Where Did Jesus Pray After The Last Supper

Agony in the Garden – Wikipedia

During the time between Jesus’ Farewell Discourse at the conclusion of the Last Supper and his arrest, theAgony in the Garden of Gethsemanewas a period in his life that is recorded in the four canonical gospels as taking place in the Garden of Gethsemane.

Gospel narratives

As recorded in all four of the canonical Gospels, Jesus went for a walk to pray immediately following the Last Supper. In terms of narrative specifics, each Gospel provides a somewhat different version of the story. This area of prayer is referred to as Gethsemane in the gospels of Matthew and Mark. Jesus was joined by three Apostles: Peter, John, and James, whom he instructed to remain awake and pray throughout the night. He made a move “A stone’s throw away” from them, he experienced immense grief and pain, prompting him to pray: “My Father, please let this cup pass me by if at all possible.” Allow things to unfold as You, rather than I, would want.” Then, a little time later, Jesus said, “If this cup cannot be passed by without being drunk, Your will be done!” “It is your will that I do” (Matthew 26:42; in Latin Vulgate:fiat voluntas tua).

He repeated this prayer three times, pausing between each prayer to check on the three apostles, who were all sound sleeping.

An angel from on high appeared to him to give him strength.

Finally, towards the conclusion of the tale, Jesus acknowledges that the time has come for him to be abandoned by his friends.

Tradition

Agony in the Garden is the firstSorrowful Mystery of the Rosary and the first Station of the Scriptural Way of the Cross in Roman Catholic tradition, and it is also known as “The Garden of Gethsemane” (second station in the Philippine version). There are certain prayers and devotions that are offered in the Catholic faith as acts of penance for the pain and suffering experienced by Jesus during His Agony and Passion. There is no plea for a living or deceased beneficiary in these Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ, but rather an attempt to “fix the sins” against Jesus that have been committed.

Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ, according to Pope Pius XI, are a moral obligation for Catholics and are described as “some type of recompense to be made for the hurt” caused by Jesus’ sufferings in his encyclicalMiserentissimus Redemptoron reparations.

Holy Hour

Agony in the Garden is the firstSorrowful Mystery of the Rosary and the first Station of the Scriptural Way of the Cross in Roman Catholic tradition, and it is also known as “The Garden of Gethsemane” (second station in the Philippine version). There are certain prayers and devotions that are offered in the Catholic faith as acts of penance for the pain and suffering Jesus endured during His Agony and Passion. There is no plea for a living or deceased beneficiary in these Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ, but rather an attempt to “fix the sins” against Jesus that are being addressed.

In his encyclicalMiserentissimus Redemptoron reparations, Pope Pius XI described Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ as an obligation for Catholics and referred to them as “some type of recompense to be made for the hurt” that had been caused by Jesus’ suffering.

In accordance with Catholic belief, Jesus’ shedding of blood was physical, rather than metaphorical.

Artistic depictions

On the Mount of Olives, we find Jesus. Art portrayals of the Agony in the Garden are many and varied, and include the following examples:

  • Agony in the Garden is a painting by Giovanni Bellini, an Italian Renaissance painter who lived from 1459 to 1465
  • It depicts a woman in agony in a garden. Painted by romantic poet and artistWilliam Blake in the early 1800s and preserved at the Tate Britain in London, Agony in the Garden is a picture by romantic poet and artistWilliam Blake in the early 1800s. Correggio’s Agony in the Garden, a painting by the Italian artist Correggio that dates back to 1524 and is presently housed in Apsley House in London
  • Painted by the Italian painter Andrea Mantegna between 1458 and 1460, Agony in the Garden may be seen at the National Gallery of London. Painted by Andrea Mantegna between 1457 and 1459 and now housed in the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Tours, Agony in the Garden depicted a woman in agony in a garden. Agony in the Garden, a painting by Gerard David from the 1510s that was formerly assigned to Adriaen Isenbrandt and is currently housed in the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg
  • Christ on the Mount of Olives– a painting by Baroque painter Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, c. 1605
  • Christ on the Mount of Olives– a painting by Paul Gauguin, 1889
  • Christ on the Mount of Olives– a painting by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, c. 1605
  • Christ on the Mount of Olives– a painting by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, c In the classical music world, “Christ on the Mount of Olives” is an oratorio by Ludwig van Beethoven
  • In rock opera, “Gethsemane (I Only Want to Say)” is a song by the rock band Aerosmith. When Jesus performs this song in the musical Jesus Christ Superstar, written by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber, He confronts God about His impending fate, eventually accepting it at the conclusion of the song. Following the crucifixion, an orchestral reprise in the manner of “John Nineteen: Forty-One” may be heard.

Medical conjectures

An interpretation of hematidrosis has been advanced in the scientific literature, according to which the great mental anguish that Jesus suffered to the point that his sweat turned to blood is described only byLuke the Evangelist because he was trained in medicine. This interpretation is based on a medical interpretative hypothesis of hematidrosis.

See also

  • Christ in the Garden, a poem by Felicia Hemans that appeared in the 1826 issue of The Amulet yearly

References

  1. Wiersbe, Warren W. (Wiersbe, Warren W.) (1992). Bible Exposition Commentary, Vol. 1: New Testament (Bible Exposition Commentary, Vol. 1: New Testament). Pages 268–269 of Chariot Victor Publishing’s book. “Knowing everything that was going to happen to Him,” says Matthew 26:46
  2. Mark 14:41
  3. Cf. John 18:4: “Knowing everything that was going to happen to Him,” says Slater (1911). “Reparation,” in Herbermann, Charles (ed. ), Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 12, New York: Robert Appleton Company
  4. Delany, Francis Xavier, “Reparation,” in Herbermann, Charles (ed. ), Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 12, New York: Robert Appleton Company
  5. (1911). “Raccolta.” In Herbermann, Charles (ed. ), Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 12, New York: Robert Appleton Company
  6. Christopher, Joseph P. “Raccolta.” In Herbermann, Charles (ed. ), Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 12, New York: Robert Appleton Company
  7. (2003). The Raccolta is a collection of items. abBall, Ann (2003).Encyclopedia of Catholic Devotions and Practices. St. Athanasius Press, ISBN 978-0-9706526-6-9
  8. AbBall, Ann (2003).Encyclopedia of Catholic Devotions and Practices. St. Athanasius Press, ISBN 978-0-9706526-6-9
  9. AbBall, Ann (2003).Encyclopedia of Catholic Devotions and Practices. abStravinskas, Peter (1998). “Miserentissimus Redemptor.” In Herbermann, Charles (ed.).Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company
  10. AbPope Pius XI (8 May 1928). “Miserentissimus Redemptor.” In Herbermann, Charles (ed.).Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company
  11. AbStravinskas, Peter (1998). The Catholic Encyclopedia published by Our Sunday Visitor. Huntingdon, Indiana: OSV Press, p. 498. ISBN 978-0-87973-669-9
  12. Wakefield, Gordon S. Huntingdon, Indiana: OSV Press, p. 498. ISBN 978-0-87973-669-9
  13. (1983). The Westminster Dictionary of Christian Spirituality is a reference work on Christian spirituality. Kentucky’s Westminster John Knox Press published a book with the ISBN 978-0-664-22170-6 on page 347. Sister Mary Bernard is represented by a doll (1910). “St. Margaret Mary Alacoque,” says the narrator. According to Charles Herbermann (ed.). Vol. 9 of the Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company, New York, New York
  14. Edwards, William D., Gabel, Wesley J., and Hosmer, Floyd E. (2001). (March 21, 1986). “On the Physical Death of Jesus Christ” is the title of this article (PDF). JAMA, vol. 255, no. 11, pp. 1455–1463. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.621.365.doi: 10.1001/jama.1986.03370110077025.PMID3512867
  15. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.621.365.doi: 10.1001/jama.1986.03370110077025

Did Jesus go to the Garden of Gethsemane after the Last Supper?

According to all four Gospels, Jesus went for a walk after the Last Supper in order to pray to the Father. Gethsemane is the name given to this area of prayer in the gospels of Matthew and Mark. Jesus was joined by three Apostles: Peter, John, and James, whom he instructed to remain awake and pray throughout the night. According to scholars, the Last Supper was held three days before the crucifixion. JERUSALEM (AP) _Jesus and his followers had the Last Supper three days before the crucifixion, not several hours as previously believed.

  • Luke 22:22-44 And since he was in anguish, he prayed even more fervently, and his perspiration seemed like large droplets of blood dropping to the ground.
  • As a result, where did Jesus pray following the Last Supper?
  • Is it possible that Jesus wept in the Garden of Gethsemane?
  • “And being in sorrow, he prayed more intensely, and his perspiration was like drops of blood pouring to the ground,” he said.

What is the Garden of Gethsemane and Why Was it so Crucial to Jesus’ Life?

It is a vulnerable moment just after the Last Supper, when Jesus has revealed to His closest friends on earth what is about to happen to Him — the painful betrayal He will suffer from one of them, as well as His impending arrest, torture, and crucifixion — and how they should prepare for what is to come. Jesus withdraws with His inner circle, the three disciples closest to Him, and seeks sanctuary in a secret area, filled with agony and intense fear at the prospect of what He would shortly face.

And then, with unwavering determination, He goes about doing what He believes is necessary to save all of humanity.

Where Is the Garden of Gethsemane?

While the exact location of the Garden of Gethsemane is difficult to determine, the Bible states that it is located on the Mount of Olives, which is a historic site with significant significance throughout the Bible. We learn that the Mount of Olives was a “Sabbath day’s walk” from the city in Acts 1:12, according to the Bible. According to Easton’s 1897 Bible Dictionary, the Mount of Olives was given this name because it was covered with olive trees at the time. Because it was situated around 200 feet above sea level, it was one of a handful of mountain ridges east of Jerusalem that provided an excellent perspective of the city.

The Mount of Olives is a significant location because it was there that King Solomon built a “high place” for the worship of foreign gods, which caused the Lord to become extremely enraged with him (1 Kings 7-11).

The prophet Zechariah predicted that “a day of the Lord” would come when the Lord will stand on the Mount of Olives, ready for war, and reign as king over the entire planet, and he was correct (Zechariah 14:1-9).

The garden was a site of great significance, where not only did a monumental event in the life and death of our Lord Jesus Christ take place, but it was also a place where we might learn important lessons about what it means to be a believer in Christ.

What Is the Garden of Gethsemane?

A significant location in Jesus’ life, the Garden of Gethsemane is mentioned in all four Gospels as a place where He retreated into deep prayer and a time of agony before His arrest and crucifixion, and it is also mentioned as a location near where He ascended to heaven in the Book of Acts, among other things. In Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, Gethsemane is translated from the Greek as “an oil press,” which makes sense given the context. It is said to be located at the base of the Mount of Olives, beyond the Kidron Valley, and to be accessible only by foot.

The oil press, a mechanical device of some type used to crush olives and extract their oil for cooking and other purposes, was also most likely included in the excavation.

Jesus brought His three closest followers — Peter, James, and John — with Him to a spot named Gethsemane (Matthew 26:36) so that He may pray, according to the Gospel of Matthew.

The Bible has a similar story in Mark 14:32, where the Gospel account also mentions that Jesus took Peter, James, and John with Him “to a location called Gethsemane,” where He prayed in intense agony, overwhelmed by what was going to take place.

What Happened in the Garden of Gethsemane at the Mount of Olives?

According to the Gospels, Jesus instructed His followers to “sit here while I pray” (Mark 14:32). Because “my spirit is filled with anguish to the brink of death,” he admitted his sorrow and asked them to keep an eye out for him (14:34). Then, after walking a short distance away from them, he knelt on His knees and cried out to His Father, God. Then he told me that he could do anything for me because he was my Abba, Father.” Please accept this cup from me. Yet it is not what I will, but what You will, that counts.” (14:36).

  1. “He fell to the ground with His face to the ground,” Matthew’s Gospel tells us, as He prayed with all of His might (Matthew 26:39).
  2. The Gospels describe Jesus rebuking them for their frailty and failure to maintain vigil at this time of great need, a time when He prayed with such intensity that the Gospel of Luke described His sweat as “drops of blood dropping to the ground” (22:44).
  3. He appeared ready to confront the path His Father had mapped out for Him.
  4. “Enough!
  5. Look at what has happened: the Son of Man has been handed into the hands of sinners.
  6. Let’s get this party started!
  7. Judas betrayed Jesus with a kiss, and the Son of God was apprehended and imprisoned as a result (Mark 14:43-46).
See also:  What Jesus Actually Looked Liked

Nevertheless, during His all-night anguish of sadness and prayer, Jesus realized what had to be done.

“Jesus responded by saying, ‘No more of this!’ In addition, He touched the man’s ear, healing him” (Luke 22:51).

When this happened, as Jesus had warned, “all of His disciples left Him and fled” (Matthew 26:56).

This time, however, it is during His ministry (Acts 1:12).

“It is not for you to know the times or dates that the Father has fixed by His own authority,” Jesus said.

In the immediate aftermath of His words, He was lifted up and hidden by a cloud in front of their very eyes” (Acts 1:6-9).

They also informed them that Jesus would return in the manner in which they had last seen Him go. The disciples then returned from the Mount of Olives to Jerusalem, prepared to carry out the tasks that Jesus had assigned to them there (1:10-12).

Why Is the Garden of Gethsemane Important?

Although the garden was an important location, especially to Jesus because it was a place where He sought much-needed comfort and solace with His Father during a time of pain and sadness, as well as the location where He was betrayed and arrested, it also served as a setting for important instruction on key concepts that are still relevant today. In the first place, we are presented Jesus as the real “Word (that) became flesh” (John 1:14), the incarnate Son of the Lord God, born of a virgin, and referred to as Immanuel, which means “God with us” (Isaiah 7:14).

  1. He was in the Garden of Gethsemane where He experienced sadness and tremendous pain as a result of the suffering He would have to undergo.
  2. Jesus’ reaction may be taken as annoyance, disdain, or scolding when His closest companions, whom He’d pleaded with to stay awake and maintain watch, were unable to complete even the simplest of tasks for Him.
  3. Then Jesus turned to Peter and said, “Couldn’t you men keep watch with Me for an hour?” (Matthew 26:40 b).
  4. (Matthew 36:27-29).
  5. Jesus did more than just have a sacred supper with His closest companions when they gathered with Him for their final major meeting before His arrest and execution.
  6. His revelations included the fact that one of them would betray Him, and that all of the disciples would scatter, with even Peter confessing three times before the rooster crows the following morning (Matthew 26:34).

Lastly, As part of the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus shared wisdom on topics such as turning the other cheek (Matthew 5:38-39), loving our enemies and praying for those who persecute us (5:44), giving to the needy (6:1-4), serving God rather than money or other temporary things of this world (6:19-24), and many other topics.

  1. Jesus told him, ‘Put your weapon back where it belongs,’ for those who draw the sword will perish by the sword.’ Do you believe that I will be unable to summon my heavenly Father and have Him immediately place more than twelve legions of angels at my disposal?
  2. Jesus was implying that the will of the Father would be carried out regardless of the circumstances, and that there was no use in resisting or incurring extra bloodshed.
  3. Despite the fact that they did not comply with His instructions, His requests of them — as well as His modeling of the proper way to behave in times of grief and agony – reveal what we as Christians ought to do now.
  4. Many Christians believe that contemplating the Garden of Gethsemane and its significance to Jesus, whether they travel to the exact spot or merely read about it, is an important step in better comprehending the deeds, the message, and the intent of Christ.
  5. Her novel, The Memory Garden, was nominated for the 2018 American Christian Fiction Writers Genesis Award, which she received for her work as a Christian novelist.
  6. Jessica Brodie’s fiction may be found at jessicabrodie.com, as well as her religious blog.

She also does a weeklyYouTubedevotional on her channel. You may also find her on social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and others. She’s also written a free eBook, A God-Centered Life: 10 Faith-Based Practices for When You’re Anxious, Grumpy, or Stressed, which you can get here.

What did Jesus Pray for in His Last Days?

Although the garden was an important location, especially to Jesus because it was a place where He sought much-needed comfort and solace with His Father during a time of pain and sadness, as well as the location where He was betrayed and arrested, it also served as a setting for important instruction on key concepts that are critical for today’s believers. First and foremost, we are presented Jesus as the genuine “Word (that) became flesh” (John 1:14), the incarnate Son of the Lord God, born of a virgin and known as Immanuel, which means “God with us” (Isaiah 7:14).

  • As He sat in the Garden of Gethsemane, He was overcome with grief and tremendous agony as He contemplated the difficulties He would have to face.
  • Jesus’ reaction may be taken as frustration, disdain, or scolding when His closest companions, whom He’d pleaded Him to stay awake and maintain watch, were unable to accomplish even the simplest of tasks.
  • Then Jesus questioned Peter, “Couldn’t you men stay watch with Me for an hour?” (Matthew 26:40 b).
  • (Matthew 36:27-29).
  • Jesus did more than simply have a sacred supper with His closest companions when they gathered with Him for their final significant meeting before His arrest and execution.
  • As a result, He revealed that one of them would betray Him, and that all of the apostles would disperse, including Peter, who would reject Him three times before the rooster crows the following morning (Matthew 26:34).

Lastly, In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus shared insight on topics such as turning the other cheek (Matthew 5:38-39), loving our enemies and praying for those who persecute us (5:44), giving to the poor (6:1-4), serving God rather than money or other fleeting things of this world (6:19-24), and more.

  1. Jesus told him, ‘Put your weapon back where it belongs,’ since those who draw the sword will perish by the sword.'” Do you believe that I will be unable to summon my heavenly Father and have Him immediately dispatch more than twelve legions of angels to my aid when the time comes?
  2. Because the Father’s will will be carried out regardless of the circumstances, Jesus was suggesting that opposing or incurring further bloodshed was pointless.
  3. In today’s world, the Garden of Gethsemane is a hallowed spot, a pilgrimage site where people gather to meander amid still-growing olive trees and try to locate the precise location where Jesus went to His knees or freely surrendered Himself for arrest and sacrifice.
  4. Photo courtesy of David Boca on Unsplash.com.
  5. Her work, The Memory Garden, was nominated for the 2018 American Christian Fiction Writers Genesis Award, and she is the recipient of the Genesis Award.
  6. Jessica Brodie’s novels may be found at jessicabrodie.com, as can her religious blog.

A weekly YouTube devotional is also available from her. In addition, you may follow her on social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter. Also available as a free eBook is A God-Centered Life: 10 Faith-Based Practices When You’re Anxious, Grumpy, or Stressed, which she wrote with her husband.

What is the story of the Garden of Gethsemane the night Jesus was arrested?

Scripture passages relating to Jesus’ time in the Garden of Gethsemane are found in Matthew 26:36–56, Mark 14:32–52, Luke 22:39–53, and John 18. As a result of Judas’s departure from the Upper Room to inform the top priests that Jesus would be vulnerable, Jesus took His surviving followers to Gethsemane, where they spent the next three days praying and fasting. The garden, which may have been an olive grove (the word “gethsemane” means “oil press”), was located on the slopes of the Mount of Olives and overlooked the Mediterranean Sea.

  1. When Jesus and the disciples arrived, Jesus immediately pulled away Peter, James, and John, three of His most important disciples.
  2. I am pained to the verge of death; please stay here and keep vigil with Me” (Matthew 26:38).
  3. An angel appeared to him and comforted him as his perspiration dropped like beads of blood.
  4. While Jesus sobbed in agony, Peter, James, and John fell asleep on the spot.
  5. “So you couldn’t keep watch with Me for an hour because you were too tired?
  6. He prayed once more, this time humbly and actively surrendering to the will of God.
  7. Jesus arose from the dead.

Both his sadness about the situation and his readiness to help were expressed again and again.

The arrival of Judas was followed by a huge number of men with swords, torches, and clubs—a Roman cohort (of 300-600 men) as well as officers from the chief priests and Pharisees—at the time that Jesus was speaking.

In case the soldiers didn’t recognize the person in the photo, Jesus inquired as to who they were looking for.

Jesus bowed down to the rabble, but His followers refused to do so.

Peter didn’t hang around waiting for a response.

The Bible doesn’t go into detail on why.

Or it’s possible that he had his hands on Jesus.

When Peter responded violently, Jesus effectively told him that if violence was his first reaction, then violence would be his downfall.

How, therefore, will the Scriptures be fulfilled, given that it is required to take place in this manner?” (Matthew 26:53-54; Mark 12:53-54).

Jesus then remarked on the cowardice of the mob, pointing out that they had come to face one unarmed man in the middle of the night rather than taking Him in the open during the day when the people might see him.

Each member of the crowd was responsible for his or her own decision, but Jesus, on the other hand, would not fight against God’s command.

Is it possible that Judas knew where Jesus would be?

According to Luke 22:39, that was Jesus’ “custom.” Judas, who was betraying Him, knew the location since Jesus had frequently met there with His followers, as recorded in John 18:2, according to the Bible.

It is not stated in the Bible.

Apart from the obvious, why was Jesus in such agony if He’d been forewarned all along that this would happen?

The thorns on His crown were inches long, and they caused blood to squirt out of His scalp.

During the torture, Jesus, on the other hand, remained mute.

The physical anguish was not a source of concern for Jesus; rather, when the Second Member of the Trinity was separated from the other members, He cried out, “Father, why have You deserted Me?” When Jesus said, “I am He,” the soldiers backed away.

Although some Bible translations use the pronoun “He” to make it clearer, Jesus truly said “I AM.” This is the name of the Creator (Exodus 3:14).

When confronted with the name—with its power and identity—the guards trembled in terror of His might.

In an olive grove, Jesus was anointed with perspiration after his baptism.

It is suitable that He began His fulfillment of His duty as Messiah in this location.

What happened in the aftermath of Judas’ betrayal of Jesus?

Who has responsibility for the killing of Jesus Christ? What judicial proceedings against Jesus resulted in His crucifixion? What is the source of Christ’s zeal? What transpired in the final hours before Jesus’ death is unknown. Return to the previous page: The Truth About Everything Else

The Lord’s Supper – the Final Week in Jerusalem

Matthew 26, Mark 14, Luke 22, John 13, and 18 are the Gospels.

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The Plot to Kill Jesus

Jesus was extremely well-liked by the large throngs of people that gathered in Jerusalem. The leading priests of the temple began to feel their power eroding and grew extremely envious of one another. Although they were seeking for a means to murder Jesus, the authorities were unsure of how they might apprehend Him without causing a disturbance. One of Jesus’ disciples, Judas, on the other hand, turned traitor. As a disciple, Judas was well-versed in the locations where Jesus frequently traveled.

They would be able to apprehend Jesus without sparking a commotion in this manner.

They approved of it and offered Judas a huge quantity of money – around four months’ salaries – in exchange for betraying Jesus.

Jesus Washes His Apostles’ Feet

The time had arrived for the Passover supper to be served. As they had for millennia, Jews celebrated Passover with roasted lamb, unleavened bread, bitter herbs, and four glasses of wine, according to the Jewish calendar. During His time on earth, Jesus made arrangements to rejoice with the twelve disciples whom He had appointed as apostles. In the afternoon, Jesus dispatched them to Jerusalem to prepare a traditional Passover feast, and He himself joined them in the evening. After that, Jesus did something that took everyone by surprise.

When it came Peter’s time, he expressed his dissatisfaction with Jesus’ washing of feet, saying that it was improper.

Jesus, on the other hand, was not a servant; He was the master!

“You don’t understand why I’m doing this right now, but you will understand later,” Jesus responded.

The Last Supper

Jesus shares bread and wine with Hisdisciples at the Last Supper.

Jesus was well aware that Judas would betray Him and that He would be crucified the next day. It was not just Passover, but it was also Jesus’ final dinner with His followers, making it a very poignant event for those involved. While Jesus and His disciples were eating, Jesus startled and offended the entire group of disciples once more. And he continued: “I promise you that one of those who is eating with me will betray Me!” “Surely, it is not I, Lord,” everyone of the disciples responded as they glanced around them.

“It is the one to whom I am giving this piece of bread,” Jesus said.

Judas fled right away, but the most of the disciples were clueless as to why.

His final words to the eleven surviving disciples were as follows: “Give a portion to each of the eleven remaining disciples.” “This is My physical body, which I have given to you.

I will never drink wine again until the day comes when I shall drink it for the first time with you in My Father’s kingdom.”

Jesus Is Arrested

Judas gives Jesus a kiss as a signalto the chief priests’ armed mob.

In advance of his betrayal, Jesus knew that He would be crucified the next day. In addition to being the Jewish holiday of Passover, it was also Jesus’ final dinner with His followers, making it a very memorable occasion. While Jesus and His disciples were eating, Jesus startled and offended the entire group of disciples once more. And he continued: “I promise you that one of those who are eating with me will betray Me!” “Surely, it is not I, Lord,” all of the disciples exclaimed as they all glanced around them.

“It is the one to whom I am giving this piece of bread,” Jesus said.

A loaf of bread was then taken from the oven and broken into pieces by Jesus.

This is something you should do in memory of Me.” When he had finished speaking, he took a cup of wine, expressed his gratitude, and distributed it around the table, saying, “It is My blood of the covenant that has been poured out for many for the remission of sins, and you are all invited to drink from it together.

Questions

“Disciple” is a term that refers to a pupil or learner, and Jesus had a large number of disciples. He selected twelve of them to serve as apostles. The term “apostle” refers to a messenger, and the apostles were tasked with spreading the message of Jesus across the globe (Matthew 28:16-20).

Why DidJesus Wash the Feet of His Apostles?

Jesus was the guy referred to as “Master” and “Lord” by His disciples. True greatness, on the other hand, does not come from being influential and powerful, as Jesus intended to demonstrate to his apostles. It was only a humble servant who would do something like washing the feet of visitors to a family, yet Jesus did it. By setting an example, He demonstrated to the apostles that genuine greatness comes from serving others. Whoever want to be the greatest in God’s kingdom must devote their lives to helping God and humanity in some capacity (Matthew20:25-28, Mark 9:35, Luke 18:14).

Why Did Judas Betray Jesus?

Judas was under the power of Satan at the time of his betrayal (Luke 22:3, John 13:27). Nevertheless, how did Satan entice Judas to betray Jesus? Perhaps he was motivated by avarice, as the high priests offered him a large sum of money in exchange for betraying Jesus. Perhaps Judas had lost trust in Jesus and had come to the conclusion that He was not the Messiah after all.

Whatever the cause, Judas allowed Satan to have the better of him and therefore committed a terrible crime. In addition to this, Judas was a participant in God’s grand design, and his covert betrayal may have prevented many innocent people from being wounded in the aftermath of a riot.

What Is the Meaning of the Lord’s Supper?

Clearly, when Jesus broke the bread and handed the cup of wine at the Last Supper, He was announcing something of enormous significance to the assembled guests. Most Christian churches commemorate this event on a regular basis via the celebration of “The Lord’s Supper,” “Communion,” or “Eucharist.” The diners are given bread (or wafers) and wine (or grape juice), and Jesus’ words from the Last Supper are read out to them once more. Different churches have established a variety of ideas on the significance of the Lord’s Supper over time.

Others believe that Christ is present in the bread and wine, but they do not think that they transform into His actual flesh and blood when they are consumed.

Many Christians, however, think that the Lord’s Supper serves primarily as a commemorative commemoration of Christ’s life and ministry.

The Last Great Prayer of Jesus

Consider the possibility of eating supper with Jesus tonight, and the meal ending with Him lifting His eyes to the heavens and beginning to pray. I’d be listening intently to every word! Following the Last Supper, the disciples were privy to Jesus’ final big prayer, which they heard aloud. Jesus knew they would miss his bodily presence and want for them (and us) to be comforted and loved as He had done for them. It was, in a sense, his final opportunity to inform them of his goals and objectives for their life.

We have been given a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to peek into the heart and thoughts of Jesus, which demonstrates to us the unique significance we have in his eyes as he prays for us.

Jesus Prays for Himself

1-5: “After saying all of this, Jesus looked up to heaven and exclaimed, ‘Father, the hour is arrived.'” Give glory to your Son so that he might return the glory to you. Because you have delegated authority to him over everyone. He grants eternal life to each and every one of the people you have given him. In order to have eternal life, one must come to know you, the one and only real God, as well as Jesus Christ, the one you sent to earth. I brought honor to you on this planet by fulfilling the task you assigned me to complete for you.

  • Our Father and His Son have worked together since the beginning of time to grant His Son absolute sovereignty over all humanity.
  • Jesus didn’t just stare about aimlessly; He was looking at His Father, who was seated on His throne.
  • Jesus uses the term “glory” a number of times.
  • We can have everlasting life with Jesus if we KNOW the Father and the redemptive work of his Son, Jesus, as Jesus describes plainly in the Gospel of John.

The sheep of Jesus are AWARE of His voice. He informs us that he is our shepherd and that we are members of his sheep. (See also John 17:14-15.) By studying God’s Word, we may get to know him better, which increases our confidence in him and his promises.

Jesus’ Prayer for His Disciples

Verse 6-10: “I have exposed you to them whom you gave me out of the world, and they have seen your glory.” They belonged to you; you entrusted them to me, and they have remained true to your word. They are now aware that everything I have received has been provided by you. Because I delivered the words you provided me, and they were well received. They were confident that I was sent by you, and they thought that you were the source of my message. I will say a prayer for them. I am not praying for the entire world, but rather for those whom you have given me, for they are yours to keep and cherish.

And it is through them that I have received honor.” We, his beloved ones, are in Jesus’ prayers just as much as he was for the disciples.

He respects, loves, and embraces each and every one of us.

Jesus is alive and well in the world today because of our efforts!

Jesus Prays for Unity

The following are the verses 11-19: “Now I am going from the world; they are remaining in this world, but I am coming to you.” As you have given me your name, Holy Father, please protect them with the power of your name so that they will be joined in the same way that we are. They were protected by the power of the name you gave me while I was in this place with them. I kept watch over them, making sure that none of them went missing, with the exception of the one who was bound for disaster, as the Scriptures said.

  1. As long as I was with them in this world, I told them numerous things in order for them to be filled with my happiness.
  2. Furthermore, they are despised by the world because they do not belong to it, in the same way that I do not belong to the world.
  3. They are not a part of this world any more than I am a part of it.
  4. In the same way that you sent me into the world, I am now sending them into the world as well.
  5. I think I didn’t really comprehend or appreciate just how safe and secure we were being kept and protected until now.
  6. He desires for us to be united in a way that is as strong as the link that exists between the Father and the Son.

His message transforms us into “holy” people who are dedicated and devoted to God. “The Spiritual Meaning of Salt” is a related post. In related news, “The Light of the World” was released.

The Joy of the Lord

As Jesus explains in verse 13, he taught his followers “many things” in order for them to be “full” with his pleasure. He prays for you and me in the same way. Jesus desires for us to be filled with the overflowing joy that comes from a genuine relationship with him. Being able to experience the delight of his presence is not dependent on our current circumstances. He desires more than the satisfaction that his surroundings provide. Happiness is a fleeting emotion. His happiness will always be with us.

Jesus Praying for Us

“I am praying not just for these disciples, but also for everybody who will ever believe in me as a result of their message,” says the author in verses 20-26. I hope that they will all become one, just as you and I are one—as you are in me, Father, and I am in you—and that they will all be one in Christ. We pray for them to be present in us so that the world would believe you sent me. I have given them the honor you have given me, so that they may be one with us as we are with them. It is I who is in them, and it is you who is in me.

  1. Father, I want these people who you have given me to be with me wherever I am at this time.
  2. O righteous Father, the world does not know who you are, but I do; and these disciples are aware that you sent me to them.
  3. Then your feelings for me will be reflected in them, and I will be reflected in them.” We, as well as future believers and followers, are included in Jesus’ prayer as a result of our participation.
  4. He desires for us to be bound together in His love, as witnesses to his life, love, and sacrifice on the cross.
  5. His greatest goal is for us to be with him in Heaven, where we will be able to witness the entire grandeur of God for all time.
  6. When he speaks his last words, they reverberate with the intensity of his longing: “Then your love for me will be in them, and I will be in them.” His immense love for us motivated him to make the ultimate sacrifice for us.
  7. While we are on this planet, he wants us to feel safe and secure, and to put our whole faith in his plan and purpose.
See also:  Man Who Claim To Be Jesus

John 17- Prayer of Intercession

This prayer provides us with an up-close and personal glimpse into his thoughts: He is on his way to the cross and is frantically praying for us; for those whom he loves. Jesus was well aware that the crucifixion lay ahead of him, and he prayed publicly to his Father in the midst of his followers, demonstrating his compassion. He made certain that his statements were captured so that we could hear what was going through his head and heart. Isn’t it difficult to grasp what’s going on? He was thinking about me at the time.

  • I’m sure it helped to strengthen the disciples, and I hope to feel the same love, protection, comfort, and strength every day of my life as they did.
  • Reflections: As we get closer to Easter, I’d want to spend some time thinking about Jesus’ final prayer.
  • We should ask ourselves the following questions: What is my strategy for getting to KNOW Jesus better?
  • Is it possible for me to truly comprehend and embrace the great value that Jesus placed on my life?

In order to live a life in harmony with my fellow Christians, what actions may I take? What is the best way for me to convey the love that Jesus has for me? Blessings, AnnMarie Photo courtesy of Pixabay

What happened in the Garden of Gethsemane?

QuestionAnswer Located on a slope of the Mount of Olives, directly across the Kidron Valley from Jerusalem, the Garden of Gethsemane, whose name literally translates as “oil press,” is a popular pilgrimage destination. Even now, a garden of antique olive trees may be found on the property. With His followers, Jesus went to Gethsemane on a regular basis to pray (John 18:2). The most well-known events in Gethsemane happened the night before Jesus’ crucifixion, when He was betrayed by Judas Iscariot.

  • Matthew 26:36-56 is the most accurate account of the events of that night.
  • When they reached a certain point in their journey, Jesus brought three of them—Peter, James, and John—to a spot apart from the rest.
  • Twice, Jesus had to wake them up and tell them to pray in order for them to avoid falling prey to the temptation.
  • The three men were watching Jesus as He walked a little distance away from them to pray, and twice He requested His Father to withdraw the cup of vengeance He was about to drink, but each time He bowed to the Father’s decision.
  • Following this, Judas Iscariot, the betrayer, arrived with a “multitude” of soldiers, high priests, Pharisees, and slaves in order to arrest Jesus and take him away.
  • In an attempt to defend Jesus, Peter brandished a sword and stabbed a man named Malchus, a servant of the high priest, severing his ear in the process.
  • Surprised that seeing this great miracle of healing had no effect on the large number of people present.
  • Nonetheless, they seized Him and brought Him before Pontius Pilate, while the disciples fled in terror for their lives.
  • For ages, artists have represented the fervor with which Jesus demonstrated on that historic night in music, literature, and film.
  • Even our vocabulary has been influenced by these events, with words such as “he who lives by the sword dies by the sword” (Matthew 26:52), “the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak” (Mark 14:38), and “sweating droplets of blood” (Matthew 26:51) emerging from the Bible (Luke 22:44).
  • Christ, who was without sin, was made sin for us, so that we may become the righteousness of God in Him, according to the Scriptures (2 Corinthians 5:21).

The gospel of Jesus Christ is presented here. Questions about Biblical Locations (Questions about Biblical Places) What transpired in the Garden of Gethsemane is a mystery.

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Library : The Prayer of Jesus at the Last Supper

Submitted by Pope Benedict XVI

Descriptive Title

On January 11, 2012, Pope Benedict XVI delivered his General Audience Address.

Description

The focus of Pope Benedict XVI’s catechesis at his general audience, which was conducted this morning in the Paul VI Hall in the presence of 4,000 faithful, was Jesus’ prayer during the Last Supper. The Pope stated that the imminence of Jesus’ impending death served as the emotional backdrop to the Last Supper, during which Jesus bid his companions farewell. Furthermore, during the days in which He was prepared to depart from His disciples, the Jewish people’s lives were marked by the impending Passover, which commemorated Israel’s escape from Egypt and was celebrated annually.

PublisherDate

The Vatican City State on January 11, 2012 Greetings, Brothers & Sisters. Today, as we continue our voyage of contemplation on Jesus’ prayer as it is shown in the Gospels, I would want to think on the time of his prayer at the Last Supper, which I believe is particularly somber. It is the imminence of his death, which he perceives as being close at hand, that serves as the temporal and emotional backdrop to the joyful supper at which Jesus bids his companions farewell. Jesus had been speaking about his Passion for some time, and he had also been attempting to include his followers more and more in this process.

  1. Furthermore, the impending celebration of the Passover, which commemorates Israel’s escape from Egypt, occurred precisely during the days when Jesus was preparing to say goodbye to his followers, bringing the lives of the people into sharp focus.
  2. The Last Supper fits into this environment, but with a fundamental difference from the norm.
  3. In this Supper, Jesus intends to spend time with his followers since it has a distinct character and is unlike any other meal; it is his Supper, in which he offers something completely new: himself.
  4. As a reminder of this new element, we can look at John’s account of the Last Supper.
  5. Furthermore, according to the Gospel of John, Jesus died on the cross at the same time that the Passover lambs were being killed in the Temple.
  6. When Jesus breaks bread with his disciples, distributes it to them, and shares the cup of wine with them, along with the words that accompany them, and in the context of prayer to which they belong, this is the institution of the Eucharist, which is the great prayer of Jesus and the Church.
  7. First and foremost, the New Testament traditions of the Institution of the Eucharist (cf.

When it comes to eucaristia/thanksgiving, Paul and Luke write of it as follows: “And he took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to them” (Lk 22:19).

(Mk 14:22).

The two distinct Greek terms used in this prayer denote the two intrinsic and complementary orientations of the prayer, respectively.

At the Last Supper of Jesus, the bread – which is made from wheat that God causes to sprout and grow in the earth – and the wine – which is made from fruit that has been allowed to ripen on the vine – are the primary items of thanksgiving and praise to God.

Thanking and praising God become blessings as a result, and the sacrifice made to God is blessed by the Almighty and returned to the giver.

Prior to the Institution’s remarks, there are two activities that take place: the breaking of the bread and the offering of the wine.

These precise acts, which take place throughout the Supper and with which Jesus bids his people farewell, take on an entirely new significance.

Jesus makes himself available and conveys himself via the bread and the wine.

How is it possible for Jesus to sacrifice himself at that moment?

In offering the gifts of the bread and the wine at the Last Supper, Jesus predicts his death and resurrection, bringing about the fulfillment of his Good Shepherd Discourse statement: “I lay down my life in order that I may take it again.” No one can take it away from me, but I choose to put it down of my own free will.

As a result, he provides himself in preparation of the life that will be snatched from him, transforming his violent death into a selfless act of offering himself for and to other people.

A second time, in prayer, which is initiated in accordance with the ritual forms of the Biblical tradition, Jesus demonstrates his identity and his determination to carry out until the very end his mission of total love and offering in obedience to the Father’s will, as he has done so many times before.

  1. Consider Jesus’ acts and words that night, and we can see clearly that he carries out his act of bequeathing to his disciples and to each of us the sacrament of love, known as the “Sacramentum caritatis,” while in this intimate and continual connection with the Father.
  2. In order to convey this message to the Christians in Corinth, St Paul says: “Christ, our Paschal Lamb, has been slaughtered.” In order to commemorate the feast, let us break bread with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth” (1 Cor 5:7-8).
  3. Beginning with a prayer of thankfulness and blessing, Jesus progresses to the Eucharistic gift, which is the gift of himself, and it is during this time that he confronts Peter about the central sacramental reality of the Mass.
  4. After being put to the test, Jesus’ prayer assists his followers in overcoming their frailty in their attempt to comprehend that the path of God goes via the Paschal Mystery of the death and Resurrection, which is anticipated in the giving of the bread and the wine (Luke 24:13–14).
  5. And the prayer was specifically for Peter, so that after he had gone back to the Lord, he would be able to encourage his fellow believers in the faith.
  6. As a result, Peter was reminded of the Lord’s word” (Lk 22:60-61).
  7. Dear brothers and sisters, As part of the Eucharist, the Church responds to Jesus’ commandment to “do this in remembrance of me” (Lk 22,19; cf.

For centuries, the Church has understood the words of consecration as an integral part of the prayer offered to Jesus in community; as a central part of the praise filled with gratitude, through which the fruits of the earth and man’s labor come to us anew, given to us by God in the Body and Blood of Jesus, as the self-giving of God himself in his Son’s self-emptying love (cf.Jesus of Nazareth,Part Two, p.

128).

We pray to the Lord that, having being properly prepared, including through the sacrament of Penance, our participation in his Eucharist, which is essential to the Christian life, may always be the pinnacle of all our prayer.

Thank you very much.

To the students of Carmel College in New Zealand, please accept my greetings as well.

God’s abundant blessings be upon all of the English-speaking visitors and their families, which I respectfully invoke.

The Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, which we commemorated last Sunday, provides us with an opportunity to reflect on our own baptismal experiences.

Dear ill people, may the grace of baptism ease your pain and motivate you to devote yourself to Christ for the salvation of all mankind.

Copyright 2012 – Vatican Publishing House (Libreria Editrice Vaticana) This digital reproduction of item 9841 is given courtesy of CatholicCulture.org.

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