellings, as well as the Biblical home of Peter, the church, and the synagogue, all of which may be found in the vicinity.

Area Near Capernaum

Capernaum is located in the Sea of Galilee in the lovely Galilee area of northern Israel, near the town of Nazareth. There are a variety of exciting things to do in the surrounding region, ranging from seeing some of the most important Christian sites in Israel to engaging in fun adventures and leisure activities.

Capernaum – The Town of Jesus (from the first century until today)

Capernaum, known in the Bible as “the town of Jesus,” is located on the northern coast of the Sea of Galilee in northern Israel, and is referred to as “the town of Jesus.” There are several more significant biblical sites in the vicinity, including Tabgha, the Church of the Beatitudes, and the Church of St. Peter the Primate, all of which are frequently referenced in the New Testament.

Jesus in Capernaum

The name ‘Capernaum’ is derived from two Hebrew words: ‘kfar’ means hamlet and ‘Nachum’ is a man’s name; hence, Nachum’s village is the basis of the name. It is unclear which Nachum is being referred to by the moniker. A sign proclaiming Capernaum as “the town of Jesus” greets visitors as they arrive at the town’s gate. As a town associated with Jesus in the New Testament, Capernaum is also referred to as such. How did this little hamlet, rather than Jerusalem or Nazareth, come to be known as the birthplace of Jesus Christ?

  • After being baptized at the Jordan River by John the Baptist, Jesus returned to his hometown of Nazareth.
  • Jesus traveled to Jerusalem on several occasions, and it was there that he was crucified, buried, and risen.
  • Capernaum was where Jesus stayed while on his trip to spread the gospel.
  • On the northern bank of the Sea of Galilee, in this region, Jesus picked his twelve disciples.
  • Five of them — Peter, Andrew, James, John, and Matthew – were brought immediately from Capernaum, while the rest of the disciples arrived from the surrounding Galilee region of the region.
  • More than fifty times in the New Testament, the town of Capernaum is named, making it the second-most-mentioned location behind Jerusalem.
  • Because he desired to be near to the Golan Heights, Jesus decided to dwell at Capernaum rather than Tiberias, which was a larger and more prominent city at the time.
  • He was the one who assassinated John the Baptist.
  • As a result, Jesus would be able to go quickly to the Golan Heights in times of peril.

He desired to remain in the Galilee since it was there where the majority of the Jews resided. However, despite the fact that Capernaum was a little community, it was located along an important route that connected it to Damasco. It was an excellent setting for meeting and influencing others.

Capernaum in Jesus’ time

A structure that resembles a space shuttle greets visitors as they arrive at the village’s entrance. The Franciscans completed the construction of this church in 1990. The Franciscans purchased the property in 1894 and dug the land before constructing a structure on it. Many churches in Israel have been built using archeological finds from old churches that had been destroyed in earlier centuries. In this particular instance, they opted to construct a new church that floats over the historic church and is supported by exterior pillars on either side.

  1. Located atop a historic chamber that has been recognized as the House of St.
  2. The first church is supposed to have been established here, as it was the initial meeting site for Jesus’ disciples.
  3. The home is referenced several times in the New Testament, including as the location where Jesus cured Peter’s mother-in-law, among other things.
  4. Inscriptions naming Jesus in a handful of different languages, as well as other Christian symbols, were discovered in layers of plaster on the walls of the building.
  5. In the 5thcentury, the site was transformed into an octagonal church, which is documented in pilgrims’ writings to this day.
  6. Modern statue of St.
  7. The statue was constructed in the year 2000, just before Pope John Paul II paid a visit to the city.
  8. Peter is believed to be the first Pope, and as a result, visitors visiting the Holy Land value the locations associated with the Apostle Peter.
  9. Visitors get the opportunity to wander around a place that has remained virtually untouched since the time of Christ.

The Synagogue in Capernaum

A few basic basalt dwellings may be found to the north of the church. There were no sewage or drainage systems discovered. Capernaum was a twon that ranged in size from small to medium. The majority of the people lived their lives as fisherman or farmers. The large white synagogue stands out in stark contrast to the little black dwellings in the neighborhood. In 1838, the synagogue was found and excavated by Heinrich Kohl and Carl Watzinger, two German archaeologists who were doing study on ancient synagogues in the Galilee at the time of discovery.

  1. This structure’s white limestone, which was brought in from a great distance away, as well as its adornment, suggest that a prosperous Jewish population flourished in this area during the Byzantine era.
  2. Despite the fact that it was constructed five hundred years after Jesus’ death, the Franciscans assert that the synagogue that genuinely dates from Jesus’ time is located beneath the one that survives today.
  3. On a Saturday morning, a miracle occurred in the synagogue: Jesus expelled an unclean spirit from the body of a man (Luke 4, 31-35).
  4. The wicked was the one who was the first to see the good.
  5. He goes into detail on the significance of bread in Christianity as well as the meaning of the mass.
  6. Some of them have Jewish symbols emblazoned on them.
  7. Capernaum, on the other hand, remained to exist for many years.

For hundreds of years, Jews and non-Jews who professed faith in Jesus coexisted peacefully side by side. In fact, it was not until the Muslim era, in the middle of the eighth century, that Capernaum was completely devastated, most likely as a result of the great earthquake of 749.

Modern-day Capernaum

Until the discovery of the site by British archeologist Charles Wilson in 1866, the location of Capernaum remained a mystery for more than a thousand years. At the end of the nineteenth century, the Franciscans purchased the majority of the site and began excavating it. Capernaum is now a Franciscan archeological site that is managed by the Franciscans. The Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Apostles is located right next to it. The entrance charge is three shekels. Hours of operation: 8:00-17:00 For further details, please see: Website for the town of Capernaum Right now, you can purchase my three booklets – Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, and Masada – from me directly for 19€ each, and you will receive the PDF and EPUB versions for free!

  • Take a look at all of my merchandise.
  • Are you planning a vacation to Israel?
  • I want my website to be the most comprehensive source of information on traveling to Israel available.
  • To find out what you want to know, please write down any questions you have in this section, and I will do my best to respond to them.
See also:  When Did Peter See Jesus After The Resurrection

Capernaum at the Time of Jesus

Until the discovery of the site by British archeologist Charles Wilson in 1866, the location of Capernaum had remained a mystery for more than 1,000 years. Towards the end of the nineteenth century, the Franciscans purchased a large portion of the site and began excavations there. Capernaum is now a Franciscan archeological site that is maintained by the order. The Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Apostles is located directly across the street from the cathedral. 3 shekels is required for entry.

  • Here’s where you can find out more: Internet address for Capernaum.
  • For 9.90€, you can get the PDF or EPUB.
  • Also available on Amazon is a set of booklets.
  • Here’s what you should know.
  • The finest source of information regarding traveling to Israel is what I want this website to be, so please check it out.
  • To find out what you want to know, please put down any questions you have in this section, and I will try my best to respond to each one.
Ruins of a synagogue built on top of the original in Kfar Nahum. By Yourway-to-israel – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0,The shoreline of the Sea of Galilee moves according to how much water the lake contains. Although there are ruins, the exact location of Kfar Nahum is uncertain. Evidently, there was a fertile spring in Kfar Nahum, creating an oasis and providing fresh, clean water.Below is an artist’s conception of what Peter’s home may have looked like.

Capernaum was a tiny Jewish fishing and agricultural village on the northwest bank of the Sea of Galilee that was founded by Jesus in the first century AD. It appears to have served as a primary base of operations for Jesus, with Matthew 9:1 referring to it as “Jesus’ own city.” This location was the hometown of Jesus’ followers Simon, Andrew, James, and John, according to Mark 1:29 (KJV). This location serves as the setting for well-known stories such as Jesus’ invitation to a tax collector to follow him (Mark 2:12-17), his preaching and exorcism of a synagogue (Mark 1:21-28,Luke 4:31-37), the healing of Simon’s mother-in-law (Matt 8:14-15,Mark 1:29-31,Luke 4:38-39), and the healing of a paralytic man (Matt 8:14-15, (Matt 9:1-8,Mark 2:1-12).

  1. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, a number of researchers investigated and excavated areas of the site.
  2. The most well-known finds include a limestone synagogue built in the late fourth or early fifth century C.E.
  3. The church is built on the foundations of a first-century mansion that had undergone substantial renovations in the centuries before it.
  4. Several historians think that the old architectural remnants beneath the octagonal church are in reality the disciple’s house, based on a fourth-century Christian pilgrim’s account that she saw Peter’s house.
  5. It was primarily Jews in this region who used stone containers, thinking them to be impenetrable to toritual impurity, as evidenced by the presence of fragments from stone vessels among the village’s exclusively Jewish population.

Today, the well-preserved ruins of Capernaum are a popular pilgrimage and tourist site due to their exceptional preservation.

Have archaeologists discovered the synagogue where Jesus taught?

At the early twentieth century, archaeologists were convinced that the limestone synagogue in Capernaum was the one constructed by the centurion recounted in Matthew 8:5-13 and Luke 7:1-10. Later researchers speculated that the synagogue may have been built in the second or third century C.E. based on its architectural features. On the basis of pottery evidence, coin findings, and stylistic factors, the building’s construction is now generally accepted to have taken place in the late fourth or early fifth centuries C.E.

Because a full excavation of the basalt structures would necessitate the destruction of the limestone synagogue, it seems probable that this question will never be definitively answered.

Were Roman soldiers stationed at Capernaum in the time of Jesus?

Some scholars, unsurprisingly, believe that the centurion referenced in Matthew 8:5-13 and Luke 7:1-10 was a member of the Roman military. It should be noted that, while both gospels refer to the centurion as a Gentile, neither of them refers to him as a Roman, and it seems improbable that Capernaum was home to a Roman garrison in the first century. Galilee was then part of the kingdom of Antipas, a Herodianclient-king who served at the pleasure of the Romans but enjoyed a certain amount of autonomy in his administration.

Galilee was not continuously occupied by Roman forces until the second century C.E., according to historical evidence.

The fact that the armies of the Herodian rulers contained Jews as well as Gentiles, and since they were occasionally organized following Roman lines, it seems possible that the tradition underpinning the gospels’ tale originally related to an officer in Antipas’ army.

Chancey’s “Capernaum,” n.p., is available online.

Contributors

Professor of religious studies at the Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Mark A. Chancey is a member of the American Academy of Religion. In addition to the historical Jesus, archaeology and the Bible, and the political and social history of Roman-period Palestine, his research interests also include questions of church-state relations as well as religion and modern public education. He is the author of two works published by Cambridge University Press: The Myth of a Gentile Galilee (2002) andGreco-Roman Culture and the Galilee of Jesus (2005), as well as the coauthor of Alexander to Constantine: Archaeology of the Land of the Bible (Cambridge University Press, 2008).

  • Excavated, frequently from an archaeological site.
  • a person who does not identify as Jewish Unauthorized inscriptions or graphics scrawled on a wall or in another public area are considered graffiti.
  • (See also “purity” (HCBD) for more information.) Of or pertaining to any of various branches of Christianity, particularly those originating in Eastern Europe and the Middle East, whose adherents may trace their lineage back to the early Christian communities.
  • a journey of religious meaning, which is generally undertaken Ceremonies held in a group with a common emphasis on a god or gods are known as collective ceremonies.
  • He then boarded a boat and traveled across the sea to his home town of Matthew 9:11.
  • Mark 2:12-17 is an example of a parable.
  • Their astonishment was piqued by his instruction, f.

32 Because of this, they were taken aback by his instruction.

8:14-15 (KJV) Jesus Heals a Large Number of People at Peter’s House 14When Jesus entered Peter’s house, he found his mother-in-law lying in bed with a fever;15he gently stroked her hand, and the fever subsided immediately.

Jesus Heals a Large Number of People at Simon’s House After leaving the synagogue, they went straight to the residence of Simon and Andrew, where they were joined by James and John.

Luke 4:38-39 (New International Version) Simon’s House is a place of healing.

Now that Simon’s mother-in-law was suffering from a high fever, they approached him and requested him to help.

A Paralytic is healed by Jesus.

See more of Mark 2:1-12.

He returned to Capernaum after many days, and it was claimed that he had returned to his house in the meantime.

Observe further information 5-13 in Matthew 8:5-13 Jesus Heals the Servant of a Centurion In Capernaum, five centurions came up to him, pleading with him6and explaining that one of his servants was disabled and needed to be brought to him.

Observe further information Luke 7:1–10 is a biblical text. Jesus Heals the Servant of a Centurion 1After Jesus had concluded all of his teachings in front of the crowds, he entered the town of Capernaum. 2There was a slave who belonged to a centurion. Observe further information

An excavation site where ancient items are unearthed or otherwise disclosed. 5-13 in Matthew 8:5-13 Jesus Heals the Servant of a Centurion In Capernaum, five centurions came up to him, pleading with him6and explaining that one of his servants was disabled and needed to be brought to him. Observe further information Luke 7:1–10 is a biblical text. Jesus Heals the Servant of a Centurion 1After Jesus had concluded all of his teachings in front of the crowds, he entered the town of Capernaum. 2There was a slave who belonged to a centurion.

  • An adjective denoting or referring to the reign of the Herodian dynasty, who ruled Palestine from 55 BC until the end of the first century C.E., or to the family’s descendants.
  • 5-13 in Matthew 8:5-13 Jesus Heals the Servant of a Centurion In Capernaum, five centurions came up to him, pleading with him6and explaining that one of his servants was disabled and needed to be brought to him.
  • Jesus Heals the Servant of a Centurion 1After Jesus had concluded all of his teachings in front of the crowds, he entered the town of Capernaum.
  • Observe further information The majority of the Hebrew Bible, with the exception of sections of Daniel and Ezra, is written in this West Semitic language.
  • In the first century C.E., a Jewish historian lived in Rome.
  • Along with the Old Testament, the Christian Bible is comprised of a collection of works from the first century that were written by Jews and Christians.

The third part of the Jewish canon is known by the Hebrew term Ketuvim, which means “three divisions.” The Torah (Pentateuch) and Nevi’im (Prophets) are the other two parts; when all three divisions are added together, the acronym Tanakh is formed, which is the Jewish word for the Hebrew Bible.

Matthew 8:5-13Jesus Heals the Servant of a Centurion In Capernaum, five centurions came up to him, pleading with him6and explaining that one of his servants was disabled and needed to be brought to him.

Jesus Heals the Servant of a Centurion 1After Jesus had concluded all of his teachings in front of the crowds, he entered the town of Capernaum.

Observe further information

Capernaum (BiblePlaces.com) – BiblePlaces.com

Tell Hum is also known by the names Khirbet Karazeh, Bethsaida, Capharnaum, Chorazin, Kefar Nahum, Kafarnaum, Kefar Tanhum, Talhum, Tanhum, and Tanhum. Capharnaum is also known by the names Capharnaum, Chorazin, and Capharnaum.

Aerial View

Built near the shores of the Sea of Galilee, the town of Capernaum existed from the 2nd century BC to the 7th century AD and had a population of up to 1,500 people at its peak. The remains are currently controlled by two churches: the Franciscans own the western section of the site, which includes the synagogue, and the Greek Orthodox Church, which is distinguished by its white church with red domes.

View from the Sea

The town of Capernaum served as Jesus’ base of operations during the years of his ministry: “Leaving Nazareth, He went and dwelt in Capernaum” (Matt 4:13). Peter, Andrew, James, and John were four brothers who worked as fisherman in the area. Matthew, the tax collector, was also a resident of this location. Capernaum is one of three cities condemned by Jesus because of its lack of faith. The other two cities are Nazareth and Jerusalem.

The Synagogue

Although the exact era of construction of this synagogue is debatable, it is known that it was built after the first century. During excavations, it was discovered that the synagogue was built in the time of Jesus, with walls constructed of worked stone that were 4 feet (1.2 m) thick. These previous walls were retained up to a height of three feet (0.9 m). The whole western wall, which was utilized as the foundation for the subsequent synagogue, is still standing today.

See also:  Why Didn T Nicodemus Follow Jesus

The Synagogue

While preaching in this location, Jesus was approached by a demoniac (Mark 1:21-27). Jesus cured the servant of a centurion in the town of Capernaum. The synagogue is assigned to this Roman officer, who is said to have built it (Luke 7:3). In this synagogue, Jesus preached about the food of life, which he called “the bread of life” (John 6:35-59).

The House of Peter

Excavations uncovered a home that stood out from the rest of the structures. This home was the focus of early Christian concern, as shown by 2nd-century graffiti and a house church erected above it in the 4th century AD. A massive octagonal Byzantine church, complete with a baptistery, was built atop this in the 5th century. It is still standing today. These buildings were referred to be the “home of the apostle Peter” by pilgrims.

Download all of our Galilee and the North photos!

There was one home that stood out among the rest that was discovered during the excavations. With 2nd-century graffiti and a 4th-century house church constructed above it, this home was the focus of early Christian devotion. An octagonal Byzantine church, complete with a baptistery, was built on top of the structure in the 5th century. As the residence of the apostle Peter was known to pilgrims, it was also known as such.

Capernaum – The town of Jesus

This village, located on the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee, served as the focal point of Jesus’ and his town’s activity during that time period. Excavations revealed a magnificent Synagogue from the 4th century AD, which had existed over the Synagogue since the time of Jesus. Sites of InterestSea of Galilee Capernaum is a town in the region of Capernaum (Kefar Nachum, Nahum) Contents: Background Information, Location History, and Photographs Overview Synagogue Synagogue from the past Village in the Roman Empire Peter’s residence and the new church Farming References from the Bible References in History Etymology

Background:

Capernaum was the focal point of Jesus’ activity in the Galilee and in his hometown at the time of his death. Jesus delivered his sermons in the local synagogue. Peter, James, Andrew, and John, as well as the tax collector Matthew, were all born and raised in the city of Jerusalem. As recorded in Matthew 4:13, “And leaving Nazareth, he came and resided at Capernaum, which is on the sea coast, in the borderlands of Zabulon and Nephthalim” (Matthew 4:13-17).

Location:

Location: The location is located at the northernmost point of the Sea of Galilee, on the side of the old route that runs from Tiberias to the easternmost points of the sea of Galilee: Golan, Gamla, and Jordan. Description: It should be noted that there is also an Orthodox Church in Capernaum, which is located on the eastern side of the ruins.

History:

Capernaum was initially inhabited during the early Bronze Age of the 3rd Millennium BC, when the city was founded. It was a little settlement with a few buildings that was in the territory governed by the biblical city of Tell Kinneret, which was 3 kilometers to the west of the village. It persisted in the region surrounding the heart of the Roman hamlet during the 2nd millennium, according to the evidence uncovered during the excavations. In the Israelite/Iron era (1200-587 BC), there was a significant decline in the population, which was eventually regained in the fifth century BC (the period of the returns of the exiles to Zion).

  1. On the northern side of the town, it was erected in parallel to the major Roman imperial route, which passed through the hamlet and was created in accordance with the straight-line urban design of the time period.
  2. It reached its zenith during the Byzantine period, when the magnificent white-stone Synagogue was constructed above the previous synagogue (around the end of the 4th century AD).
  3. At the time, the settlement had a population of around 1,500 people and encompassed approximately 60 Dunams (6 Hectares).
  4. This prosperous community flourished during the Roman and Byzantine periods, and its population were mostly fishermen (as were the majority of Jesus’ apostles), farmers, and individuals who supplied services to the Roman road and caravans, such as tax collection (as was Matthew).
  5. The synagogue and church were demolished during the Arab period (7th-12th centuries AD), yet the community continued to exist for a length of time beyond that period.

It was then irreparably damaged. In 1894, the Franciscans bought two-thirds of the land, with the remaining one-third being purchased by the Greek Orthodox Church. Excavations were carried out over a number of seasons (1905-1915, 1968-1984).

Photos:

It was during the early Bronze age of the third millennium BC that Capernaum first became populated. Three kilometers to the west, at Tell Kinneret, there was a little settlement with a few buildings in the region governed by the biblical city of Tell Kinneret, which was three kilometers away. It persisted in the region surrounding the heart of the Roman hamlet during the 2nd millennium, according to the evidence uncovered during the excavations. After a population decline during the Israelite/Iron era (1200-587 BC), the population began to grow again in the 5th century BCE (the period of the returns of the exiles to Zion).

  • It was erected in conjunction with the major Roman imperial route, which traversed the hamlet on the northern side, and was created in accordance with the straight-line urban design of the time period.
  • During the Byzantine period, when the magnificent white-stone Synagogue was constructed on top of the previous synagogue (about the end of the 4th century AD), it achieved its zenith.
  • There were around 1,500 people living in the settlement at the time, which spanned 60 Dunams (6 Hectares).
  • As time passed, the community grew in prosperity, and its population were mostly fishermen (as were the majority of Jesus’ apostles), farmers, and individuals who offered services to the Roman road and caravans, such as tax collection, to name a few (as was Matthew).
  • The settlement was abandoned for a while during the Arab occupation (7th-12th centuries AD), although it continued to exist for a while after that.
  • The Franciscans acquired two-thirds of the land in 1894, while the Greek Orthodox purchased the remaining one-third in 1895.

(b) The Synagogue

Capernaum was initially inhabited during the early Bronze Age of the 3rd Millennium BC, when the city first began to flourish. It was a little settlement with a few buildings in the territory governed by the biblical city of Tell Kinneret, which was 3 kilometers to the west. It persisted in the region surrounding the heart of the Roman hamlet throughout the 2nd millennium, according to the evidence uncovered during the excavations. There was a demographic pause during the Israelite/Iron era (1200-587 BC), which was reestablished in the 5th century BC (the period of the returns of the exiles to Zion).

  1. It was erected in parallel to the major Roman imperial route, which passed through the hamlet on the northern side, and was created in accordance with the straight-line urban design of the time period.
  2. It reached its zenith during the Byzantine period, when the magnificent white-stone Synagogue was constructed on top of the previous synagogue (around the end of the 4th century AD).
  3. At the time, the settlement had a population of around 1500 people and encompassed approximately 60 Dunams (6 Hectares).
  4. As time passed, the community grew in prosperity, and its population were primarily fishermen (as were the majority of Jesus’ apostles), farmers, and individuals who offered services to the Roman road and caravans, such as tax collecting (as was Matthew).
  5. The settlement was abandoned for a while during the Arab period (7th-12th centuries AD), although it continued to exist for a while after that.

It was then completely wrecked. In 1894, the Franciscans bought two-thirds of the land, with the remaining one-third being purchased by the Greek Orthodox. Excavations took place over a number of seasons (1905-1915, 1968-1984).

(c) The earlier Synagogue (Jesus times)

It is possible to find the ruins of an early Roman synagogue from the time of Jesus Christ beneath the massive structure, which was constructed of native (black) basalt rock. “And they went into Capernaum; and immediately on the Sabbath day, Jesus entered the synagogue and taught.” (Mark: “And they went into Capernaum; and straightway on the Sabbath day, Jesus got into the synagogue, and taught.”)

(d) The village

The remnants of a Byzantine hamlet, constructed of black basalt stone from the surrounding area, may be found behind the Synagogue. The region between the synagogue and the 5th century church is seen in this photograph. The new church, which is visible in the distance, is being constructed on the site of the old church and St Peter’s home, which were both demolished.

(e) The Octagon Church and St Peter’s house

Peter, also known as Simon Bar-Yonah, was one of the twelve apostles who served with Jesus. He worked as a fisherman, and his home was near to the lake’s shoreline, which he enjoyed. As shown by archaeological digs and the subsequent construction of a church above his house, which was constructed in his honor by early Christian worshipers, this location is considered to be his residence. The church, which may be seen below, was constructed on the site of St. Peter’s residence in the 5th century AD.

(f) The new Church

Jesus’ 12 apostles included Peter, who was also known as Simon Bar-Yonah. In his spare time, he enjoyed fishing, and his home was near to the lakeshore. Because of archaeological investigations and the later construction of a church atop his house, this location is considered to be his residence, which was constructed in his honor by the early Christian worshipers. The church, which was constructed above St. Peter’s residence in the 5th century AD, may be seen below. It is shaped in the manner of an Octagon, which was typical of early churches and buildings (such asKathismasouth of Jerusalem, and even theDome of the Rock).

(g) Farming Industry

A exhibition of parts from the great synagogue is set up in the court yard; a portion of them may be seen in the background of the accompanying photograph. Among the items on exhibit are industrial stone equipment that were once used for farming, such as multiple oil presses, as shown in the photo below.

Biblical References:

There are several allusions to the town of Capernaum, which played a significant part in Jesus’ life and ministry. The following are only a few examples:

Mathew 4:13, 18:22

According to Mathew, Capernaum is located “on the border between Zabulon and Nephthalim.” Actually, it is located in the heart of the Nephthalim region, because Zabulon’s eastern border is located in Mount Tabor. Leaving Nazareth, he traveled to Capernaum, which is located on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea, on the boundaries of Zabulon and Nephthalim. The narrative goes on to say that it is here in Capernaum that Jesus picks the fishermen to be his disciples. While strolling by the Sea of Galilee, Jesus came across two brothers, Simon named Peter and Andrew his brother, who were tossing a net into the water, because they were fishermen.

See also:  How Long Was Jesus On The Cross Before Death

And as he continued on his journey, he came across another pair of brothers, James the son of Zebedee and John his brother, who were aboard a ship with Zebedee their father, mending their nets; and he summoned them to him.

And they instantly left the ship and their father’s side, and they pursued him.”

Mark 1:21

They arrived at Capernaum, where Jesus immediately entered the synagogue on the sabbath day and began to teach.”

Luke 4:31

As a result, Jesus traveled down to Capernaum, a Galilean city, and taught them on the Sabbath days.

HistoricalReferences:

The area around Capernaum and the Sea of Galilee is described by Josephus, the commander of the Jewish revolt against Roman rule, who is considered to be the best historian of his time: “The country also that lies over against this lake hath the same name as this lake; its nature is wonderful as well as its beauty; its soil is so fruitful that all kinds of trees can grow upon it, and the inhabitants accordingly plant all kinds of trees there; for the temper of the air is so well-tempered.” This region may be described as the ambition of nature, where it forces plants that are naturally antagonistic to one another to cooperate; it is a happy contest of the seasons, as if each of them had staked a claim to this territory; it not only nourishes different kinds of autumnal fruit beyond men’s expectations, but preserves them for a long time; it supplies men with the principal fruits, with grapes and figs continuously, during ten months of the year and the rest of the year; and it Capharnaum is the name given by the locals to the city.

Some have speculated that it is a vein of the Nile, based on the fact that it produces the Coracin fish in the same quantities that a lake close to Alexandria does.

“The length of this country spreads itself along the banks of this lake with the same name for thirty furlongs and twenty feet wide in breadth.

Etymology (behind the name):

  • From the Hebrew:Kefar (village) + Nachum (the name of a prophet from the Old Testament), comes the town of Capernaum.

Links:

* Hypertext links within a document:

  • Map of the Sea of Galilee
  • Greek Orthodox Church in Capernaum
  • St. Peter’s information page
  • And more. Footsteps of Jesus–This visual presentation, created by BibleWalks staff, depicts the steps of Jesus. The town of Capernaum is mentioned in 18 of the 100 incidents. Aerial pictures captured by a quadcopter– a collection of biblical landmarks photographed from the air

* Sites in the vicinity include:

  • In Ein Sheva, the Tabcha (Church of the First Feeding of the Multitude) is located. A warm sulfuric spring in Tabcha known as Job’s spring. Jesus performed two miracles in Beit Saida, the site of the first and second miracles.
BibleWalks.com – walk with us through the sites of the Holy Land

Sites in the past include Yardenit, All Sites, and Capernaum, which is the next Sea of Galilee site–Orthodox. The information on this page was last updated on February 26, 2018. (added ad, updated text) Advertiser-sponsored links:

Bible Map: Capernaum

AtlasCapernaum and the surrounding region are included. Maps Biblemapper 3.0 was used in conjunction with OpenBible.info to create this map. Occurrences Matthew 4:13 (KJV) After leaving Nazareth, he traveled to Capernaum, which is located near the sea in the area of Zebulun and Naphtali, and settled there. Matthew 8:5 (KJV) When he arrived in Capernaum, a centurion approached him and inquired about him. Matthew 11:23 (KJV) You, Capernaum, who have been elevated to the heights of heaven, will be cast into Hades.

Matthew 17:24 (KJV) When they arrived at Capernaum, the people who were in charge of collecting the didrachma coins approached Peter and said, “Doesn’t your teacher pay the didrachma?” 1:21 (Mark 1:21) They arrived at Capernaum, where Jesus entered the synagogue and began teaching directly on the Sabbath day after their arrival.

  1. His journey took him to Capernaum, where he entered the house and inquired of them, “What were you debating among yourselves on the way?” Mark 9:33 Luke 4:23He addressed them by saying, “”Physician, heal yourself!” you will almost certainly tell me in response to this fable.
  2. He was instructing them on the Sabbath, which was a holy day.
  3. Luke 10:15You, Capernaum, who have been elevated to the heights of heaven, will be cast into Hades.
  4. 4:46 (John 4:46) As a result, Jesus returned to Cana of Galilee, where he transformed water into wine once more.
  5. John 6:17Then they got into the boat, and they were on their way to Capernaum over the sea.

6:24 (John 6:24 NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB NASB When the crowds realized that Jesus and his followers were not present, they jumped into the boats and made their way to Capernaum, where they were in search of the Messiah.

  • Encyclopedia CAPERNAUM the word kaper’-na-um (Kapernaoum (Textus Receptus), Kapharnaoum (Codex Vaticanus, Codex Sinaiticus, Codex Bezae, and so on) means “received text” in Greek.
  • It has been destroyed to such an extent that the location of the ruins is currently under question.
  • When Jesus ultimately left Nazareth, he settled in Capernaum (Matthew 4:13), where he remained for the rest of His public ministry, and made it the focal point of His activities for the most of the time.
  • It was the site of a number of “major works” (Matthew 11:23Mark 1:34).
  • While in Capernaum, Jesus used a small boy to teach the disciples the importance of humility, in the synagogue, He delivered His ever-memorable talk on the bread of life, which is still remembered today (John 6).
  • Some believe that the phrases “will thou be exalted,” etc.
  • Perhaps more naturally, they are referring to the extreme pride that the residents of their city have in their city.

In it were detachments of Roman troops, whose commander believed that it was worthwhile to secure the good will of the people by building a synagogue for them at the price of their own lives (Matthew 8:5Luke 7:5).

Josephus mentions Capernaum twice in his writings.

He was injured when his horse became stuck in mud during the battle of El-BaTeichah, rendering him unable to fight for the remainder of the conflict.

Another time, he praises the plain of Gennesaret for the abundance of its fruits and claims that it is irrigated by a particularly fruitful spring, which the locals refer to as Capharnaum (the fountain of fertility).

Thus, Josephus confirms the Biblical material while also providing further information on the fountain and the Coracinus fish (see below).

In the competition for the honor of representing Capernaum are Tell Chum, a ruined site on the lake shore nearly 2 1/2 miles west of the Jordan’s mouth, and Khan Minyeh, a site located nearly 2 1/2 miles farther west in the northeast corner of the plain of Gennesaret.

“Ain El-Madowwerah,” he offered, a huge spring on the western border of the plain ringed by a circular wall, which would be a good place to start.

Additionally, water is only available for a tiny portion of the plain.

If Kerazeh is Chorazin, this is more appropriate for Tell Chum than Khan Minyeh.

Tankhum is a place mentioned in Jewish tradition, and it is where the tombs of Nahum and Rabbi Tankhum are located.

Every link in that line of reasoning, on the other hand, is exceedingly fragile.

However, the town was not connected to the major north-south transportation routes.

It is sufficient to mention Schurer (HJP, IV, 71) and Buhl (HJP, IV, 71) as recent supporters of Tell Chum (GAP, 224).

As a response, Kaniset el Kufry was given, which can be loosely translated as “church of the infidels.” This is simply the Arabic equivalent of the Jewish “church of the minim,” which means “minimalist church.” It should be noted that Gennesaret corresponds to el-Ghuweir, the plain lying on the northwest shore, and that Khan Minyeh stands at the northeast extremity of the plain, thus answering, in a way that Tell Chum cannot, the description of the Gospels in regard to the location of the city of Jerusalem.

  • There were numerous fountains at eT-Tabigha, half a mile to the East, which supplied water that was channeled around the face of the rock toward Khan Minyeh at a height that allowed it to water a large portion of the plain.
  • A narrow piece of ground between the mountain and the lake, according to Arculf (1670), is where Capernaum is located.
  • According to Isaac Chelo (1334), Capernaum, which was then in ruins, had been inhabited by Minim, i.e., Jewish Christians who had converted to Christianity.
  • A Khan named Menieh, who lived near the site of Capernaum, is mentioned by Quaresimus (1620-1626).
  • Because the road from the East connected with the road that came down from the North via Khan Jubb Yusif, this must have been a significant junction, both from a military and a customs standpoint, indicating that it was a significant junction.
  • A.

According to the present writer, Sanday originally supported Khan Minyeh in his book, The Sacred Sites of the Gospel, but he later changed his mind, owing to what the present writer believes to be an erroneous understanding of the relationship between Tell Chum and the fountain at eT-Tabigha (Expository Times, XV, 100).

Tell Chum, which stood on the seashore and was independent of this fountain, whose strength was also expended in a westward direction, away from Tell Chum, was independent of this fountain.

A.

Macalister published the results of his research, the balance of evidence tipped heavily in favor of Khan Minyeh.

As a result, the ruins of Tell Chum themselves are now referred to as a ‘tell’ ” (Expos, April, 1907, 370).

At Khan Minyeh, he discovered nothing older than the Arabian period, whereas at Tell Chum, he discovered an abundance of pottery from the Roman period, which he describes as “exactly the period of the glory of Capernaum” (PEFS, April and July, 1907).

A significant number of Roman ruins have now been discovered between the ruined Khan and the sea.

The Roman era, on the other hand, encompasses a significant amount of time.

It is possible to determine that the city thrived during the Herodian era based on the pottery that has been discovered so far.

They are not the only extensive ruins in a country whose history we are completely ignorant of; there are many more.

Ewing, is located somewhere along the n.w.

There are a variety of reasons why it should be located at Khan Min-yeh, on the northern side of the Gennesaret plain.

Some, on the other hand, place it at tell Hum. It appears to be a foregone conclusion that it occurred at either location. Strong’s GreekG2584: KapernaoumCapernaum is a place name in the Greek language.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.