What Is In The Jesus Shot

Q&A: What is a ‘Jesus shot’ and what’s it supposed to do?

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Last year, the Texas Agriculture Commissioner traveled to Oklahoma and spent at least $1,120 in government funds. Sid Miller claims that he traveled to Houston to meet with elected leaders, but the Houston Chronicle reports that he may have received a “Jesus injection,” which is said to provide long-term relief from chronic pain. The following is an outline of the procedure: QUESTION: WHAT EXACTLY IS A “JESUS SHOT?” A: An injection of an anti-inflammatory medication that is intended to relieve chronic pain.

John Michael Lonergan, who is based in Oklahoma, and is said to cost $300.

A: In 2004, Lonergan was found guilty of eight crimes in Ohio, including health care and mail fraud, as well as tax evasion and failure to pay taxes.

Lonergan has been granted permission to practice medicine in Oklahoma.

  • He graduated from the University of Texas School of Medicine in San Antonio in 1976.
  • In such case, any phone calls were sent to a cellphone belonging to Lonergan’s secretary.
  • Q: WHAT EXACTLY IS IN THE PHOTO?
  • However, Mary Schrick, the owner of Full Circle Health in Edmond, Oklahoma, which used to house Lonergan’s office, has stated that it includes Dexamethasone, Kenalog, and vitamin B12, according to her research.
  • Kenalog is the brand name for a synthetic anti-inflammatory medicine that is available over the counter.
  • A 2014 edition of Thrive Magazine, a health and wellness magazine on which Schrick serves on the board of directors, had an article about the treatment written by Schrick.
  • According to her, the giving doctor conducts a “thorough one-hour review” with each patient to rule out allergies and combinations with other prescriptions before delivering the medication.
  • The term “Jesus shot” was invented by Dr.
  • Lonergan.” He attributes the concept of combining the substances into a single injection to Jesus.” It was her clinic’s policy not to use the phrase, and instead referred to the operation as “inflammatory protocol,” according to her.
  • Schrick claims that the shot has been misrepresented in media coverage, writing: “There is no claim that this injection would heal pain for the rest of your life.” _Q: DOES IT ACTUALLY WORK?
  • He acknowledged to the Chronicle that he had got the shot, but he would not reveal whether it arrived during his vacation to the United Kingdom last year.

However, Reji Varghese, deputy director of the medical board, stated on Tuesday that no disciplinary action had been taken against Lonergan and that he was unable to provide any more information.

Oklahoma doctor claims $300 ‘Jesus Shot’ can cure chronic pain

According to Varghese, as of Friday afternoon, Lonergan has not received any disciplinary action from the board of directors. In an interview with the Chronicle, Lonergan declined to comment after being approached at the spa, where he apparently works on Thursday mornings. According to News9.com in Oklahoma, the State Medical Board of Ohio, where Lonergan had previously resided, permanently revoked Lonergan’s medical license in 2005 after he was convicted and imprisoned on multiple counts of tax evasion, mail fraud, and health care fraud in Ohio after being charged by the federal government.

Mike,” to practice medicine after completing his training at the Center for Personalized Education for Physicians, according to Varghese.

When a licensee is attempting to get reinstated or if there is any concern about an applicant who has been out of practice for some time, Varghese explained that this is essential.

Miller has come under fire for allegedly using taxpayer funds to fund a $1,120 flight to Oklahoma in February 2015 to receive the Jesus Shot in order to relieve his chronic pain.

DEPOT TRIAMCINOLONE INJECTION CONTRIBUTING TO ADRENAL SUPPRESSION AND CUSHING SYNDROME: CASE REPORT AND LITERATURE REVIEW

AACE Clinical Case Reports, 5(1), January-February 2019, e1–e3.

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to describe an exceptional instance of Cushing syndrome in a young kid that was produced by a single depot triamcinolone shot.

Methods:

A case report is provided, which is followed by a review of the literature.

Results:

He arrived with fast weight gain, raised blood pressure, headaches, and purple striae in a widespread pattern on his thighs. A low 24-hour urinary free cortisol of 3 ng (reference range is 4.0 to 56 ng/24 hours), an abnormally low midnight salivary cortisol of 50 ng/dL (reference range is 100 ng/dL), a low ADH level of 5 ng/mL (reference range is 6 to 55 ng/mL), and lower than expected testosterone levels of 86ng/dL were discovered in the lab. The family’s views were inconsistent, and after additional inquiry, they acknowledged that the patient had gotten a “Jesus shot” from a practitioner who had advertised it as a cure-all.

The triamcinolone included in this injection was measured and was still detectable more than 4 months after the injection was given.

Conclusion:

He arrived with fast weight gain, high blood pressure, headaches, and purple striae in a widespread pattern on his legs. A low 24-hour urinary free cortisol of 3 ng (reference range is 4.0 to 56 ng/24 hours), an abnormally low midnight salivary cortisol of 50 ng/dL (reference range is 100 ng/dL), a low ADH level of 5 ng/mL (reference range is 6 to 55 ng/mL), and lower than expected testosterone levels of 86ng/dL were discovered in the laboratory. The family’s views were inconsistent, and after additional inquiry, they acknowledged that the patient had gotten a “Jesus shot” from a practitioner who had claimed it was a cure-all.

The presence of both dexamethasone and depot triamcinolone was discovered when a more in-depth analysis was conducted. There was a quantification of the triamcinolone included in this injection, which was still detectable more than 4 months after the injection.

INTRODUCTION

Glucocorticoid treatment is used to treat a number of disorders that are universally acknowledged, as well as for a few conditions that are still up in the air. Regardless, the primary motivators for seeking such treatment are often centered on the anticipation of a positive outcome for a troublesome ailment. In the next section, we provide a case of glucocorticoid administration for unknown reasons that had severe repercussions.

CASE REPORT

He arrived to the pediatric endocrinology clinic with significant weight gain (estimated to be 30 pounds in the prior three months), severe acne, dark striae, frequent headaches, and high blood pressure, all of which were associated with his age. The lifestyle factors that contributed to this fast weight increase were not identified. His previous medical history was unremarkable. When the patient first came to our clinic, he was using clindamycin and topical tazarotene for his acne treatment.

  1. His systems were reviewed and it was discovered that the previous two months had been marked by facial edema, urine frequency, and myalgias.
  2. According to his physical examination findings, he was fat, had facial plumps, was classified as having sexual maturity stage 4, had a testicular capacity of 15 mL, and had slight proximal muscle weakness.
  3. 1).
  4. When he was 17 years old, his skeletal age had advanced significantly.

DISCUSSION

Exogenous glucocorticoid exposure is the most prevalent cause of chronic stress. Anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties of corticosteroids are utilized for a range of disorders in addition to physiologic replacement treatment, primarily for their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Subphysiologic glucocorticoid use can have a range of unexpected outcomes, including inhibition of the normal HPA axis and corticosteroid secretion in the blood (1). Glucocorticoids, such as triamcinolone and dexamethasone, are used in this instance because they are far more powerful than physiologic cortisol.

  • There have been multiple examples of iatrogenic CS related with triamcinolone injections into the joints, the epidural space, and the subcutaneous tissue, but only a few cases where the triamcinolone injections were the primary cause of the CS without additional complicating variables (2, 3).
  • Furthermore, patients and healthcare professionals alike are likely to be unaware of the less frequent adverse effects of exogenous glucocorticoid medication, which can make diagnosis even more difficult and possibly time-consuming (5).
  • Due to the fact that triamcinolone has a medium duration of action and is 5 times more effective than cortisol, injections such as the one administered to our patient might have negative consequences (6).
  • TRIAMCINOLONE is often used to treat skin disorders such as dermatitis and systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as chemotherapy regimens and a variety of other disease processes.
  • Increased dose, even if it is inadvertent, can result in a variety of systemic consequences, such as those observed in our case.
  • The majority of those who heard favorable stories are likely to have followed the trend and concluded that it would be best not to lose out on the chance, regardless of their personal health state.
  • There are testimonies for and against this $300 injection, and both are available.
  • There are three basic reasons for this: discontent with the system, philosophical or religious beliefs, and patient autonomy (9).
  • Additionally, patients’ religious beliefs or personal values might have a significant impact on their treatment selections.

Alternative treatments are perceived as more empowering by many people, as they provide them with a sense of control over their health problems. As this case demonstrates, the ability of internet information to affect patient medical decision-making is rising in importance every day.

CONCLUSION

This instance demonstrates the possibility that patients would refuse to identify or confess to the use of alternative items, such as untested or unsuitable remedies, whether prescribed or obtained over-the-counter by a healthcare provider. Furthermore, it draws attention to the potentially serious effects and enormous medical expenses that might arise as a result of such concealed therapies. In one particular instance, a $300 injection resulted in several trips and laboratory examinations, which resulted in exponentially escalating medical bills for the entire family.

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It is critical that doctors administering high-dose glucocorticoid treatment, regardless of the method of administration, educate patients about the potential adverse effects of the medication and adhere to particular recommendations aimed to minimize these consequences as closely as possible.

Abbreviations:

CS Cushing syndrome
HPA hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal

Footnotes

DISCLOSURE There is no conflict of interest for the authors to report at this time.

REFERENCES

1.Nieman LK, Biller BM, Findling JW, and colleagues Clinical Practice Guideline for the Diagnosis of Cushing’s Syndrome published by the Endocrine Society 93:1526–1540 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism in 2008. The Cushing’s syndrome following intralesional triamcinolone acetonide administration: a comprehensive review of the literature and a global survey (Fredman et al., 2002). The journal Burns published a paper in 2013 titled 39:549–557. 3.Iglesias, P., González, J., Dez, J.J., et al.

  • Journal of Endocrinology and Investig.2005;28:1019–1023.
  • An update on the treatment of Cushing syndrome in children.
  • There have been four reported incidences of a secondary Cushingnoid condition following the use of triamcinolone acetonide (Kenacort).
  • 6.Finken MJ, Mul D.
  • Eur J Pediatr.2010; 169:1147–1149.
  • Why patients seek alternative medicine: findings from a nationwide research.

‘Jesus shot’ flap unfarily taints other treatments

Earlier this month, I returned from my seventh mission trip to Honduras, where I was part of a volunteer medical mission that provided prolotherapy treatments to more than 1,000 impoverished individuals. An international team of more than 70 physicians and support professionals from several nations participated. They also got instruction on how to administer this injection therapy treatment, which uses the body’s own sugar, dextrose, and lidocaine to stimulate the body’s natural healing process.

  • Additionally, the objective is to educate physicians on the most up-to-date injectable treatment procedures that they may implement in their practices.
  • Texas Agriculture CommissionerSid Miller is under investigation by the Texas Rangers for allegedly using state funds last year to go to Oklahoma, apparently for a controversial medical procedure known as the ” Jesus Shot,” according to media reports.
  • The services of Dr.
  • Former Lonergan colleagues have reported that the “Jesus injection” is a combination of Dexamethasone, Kenalog, and vitamin B12 administered intravenously.
  • Because I am a practitioner of evidence-based injection therapy treatments, I am concerned that the additional attention being paid to the treatment may unfairly detract from therapies that can give long-lasting and perhaps permanent relief from chronic joint pain and stiffness.
  • Because of the process’s track record of fostering rapid healing and recovery, professional sportsmen such as golfers Tiger Woods and Steph Curry as well as countless Major League Baseball pitchers have turned to it for their healing and recovery needs.
  • These treatments, including the “Jesus Shot,” are not currently covered by health insurance plans.
  • For example, recent study reveals that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections are more effective at relieving chronic joint pain than cortisone and other FDA-approved pain management medications for persons with arthritis.

Dr. Annette Zaharoff is the medical director of the Non-Surgical Center of Texas in San Antonio, where she also practices medicine. She is a member of the Hackett Hemwall Patterson Foundation’s board of directors, which is a non-profit organization.

Miller Won’t Face Charges For “Jesus Shot” Trip, Rodeo Visit

This item has been updated to include a statement from Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller. Thank you for your interest. Travis County prosecutors will not file criminal charges against Texas Agriculture CommissionerSid Miller for using taxpayer funds for two trips that included personal activities, including an appearance in a Mississippi rodeo and the receipt of a medical injection in Oklahoma known as the “Jesus Shot.” Miller used taxpayer funds for two trips that included personal activities, including an appearance in a Mississippi rodeo and the receipt of a medical injection known as the “Jesus Shot.” “We have decided to close our file and will not pursue criminal charges against Commissioner Miller as a result of these allegations,” Assistant District Attorney Susan Oswalt wrote in an email to the Texas Department of Public Safety on September 8, according to a report in The Houston Chronicle.

“We have decided to close our file and will not pursue criminal charges against Commissioner Miller as a result of these allegations.” “Our office has assessed that it would be difficult to show criminal intent in this case,” said the prosecutor.

The investigation was being reviewed by Travis County.

On Miller’s Facebook page, he expressed his satisfaction with the outcome of the investigation, saying he was “pleased this process is finally concluded and that he has been exonerated of any wrongdoing.” The Travis County District Attorney’s Office and the Texas Rangers were also recognized for their “professionalism,” according to the statement.

  • Miller explained that he traveled to Oklahoma in order to view the Oklahoma National Stockyards and meet with state representatives.
  • Miller had scheduled his trip around receiving the injection, according to internal correspondence from the Agriculture Department that were later discovered.
  • The National Dixie Rodeo was held in that city, and the world champion calf roper competed there.
  • In an article published in the Houston Chronicle, Miller was quoted as saying that he took a state-paid trip to Mississippi to compete in the National Dixie Rodeo, but afterwards returned the state with campaign and personal cash.
  • Miller stated that once those meetings failed to materialize, he reimbursed the state for the travel expenses with campaign cash because he also met with donors and advisers during that period.

“Also, the overall amount spent on the travels was very minor, the state has been reimbursed for all of the money it spent on these trips, and the facts have been made public, indicating that Commissioner Miller would be more cautious in the future,” the statement said “According to the letter, Read the following related coverage from the Tribune:

  • Texas Agriculture CommissionerSid Miller has stated that he is collaborating with Republican presidential contender Donald Trump’s campaign to assist in the leadership of an agriculture team. In 2014, four complaints were filed against Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller, alleging that he failed to record campaign funding information while serving as a state representative. One inquiry has been completed, and Miller anticipates that the remaining three will be closed as well. If you’re looking for a Texas agriculture event, the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo was a must-see for state Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller and his crew. There was more to Miller’s interest than just the industry. He also had one that was particular to him

Doctor Claims $300 ‘Jesus Shot’ is a Miracle Cure for Chronic Pain Sufferers

The components in the injection have been authorized for the treatment of inflammation, and according to Dr. Mike, it has the potential to permanently eliminate chronic pain. Image:PhotoviaShutterstock The hunt for non-addictive remedies for chronic pain may be exhausting and distressing for many people who are suffering from it. As a result, many sufferers are eager for treatment and are prepared to do practically anything to find it. A Texas senator recently made news for going to Oklahoma (supposedly on the taxpayer’s money) in order to receive an unorthodox pain treatment known as the “Jesus Shot,” which is a remedy for chronic pain.

  • Advertisement on behalf of These advertisements were purchased for placement in this section by the sponsor.
  • The Jesus Shot has only been administered once thus far, and that was by John Michael Lonergan, or “Dr.
  • Another noteworthy information about Dr.
  • The doctor was captured in 2004 on eight felony counts (including mail fraud, healthcare fraud, tax evasion, and others) and sentenced to two years in jail, which resulted in the loss of his medical license in Ohio as a result of his conviction.
  • Another interesting aspect of the story is how the doctor came up with the name for the injection, which he claims came to him from a higher force.
  • “He was unable to work outside any longer and was therefore losing revenue,” the doctor noted in a statement.
  • “I feel that Jesus answered that request through the formula I use, which has FDA-approved chemicals,” she says.
  • Lonergan, the Jesus Shot can permanently eliminate chronic pain.
  • Lonergan, described the procedure.
  • It doesn’t matter to me what is in the image.” However, not everyone agrees with the miracle shot’s efficacy.

In Apkarian’s words, “this is a variation of delivering an anti-inflammatory medicine plus cortisol, which is what all chronic pain patients are treated with on a daily basis in practically all pain clinics.” “It’s only helpful for a week or so, and then the pain starts to return.” This is quackery at its finest.

Advertisement on behalf of These advertisements were purchased for placement in this section by the sponsor.

It has featured in a multitude of magazines, including but not limited to: Vanity Fair, MTV, The Huffington Post (twice), Teen Vogue (twice), She Knows (twice), Latina (twice), The Fix (twice), Salon.com (twice), Cosmopolitan (twice), and more.

Valerie may be found on social media sites such as LinkedIn and Twitter.

Oklahoma Medical Board Investigates “Jesus Shot”

8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 5th, 2014. Submitted by:News 9 The state of Oklahoma is looking into a doctor who is accused of providing what he refers to as the “Jesus Shot.” Out of the state of Ohio, Dr. John Michael Lonergan has received a total of eight federal convictions for mail fraud, tax evasion, and insurance fraud. These convictions led to the revocation of Lonergan’s medical license by Ohio officials in 2005, but the Oklahoma Medical Board granted him a second shot. The “Jesus Shot” is a mixture created by Lonergan, also known as “Dr.

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News 9 reports that patients have complained that the doctor has refused to provide the components of the injection.

and if they don’t want to answer those questions, then change doctors.” Kelsey serves as the executive director of the board of directors.

Thanks to Lonergan’s boss at Full Circle Health in Edmond, it is possible that the injection’s secret components may suddenly become public knowledge.

Mary Schrick, the owner of Full Circle Health, “there are really three substances in there that are authorized by the FDA for inflammation.” According to Schrick, who spoke to News 9, the three substances are Dexamethasone, Kenalog, and B12, which are ingredients that most patients would not be aware of unless they watched News 9 or read this article.

It doesn’t matter to me what is in the image.” According to the clinic, Lonergan kept the medication mixture a secret in order to safeguard his exclusive usage of the injection.

According to Kelsey, “people must take responsibility and question their doctors, ‘What type of treatment is this?'” According to the Oklahoma Medical Board, the next step might be the filing of legal charges against the Lonergan, depending on the outcome of the ongoing investigation.

Lonergan, on the other hand, has issued a statement.

‘Jesus Shot’ at center of Miller’s controversial, taxpayer-funded trip

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller traveled to Oklahoma City with a top assistant less than a month after taking office, according to budget documents. The trip cost the state at least $1,120 in airfare and a rental vehicle, according to the data. Miller stated at the time that he traveled to Oklahoma to tour the Oklahoma National Stockyards and meet with state legislators as well as the state’s top agriculture official, among other things. A photo of him with three politicians, whom his office said had welcomed him to the Sooner State’s Capitol, was released on Facebook by his office on Monday.

  • All of the legislators in the photos, or their aides, have stated that they did not invite Miller to their state or even anticipate him to be there on that particular day in February of 2015.
  • The meeting with the Oklahoma agricultural official, Miller now admits, was requested by Miller, who then failed to appear.
  • According to the interviews, there is a probable explanation: An Oklahoma lawmaker and another individual with direct knowledge of the trip both stated that Miller informed them that he had had a medical treatment while in the state.
  • When asked if he received the injection on the February 2015 trip, Miller declined to confirm or refute the claim.
  • Miller claims that, if nothing else, the Facebook photo serves as proof that he met with members of the Oklahoma legislature.
  • The aides to the others were in agreement.
  • Jerry Shoemake made the statement.

“Out of an abundance of caution, the commissioner is reimbursing the state for the costs associated with this travel,” stated spokesperson Lucy Nashed in an email to the press.

He will travel across the country and around the world to seek new markets for Texas agricultural exports.

Miller, a first-term Republican who ran on a platform of small-government conservatism, has come under fire from lawmakers for imposing steep fee increases on farmers, ranchers, and grocery stores, among other things.

Moreover, newly discovered documents reveal that Miller has flown first class, charged the state for drinks, and deducted the cost of 450 miles of driving for a trip to Fort Worth to appear on television, which he claimed was canceled once he had reached his destination.

In the words of Buck Wood, a long-time Austin lobbyist who specializes in ethics, “There’s no dispute about that.” “Is it being used in a medical procedure?

However, I’m sure I haven’t seen everything.” According to the Oklahoma Medical Board, the “Jesus Shot” is a medical operation that is lawful to perform.

Mike.” The records reveal that Lonergan relocated to Oklahoma a decade ago after losing his medical license in Ohio after being found guilty of tax evasion on a felony level.

Mary Schrick of Full Circle Integrated Health in Edmond, Okla., which used to house Lonergan’s office, the “Jesus Shot” costs around $300 and contains Dexamethasone, Kenalog, and B12, all of which are FDA-approved for treating inflammation.

Miller stated in a brief interview conducted earlier this year that the “Jesus Shot” had been effective for him so far.

I’m not going to tell you anything about it “he explained.

“It’s my private money, and I’m seeing my private doctor,” he explained.

The department only produced data, including the receipt for the rental car, after receiving a supplementary request that was precisely concerning the journey.

When Miller was asked to explain what transpired during an interview last week, he shrugged.

It’s clear that I’m not attempting to withhold anything from you.

for a meeting hosted by the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA).

Batts went on to say that the meeting was not rescheduled.

His explanation was that he had offered the meeting with the official from Oklahoma since they had not had enough time to discuss during an earlier conference that week.

Even though he admitted that he had missed the meeting, he said that it was only because he and his aide had unintentionally arrived at the incorrect location.

His alternative was to simply stop by and look around for a few of minutes, he explained further.

He referred to another photograph in which he and his aide were shown smiling beside Rep.

Brian Renegar, Wade Rousselot, and Jerry McPeak are the members of the band.

“We covered a significant amount of ground.” Different people have different recollections.

Aides to Renegar and Rousselot stated that their employers did not set aside any time to meet with Miller and were instead lured into a meeting that was already going place at the Capitol building.

The meeting, according to McPeak’s legislative assistant, was not organized by her office, either, she added.

“I’m not sure how much more I can tell you about 15 minutes a year ago,” Janice Stotts, the assistant, said when asked about the incident.

During a hallway encounter, the congressman claimed he bumped into Miller and began up a lengthy chat with him after discovering that Miller was the Texas agricultural commissioner, according to the member.

“It was no more than 15 minutes,” he estimated. When Shoemake was asked what the topic of the talk was, he hesitated. “Can you tell me what we spoke about?” he inquired. “There is nothing specific. I mean, just nothing.”

Texas Ag Commissioner Woes Over ‘Jesus Shot’ Trip Threatens To Undermine Acceptance of Proven Injection Therapies

PRP (platelet-rich plasma), shoulder pain, stem cell therapy, physiatrist, physiotherapy, joint pain, knee pain, and pain management are all terms that can be used to describe the treatment of heel pain.

  • On May 16, 2016, we will be discussing Bioscience, Prolotherapy, and Sports Medicine.

Earlier this month, I returned from my seventh mission trip to Honduras, where I was part of a volunteer medical mission that provided prolotherapy treatments to more than 1,000 impoverished individuals. A total of more than 70 physicians and support professionals from several nations participated in the trip. They also got instruction on how to administer this injection therapy treatment, which uses the body’s own sugar, dextrose, and lidocaine to stimulate the body’s natural healing process.

Additionally, the objective is to educate physicians on the most up-to-date injectable treatment procedures that they may implement in their practices.

A criminal investigation is presently underway by the Texas Rangers into whether Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller improperly used state funds to go to Oklahoma last year, reportedly to obtain a controversial medical procedure known as the “Jesus injection.” Despite the fact that Miller is a professional rodeo calf roper, the state has received more than $1,000 in compensation after media investigation uncovered the trip, which appeared to have been for personal medical reasons.

  • Dr.
  • Dr.
  • Despite Dr.
  • In any case, there should be no established standard of care that allows a physician to retain information about a specific course of treatment from a patient.
  • Lonergan’s refusal to disclose what is in the so-called “Jesus Shot,” former colleagues claim the $300 injection contains a blend of Dexamethasone, Kenalog, and vitamin B12, among other ingredients.
  • Lonergan’s claim that the injection will permanently heal joint pain is unsupported by scientific data.
  • Because I am a taxpayer, I am concerned about Miller’s trip, which is being paid for by the state.
  • Lonergan’s treatment may unfairly tarnish therapies that might give long-lasting and perhaps permanent relief from joint pain in the long term.
  • It is being used by a growing number of professional sportsmen, including golfers like as Tiger Woods, NBA players such as Steph Curry, and countless Major League Baseball pitchers, because of its track record of encouraging rapid healing and recovery.
  • These treatments, including the “Jesus Shot,” are not currently covered by health insurance plans.
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Research has found that PRP injections, for example, are superior than cortisone shots, viscosupplementation, and other FDA-approved pain management therapies in the treatment of persistent joint pain in people.1 An article published in the Annals of Family Medicine in 2013 found that prolotherapy resulted in “clinically meaningful sustained improvement of pain, function, and stiffness scores for knee osteoarthritis when compared with blinded saline injections and at-home exercises” for patients with knee osteoarthritis.

Of course, the ongoing criminal investigation of the Texas agricultural commissioner has resulted in a significant increase in the number of individuals who are aware of the “Jesus Shot.” Hopefully, students will be able to tell the difference between so-called miraculous cures and scientific advancements in orthopedic therapies that have been demonstrated.

Annette “Dr.

Dr. Zaharoff is a former professional tennis player who participated on the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) circuit. He is now actively associated with the United States Tennis Association. You may find out more about her at You may keep up with her on Facebook by clicking here.

Jesus Shot – RationalWiki

Last week, I returned from my seventh mission trip to Honduras, where I participated in a volunteer medical mission that provided prolotherapy treatments to more than 1,000 impoverished individuals. Over 70 physicians and support professionals from a variety of nations participated in the expedition. As part of their training, providers learned how to perform successful procedures for this injection therapy treatment, which helps repair injuries and relieve joint pain by utilizing the body’s own sugar, dextrose, and lidocaine to jumpstart the body’s natural healing process.

A secondary goal of the mission is to educate physicians on the most recent injectable treatment procedures that they may apply in their practice settings.

A criminal investigation is presently underway by the Texas Rangers into whether Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller improperly used state funds to go to Oklahoma last year, reportedly to obtain a controversial medical procedure known as the “Jesus injection.” As a result of the media attention that uncovered the trip that appears to have been for personal medical reasons, Miller, a professional rodeo calf roper, has refunded the state more than $1,000.

  1. Dr.
  2. “Jesus Shot,” which Dr.
  3. The fact that Dr.
  4. However, no acknowledged standard of care should permit a physician to retain information on a patient’s specific course of treatment.
  5. Dr.
  6. If accurate, the shot is simply an anti-inflammatory corticol steroid potion that may momentarily alleviate pain.
  7. Because I am a practitioner of evidence-based injectable therapy treatments, I am concerned that the additional attention being paid to Dr.
  8. Worldwide, prolotherapy, platelet-rich plasma injections, and stem cell injections are being utilized on a regular basis to treat anything from sprained knees and tennis elbow to chronic tendonitis and osteoarthritis, as well as acute ligament and muscle injuries.
  9. While PRP injections are becoming a more widely recognized alternative to surgery, some orthopedic doctors are particularly employing them to speed up the healing process after surgery as well.
  10. Their effectiveness is, however, now being investigated in clinical studies.

An article published in the Annals of Family Medicine in 2013 found that prolotherapy resulted in “clinically meaningful sustained improvement of pain, function, and stiffness scores for knee osteoarthritis when compared with blinded saline injections and at-home exercises” for patients with knee arthritic pain.

“Dr.

Doctor Zaharoff is a former professional tennis player who participated on the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) circuit. He is still engaged with the United States Tennis Association (USTA). Her website has further information. It’s possible to keep up with her on Facebook at

Dr. Mike

Dr. Mike has a long and illustrious career, to say the least. Before doing time for eight offenses including tax fraud, mail fraud, and healthcare fraud, he was a licensed doctor in the state of Ohio. According to court documents from this time period, he never talked to his lawyer from December 2004 to June 2005, saying that they couldn’t meet because the defendant was in jail. The attorney then failed to appear for his appeal hearing, which resulted in the dismissal of his case. If attorneys were prohibited from working in jails, it would almost certainly make national news.

Mike a license to practice medicine.

A local TV station conducted a probe of his wonder Shot, which prompted the Oklahoma State Medical Board to launch its own inquiry against it in March 2016.

Mike received additional attention in 2016 after Texas state agricultural commissioner Sid Miller was accused of using government dollars to travel to Oklahoma and obtain the Shot.

Notes

  1. Not to be confused with Mikhail Varshavski, the famous doctor who goes by the moniker “Doctor Mike.”

References

After claims surfaced that the state’s agricultural director used government dollars to get a so-called “Jesus shot” in Oklahoma, an injection touted as having the ability to cure pain for life, public corruption investigators in Texas stated on Wednesday that they are looking into the matter. Since assuming office last year, Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller has become the second high-ranking Republican in the state to be the subject of a criminal investigation. Attorney General Ken Paxton was accused on two felony charges of securities fraud last summer, according to court documents.

After the Houston Chronicle disclosed that Miller used government funds to fly to Oklahoma last year, where he supposedly received the “Jesus shot,” an anti-inflammatory injection that is claimed to ease chronic pain, the inquiry was launched a month later.

Miller has since apologized for his actions.

Following the publication of the newspaper piece, an attorney representing Miller slammed a leftist advocacy group, Progress Texas, which had filed a formal complaint against Miller in response to it.

According to Miller’s spokesperson Todd Smith, “Just because Progress Texas wants to gain political points by sensationalizing a complaint that was filed by them doesn’t make it a criminal matter or suggest that the Texas Rangers have discovered any misconduct.”

Local

The most recent breaking news from North Texas. “The Jesus injection,” according to reports, costs $300 and is only accessible through Dr. John Michael Lonergan, who lost his medical license in Ohio after being convicted of felony health care fraud, mail fraud, and tax evasion, among other charges. Lyle Kelsey, executive director of the Oklahoma medical board, stated on Wednesday that state officials had previously expressed concerns about the Jesus shot’s efficacy and safety. However, he stated that Lonergan has not been subjected to any disciplinary action and continues to hold a valid medical license.

“However, that isn’t unlawful in and of itself; it’s simply humiliating.” Republicans have held every statewide position in Texas for the past two decades, and in 2014, Miller and Paxton were elected as part of a Republican ticket that included Gov.

Bush, the son of former Florida Gov.

The current Texas Democratic Party is so weak that it didn’t even field a candidate to challenge Miller, who recruited shock musician Ted Nugent as his campaign treasurer and made lifting a ban on deep fryers in public schools one of his first official acts as a state representative.

“It is imperative that Sid Miller be held responsible for misusing his position as a steward of the people’s money.” Early this week, the Securities and Exchange Commission of the United States filed allegations of investor fraud against Paxton, who had previously entered a plea of not guilty to criminal charges of defrauding investors in a technology business.

Others in the Republican leadership, including Abbott, have been defiant in their refusal to comment on the difficulties faced by their colleagues in state government.

Convicted Felon, Doctor Injects Oklahomans With ‘Jesus Shot’

Patients across Oklahoma are claiming that an Edmond doctor has been injecting them with a strange substance known as the “Jesus injection,” prompting outrage. Dr. John Michael Lonergan is a former federal prison inmate who was convicted in Ohio of tax evasion, mail fraud, and healthcare fraud after serving time in federal prison for the crimes. Dr. Mike Lonergan is another nickname for Lonergan. Following his federal convictions, the State Medical Board of Ohio permanently suspended Lonergan’s medical license, which was reinstated in 2007.

The doctor, according to recent e-mails supplied to News 9’s newsroom, is aggressively injecting individuals around the state with a strange substance known as the “Jesus injection.” Lonergan was tracked down to Full Circle Health in Edmond and Doorway To Health in Moore, according to News 9.

“Why is it referred to as the Jesus shot?” asks News 9.

“You would have to sit down for a consultation with,” the clinic says.

Lonergan is employed as a part-time employee, according to Full Circle Health Clinic Director Barbie Schrick.

According to the facility, the procedure will cost $300.

“Thank God for journalism that investigates and uncovers information for the benefit of the public.

Lonergan was unable to be reached for comment by News 9.

It has been brought to the attention of the Oklahoma Medical Board, which says it is aware of the issues around the “Jesus shot.” After a year-long investigation, the Oklahoma Medical Board decided to terminate its supervision arrangement with Lonergan in March 2013.

Because of the cancellation of the agreement, Lonergan has been able to practice medicine in Oklahoma without being observed for the previous 12 months. To access Lonergan’s court and medical board records from the state of Ohio, please visit this page.

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