Where Did Jesus Pray Before He Was Crucified

Bible Gateway passage: Matthew 26:36-44 – New International Version

36When Jesus and his disciples arrived at Gethsemane, he told them to “Sit here while I walk over there and pray.” They did what he instructed. 37He grabbed Peter, as well as the two sons of Zebedee B) and fled “(B)along with him, and he became depressed and worried at the same time. 38Then he addressed them, saying, “My soul is overwhelmed with anguish C).” “To the brink of death, in fact. Keep an eye on things with me while you’re here. ” D) The word “D” is an abbreviation for “Different.” “> The following is an example of a formalized formalized formalized (D) “My Father, if it is possible, may this cup E) be removed from me,” he said as he went a little further and fell with his face to the ground “>(E)asily taken away from me.

” F) The letter “F” is an abbreviation for “F” in the English language “> The following is an example of a formalized formalized formalized (F) Upon returning to his followers, he saw that they had gone to sleep.

41 “Be on the lookout and in prayer so that you do not fall prey to temptation.

42As he was leaving, he said to the Father, “My Father, if it is not possible for this cup to be taken away unless I drink it, may your will be done.” “> The following is an example of a formalized formalized formalized (I) 43When he returned, he discovered them sleeping again, this time because their eyes were heavy.

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“Jesus: A Pilgrimage,” a new book by the Rev. James Martin, a Jesuit priest, editor-at-large of America magazine, and the author of several books, is included here as an exclusive extract. ‘Gethsemane’ is the title of the chapter from which this snippet is drawn. When Jesus sits in the Garden of Gethsemane, he cries out in agony, “Abba, Father, for you all things are possible; take this cup from me; however, not what I desire, but what you want.” We are asked to discover more about Jesus of Nazareth, about God, and about ourselves at this crucial point in his life, when he is struggling to understand the will of the Father.

  • When the inescapable appears to be inconceivable, what do you do?
  • In such a case, the most hardest thing to deal with may be the crushing inevitability of the situation.
  • It is the feeling of disbelief that you get when you hear a terrible diagnosis from your doctor.
  • When a close buddy passes away.
  • “This can’t possibly be happening,” you think to yourself.
  • At the precise moment when you want to feel the most anchored to God, you feel the most unanchored.
  • When my father was originally diagnosed with the disease that would ultimately claim his life, I couldn’t believe it.
  • “No, no, no,” I said to myself, realizing that this was not the way things were supposed to be.

When a buddy just learned that his father had an incurable cancer and had only one year to live, he expressed his disbelief that he was “lost.” His response to my question was, “I don’t even know where to begin.” It is possible to say, “Remove this cup,” even when presented with conditions that are not life-threatening.

  1. Perhaps you are trapped in a deplorable work with little hope of escaping it any time soon.
  2. Alternatively, you may be diagnosed with a minor medical condition that necessitates a change in your way of life.
  3. Panic can have such a grip on you that you are unable to think, let alone pray.
  4. One approach is to consider Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane.
  5. He does not turn a blind eye to his own or his friends’ suffering.

If you ever find yourself tempted to hide your struggles from friends or conceal your deepest pain from loved ones, remember what Jesus told his own friends in Gethsemane: “I am deeply grieved, even to death.” These are not the statements of a person who is trying to keep his or her emotions hidden.

It’s possible that Jesus is quoting from Psalm 42, which says, “My spirit is cast down within me.” It’s possible that he’s thinking about a verse from Sirach that captures the thoughts of a person who has been betrayed: “Is it not a sorrow like that for death itself when a beloved friend becomes an enemy?” The New Testament scholar Raymond Brown argues in his classic essay “The Death of the Messiah” that if Jesus had foreseen his companions’ betrayal and subsequent dispersal after his death, it must have been a terrible burden on his shoulders.

  • As a result, not only his incarceration, but also their subsequent betrayal, may have caused him great distress.
  • In general, the meaning appears to be: my anguish is so great that it feels as if it may kill me at any moment.
  • To imagine what it must have been like for them to witness Jesus plainly distressed.
  • It also serves as a means of inviting friends and family who care about you into your life.
  • In Gethsemane, while still standing in line, Jesus feels the complete spectrum of human emotions, which he then shares with his friends in a way that is entirely genuine and authentic.
  • It also serves as an invitation to allow people to love us.
  • Too often, we feel obligated to go right into “Yet your will, not mine” before we have given ourselves time to process our emotions and communicate them to God.

Even Jesus went through the process of expressing himself honestly and openly about his unpleasant emotions.

He concludes by placing his faith in God and submitting his will to that of the Father, even in the midst of adversity.

We have faith that God will be with us in whatever we do and everything we go through.

Someone is with us and is assisting us.

It is usually tough to comprehend someone else’s suffering.

It was undeniably difficult for the disciples to comprehend what was going on.

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3 Final Prayers: Jesus’ Desire for Us on His Final Night

(The following is an exclusive extract from the forthcoming book, “Jesus: A Pilgrimage,” by the Rev. James Martin, a Jesuit priest who also serves as editor at large for America magazine and is the author of several books.) ‘Gethsemane’ is the title of a chapter in the book of Matthew. When Jesus sits in the Garden of Gethsemane, he utters his excruciating plea, “Abba, Father, for you all things are possible; take this cup from me; however, not what I desire, but what you want.” At this crucial point in Christ’s life, when he is struggling to understand the will of the Father, we are called to discover more about Jesus of Nazareth, about God, and more about ourselves.

  1. When the inescapable appears to be inconceivable, what should you do?
  2. When faced with such a predicament, the most hardest thing to deal with may be the crushing inevitability of the situation.
  3. That feeling of disbelief that you get when your doctor gives you an ominous prognosis.
  4. A buddy has passed away.
  5. And to make matters worse, these circumstances cause us to worry, which makes it much more difficult to discern God’s “will.” Just when you want to feel the most anchored to God, you find yourself feeling unanchored.
  6. At the time of my father’s diagnosis with the illness that would ultimately claim his life, I couldn’t believe it when I was told that the therapies would only prolong his life by a few months.
  7. The majority of people, if they live long enough, will eventually experience this sensation.

His response to my question was, “I don’t even know where to start.” It is possible to say, “Remove this cup,” even when faced with conditions that are not life threatening.

Possibly, you are trapped in a deplorable work with little hope of escaping it.

Alternatively, you may be given a minor medical condition that necessitates a modification in your way of life.

And, once again, a fear that can impair our capacity to make sound judgments exacerbates the issue.

What is the best way forward?

In the face of the harsh reality of his circumstances, he does not back away.

“I am deeply grieved, even to death,” Jesus told his friends in Gethsemane, according to the New Revised Standard Version.

Now, let’s take a closer look at those lines, which can be more accurately translated as “My soul is grieved unto death.

Alternatively, he may be thinking about a verse from Sirach that depicts the thoughts of a person who has been betrayed: “Is it not a sorrow like that for death itself when a good friend turns into a foe?” The New Testament scholar Raymond Brown argues in his classic essay “The Death of the Messiah” that if Jesus had foreseen his companions’ betrayal and subsequent dispersal after his death, it must have been a terrible burden on his mind and heart.

He may have experienced profound anguish as a result of his detention as well as their subsequent betrayal.

As a whole, the message appears to be: my despair is so overwhelming that it feels as if it could kill me.

In the face of a scary demoniac, a horrible storm at sea, an enormous crowd of people seeking for food, and two sisters lamenting their brother’s loss, the calm person on whom they relied to aid them in every scenario admits to being “greatly upset.” It is not weakness, but rather humanity and humility, to express your sentiments honestly through difficult circumstances.

  • Although he was spotless, Jesus opted to stand in line with the rest of mankind as he prepared to begin his public ministry on the banks of the Jordan River — even though the sinless one did not need to be baptized in order to be cleansed of his sins.
  • He expresses these feelings to his companions in a manner that is wholly human.
  • The call to love comes with the understanding that we must allow people to love us.
  • We have a tendency to go right into “Yet your will, not mine” before we have had a chance to linger with our sentiments and communicate them to God, which is unfortunate.
  • Even Jesus went through the process of expressing himself honestly about his terrible emotions.
  • His faith in God and conformity to the Father’s will bring him to a successful conclusion, despite the difficulties he has encountered.
  • It is in the framework of a connection with God that we are invited to surrender, to take our cup, to recognize the inevitability of suffering, and to go upon the road of sacrifice.
  • Without assistance, we do not just clinch our fists and grit our teeth as we push forward.
  • As another metaphor from the Gospels illustrates, there is always someone else in the boat with us, pushing on the oars even though we aren’t aware of it.
  • It’s possible that Jesus had a hard time comprehending what was happening.
  • However, it will take them three days to grasp the concept entirely.

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1) That We May Be One

Jesus’ very nature is oneness with the Father, and he longs for us to experience that same unity. Our mission on this planet is to proclaim that Jesus is the son of God, and we will only be able to accomplish this if we comprehend and recognize what Jesus accomplished. It is through his crucifixion that we as believers will be able to experience peace, love, and unity with the Father in our lives. Once we have received this new life, our mission is to tell the world about it, and as a result, the world will come to understand that Jesus is the one God sent to offer Himself as a sacrifice in order to reconcile all believers with Himself.

See also:  How Far Did Jesus Travel From His Home

2) That We Behold His Glory

Jesus prays that we shall be with him in heaven one day, and that we will view all of his splendor, which was granted to him by his Father, when he returns to earth. He also says that we are entitled to a portion of that glory, that he has bestowed upon us the same glory that God has bestowed upon him, among other things. What a privilege it is to know that we shall be able to participate in the Lord’s splendor when we are welcomed into his presence for all of time.

3) That We Be Loved By His Father

As we can see in John 3:16, the Father has always loved us. “For God so loved the world that he gave his only son, that whomever believes in him will not perish but have eternal life,” the Bible says. However, in this prayer, Jesus requests that God love us in the same manner that he loves His son, Jesus, as he does His son. In the Bible, Jesus is described as “the Alpha and the Omega,” “the Beginning and the End,” “the beloved son of God,” “the Bread of Life,” “the Creator of All Things,” “the Everlasting Father,” and “the Great I AM.” On the final night of his life on Earth, Jesus prayed for us.

Why did Jesus ask God to “let this cup pass from me”?

QuestionAnswer There is a description of the time that Jesus, his disciples, and other followers of Jesus spent in the Garden of Gethsemane, immediately before he was arrested, in the gospels. In the garden, Jesus prayed three times to his Father, saying, “My Father, if it is possible, please take this cup away from me.” The King James Version (KJV) adds, “But not as I will, but as you will”—”Let this cup pass from me” (Matthew 26:39). Following this prayer comes another one in which Jesus prays: “Father, if it is not possible for this cup to be taken away unless I drink it, may your will be done” (Matthew 26:42).

  • The “cup” that Jesus is referring to is the agony that He was going to go through.
  • When Jesus predicted the future suffering of James and John in Matthew 20:22, he used a metaphor that was similar to this one.
  • He wrestled with the need of accepting the suffering and disgrace that awaited Him, despite the fact that His human nature was flawless; His flesh resented the crucifixion.
  • “Let this cup pass from me,” Jesus prayed, acknowledging that he was up against the body and its desires for self-preservation and comfort.
  • This prayer, if anything, demonstrates that Jesus was truly a completely human being.
  • The suffering He would endure would be more than just bodily; it would also be spiritual and emotional in nature, as He would discover.
  • Even though Jesus adored people, His humanity dreaded the suffering and anguish He would have to endure, which led Him to implore His Father, “Let this cup pass from me.” The phrase “let this cup pass from me” (let this cup be taken away from me) has two critical conditions.

The circumstances that transpired as a result of His prayer demonstrate that there was no other option; Jesus Christ is the only sacrifice that can be made to save the world (John 1:29; Acts 4:12; Hebrews 10:14; Revelation 5:9).

Whether or whether a pious person prays is always contingent on the will of God (see Matthew 6:10).

He accomplished this via fervent prayer and complete, unwavering obedience to God’s will.

This is not a sinful struggle; rather, it is a human fight.

He had come “to seek and to save the lost” (Luke 19:10), and He was successful in His mission, despite the fact that it required drinking the bitter cup of suffering till the very end of His life.

Questions about Luke (return to top of page) What was Jesus’ motivation for pleading with God to “let this cup pass from me”?

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What an Atheist Might Think About Jesus Praying in Gethsemane

Upon reaching Gethsemane, he addresses his followers by saying, “Please sit here while I pray for you.” Taking Peter and James and John along with him, he begins to be terribly startled and to feel extremely heavy; 34 and he tells them, “My soul is exceedingly sad unto death: wait here, and watch.” 35 And he walked a little distance forward before falling to the ground and praying that, if it were possible, the hour might pass him by.

  1. He responded, “Abba Father, with thee anything is possible; take this cup away from me; but not what I want, but what you want.” 37 And when he arrives, he finds them asleep, and he says to Peter, “Simon, are you sleeping?” Couldn’t you just sit and watch for an hour?
  2. The spirit is indeed ready, but the bodily is unable to keep up.
  3. 40 And when he returned, he saw them sleeping again (since their eyelids were heavy), and they had no idea what to say in response.
  4. 42 Get up, let us depart; behold, he who betrays me is close at hand.

Jesus and the Garden of Gethsemane

For centuries, the tale of Jesus’ uncertainty and suffering in Gethsemane (literally “oil press,” a tiny garden outside the eastern wall of Jerusalem on the Mount of Olives) has been considered one of the most intriguing chapters in the gospels. This verse heralds the beginning of Jesus’ “passion,” which is defined as the time of his suffering leading up to and including his crucifixion. Because the disciples are repeatedly shown as asleep throughout the account, it seems doubtful that the story is historical (and hence unable to know what Jesus is doing).

The Jesus represented in this painting is significantly more human than the Jesus depicted in the majority of the gospel accounts.

He is unaffected by the challenges of his adversaries, and he exhibits extensive awareness of the events that will take place in the future – even his own death.

Jesus behaves in much the same way as practically any other person who realizes that their life is coming to an end: he is filled with anguish and sorrow, and he wishes that the future does not unfold in the way he expects it will.

Did he believe that his mission had been a failure? Was he depressed because his disciples had failed to stick by him?

Jesus Prays for Mercy

Earlier, Jesus told his disciples that everything is possible if they had enough faith and prayer – including shifting mountains and forcing fig trees to fall down. Jesus is praying in this place, and his faith is undeniably powerful. In fact, one of the main points of the story is the contrast between Jesus’ faith in God and the lack of faith exhibited by his disciples: despite Jesus’ repeated instructions to “stay awake and watch” (the advice he gave earlier to watch for signs of the apocalypse), his disciples keep falling asleep despite his repeated instructions to do so.

  • No.
  • This is implied by the phrase “not what I will, but what thou wilt.” If one is only ever going to pray that God accomplishes what he wants (is there any doubt that anything else will happen?
  • Jesus demonstrates a readiness to enable God to carry out the purpose for which he is sacrificed.
  • The expression “Abba” is derived from the Aramaic word for “father” and suggests a very intimate relationship; nevertheless, it also limits the possibility of identification – Jesus is not speaking to himself here.
  • They, too, were subjected to persecution, arrest, and even the prospect of execution on their heads.
  • At the end of the day, they would most likely feel abandoned by their friends, family, and God himself.
  • The narrative nearly begs the reader to think how they would behave in a similar scenario, which is an acceptable response for Christians who may find themselves in a similar situation as soon as tomorrow or the next week.

Agony in the Garden – Wikipedia

During the time between Jesus’ Farewell Discourse at the conclusion of the Last Supper and his arrest, theAgony in the Garden of Gethsemanewas a period in his life that is recorded in the four canonical gospels as taking place in the Garden of Gethsemane.

Gospel narratives

As recorded in all four of the canonical Gospels, Jesus went for a walk to pray immediately following the Last Supper. In terms of narrative specifics, each Gospel provides a somewhat different version of the story. This area of prayer is referred to as Gethsemane in the gospels of Matthew and Mark. Jesus was joined by three Apostles: Peter, John, and James, whom he instructed to remain awake and pray throughout the night. He made a move “A stone’s throw away” from them, he experienced immense grief and pain, prompting him to pray: “My Father, please let this cup pass me by if at all possible.” Allow things to unfold as You, rather than I, would want.” Then, a little time later, Jesus said, “If this cup cannot be passed by without being drunk, Your will be done!” “It is your will that I do” (Matthew 26:42; in Latin Vulgate:fiat voluntas tua).

He repeated this prayer three times, pausing between each prayer to check on the three apostles, who were all sound sleeping.

An angel from on high appeared to him to give him strength.

“His perspiration was, as it were, large droplets of blood streaming down upon the ground” during his misery while he prayed, says the author (Luke 22:44). Finally, towards the conclusion of the tale, Jesus acknowledges that the time has come for him to be abandoned by his friends.

Tradition

Agony in the Garden is the firstSorrowful Mystery of the Rosary and the first Station of the Scriptural Way of the Cross in Roman Catholic tradition, and it is also known as “The Garden of Gethsemane” (second station in the Philippine version). There are certain prayers and devotions that are offered in the Catholic faith as acts of penance for the pain and suffering experienced by Jesus during His Agony and Passion. There is no plea for a living or deceased beneficiary in these Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ, but rather an attempt to “fix the sins” against Jesus that have been committed.

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Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ, according to Pope Pius XI, are a moral obligation for Catholics and are described as “some type of recompense to be made for the hurt” caused by Jesus’ sufferings in his encyclicalMiserentissimus Redemptoron reparations.

Holy Hour

Agony in the Garden is the firstSorrowful Mystery of the Rosary and the first Station of the Scriptural Way of the Cross in Roman Catholic tradition, and it is also known as “The Garden of Gethsemane” (second station in the Philippine version). There are certain prayers and devotions that are offered in the Catholic faith as acts of penance for the pain and suffering Jesus endured during His Agony and Passion. There is no plea for a living or deceased beneficiary in these Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ, but rather an attempt to “fix the sins” against Jesus that are being addressed.

In his encyclicalMiserentissimus Redemptoron reparations, Pope Pius XI described Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ as an obligation for Catholics and referred to them as “some type of recompense to be made for the hurt” that had been caused by Jesus’ suffering.

Artistic depictions

On the Mount of Olives, we find Jesus. Art portrayals of the Agony in the Garden are many and varied, and include the following examples:

  • Agony in the Garden is a painting by Giovanni Bellini, an Italian Renaissance painter who lived from 1459 to 1465
  • It depicts a woman in agony in a garden. Painted by romantic poet and artistWilliam Blake in the early 1800s and preserved at the Tate Britain in London, Agony in the Garden is a picture by romantic poet and artistWilliam Blake in the early 1800s. Correggio’s Agony in the Garden, a painting by the Italian artist Correggio that dates back to 1524 and is presently housed in Apsley House in London
  • Painted by the Italian painter Andrea Mantegna between 1458 and 1460, Agony in the Garden may be seen at the National Gallery of London. Painted by Andrea Mantegna between 1457 and 1459 and now housed in the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Tours, Agony in the Garden depicted a woman in agony in a garden. Agony in the Garden, a painting by Gerard David from the 1510s that was formerly assigned to Adriaen Isenbrandt and is currently housed in the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg
  • Christ on the Mount of Olives– a painting by Baroque painter Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, c. 1605
  • Christ on the Mount of Olives– a painting by Paul Gauguin, 1889
  • Christ on the Mount of Olives– a painting by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, c. 1605
  • Christ on the Mount of Olives– a painting by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, c In the classical music world, “Christ on the Mount of Olives” is an oratorio by Ludwig van Beethoven
  • In rock opera, “Gethsemane (I Only Want to Say)” is a song by the rock band Aerosmith. When Jesus performs this song in the musical Jesus Christ Superstar, written by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber, He confronts God about His impending fate, eventually accepting it at the conclusion of the song. Following the crucifixion, an orchestral reprise in the manner of “John Nineteen: Forty-One” may be heard.

Medical conjectures

An interpretation of hematidrosis has been advanced in the scientific literature, according to which the great mental anguish that Jesus suffered to the point that his sweat turned to blood is described only byLuke the Evangelist because he was trained in medicine. This interpretation is based on a medical interpretative hypothesis of hematidrosis.

See also

  • Christ in the Garden, a poem by Felicia Hemans that appeared in the 1826 issue of The Amulet yearly

References

  1. Wiersbe, Warren W. (Wiersbe, Warren W.) (1992). Bible Exposition Commentary, Vol. 1: New Testament (Bible Exposition Commentary, Vol. 1: New Testament). Pages 268–269 of Chariot Victor Publishing’s book. “Knowing everything that was going to happen to Him,” says Matthew 26:46
  2. Mark 14:41
  3. Cf. John 18:4: “Knowing everything that was going to happen to Him,” says Slater (1911). “Reparation,” in Herbermann, Charles (ed. ), Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 12, New York: Robert Appleton Company
  4. Delany, Francis Xavier, “Reparation,” in Herbermann, Charles (ed. ), Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 12, New York: Robert Appleton Company
  5. (1911). “Raccolta.” In Herbermann, Charles (ed. ), Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 12, New York: Robert Appleton Company
  6. Christopher, Joseph P. “Raccolta.” In Herbermann, Charles (ed. ), Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 12, New York: Robert Appleton Company
  7. (2003). The Raccolta is a collection of items. abBall, Ann (2003).Encyclopedia of Catholic Devotions and Practices. St. Athanasius Press, ISBN 978-0-9706526-6-9
  8. AbBall, Ann (2003).Encyclopedia of Catholic Devotions and Practices. St. Athanasius Press, ISBN 978-0-9706526-6-9
  9. AbBall, Ann (2003).Encyclopedia of Catholic Devotions and Practices. abStravinskas, Peter (1998). “Miserentissimus Redemptor.” In Herbermann, Charles (ed.).Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company
  10. AbPope Pius XI (8 May 1928). “Miserentissimus Redemptor.” In Herbermann, Charles (ed.).Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company
  11. AbStravinskas, Peter (1998). The Catholic Encyclopedia published by Our Sunday Visitor. Huntingdon, Indiana: OSV Press, p. 498. ISBN 978-0-87973-669-9
  12. Wakefield, Gordon S. Huntingdon, Indiana: OSV Press, p. 498. ISBN 978-0-87973-669-9
  13. (1983). The Westminster Dictionary of Christian Spirituality is a reference work on Christian spirituality. Kentucky’s Westminster John Knox Press published a book with the ISBN 978-0-664-22170-6 on page 347. Sister Mary Bernard is represented by a doll (1910). “St. Margaret Mary Alacoque,” says the narrator. According to Charles Herbermann (ed.). Vol. 9 of the Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company, New York, New York
  14. Edwards, William D., Gabel, Wesley J., and Hosmer, Floyd E. (2001). (March 21, 1986). “On the Physical Death of Jesus Christ” is the title of this article (PDF). JAMA, vol. 255, no. 11, pp. 1455–1463. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.621.365.doi: 10.1001/jama.1986.03370110077025.PMID3512867
  15. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.621.365.doi: 10.1001/jama.1986.03370110077025

Prayers of Jesus – Wikipedia

Josef Untersberger’s painting Christ on the Mount of Olives is a masterpiece.

In the canonical gospels, Jesus Christ is described as praying to God on a number of different occasions.

Recorded prayers

The following are the phrases that Jesus uttered in prayer, according to the gospels:

  • We express our gratitude to God for his revelation (Matthew 11:25
  • Luke 10:21)
  • Before reviving Lazarus from the dead (John 11:41-42), Jesus said, “Father, exalt your name” (John 12:28). In John 17, he prays for us. Threeprayers in the Garden of Gethsemane
  • Threeprayers on the Cross
  • Threeprayers in the Garden of Gethsemane
  • They do not understand what they are doing, so “Father forgive them,” Jesus says (Luke 23:34), and “My God, My God, why have thou deserted me?” (Luke 23:37). “Father, into thy hands I surrender my spirit” (Luke 23:46)
  • “Father, into thine hands I commit my spirit” (Matt 27:46, Mark 15:34)

Other references to Jesus praying

Other passages that mention Jesus praying include:

  • After healing people in the evening (Matt 1:35), before walking on water (Matt 14:23, Mark 6:46, John 6:15), before Peter’s confession (Luke 9:18), before teaching his disciples the Lord’s Prayer (Luke 11:1), before the Transfiguration (Luke 9:29), before teaching his disciples the Lord’s Prayer (Luke 11:1), before teaching his disciples the Lord’s Prayer (Luke 11:1), before In Luke 22:32, Jesus declares that he has prayed for Peter’s faith.

In addition, Jesus said grace before the feeding miracles, at the Last Supper, and at the Supper at Emmaus, among other places. R. A. Torrey observes that Jesus prayed early in the morning as well as all night, that he prayed before and after the main events of his life, and that he prayed “when life was especially hectic,” according to Torrey.

See also

  • In the New and Old Testaments, there is mention of prayer as a Christian practice.

References

That same morning, he awakened early and walked outside to an isolated spot, where he prayed for quite some time before the sun came up. (Matthew 1:35) This line, written so early in Jesus’ public career, serves as the first of many examples of intimate private prayer that he would demonstrate throughout his life (the parallel version is Luke 4:42). He leaves the house early in the morning, before anybody else is awake to notice him, to travel to a remote location where he may have contemplative contact with his Father.

When Jesus leaves the group for solitary prayer, the Gospels, particularly those of St.

Luke, make a point of noting it: After the miracle of the loaves and fishes — Mark 6:46: And when he had said goodbye to them, he went up to the mountain to pray.

Luke 9:18 describes the events leading up to Peter’s confession of faith that Jesus is the Christ.

Immediately before teaching the Our Father, Jesus was praying in a certain location, and after he stopped praying, one of his disciples approached him and asked, “Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his followers.” Matthew 26:36-45, Mark 14:32-41, and Luke 22:39-46 describe Jesus’ last hours in the Garden of Gethsemane before his crucifixion.

  • You must not be like them.” True to my word, I can assure you that they have earned their recompense.
  • (Matthew 6:5-6; Mark 6:5) This type of prayer of communication with God gives vital spiritual sustenance for those who are undertaking the Christian walk.
  • Consider the possibility that, when Jesus walked out to pray alone, he discreetly invited you to accompany him to his hidden location.
  • What would be the focus of his attention?
  • What do you think his posture would be?
  • After then, imagine yourself having a dialogue with Jesus about your personal prayer life when he’s through speaking.
  • After that, inquire as to what he would expect from you.
  • Was there anything else he may have wanted from you in this area of your life?

(Matthew 6:5-13). Finish this meditation by reciting the Our Father with Jesus, which will bring it to a close. This article is an extract from “Praying the Gospels with Fr. Mitch Pacwa, SJ: Jesus Launches His Ministry,” a book written by Fr. Mitch Pacwa, SJ. Wau.org/books has a collection of books.

Matthew 26:36–46; Mark 14:32–42

36m Then Jesus accompanied me to a spot called Gethsemane, where he instructed his followers to “sithere” while he walked over there to pray. 37 And, bringing with him Peter and O, the two sons of Zebedee, he began to be distressed and distressed. p “My soul is exceedingly sorrowful, even to death; please remain here andq watch Or keep awake; likewise lines 40 and 41.” “href=” f1-“>1withme”>1withme. Taking a step farther, he fell on his face and pleaded, declaring, “MyFather, if it be possible, please take this cup away from me; nonetheless, not according to my desire, but according to yours.” 40 And he arrived at the disciples’ house and saw them asleep.

  1. 41q Keep an eye out and hope that you will not fall prey to temptation.
  2. 43 And again again, he arrived and saw them sleeping, forx their eyes were heavy.
  3. 45 Then he approached the disciples and told them, “Sleep and take your rest later on.” Alternatively, are you still sleeping and getting some rest?” As you can see, the hour is approaching, anda theSonofMan has been betrayed into the hands of sinners.
  4. 46 Rise,letusbegoing;see,mybetrayerisathand.”

Jesus Prays in Gethsemane

32s They then proceeded to a location known as Gethsemane. Andhesaidtohisdisciples,“SitherewhileIpray.” 33 And he brought with him Peter, James, and John, and he started to be extremely disturbed and agitated. 34 “My soul is exceedingly miserable, even to the point of death,” he told them. “Remainhere and keep an eye on everything.” Alternatively, remain awake; see also verses 37 and 38. And when he walked a little further, he sank to the groundx and begged that, if it were possible, the hour would pass him by.

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c YetnotwhatIwill,butwhatyouwill.” He walked in and discovered them sleeping, and he asked Peter, “Simon, are you sleeping?” Couldyounotwatchonehour?

Thespiritindeediswilling,butthefleshisweak.” 39 And again he went aside and prayed, f using the same words as before.

“Are you still sleeping and enjoying your rest?” he said.

In Matthew 26:40-46; how many hours did Jesus pray in the Garden of Gethsemane? Only one or three? – Evidence for Christianity

How many hours did Jesus spend praying in the Garden of Gethsemane, according to Matthew 26:40-46? Is it only one or three? I couldn’t fathom why it would be significant to know how long he prayed in the garden for such a lengthy period of time. Normally, when such a question is posed, there is an underlying issue that is being addressed, such as a critique of the Bible raised by a skeptic or a misunderstanding of the Bible. In this particular instance, I am unable to provide a justification for this being a critical question.

  • After being separated from Peter, James, and John for the first time in the garden of Gethsemane, Jesus returned and said, “Could you guys not keep watch with me for one hour?” with sorrow and sadness.
  • At the very least, it might have been less than an hour, as Jesus clearly stated that they would not be able to stay even an hour.
  • Keep in mind that people back then did not wear watches and typically kept track of the passage of time with less precision than we do now.
  • Following the initial prayer session, Jesus returned to the location to pray twice more.
  • It would not be unreasonable to assume that these two meetings lasted around an hour each, but the truth is that we just do not know for certain.

We do know that he ended praying when it was still dark and that he began praying late at night, but beyond that, we have no way of knowing what he was thinking. John Oakes is a writer and poet.

What is the Garden of Gethsemane and Why Was it so Crucial to Jesus’ Life?

It is a vulnerable moment just after the Last Supper, when Jesus has revealed to His closest friends on earth what is about to happen to Him — the painful betrayal He will suffer from one of them, as well as His impending arrest, torture, and crucifixion — and how they should prepare for what is to come. Jesus withdraws with His inner circle, the three disciples closest to Him, and seeks sanctuary in a secret area, filled with agony and intense fear at the prospect of what He would shortly face.

And then, with unwavering determination, He goes about doing what He believes is necessary to save all of humanity.

Where Is the Garden of Gethsemane?

While the exact location of the Garden of Gethsemane is difficult to determine, the Bible states that it is located on the Mount of Olives, which is a historic site with significant significance throughout the Bible. We learn that the Mount of Olives was a “Sabbath day’s walk” from the city in Acts 1:12, according to the Bible. According to Easton’s 1897 Bible Dictionary, the Mount of Olives was given this name because it was covered with olive trees at the time. Because it was situated around 200 feet above sea level, it was one of a handful of mountain ridges east of Jerusalem that provided an excellent perspective of the city.

The Mount of Olives is a significant location because it was there that King Solomon built a “high place” for the worship of foreign gods, which caused the Lord to become extremely enraged with him (1 Kings 7-11).

The prophet Zechariah predicted that “a day of the Lord” would come when the Lord will stand on the Mount of Olives, ready for war, and reign as king over the entire planet, and he was correct (Zechariah 14:1-9).

What Is the Garden of Gethsemane?

A significant location in Jesus’ life, the Garden of Gethsemane is mentioned in all four Gospels as a place where He retreated into deep prayer and a time of agony before His arrest and crucifixion, and it is also mentioned as a location near where He ascended to heaven in the Book of Acts, among other things. In Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, Gethsemane is translated from the Greek as “an oil press,” which makes sense given the context. It is said to be located at the base of the Mount of Olives, beyond the Kidron Valley, and to be accessible only by foot.

The oil press, a mechanical device of some type used to crush olives and extract their oil for cooking and other purposes, was also most likely included in the excavation.

Jesus brought His three closest followers — Peter, James, and John — with Him to a spot named Gethsemane (Matthew 26:36) so that He may pray, according to the Gospel of Matthew.

The Bible has a similar story in Mark 14:32, where the Gospel account also mentions that Jesus took Peter, James, and John with Him “to a location called Gethsemane,” where He prayed in intense agony, overwhelmed by what was going to take place.

What Happened in the Garden of Gethsemane at the Mount of Olives?

A significant location in Jesus’ life, the Garden of Gethsemane is mentioned in all four Gospels as a place where He retreated into deep prayer and a period of agony before His arrest and crucifixion, and it is also mentioned as a location near where He ascended to heaven in the Book of Acts, among other things. It is written as “an oil press” in Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, which translates it from the Greek as “an oil press.” Located at the foot of the Mount of Olives, just beyond the Kidron Valley, it is believed to be an ancient site.

A mechanical device of some kind, used to crush olives and extract their oil for use in cooking and other applications, was also most likely present.

Jesus took His three closest disciples — Peter, James, and John — with Him to a place called Gethsemane (Matthew 26:36) so that He could pray, according to the gospel writer Matthew.

A similar story is told in Mark 14:32, where the Gospel account also notes that Jesus took Peter, James, and John with Him “to a place called Gethsemane,” where He prayed in deep distress, overwhelmed by what was about to take place.

Why Is the Garden of Gethsemane Important?

Although the garden was an important location, especially to Jesus because it was a place where He sought much-needed comfort and solace with His Father during a time of pain and sadness, as well as the location where He was betrayed and arrested, it also served as a setting for important instruction on key concepts that are still relevant today. In the first place, we are presented Jesus as the real “Word (that) became flesh” (John 1:14), the incarnate Son of the Lord God, born of a virgin, and referred to as Immanuel, which means “God with us” (Isaiah 7:14).

  • He was in the Garden of Gethsemane where He experienced sadness and tremendous pain as a result of the suffering He would have to undergo.
  • Jesus’ reaction may be taken as annoyance, disdain, or scolding when His closest companions, whom He’d pleaded with to stay awake and maintain watch, were unable to complete even the simplest of tasks for Him.
  • Then Jesus turned to Peter and said, “Couldn’t you men keep watch with Me for an hour?” (Matthew 26:40 b).
  • (Matthew 36:27-29).
  • Jesus did more than just have a sacred supper with His closest companions when they gathered with Him for their final major meeting before His arrest and execution.
  • His revelations included the fact that one of them would betray Him, and that all of the disciples would scatter, with even Peter confessing three times before the rooster crows the following morning (Matthew 26:34).

Lastly, As part of the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus shared wisdom on topics such as turning the other cheek (Matthew 5:38-39), loving our enemies and praying for those who persecute us (5:44), giving to the needy (6:1-4), serving God rather than money or other temporary things of this world (6:19-24), and many other topics.

  • Jesus told him, ‘Put your weapon back where it belongs,’ for those who draw the sword will perish by the sword.’ Do you believe that I will be unable to summon my heavenly Father and have Him immediately place more than twelve legions of angels at my disposal?
  • Jesus was implying that the will of the Father would be carried out regardless of the circumstances, and that there was no use in resisting or incurring extra bloodshed.
  • Despite the fact that they did not comply with His instructions, His requests of them — as well as His modeling of the proper way to behave in times of grief and agony – reveal what we as Christians ought to do now.
  • Many Christians believe that contemplating the Garden of Gethsemane and its significance to Jesus, whether they travel to the exact spot or merely read about it, is an important step in better comprehending the deeds, the message, and the intent of Christ.
  • Her novel, The Memory Garden, was nominated for the 2018 American Christian Fiction Writers Genesis Award, which she received for her work as a Christian novelist.
  • Jessica Brodie’s fiction may be found at jessicabrodie.com, as well as her religious blog.

She also does a weeklyYouTubedevotional on her channel. You may also find her on social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and others. She’s also written a free eBook, A God-Centered Life: 10 Faith-Based Practices for When You’re Anxious, Grumpy, or Stressed, which you can get here.

Worship in the Garden of Gethsemane where Jesus prayed the night before he was crucified

Given its proximity to the natural road going from the Temple to the peak of the Mount of Olives and the ridge leading to Bethany, the garden of Gethsemane was well-known to Jesus’ followers at the time of his arrest. As you may guess, the word “oil press” translates to “oil press” in Hebrew. Oil is still extracted from the fruit today, and it is even used to light the sanctuary lamps in Gethsemane, and the pits are used to make rosary beads, providing the garden with a timeless and inspirational legacy that endures today.

The Grotto of Gethsemane, located about 100 metres north of the chapel, is where Jesus and his followers would frequently camp out at night.

As you wander about and take in the wonderful features, a bible land tour through this rich and gorgeous garden is guaranteed to present you with an experience for your spirit that you will never forget.

The current Gethsemane trees, on the other hand, were not existent at the time of Christ.

According to research published in 2012, three of the eight old trees were planted around the middle of the 12th century and all eight were propagated from cuttings taken from a single parent tree.

Due to the fact that when an olive tree is chopped down, fresh shoots will grow from the roots to form a new tree, this is true.

Take a guided Bible trip of the Garden of Gethsemane, which is described in the New Testament as the location where Jesus and his disciples went to pray the night before he was crucified, according to the Bible.

Enjoy the movie below, which features a Friendship Tours group at the Garden of Gethsemane’s private garden.

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