What Is The New Commandment, That Jesus Gave To His Disciples

New Commandment: Why Did Jesus Give It?

During the night before His crucifixion, Jesus Christ referred to His followers as “small children” in a loving manner as He prepared them for His impending departure. He was well aware that His time on this planet was drawing to a close swiftly. He was well aware of His impending suffering, death, and resurrection, as well as His final ascension to His Father in heaven, and he acted accordingly. Following are a few verses that demonstrate His compassion for them, as well as His use of them to teach them—and His Church throughout the ages—a lesson in Christian love.

You are going to look for Me, and just as I told the Jews, ‘Where I am going, you cannot follow,’ so now I say to you” (John 13:33).

Love for one another, as defined in this new commandment, was so important that Jesus used it as a distinguishing characteristic of His real disciples: “By this everyone will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another” (verse 35).

What was new about the “new commandment”?

As a matter of fact, the mandate “that you love one another” was not a new one throughout the period of the New Testament. The Old Testament’s mandate to “love your neighbor as yourself” used terms that were similar to those in the New Testament. This was an old law that existed even throughout the time of Jesus Christ’s ministry. In the book of Exodus, it reads, “You shall not seek revenge or carry any grudge against the children of your nation; rather, you should love your neighbor as yourself: I am the LORD” (Leviticus 19:18).

  • The “new commandment” is defined as Christ’s instruction to love “as I have loved you.” This intensity of love propels the Christian into a whole new realm of love-expressing for others around him or her.
  • Jesus Christ gladly paid the penalty for our sins, putting into effect His “as I have loved you” sort of love.
  • His pain, torture, and brutal death were the high price we paid for our sin.
  • In the absence of that love, we would be without hope and without the possibility to live eternally.

He suffered and died out of love for us, so that we, like Him, may be raised and live for all eternity. He was a pioneer in the cause of our redemption.

Are the 10 Commandments still relevant today?

Within traditional Christianity, there is a widely held belief that in33 Little children, I will be with you for a short period of time more time. I know you will look for Me, and just as I told the Jews, ‘Where I am going, you cannot follow,’ so now I say to you as well. 34 I offer you a new commandment: that you love one another as I have loved you, and that you love one another as I have loved you in return. The Holy Bible, New King James Version (NKJV) was published in 1982 by Thomas Nelson and is known as the New King James Version (NKJV).

According to the theory, He was replacing them with His new commandment because the 10 Commandments were proving to be too heavy for Christians.

In contrast to the Ten Commandments, Jesus’ new commandment does not contradict or replace them; rather, it enhances and demonstrates the spiritual depth and aim of God’s rule.

Is the claim logical?

Consider the following analogy: thinking that the 10 Commandments were abolished just because a new one was given is similar to believing that a government must abolish all of its former laws each time a new law is enacted. Alternatively, it may be as simple as parents disowning all of their previous children just because they had a new baby. That is not logical or required in this situation. As such, why would a new commandment be necessary to replace the ten commandments that our Creator gave us for our benefit (13 and to observe the commandments of the Lord and His laws, which I command you today for your benefit)?

As we saw previously, the notion of “love your neighbor as yourself” (which was not one of the Ten Commandments to begin with) was superseded for Christians by the considerably more difficult order to love “as I have loved you,” which was enshrined in the phrase “love your neighbor as yourself.”

Spirit of the law and the law of love

In contrast to the Ten Commandments, Jesus’ new commandment does not contradict or replace them; rather, it enhances and demonstrates the spiritual depth and aim of God’s rule. All of God’s rules are evidence of God’s love for us. God’s law, which includes the two major commandments as well as the rest of the Ten Commandments, is a law based on love. The “greatest commandment in the law,” Jesus said when questioned about it. “‘You shall love the LORD your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with everything in your mind,'” he stated.

  • This is similar to the second commandment, which states, “You should love your neighbor as yourself.” “All of the Law and the Prophets are hung on these two commandments.
  • Jesus recounted these passages from the Law of Moses and indicated that they served as a condensed version of the other rules.
  • By obeying not only the letter of the law, but also the spirit of the law, we demonstrate the love that God intended for us.
  • Those who believe in the legitimacy of the commandments prohibiting murder, theft, and lying, for example, would be in the minority.

(For further information, please see our free pamphlet The Sabbath: A Neglected Gift From God.)

What did Jesus say about the 10 Commandments?

According to the New Testament, a wealthy young ruler approached Jesus and inquired about how he may get eternal life. “At that point, a person approached Him and inquired, ‘Good Teacher, what good deed should I do in order to obtain eternal life?’ So He asked him, “Why do you call Me good?” He replied. There is only One who is good, and that is God. “However, if you wish to come into life, you must observe the commandments.” (Matthew 19:16-17; Mark 10:16-17; Luke 10:16-17). If Jesus Christ had come to abolish the Ten Commandments and institute a new commandment in their place, then these passages were simply one of many opportunities He had to declare so during His earthly ministry.

  1. In fact, He declared the polar opposite: “If you wish to come into life, observe the commandments,” He explained.
  2. And after becoming angry with the woman, the dragon set out to wage war against the remainder of her descendants, who adhere to the commandments of God and have faith in Jesus Christ.
  3. The Holy Bible, New King James Version (NKJV) was published in 1982 by Thomas Nelson and is known as the New King James Version (NKJV) “>22:14 (UTC).
  4. The articles ” The Ten Commandments for Today” and ” Jesus and the Law” might be used to supplement your research.

What is the new commandment?

QuestionAnswer While speaking to His followers on the night He was betrayed by Judas, Jesus revealed the “new commandment” in John 13:34–35, which is known as the “new testament.” He had stood by and watched as His disloyal pupil walked away from the dinner table to complete the horrible deed he had begun. Then, when Judas had left, Jesus addressed the remaining eleven by saying, “I offer you a new commandment, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you are to love one another.” By doing so, everyone will recognize you as my followers, especially if you have love for one other.” During the three years that Jesus and the disciples had been together, He had taught them many things, but this new commandment was the final one He gave them before He was executed.

  1. What would it take for us to have the same influence on the world as He had?
  2. When the world sees His disciples continuing to love one another, Jesus predicted that the world will be drawn to His message.
  3. Jesus established a community that was united by a single characteristic: love.
  4. However, the church is one-of-a-kind.
  5. The love that Christ’s followers have for one another distinguishes them as followers of Christ.
  6. The disciples had not started out by showing affection for one another.
  7. They were just as wicked and greedy as the rest of us, and they were just as rough around the edges.
  8. Their awareness that this was God’s appearance on earth was a revelation for them.
  9. He served as a role model for them.
  10. For example, in Matthew 5:21–38, Jesus often prefaced a teaching with the words, “You have heard it said.

but I say to you.) Also, He taught about love in a way that His listeners had never heard before: “You have heard that it was stated, ‘You should love your neighbor as yourself, and hate your adversary as yourself.’ Rather, I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you in so that you may be adopted as sons of your heavenly Father.” (Matthew 5:43–45; Mark 10:43–45).

  • Despite the fact that they didn’t realize it at the time, Jesus was informing them that He would not be among them for much longer.
  • At first, it had not been simple to fall in love with them.
  • However, for three years, Jesus had demonstrated to them that love is not conditional on the merit of the one who is loved.
  • Jesus displayed this unconditional love by washing the feet of His followers, including the feet of the one who would betray Him.
  • As expressed in 1 Corinthians 13:4–7, he demonstrated the love indicated in the passage.

Living with this type of love was the new commandment that Jesus taught to everyone who wished to follow in His footsteps as a disciple (Luke 9:23). Questions about John (return to top of page) What is the new commandment, and how does it apply?

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The New Commandment of Christ: ‘Love One Another As I Have Loved You’

“Now the Son of Man has been glorified, and God has been glorified through him,” Jesus declared after he had exited the building. 32 The same way that God is exalted in him, God will also glorify him in himself, so glorifying him at the same time. 33 While I am with you, please allow me to spend some time with your tiny ones. “You will go looking for me, and just as I said to the Jews, so now I say to you, “Where I am going, you cannot come.” 34 I offer you a new commandment: that you love one another as I have loved you.

35 By doing so, everyone will recognize you as my followers, especially if you have love for one other.”

A Bridge-Sermon

This discourse serves as a transitional period.

  • It serves as a transition from Summer to Fall. It serves as a transition from a year of topical sermons on marriage, regeneration, and spectacular sins to a new prolonged interpretation of the Gospel of John
  • It is a bridge between two worlds. A link between the fruit of relational servanthood and the root of the Servant himself, who served as an example for us and made it possible by his sacrifice
  • Essentially, it is a transition period between a Summer vacation from small groups and a fresh and more active engagement in small groups at Bethlehem.

Before we move on to our reading, allow me to make a little observation regarding this bridge. The Elders determined that some issues were critical for us as a church, therefore we have concentrated on them primarily since we finished the book of Romans at the end of 2006. It’s time to shift gears and prepare for another season of relentless exhibition. Earlier this week, I published an essay for the TasteSee website explaining why that kind of preaching is vital and why we are focusing our emphasis on the Gospel of John.

Relational Culture and John’s Gospel

Because this text is a bridge from what we have been talking about in the relational culture of Philippians 2:4 — have the mind in you that is humble and counts others more significant than yourself, looking not only to your own interests but also to the interests of others —a bridge from that fruit of love to the root of love himself, Jesus Christ, who modeled it and made it possible by laying his life down for his savior, we will jump into the middle of John at chapter 13 today.

If I read John’s Gospel right, we will never be far away from the topic of how we love one another during this new series of sermons.

Having this chance as we begin the Fall season together provides us with a wonderful opportunity to raise the flag for Bethlehem’s small-group life.

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Small Groups: Part of Our Organic Life

At Bethlehem, small groups do not exist as independent entities. They are a part of an organic life that progresses from Elders and pastoral staff through trained and accountable small-group leaders, and finally to the general public. Some shepherding occurs in huge gatherings like this, as well as in classes that are given, as well as in ministry initiatives that individuals choose to participate in, as well as in casual friendships. Your leaders, on the other hand, intend for you to be cared for and held responsible primarily through the organic flow of shepherding in small groups, as opposed to large groups.

This is how a big church gets reduced to a tiny one. This is how a cold, impersonal church can be transformed into something warm and welcoming. This is how a single point of announcement develops into a network of connections.

Not a New Idea

It’s been this way for a long time. Small groups are not an entirely new concept. As part of the church’s expansion in Acts 2, 3,000 new members gathered in the temple and broke bread in their own houses. Soon, the church had a membership of more than 10,000 people (5,000 men, plus women and children, in Acts 4:4). From the outset, a combination of big assemblies and small fellowships was the most effective strategy. According to each of those, there are critical characteristics of Christian obedience that must be observed.

“A New Commandment I Give You”

It’s the passage in John 13:34 that I’d like to focus on: “A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.” I’m passing by some magnificent things in verses 31–35 that I’d want to mention. We intend to return, if the Lord wills it. Only one verse and one question can be covered in today’s session: What is it about the mandate to love one another that is so revolutionary? Specifically, I pray that Jesus himself would speak in this sermon about his admonition to the people of Bethlehem that we love one another.

  • That is the process through which we are transformed.
  • This is nothing short of a miracle.
  • It possesses a level of power considerably greater than mine.
  • You do not exist on your own.
  • Jesus is more to you than only the Master of your life, but he is also not less than that to you.
  • A person’s life is determined by the will of another, in this case Jesus’ will for his or her life.
  • Furthermore, what Jesus desires and mandates in this passage is that we love one another—that his disciples love one another.

What’sNewAbout Jesus’ New Commandment?

“What’s new about the mandate to love one another?” is the question that has driven all of my efforts in preparing this sermon. It is another another commandment I offer to you: that you love one another. In this passage, I believe there are two possible responses. One of the most important clues to these questions may be found in the second part of the stanza, which reads: “. just as I have loved you, you too are to love one another.” When the mandate to love one another is expressed in the words “as I have loved you,” the demand takes on a fresh meaning.

First and foremost, the directive is novel because it is a mandate to demonstrate the love of Jesus to others.

When we say “as I have loved you,” we are expressing a pattern for our love for one another, as well as a force for our love for one another.

As early as Leviticus 19:18, which states, “You should love your neighbor as yourself,” this concept was already present in the Old Testament. What has changed is that Jesus is both the model by which we live and the force by which we live. Let’s take a closer look at these two types of novelty.

1. Jesus, Our Pattern: Living Out His Love

It is previously in John 13 that we find the foundation for the first sort of newness (Jesus as our model). As an illustration of what he means when he says, “Just as I have loved you, you too are to love one another,” take a look at what Jesus did at the very beginning of this chapter. John 13:1 and the verses that follow: When Jesus realized that it was time for him to go from this world and return to the Father, he loved his own who were still in the world to the point of death, and he loved them until the very end.

  • 5 After that, he poured water into a basin and started washing the disciples’ feet and wiping them with the cloth that he had wrapped around himself.
  • 13 You address me as Teacher and Lord, and you are correct in doing so, for that is exactly what I am.
  • 15 Because I have set an example for you, you should follow my lead and do the same thing I have done for you.
  • So when we go to verse 34 and he says, “Just as I have loved you, you too are to love one another,” we don’t have to wonder what he is referring to when he says “just as I have.” As I have loved you in the pattern I just gave you a few moments ago, I will continue to love you.
  • And in verse 34, it adds, “Just as I have loved you, you are to love one another as I have loved you.” As a result, the pattern of love that must be followed is obvious.

Laying Aside Status and Becoming a Servant

This is the way we are expected to love one another in Bethlehem. There are at least two components to it. One is that we put down our positions of authority, rank, prominence, and privilege in order to take on the shape of a servant—as Paul says in Philippians 2:7, and as Jesus did in this passage. The following verse reads, “If I, your Lord and Teacher, have bathed your feet, you too ought to wash the feet of one another.” As our Lord and Teacher, I am under no obligation to wash your feet because of my position, rank, and privilege in the community.

Engaging in Practical Deeds of Helpfulness

First and foremost is that it serves others by putting aside one’s own position and privilege in order to do so. The second aspect of the pattern is that this love is shown via tangible acts of helpfulness on the side of the recipient. In those days, practically everyone walked everywhere they went. The gravel roads and trails were a challenge to navigate. It’s likely that there were no socks and no sidewalks. Everyone’s shoes were caked in filth to varying degrees of severity. It was necessary to complete the nasty task.

He established a strong sense of entitlement. And then there was service. In the new commandment, it is required that we examine this pattern, that we observe our Lord and Savior as he does this, and that we follow him in it. We demonstrate the love that we perceive in Jesus by our actions.

2. Jesus, Our Power: Living On His Love

There is one more point to consider on the novelty of this order to love one another. I referred to it as “living on the love of Jesus,” rather than “living out.” When Jesus says that the new commandment to love one another is a mandate to love one another as I have loved you, he calls our attention not only to the pattern of love we should follow, but also to the strength of love that we require to love one another. This is where I got the inspiration for this. If you search the Gospel of John for the closest verbal parallel to the words of verse 34 (“Just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another”), the closest parallel is found in John 15:12: “This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.” The closest parallel is found in John 15:12: “This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.” However, rather than carrying out a pattern for others to follow, Jesus explains a relationship with himself that provides the ability to love others.

As a result, the newness of the exhortation to love like Jesus is not just the pattern of his behavior, but also his link to vitalpower – our connection to that power as a result of our relationship with him.

Be still and know that I am with you.

The Key to Jesus’s Love

“I remain in his love,” Jesus declared, referring to his connection with God the Father as the key to his love (verse 10). Jesus is in full and continual unity with the Father throughout his life. Accordingly, the Father’s love enters Jesus and takes up residence there as a heavenly ability to love. Then, at the conclusion of verse 9, Jesus adds, “Abide in my love.” As a result, Jesus abides in the love of his Father, and we, in turn, are to abide in his love. And it is through this that we are able to love one another “like he loves us.” The fact that Jesus loves us is a result of his staying in the love of the Father.

Abiding in Jesus

Verse 5 gives us a glimpse into the vision Jesus has in his mind: “I am the vine, and you are the branches.” ‘Whoever abides in me, and I in him, he is the one who yields great fruit, because you can do nothing apart from me.’ It’s from there that I receive the poweridea. “Without my permission,” Jesus declares, “you have no authority to accomplish anything.” Unless you remain in me as I remain in my Father, it is impossible to love one another in the way that I order you to love.

It is not only that Christ has become our example for love by assuming the role of a servant, but also that Christ has become our strength for love by dwelling in the Father, and as we abide in him, we are given the same love of the Father with which to love one another.

Trusting and Treasuring Jesus

And if you’re wondering what it means to “abide in Jesus hour by hour,” it is to “trust him to supply all of our wants and to be our greatest treasure hour by hour.” And when we have faith that he will provide for all of our needs and will be our treasure, we are free and empowered to humble ourselves and fulfill the needs of those in our community. And that leaves us with one more question: how can we put our faith in him to supply all of our wants and to be our treasure when we are sinners and deserve only anger from God, not love?

Jesus, Our Propitiation: Laying Down His Life for Us

The solution is provided in the context of the question. The following verse, immediately after declaring in John 15:12, “This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you,” Jesus adds, “Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down their life for their friends.” It was impossible for Jesus to leave us with simply a pattern and only the strength that comes through relationship with him through faith. “Whoever believes in the Son has everlasting life, but whoever does not follow the Son shall not see life, but God’s wrath remains on him,” John 3:36 says.

  • Our primary difficulty is that God’s wrath towards us has not been appeased as a result of our wrongdoing.
  • Because of Jesus’ sacrifice, God has stopped being angry with us and has instead poured love into our lives, empowering us to love.
  • Jesus gave his life in our place.
  • Because Jesus is the example and the source of that love, the mandate to love one another is a new commandment.

Together into Small Groups and John’s Gospel

It is my hope that we will all be able to go forward together into the Gospel of John and small groups this coming Fall. There are marvels of Christ to see in this place that we have never before witnessed. Additionally, love may be experienced in tiny groups that people have never had the opportunity to experience before. In the Gospel of John, there will be a harmonious marriage between life in small groups and life in general. I’m hoping you’ll be able to attend.

Why a ‘New’ Commandment?

In his second chapter, Jack Mahoney examines how Jesus comprehended and communicated about the Ten Commandments. He then moves on to the ‘new’ commandment that Jesus revealed to his disciples, which we can read in John’s Gospel, which we will discuss next. What exactly was it that Jesus was asking of his followers when he instructed them to ‘love one another as I have loved you’? The speech of Jesus at the Last Supper, as recounted in John’s Gospel, has captivated and bewildered readers for centuries.

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Raymond Brown takes the comparatively straightforward explanation of postulating that it was edited twice by the evangelist and then altered by another member of the Johannine society, which is one of numerous potential reasons for the odd structure.

When it comes to the Last Discourse, Brown observes that ‘what is said in the Last Discourse in xiv 1-31 is mainly repeated in xvi 4-33.” Moreover, according to Perkins, the discourse material ‘appears to have been increased during editing of the Gospel, and it may possibly represent different situations in the subsequent history of the Johannine society.’ As an illustration of all of this, it is noteworthy to observe that, during his Last Supper talk, Jesus advises his apostles in two different locations to love one another as he has loved them, with the context of each instruction differing from the previous instruction.

According to John 13:33-36, the first section reads:

‘Little children, I am with you only a little longer. You will look for me; and as I said to the Jews so now I say to you, “Where I am going, you cannot come.” I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.’ Simon Peter said to him, ‘Lord, where are you going?’

In his second chapter, Jack Mahoney examines how Jesus comprehended and communicated about the Ten Commandments. He then moves on to the ‘new’ commandment that Jesus offered to his disciples, which we can read in John’s Gospel, and how Jesus fulfilled it. What exactly was it that Jesus was asking of us when he said, “Love one another as I have loved you” that was so revolutionary? It has fascinated and bewildered readers for centuries to hear Jesus’ conversation at the Last Supper as recorded in John’s Gospel.

Raymond Brown takes the comparatively straightforward explanation of postulating that the evangelist revised it twice and then rewrote it by another member of the Johannine society, which is one of numerous offered reasons for the odd structure of the text.

As Brown points out, “a lot of what is said in the Last Discourse in xiv 1-31 is said all over again in xvi 4-33.” The content in the discourses, according to Perkins, ‘appear[s] to have been added during editing of the Gospel, and it may easily represent distinct situations in the later history of the Johannine society.” In order to provide an illustration of all of this, it is noteworthy to observe that throughout his Last Supper talk, Jesus advises his apostles in two different places to love one another as he has loved them, with the context of each instruction differing from the last.

According to John 13:33-36, the first paragraph reads: ”

Why call it ‘new’?

To explain why Jesus gave his disciples a ‘new’ commandment, many hypotheses have been advanced by scholars. The most straightforward, but least convincing, explanation is that he was just adding to the total number of Ten Commandments given to Israel by God via Moses. Another more appealing, but still unlikely, explanation was that in exhorting them to love one another, he was essentially repeating the ‘Great Commandment,’ which requires them to love others as they love themselves, which we previously heard him propose in response to a question about which of the Ten Commandments should come first.

It appears that the love that Jesus himself demonstrated to and for his followers will serve as the model and the supreme example of Christian loving in the future; and that this will be expanded historically into the powerful spiritualities of imitation of Christ and following of Christ, as well as other forms of Christian loving.

Nevertheless, it is important to remember that Jesus’s Last Supper discourse in John’s Gospel sometimes appears to look forward to the coming passion and death of Jesus, and at other times it appears to look back from after the Resurrection to Jesus’s completion of his task, so that, as C.

Dodd once explained, “in a real sense, it is the risen and glorified Christ who speaks.” As a result, we may be better able to comprehend why the commandment to ‘love one another’ appears to be almost exclusive, as if it were to be observed only among the disciples as opposed to the Great Commandment, which enjoins that one should love all of one’s neighbours without exception, as described above.

In this speech, it appears as though the resurrected Christ is speaking directly to the people for whom John was writing his gospel, teaching them on how to deal with the challenges and issues that they are facing.

In his gospel and letters (either as author or as source), John speaks so frequently of the importance of mutual love and unity among Jesus’ disciples that it appears likely that these virtues were notably lacking in John’s Church, and that the Last Supper discourse is a plea from Jesus, who has risen, to rectify this unfortunate situation.

The law of the new covenant

To explain why Jesus gave his disciples a ‘new’ commandment, several hypotheses have been advanced, including the following: For the most straightforward, but least convincing, explanation is that he was just adding to the total number of Ten Commandments that God had given to Israel via Moses. The possibility that he was doing little more than repeating the ‘Great Commandment,’ that they love one another as they love themselves, which we saw him propose in response to the question about which of the Ten Commandments should take precedence, was a more attractive, but still improbable, reason for his words.

Jesus’ moral teaching appears to have received a significant additional qualification as a result of this.

Therefore, according to Perkins, “this commandment is “new” since it is based not on the love precepts of the Jewish tradition (e.g., Leviticus 19:19; 1QS 1:9-11), but on the self-offering of Jesus.” Nevertheless, this ‘new’ commandment is sometimes regarded as shockingly restrictive, and it appears to diverge from the Great Commandment in that it instructs the disciples to love just one another rather than all of their neighbors.

Nevertheless, it is important to remember that Jesus’s Last Supper discourse in John’s Gospel sometimes appears to look forward to the coming passion and death of Jesus, and at other times it appears to look back from after the Resurrection to Jesus’s completion of his task, so that, as C.

Dodd once explained, “in a real sense it is the risen and glorified Christ who speaks.” As a result, we may be better able to comprehend why the commandment to ‘love one another’ appears to be almost exclusive, as if it were to be observed only among the disciples as opposed to the Great Commandment, which enjoins that one should love all of one’s neighbours without exception, as we have done.

In any civilization, frequent law prohibiting a certain piece of behavior implies that the behavior in question is prevalent in that society, just as it is in any society.

The days are surely coming, says the Lord, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and the house of Judah. It will not be like the covenant that I made with their ancestors when I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt — a covenant that they broke, though I was their husband, says the Lord. But this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, says the Lord: I will put my law within them, and I will write it on their hearts; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people. (Jer 31:31-34)

According to Jeremiah, this new covenant between God and his chosen people is none other than the one that Jesus claimed to be inaugurating at the Last Supper when, according to Mark, he took the cup of wine and proclaimed, ‘This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many’ (Mk 14:24), which was repeated in Luke with the words, ‘This cup that is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood’ (Lk 22:19).

(Lk 22:20; cf. 1 Cor 11:25). According to the Decree on the Church, which was based on Jer 31:31-34, the Second Vatican Council related the new covenant with the new commandment in the following way:

Christ instituted this new covenant, the new testament, that is to say, in his blood (cf. 1 Cor 11:25), calling together a people made up of Jew and Gentile, making them one, not according to the flesh but in the Spirit. This was to be the new People of God…Its law is the new commandment to love as Christ loved us (cf. Jn 13:34). Its end is the kingdom of God, which has been begun by God Himself on earth, and which is to be further extended until it is brought to perfection by Him at the end of time.

Therefore, according to Hebrews 12:24, Jesus is the divinely appointed mediator and author of the new covenant, and just as the Sinai covenant mediated through Moses contained the Ten Commandments as an integral part of God’s will, so the new covenant necessitates the establishment of a new commandment as the foundational law of the new covenant. The second contractual party, the new people of God, is now responsible for loving one another in the same way that Jesus loves them. ‘Jesus’ highest act of love, the laying down of his life, serves as an example for the disciples’ love,’ says the Bible.

  • Then, because of the love that they have for one another, they will be distinguishable from one another, and ‘everyone will know that you are my disciples,’ as Jesus said (Jn 13:35).
  • (London: Geoffrey Chapman, 1971), p.
  • Brown, I, pp.
  • P.
  • 61, pp.
  • Perkins (1961) 61:179.
  • 585; Charles H.
  • 423; Brown, vol.
  • Brown, II, chapter 6, page 612.
  • 682 in Lumen Gentium.

The Great Commandment and New Commandment

The Great Commandment of Jesus, “You shall love,” fulfills the Ten Commandments in their entirety. God with all of your heart, all of your soul, all of your intellect, and all of your power is what you must do. “You are to love your neighbor as you love yourself.” (Matthew 12:29-31)

The New Commandment

Just before he died on the cross, Jesus offered his followers a new commandment: “Love one another.” The way I have loved you, it is important for you to love one another” (John 13:34). These are a few excerpts from the New American Bible, which includes the Revised New Testament and the Psalms. Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC, has copyright protection for the years 1991, 1986, 1970.

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The Great Commandment

Jesus teaches that the moral life may be summarized in terms of love for God, love for oneself, and love for one’s neighbor (love of neighbor). In the New Testament, God’s steadfast love is founded on the Old Testament’s idea of covenant love, which holds that God’s love will never waver. It is impossible for a Christian who works in cooperation with the Holy Spirit to lose sight of his or her devotion to God. This is a love that is motivated by a desire to improve one’s personal connection with God and takes action.

7 Commandments Jesus Gave From the Gospels

When it comes to living a moral life, Jesus taught that it may be summarized in terms of loving God, loving self, and loving one’s neighbor. The New Testament’s idea of love is founded on the Old Testament’s understanding of covenant love, which holds that God’s steadfast love will never waver in its commitment to people. It is impossible for a Christian who cooperates with the Holy Spirit to lose sight of his or her devotion to the Lord. The dedication and deed of love to a greater personal connection with God is exemplified by this devotion.

Jesus Commandments

These rules that Jesus issued in the gospels were not ten recommendations, but ten urgent mandates that we have no place to explain away. They were similar to the Ten Commandments in that they were not ten suggestions, but compelling demands that we have no room to rationalize away. What if Jesus came down to earth, as He is destined to do again, and came to you and commanded you to do something, would you hesitate to follow His instructions? You wouldn’t try to wriggle your way out of a sticky situation, now would you?

We demonstrate our love for Christ by following His commands, as He stated in John 14:15, and so our obedience to Him demonstrates our love for Him as well.

Because obedience reveals whether we genuinely love Jesus or not, we must demonstrate our love for Him by following these seven commandments and encouraging others to do the same.

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However, I aim to expose seven of the most important commandments that Jesus gave us in the gospels in this article.

Love One Another

John 13:34-35 (KJV) “I’d like to offer you a new command: Love one another. You must love one another in the same way that I have loved you. By doing so, everyone will recognize you as my disciples, especially if you love one another.” If we are rescued, then this signifies that we have received “a new command” from Jesus, which is addressed to His disciples. Our love for one another is mandated by God, but what is the extent of this love? In the same way that Jesus loved us, we are expected to love one another.

If we love one another as Christ loves us, this implies that we will not gossip about others, that we will be servants of others, that we will put others’ interests ahead of our own, and that “everyone will know that we are disciples” if we do this.

It is not about religion, but rather about developing a personal relationship with the Son of God.

Pray for your Enemies

5:44-45 (Matthew 5:44-45) “Do kind to your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be adopted as sons of your heavenly Father.” Because he causes his sun to rise on the bad and the good, and showers rain on the just and the unjust,” says the Prophet. For individuals who do not have the Holy Spirit, this mandate is completely out of the question. This would have been completely incomprehensible to the Romans. Really? Do you pray for your adversaries? As a result, this is diametrically contrary to the ways of the world, which is precisely why Jesus teaches us to not only pray for our enemies, but also to love them!

No, it is not the case.

It is he who instructs us to pray for and love them “in order that” or in order that we “may be sons (and daughters) of Father.” A godly love is one in which we pray for our adversaries because Jesus prays for us and died for us while we were still His enemies and wicked sinners.

Repent

Matthew4:17 As a result, Jesus began preaching, telling people to repent because the kingdom of heaven was at nigh. You might not conceive of this as a new command, however as we can see, it was implemented in ” The following day, Jesus began his sermon by saying, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is near.” What period of time did Matthew intend to refer to in his gospel? It began when “Jesus began to preach,” or when He began His earthly ministry, and continued until the end of time. According to what I could locate, this is the only command that is intended at individuals who have not yet been rescued.

As a result, the kingdom’s being at hand signifies that it is within reach or within an arm’s length, and the appearance of the King of that kingdom, who is Jesus Christ, signifies that the kingdom’s being at hand has been made so by his appearance.

Believe that Jesus is in the Father

John14:11 If you believe me that I am in the Father and the Father is in me, or if you trust me on the basis of my actions, I will grant you eternal life.” At first glance, this does not appear to be a new command from Jesus, but He instructs the disciples, and by extension, instructs us, to “believe” in Him and that He is “in the Father and the Father is in Him.” He also instructs us to “believe” in the Father and that He is “in the Father and the Father is in Him.” The fact that Jesus employs the Old Testament word for God, “I am,” implies that He is compelling us to accept that He is the “I AM” of the Old Testament, even though the majority of people do not understand what He is saying.

The four gospels include a total of seven “I AM” statements from Jesus.

Because He pretended to be God, which He obviously is, the Jews wanted to stone Him for saying such things.

There are numerous other places in which Jesus orders His disciples to believe in Him, thus it is no coincidence that believing is a given instruction in this passage as well (John14:11).

Take up your Cross and Follow Me

Matthew 16:24–25 (KJV) “At that point, Jesus told his followers, “If anybody would come after me, let him deny himself, take up his cross, and follow me.” For whomever seeks to preserve his or her life will lose it, but whoever loses his or her life for the sake of mine or theirs will find it.” Jesus instructs his followers, and He tells us, to follow Him; nevertheless, if someone want to follow after Jesus, they must first deny themselves and then “take up His cross and follow” Him, as the Bible says.

When Jesus declares that if we want to save our lives, we must lose them, and that if we lose our lives for His cause, we shall find them, He is using exaggeration to make his point.

He has given us the instruction to pick up our crosses and follow him.

Choosing to follow Him is a conditional decision; we must accept His cross and deny ourselves in order to do so.

Go and Make Disciples

Matthew 28:18-20 (NASB) Go, therefore, and make disciples of all countries, baptizing them in the name of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to do all that I have told you.” And behold, I am with you always, throughout the days of your life, to the end of the age.” In this case, the demand is straightforward and forceful, similar to the way a father might tell their children to get out of the center of the roadway.

There isn’t a backup plan. “You will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and throughout all of Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the world,” Jesus tells the disciples, and He tells us (Acts 1:8).

This is mentioned three times in the gospels (Matthew and Mark), as well as once right before He ascended (Acts 1:8), indicating that it was of great significance to Christ.

Pray Always

Luke21:36 Nonetheless, keep your eyes open at all times, hoping that you will have the strength to escape all of the events that are about to unfold, as well as to stand before the Son of Man. In the context of Luke 21, Jesus instructs us to remain on the lookout since His return might occur at any time (Luke 21:29-35). He directs us to pray as follows:

  • We should pray at all times (Luke 21:36)
  • We should refrain from using vain repetitions (Matt 6:7-8)
  • We should pray to the Lord of the Harvest for more laborers (Luke 10:2)
  • We should pray to the Father in secret (Matt 6:6)
  • We should pray for God’s will and the coming of the kingdom, for forgiveness of our sins, and for our needs (Luke 11:3-4)
  • We should pray for those who despitefully use

“Lord, teach us to preach; teach us to cure; teach us to minister.but teach us to pray” (Luke 11:1) was not the question the disciples asked Jesus when they arrived because they recognized Jesus as a Man of prayer.

Conclusion

Those who are not saved are commanded to repent (Matt 4:17), to preach the gospel to everyone in the entire globe (Matt 28:18-20), and to pick up our cross and follow Jesus (Matt 16:24-25). John 14:11 also instructs us to believe that He is in God and that the Father is in Him (Luke 21:36), to love one another as Christ loves them (John 13:34-35), and to pray for our enemies and those who persecute us (Matthew 6:33-34). (Matt 5:44-45). These are not recommendations, but rather orders from the King of kings and Lord of lords, Jesus Christ our Savior, who is also our Lord and Savior.

Will you do it?

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Love one another. As I have loved you, so you also must love one another.

A new commandment I offer to you is this: Love one another as I have loved you. There is no reference to the Ten Commandments in the context, and we are not to seek the meaning of the “new commandment” by comparing it to them in any more or less complete contrast with them. They also preached that a man should love his neighbor as himself, and that love is the only way to bring the law into full compliance. In this passage, our Lord draws a distinction between what He had spoken to the Jews and what He is now saying to His followers.

  • “Ye shall seek me, and you shall perish in your sins,” he said, addressing the Jews (John 7:34-35).
  • To live in authentic communion with one another through love and sacrifice for the welfare of another would be to experience the presence of God in their midst in the most profound way.
  • – As much as I have loved you.
  • (See also the note on John 13:1.) It is necessary to keep the punctuation in our version.
  • This is reiterated in the final phrase, which is preceded by words that relate to His own actions of love, which should serve as an example for those who follow him.
  • Verse 34 and 35 are a pair.
  • 33 – Verse 34.- I offer you a new commandment (with the goal and scope of)that you love one another; even as(or, seeing that)I have loved you, that you(also)love one another.

As the Greek expositors have consistently emphasized, “a higher intensity in the love is revealed than can be found in the Mosaic maxim, ‘Love your neighbor as thyself.'” The assumption of self-love is established in this commandment, which encompasses the entire law, and it is set the norm for the love of one’s neighbor.

Christ’s love for his disciples was a love that was self-abandoning and self-sacrificing.

However, it is questionable if the ideal picture of a perfect love represents a fresh concept, and whether the duplicate, as well as the transposition of the second, can be found in the straightforward manner of John.

According to him, “I have loved everyone of you to death; in loving one another, you are loving me, and in loving an object of my gentle love, you are loving an object of my tender love.” “However powerful the desire for simple imitation may be, it does not measure up to the demand I make, but the bestowal of the ‘new’ principle of life that results from a response to my love does.” The first interpretation is based on John’s personal use of the concept (1 John 3:16).

There is a third interpretation, which creates a sentence that is parallel to the first two sentences in the sentence.

This is an attempt to bring two interpretations together in one piece.

Tholuck witnesses the manifestation of self-renouncing love – the love of the highest to the sinful, the love that is more blessed to give than to receive, the love that encompasses the entire universe.

Parallel Commentaries In Strong’s 2537, a new(kainn)Adjective – Accusative Feminine Singular is defined as “fresh,” “new,” “unused,” or “novel.” Having an unclear affinity; a fresh command Ἐντολὴν(Entolēn) An ordinance, injunction, mandate, or law, according to Strong’s 1785: The word entellomai means “injunction,” which means “authoritative prescription.” I grant my consent.

A shortened version of a basic verb, which means to give.

The pronoun thou is used to refer to the second person singular.

Perhaps from agan; to love and be loved by one another.

Strong’s 2531: As(kaths)AdverbStrong’s 2531: According to the way in which, to the extent that, exactly as, and so on.

I’ve been in love ἠγάπησα(ēgapēsa) Aorist Indicative Active 1st Person SingularStrong’s 25: Verb – Aorist Indicative Active – 1st Person Singular To adore, desire well for, take delight in, and crave for; this expression shows a deep affection for logic and regard.

alsoκαὶ(kai) ConjunctionStrong’s 2532 is as follows: And, in addition, specifically.

Strong’s 240: “one another, each other.” Personal / Reciprocal Pronoun – Accusative Masculine PluralStrong’s 240: “one another,” “each other,” “each other.” Allos is a reduplicated form of the genitive plural; one another.

LoveNewLinks John 13:34 New International Version John 13:34 New Living Translation ESV translation of John 13:34 John 13:34 New American Standard Bible John 13:34 King James Version 13:34 (John 13:34) BibleApps.com John 13:34 Biblia Paralela (Parallel Bible) 13:34 (John 13:34) The Chinese version of the Bible French translation of John 13:34 13:34 (John 13:34) The Bible according to Catholic tradition Gospels of the New Testament: 13:34 (John 13:34) I’d want to give you a new commandment (Jhn Jo Jn)

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