What Color Robe Did The Romans Put On Jesus

Was the Robe Placed on Jesus Scarlet or Purple?

What color was the robe that was placed on Jesus? Was it scarlet or purple? Pilate’s troops brought Jesus into the governor’s headquarters where the entire garrison gathered around Him after he had been beaten with a horrible Roman whip. These were the steps that the soldiers took in order to lay the crown of thorns on His head, the reed in His hand, and the linen garment over His entire body. Skeptics argue that there is a conflict between the Gospel narratives since the hue of the robe is described differently in each account of Jesus’ life.

(19:1-2).

We need rational responses since a growing number of individuals are accepting such charges on faith and denying the inerrancy of the Scriptures.

We can all agree that we view colors in a little different way from one another.

  • Depending on how dedicated a football fan is, his team’s color may be described as dark red, but someone else who sees the team’s faded jerseys for the first time at the conclusion of a long and exhausting season may decide that the team’s color is more maroon.
  • Without a doubt, no one would accuse any of these persons of lying or deception simply because one was more explicit than the other.
  • The basic reality is that Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John each wrote from a separate point of view; they did not collaborate in any way to write their books.
  • While the clothing placed on Jesus after his terrible scourging was likely comparable to the worn football outfits shown above, the Bible describes it as “a red robe.faded to resemble purple” (The Wycliffe Bible Commentary).
  • Robertson, there were many different shades of purple and scarlet in the first century, and it was difficult to tell the difference between the many hues (1997).
  • 361; Barnes, 1997).
  • As can be seen, there is no contradiction in the Gospel accounts when it comes to the color of the robe that Jesus was wearing.
  • REFERENCE Barnes’ Notes, by Albert Barnes, published in 1997.
  • J.W.
  • (Delight AR: Gospel Light).
  • Robertson’s Word Pictures in the New Testament (Robertson’s Word Pictures in the New Testament, 1997).

Originally published on May 26, 2004. REPRODUCTION PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING DISCLAIMERS:We are pleased to offer permission for this material to be used in part or in its full as long as our conditions are followed. Prerequisites for Reproduction

Scarlet Robe or Purple Robe (and Why It Doesn’t Matter) – Thinking Through Faith

Édouard Manet’s painting “Jesus Mocked by the Soldiers” Yesterday, a dear friend of mine emailed to me an article regarding an apparent inconsistency between the gospel stories of Jesus’ crucifixion and the historical records of the event. While the soldiers were insulting Jesus, they put on an orange robe, which appears to be in obvious conflict with the rest of the story. According to Matthew’s narrative, the governor’s troops led Jesus into the governor’s headquarters, where they assembled the entire army in front of him.

  • According to Mark’s gospel, “and the soldiers carried him away inside the palace (that is, the governor’s headquarters), and they gathered the entire battalion.” They dressed him in a purple robe and placed a crown of thorns on his head, which they had twisted together themselves.
  • Finally, John’s narrative describes what happened as follows: “Then Pilate grabbed Jesus and publicly flogged him.” As a result, the soldiers twisted together a crown of thorns and placed it on his head, as well as dressing him in a purple gown.
  • The article that my buddy emailed to me clarified this discrepancy by stating that the gospel authors were describing the same phenomenon, but that the colors seemed different to them because they were writing in different lighting conditions.
  • My companion, on the other hand, was not happy with this interpretation because the gospels provide no evidence that Matthew, Mark, and John were all there at the time of the incident.
  • Examine the vocabulary used in the gospels in greater detail.
  • For example, the first word in the Greek alphabet is chlamys, which refers to a loose outer garment worn by males, such as an army cloak.
  • The terminology employed by Mark and John are different.

However, BDAG goes on to reference at least one ancient source that uses both terms interchangeably, which is a bit surprising.

Consequently, it is conceivable that both names were used fairly interchangeably in the first century.

The Roman troops were definitely aiming to make fun of Jesus’ status as “King of the Jews.” As a result, they lavished Him with all of the trappings of a king.

They presented Jesus with a crown made of thorns.

They presented Jesus with a scepter of reeds.

As a result, just as the soldiers provided Jesus with a crown of thorns and a scepter made of reeds, they also provided him with “purple” — in the shape of a crimson robe used by soldiers.

Mark and John explain why they painted “purple” on Jesus by claiming that they did it in order to satirize the belief that Jesus is a sovereign ruler.

Because the soldiers chose a cloak that was not precisely the same hue as royalty, they were insulting Jesus’ claim to be a king (T he Gospel According to Matthew, IVP, 1992, p.

When I was a kid, I used to like pretending to be a superhero by wrapping a bath towel around my neck and using it as my “cape.” Was that a towel or a cape that I was sporting?

The towel was the only thing that was accessible, although it was intended to be used as a cape.

Both.

Except in Jesus’ situation, this was not a harmless game, but a harsh mocking of the one who was actually King of Kings, as was the case with the other children.

What color was Jesus’ robe? Matthew 27:28, Mark 15:17, and John 19:2

What color was Jesus’ robe, and where did it come from? Matthew 27:28, Mark 15:17, and John 19:2 are all biblical references.

Answer

Matthew 27:28 (KJV) They took him down to his underwear and dressed him in a red robe. 15:17 (Matthew 15:17) They dressed him in a purple robe and then twisted a crown of thorns together and placed it on his head. Mark 15:20 And when they had finished mocking him, they stripped him of his purple robe and dressed him in his own garments. Then they took him outside to be crucified. John 19:2 (KJV) On his head, the soldiers twisted together a crown of thorns, which they placed on his head. A purple robe was given to him by his captors.

Colors that are tinted similarly to one another might appear to be extremely similar.

However, the garment was most likely a military cloak, and the color, which indicated monarchy, was meant to ridicule Jesus’ claim to be the King of the Jews, according to scholars.

Related Resources:

Rahab and Joshua’s Covenant (Joshua 2:14-23).

Was Either Matthew or John Color Blind?

Matthew 27:281 and John 19:2 are cited as examples of supposed Bible contradictions. It is said that Jesus was wearing either a red (Matthew) or a purple (John) robe during his trial. A number of critics have referred to this as the “color-blind” contradiction, although there are no actual Bible contradictions, and these verses are no exception to this general rule. To make matters worse, Luke writes that Jesus was also dressed in a “beautiful” robe (Luke 23:11), which just adds to the confusion.

Greeklamprosis is typically translated as dazzling, magnificent, or white, so do we have a white garment to contend with as well?

Hardly.

ScarletandPurple

There is no question that the Greek terms in the two verses are distinct from one another. There is no question that the Greek terms in the two verses are distinct from one another. It is not a question of an English version interpreting the same term in two distinct ways in two separate languages. Greek term iskokkinos is used in Matthew 27:28, and it comes from the root wordkokkos, which meaning “kernel.” When the eggs of a female insect, the “kermes” (which resembled the cochineal), were gathered and crushed, a red pigment that could be used in dyeing was produced that was employed in ancient times.

  • The term “purple” comes from the Greek wordporphuroun, which comes from the root wordporphura, which refers to a kind of mussel that generated a purplish pigment that was used in the dyeing of clothing.
  • As a result, some commentators believe that John and Mark (Mark 15:17–20) considered the garment to be purple in hue, whilst Matthew considered it to be redder in color.
  • In Matthew, Mark, and John, it is obvious that the Greek terminology used to describe the colors scarlet and purple are referring to different shades of the same color: scarlet.
  • It is necessary to remember the sequence of events in order to comprehend the clothing.
  • Afterwards, Joseph was carried before the Sanhedrin in the middle of the night, where he was interrogated by Caiaphas, beaten, blinded, and hit in the face (Matthew 26:57–68).
  • The Roman governor Pilate once interrogated Jesus, discovered that he was from Galilee, and ordered him away to Herod the Great (Luke 23:7).

When Jesus declined, Herod and his troops mocked him by dressing him in a magnificent, beautiful white robe (perhaps to mock his innocence), and then humiliated him. Herod then ordered him to be returned to Pilate (Luke 23:8–11).

Cruel and Unusual Punishment

In order to scourge Jesus, when he returned to Pilate’s authority, the soldiers stripped him of his white robe (assuming it hadn’t previously been taken away by Herod) and the rest of his garments. Just before they scourged Jesus, the soldiers made fun of him in front of the entire garrison (Matthew 27:27). He was dressed in a crimson robe after his skin had been ripped apart by the soldiers after he had been scourged (Matthew 27:28). The crimson robe (the wordrobehere is a translation of the Greek wordchlamus) was most likely a cloak worn by Roman governors, generals, and other important commanders of the Roman army during the time of the Roman Empire.

  1. 4 As a parody of Christ’s physical frailty following such beatings and torture, this scarlet cloak may have been slung over his shoulders.
  2. After then, it appears that some of the troops had a nasty thought that they wanted to act on.
  3. Pilate asked Jesus if he was the King of the Jews, to which Jesus responded yes (Matthew 27:11–12), and one of the soldiers was most likely there when Jesus answered affirmatively.
  4. A purple robe, which represents royalty, as well as a crown.
  5. The crown of thorns was placed on Jesus’ head, and then the purple garment was placed on him.
See also:  Why Does Jesus Hate Me

A few commentators believe that the purple robe (the wordrobehere is a translation of the Greek wordhimation) served as a mantle that was placed on top of the scarlet robe, or that the scarlet robe may have been removed and then placed back on top of the purple robe to serve as a cloak or tunic for the king.

Timeline of Events

If we examine the relevant Scripture texts in chronological order, with some explanatory text inserted for clarity (as is done below), it is easy to see that there is no contradiction in Scripture regarding what color robe was placed on Jesus: he may have had a white robe, then both a scarlet robe and later a purple robe placed on him, all of which are described in detail in the Bible. Both physical and psychological torture had been perfected by the Romans, and many of them took great pleasure in the cruel punishment of anybody they perceived to be a criminal or insurrectionist.

  1. He was then dressed in a beautiful garment and sent to Pilate (Luke 23:11).
  2. Then the governor’s troops led Jesus into the Praetorium, where they assembled the entire garrison around Him for protection.
  3. It had been some time since the soldiers had ridiculed Him.
  4. It’s also conceivable that they just layered the purple robe over the scarlet one to disguise themselves.
  5. The color red represented a soldier, whereas the color purple represented a ruler or an emperor.
  6. They placed a crown of thorns on His head and a reed in His right hand after they had twisted the thorns together.
  7. “Behold, I am bringing Him out to you so that you may see that I find no fault in Him,” Pilate stated to them as he walked out the door for the second time.
  8. “Look, here’s the Man!” Pilate said to them.
  9. “Do you want me to crucify your King?” Pilate inquired of them.

After that, he handed Him over to them to be crucified. Consequently, they arrested Jesus and carried Him away (John 19:4–16). Then, when they had insulted Him, they stripped Him of His robe and placed Him in His own garments before leading Him away to be crucified (Matthew 27:31).

Predicted Man of Sorrows

The seeming inconsistency can be explained by the fact that there were two or three garments, not just one. No conflict can be seen when the paragraphs are viewed as a grouping of sentences. Both Matthew and John utilize Greek terminology to describe not just the color of the dye, but also the process by which the dye acquires its hue. Finally, when Matthew discusses the robe being taken off Jesus (Matthew 27:31), he purposely doesn’t say which shade is being discussed, which eliminates any possibility that these two accounts are incompatible in any way.

  • The seeming inconsistency can be explained by the fact that there were two or three garments, not just one.
  • All of this persecution and torture, both physical and mental, was foretold 700 years previously by the prophet Isaiah in relation to Jesus’ death.
  • And we turned our backs on Him, as if we didn’t want Him to see us; He was despised, and we didn’t respect Him.
  • The chastisement for our peace was laid on Him, and it is through His stripes that we are healed (Isaiah 53:3–5).

Was the robe of Jesus Scarlet or Purple?

Even though all four gospels agree that the Roman soldiers who mocked and torturedJesus dressed him in a robe in order to taunt him, they appear to disagree on what color the robe should have been. Was Jesus’ robe made of purple or scarlet material? As the sun begins to set, colors become more subdued. Take a look at what we found:

  1. The Bible says in Matthew 27:28, “They undressed Him and placed a scarlet robe on Him.” The Bible says in Matthew 27:31, “After they had ridiculed Him, they took the scarlet robe off him and put His own clothing back on Him, and led Him away to be crucified.”
  1. “They dressed Him up in purple, and after winding a crown of thorns around His head, they laid it on Him,” says Mark 15:17. The Bible says in Mark 15:20 that “when they had insulted Him, they stripped off His purple robe and placed His own clothing on Him.” “And they brought Him out to be crucified.” “And the soldiers twisted together a crown of thorns and laid it on His head, and they clothed Him in a purple garment,” says John 19:2, “and the soldiers clothed Him in a purple robe.” The Bible says in John 19:5 that “Jesus then came forth, wearing the crown of thorns and the purple robe.” “Look, here’s the Man!” Pilate said to them.

The garment of Jesus was either crimson or purple. To find out the answer to the question, we must first look at the colors and figure out what they are. Below is a chart that compares the colors scarlet and purple in different hues, as represented by the hex code. The direct color presentation is seen in the upper grid. It is the same presentation as the top grid, with the exception that it has a translucent shade over it. The shade is intended to replicate poor lighting conditions, such as those that would have been within Pilate’s palace when they laid Jesus’ robe over his shoulders.

SCARLET PURPLE
Light ScarletDD3131 Light Purple663399
Scarlet8C1717 Purple800080
Dark Scarlet660319 Dark Purple660066

As you can see, depending on the shade and the lighting, the colors are both distinct and very similar. For example, dark crimson and dark purple are extremely similar in appearance. When the lighting is bad, the contrast between the two hues becomes much more difficult to distinguish since the colors look deeper. As a result, it’s possible that the robe was merely a dark hue that might have been characterized appropriately by either term.

Another idea is that the robe was constructed of two different hues that were stitched together because of their resemblance. However, this theory does not appear to be a good fit.

What is the significance of colour purple in the robe that Jesus was made to wear?

It is brimming with meaning. Various perspectives on the meaning of not just the purple, but also the other four hues of the garment as seen in the Gospel narratives 10:19-20; Heb. 10:19-20 Being therefore empowered by the blood of Jesus to enter into the most holy place, through a new and living way that he has consecrated for us, through the veil, which is to say, his flesh; This corresponds to the pattern of the tabernacle of Moses, in which the veil was made of four different colors. 26:31, for example A vail of blue, purple, and scarlet, as well as exquisite twined linen of clever work, must be produced, and it shall be adorned with cherubims, in the colors of blue, purple, scarlet, and linen.

John 19:2 (KJV) Mt.

They undressed him down to his underwear and put on a crimson robe.

And Herod, accompanied by his soldiers, brought him to court, insulted him, and adorned him with a magnificent gown before sending him back to Pilate.

What color was the robe that was put on Jesus?

Matthew 27:28 – And they stripped him naked and placed a crimson garment over his shoulders. Moreover, the soldiers put on him a purple robe and a crown of thorns, as well as a thorn-covered cross, as recorded in John 19:2. It states in Matthew that Jesus was clothed in a “scarlet robe,” yet the Gospel of John says he was clothed in a “purple garment.” What color was the robe, by the way?

Solution

This seeming inconsistency may most likely be explained by the fact that the garment was both purple and scarlet in color (e.g. it was striped or patterned in some way). In addition, it’s probable that more than one item of clothing was involved, with one being purple and the other being red in color. Another option is to use these colors interchangeably to represent royalty, which is another viable option. Essentially, what the authors were trying to convey was that the garment they draped over Jesus was once reserved for royalty (the king) or high-ranking military officers (generals).

Revelations 19:13 (NIV) And he was clad in a vesture that had been dipped in blood, and his name was given to him as The Word of God.

He will control them with an iron rod, and he will tread the winepress of the fierceness and anger of Almighty God.

15And a sharp sword will come out of his mouth, and he will strike the nations with it; and he will rule them with a rod of iron. 16And he is adorned with the names KING OF KINGS and LORD OF LORDS, which are inscribed on his vesture and on his thigh. I hope this has been of assistance 😎

Solution

You may really obtain a very middle-of-the-road color that makes it difficult to decide whether it should be called red or purple. Do you think turquoise is more blue or green in color? According to jdeans, the first two statements he makes are absolutely valid reasoning and deduction, as any logician or lawyer would do. And it is the prosecutor’s responsibility to demonstrate that the Bible is in conflict with itself. Nonetheless, those are both possibilities, but without any supporting evidence for any of them.

The third element is unquestionably the purpose of the Romans who tortured Jesus in order to ridicule him, and it is a valuable knowledge to have.

I agree that this isn’t really a contradiction, and I understand that assuming the robe was a middle-ground color isn’t a solid proof, but given the information available, I also agree with jdeans that the most likely explanation is that two different people are describing a mixed color in slightly different ways.

What Color was the robe of Christ?

When questioned, “What color was Christ’s robe?” the response was ambiguous. One of the reasons this is an important topic is that it is frequently invoked by individuals in order to call into question whether or not the Bible can be believed. You can tell if they are simply seeking for reasons not to believe God, or whether they are looking for confirmation that the Bible CAN be trusted. It’s important to remember that the garment in question was not His. Roman soldiers nailed it on the back of Jesus the Christ’s head.

  1. Colors associated with royalty would be used in the creation of the robe, or colors that were near to those colors.
  2. I believe the latter is the more likely scenario.
  3. (depending on translation).
  4. Luke spoke about an exquisite robe that was devoid of any distinguishing features in terms of color.
  5. The reality is that the words employed in the Gospels are different.
  6. For a variety of reasons, the phrasing may deviate from what is intended.
  7. Personally, I do not believe this is the case, although it is a theoretical possibility.
See also:  On What Day Did Jesus Rise From The Dead

As a result of the research, it is believed that the Roman soldier’s uniforms were white or dark red in color, with some having stripes (see, for example, pg=PA23 lpg=PA23 dq=roman+soldier+tunic+color source=”web”).

3)It is possible that the purple garment that was laid on Christ was dyed crimson as a result of His copious blood.

This is certainly likely a genuine option, however the timing of the events in the sequence does not appear to be consistent with this interpretation.

The vocabulary employed was designed to draw attention to particular characteristics of Christ, in other words.

However, he did not.

Nevertheless, precise terminology were necessary for the purposes of Matthew, Mark, and John’s gospels.

One person may refer to something as red, while another may refer to it as purple.

Porphureos, according to the Liddell and Scott Greek-English dictionary, means “darkgleaming, dark,” and is used to depict the hue of heaving and surging seas, pouring blood, vivid red or flushing human complexions, and the color purple ().

Rather thanphorphureos, John uses the term porphurous, which is essentially an alternative spelling ofphorphureos.

There were really at least two separate different sorts of shells, each of which generated a different shade of dye when dyed with various colors.

It’s important to note that our description of purple as “halves red and half blue” does not accurately capture the real colors of the purple dye (and therefore of purple cloth, called after the dye that was used to create it).

So, what does all of this imply?

Remember that humans see color as a range of values.

Others could want a different combination of colors to make up that spectrum.

The color purple is generally associated with a certain shade of purple in our minds when we think about it.

Crimson is made up of the same two hues as blue and red ().

The color burgundy is described by my wife as dark red or purple or wine, but I describe the same hue as dark red or purple or wine.

“Why are you battling with me when you are aware that you are agreeing?”).

We shall examine the meanings of the colors red, scarlet, and purple in order to better understand this. Let us begin with the following definition of crimson () from WordNet:

crimson
adjective
1. of a color at the end of the color spectrum (next to orange); resembling the color of blood or cherries or tomatoes or rubies

Now, let’s have a look at the meaning of scarlet () according to WordNet:

scarlet
adjective
1. of a color at the end of the color spectrum (next to orange); resembling the color of blood or cherries or tomatoes or rubies

Take note that this specific dictionary utilizes the same definition for the first definitions of scarlet and crimon as it does for the other definitions. Finally, we shall look at the meaning of purple () as determined by WordNet:

purple
adjective
1. of a color intermediate between red and blue

This demonstrates that purple is made up of a variety of different tones of color. Now, utilizing the links provided above, I will demonstrate the definitions of these three hues by referring to The American Heritage Dictionary. the color crimson (): A bright crimson or reddish orange that ranges from intense to vibrant. Please keep in mind that scarlet is a variety of different colors of red. crimson (): A deep to brilliant purplish red to vibrant red color ranging from deep to vivid. Note that crimson is a color spectrum ranging from intense purplish red to brilliant red – once again, this is a spectrum of red color hues.

  • purple (): Please keep in mind that purple is a range of color tones that fall between violet and red.
  • However, this is not the situation for the majority of individuals even now.
  • Despite the fact that the majority of people agree that purple is more purple than red, crimson, or scarlet, many people believe that the colors are practically the same (depending on the shade of the hue in question) unless they see samples of the colors next to each other.
  • pur·plenoun.
1. any color having components of both red and blue, such as lavender, esp. one deep in tone.
2. cloth or clothing of this hue, esp. as formerly worn distinctively by persons of imperial, royal, or other high rank.
5. imperial, regal, or princely rank or position.

It’s important to note that the colors red and scarlet are almost synonymous. Remember that the color purple is characterized as a deep red or crimson. When we consider that the color purple was formerly used to signify the hue of blood in the ancient world, this really makes sense. The same phrase can be used differently by various persons, and the same object can be described differently by different people. This means that there is no substantive difference between purple (as used by Mark, John, and Luke) and scarlet (used by Matthew).

  1. Only the word used to describe the color differed in each account.
  2. The fact that it was an exquisite gown designed to embarrass Jesus was what was significant.
  3. In order to draw the reader’s attention to the Kingly aspect of Christ, Mark and John used the term purple.
  4. Nevertheless, because Matthew was being more detailed about the nature of the clothe/dye that was being used, the reader’s attention was drawn to the blood sacrifice that was being performed.
  5. As a result, there is no inconsistency.
  6. In summary, any of the four replies to the question of how to reconcile the varied terms used to describe the color of the robe placed on Christ might be used to respond to an argument that there is a disparity in the hue of the garment.
  7. Personally, I believe that answer 4 is the greatest one that can be given to this issue.
  8. Essentially, individuals may choose to think that God is strong enough to write what He desires, or they can choose not to believe that God is powerful enough.
  9. Although I disagree with the statement, I do believe that if someone discovers a genuine inaccuracy in one place in the Bible, it is intellectually dishonest to claim that it can be believed someplace else without having clear evidence that THAT particular spot in the Bible is trustworthy.

If you can’t put your faith in God, who can you put your faith in? The Bible, God, and Study are filed under the following categories:

What is the significance of the crown of thorns and purple robe Jesus wore at his crucifixion?

For this week’s blog question on John, I’d want to concentrate on a few distinct problems surrounding Jesus’ crucifixion, especially the meaning of the purple robe and crown of thorns that were laid on him. According to John 19:5, Jesus then emerged from the tomb, adorned with a crown of thorns and a purple garment. “Look, here’s the Man!” Pilate said to them. Before reading this book, I had no idea that they had dressed Jesus in different clothes before the crucifixion; I had only ever seen pictures of Jesus on the cross with a small white tunic covering his midsection, so I thought it would be an interesting topic to investigate and see if there was a deeper meaning behind it.

  1. Because I grew up in the church, it’s natural for me to approach this from a theological standpoint, but I’m attempting to get some more insight into why they selected a robe and a crown rather than something else, so please bear with me.
  2. Mark and John agree that the color is purple, while Mathew describes it as scarlet, which is clearly a brighter red hue.
  3. Because of this, there are some inconsistencies in the stories themselves as well.
  4. When one person sees red, another person may see maroon, and vice versa.
  5. Ancient Romans did not distinguish between scarlet and purple; they would refer to various hues of red as “purple” when they were actually referring to different colors of scarlet.
  6. The Importance of the Crown and Robe

They stripped Him and put a scarlet robe on Him.

They undressed him down to his underwear and draped him in a red robe. EXPOSITORY (BIBLE IN ENGLISH): (28) A robe in scarlet. — Once again, we have a technical term, thechlamysorpaludamentum, which refers to the military cloak worn by emperors when acting in the role of generals, as well as by other officers of high rank in the Roman army (Pliny, xxii. 2, 3). It is referred to as purple by St. Mark and St. John (Mark 15:17; John 19:2); yet, the ancients referred to it as “crimson,” and the same color might easily be referred to by either designation.

  1. Philo describes a similar farce that was perpetrated on an idiot at Alexandria, who was there mistakenly assigned the role of Herod Agrippa II (in Flacc.p.
  2. It was all too usual a habit to subject convicted criminals before their execution to this level of heinous treatment.
  3. They had most likely witnessed or heard of the insults of a similar nature leveled by Herod and his troops (Luke 23:21), and they were now reenacting them with much more violence.
  4. As soon as the cross was set on the ground, nails were driven through the hands and feet of the victim.
  5. As a result, Christ responded to the figure of the brazen serpent displayed on a pole.
  6. That is to say that they either removed all of his top garments or removed all of his clothing, which is most likely the case.
  7. See the notes at Isaiah 1:18 for further information.

The “robe” that was employed in this instance was the same as that worn by Roman generals and other notable commanders of the Roman army, as well as by Roman governors and other officials.

In light of the fact that we cannot expect Pilate to dress him in a brand new and magnificent robe, we must assume that this was an old and discarded garment that was now being used to dress the Son of God as a target for contempt and scorn by the people of the world.

See also:  Who Was Crucified On Either Side Of Jesus?

Jesus is dragged away to be crucified after being treated with contempt and cruelty by the soldiers.

(= Mr 15:16-22; Lu 23:26-31; Joh 19:2, 17).

See Poole’s essay on ” Matthew 27:31 ” for further information.

This is an example of the lowly position to which Christ was reduced: the clothes on his back appear to be all he possessed in this world, and he is stripped of them: and a scarlet robe, or “a red coat,” as the Persic version renders it, is placed on him, which is very likely an old coat belonging to one of their officers.

  1. (z) Misn.
  2. 8, sect.
  3. Misn.
  4. 8, sect.
  5. (a) Alexander ab Alex.
  6. Dier.
  7. 1.

28.

Genial.

l.

c.

And they stripped him down to his underwear and put on a crimson robe.

It didn’t have any sleeves, so they draped a cloak over his shoulders and wrapped it around him to keep him warm.

Nevertheless, these vulgar and impudently rude soldiers dressed Jesus in this adornment in order to make a further mockery of him, this one who was in fact a real King of kings.

Hal.

596).

14; Philop.9, 11), for the purpose of ridiculing His claims to the dignity of king; for kings and emperors wore the same garment, the only difference being that the garment was longer and of a finer texture in their case.

41 f.;Mor.

186 C,al.

41 f.;Mor.

186 C,al.

xxi.

118 for further information on this military cloak, which was initially employed by the Macedonians.

xv.) to be understood as at the very least conveying the notion of purple.

(or.): He is removing (or putting on) His clothing.

What if it is the latter: After being scourged, Jesus is carried nude to the praetorium, where he is dressed save for His top garment, which they remove and replace with something else (Meyer).

Carr depicts a soldier’s scarf, and he speculates that it may have been Pilate’s (Herod’s, Elsner) worn-out scarf from a previous battle.

—., making a crown out of thorns; not, according to Meyer and Weiss, hard and sharp, so as to cause severe suffering, but youthful, flexible, and readily plaited, with the goal being to mock rather than to torment.

They would take the first thing that came their way to form a band.

— : following the investiture follows the homage, which is shown with a modest gesture and a reverent salutation: Congratulations, Jewish monarchy.

In terms of purpose, the ridicule of the nation is just as offensive as the mockery of the specific victim.

ad N.

cites Philo.

Loesner (Observ.

[a scarlet robe for number 28] It was customary for top commanders to wear a soldier’s scarf, Lat.chlamys, although its usage was not restricted to those in command.

Scarlet was the right color for the chlamys of the soldiers.

It is said in Matthew 27:28 that they make fun of His kingdom in the same way that the Jews had made fun of His prophetic dignity in Matthew 26:68.

Sometimes these terms are used interchangeably; other times they are used differently, as in Revelation 17:4.

28.- Verse 28 is the final verse.

The phrase “when they had dressed him” appears in some manuscripts, although it appears to have been borrowed from St.

They were aware of his claim to be a King, and so they decided to make fun of him by bestowing imitation royal honors on him.

Investiture a crimson robe on him (indicative of wealth).

Several scholars believe it to have been a discarded garment from King Herod’s wardrobe that they discovered and seized for this purpose.

Matthew 27:28 (KJV) The robe () was a short military garment that was worn by kings and emperors, as well as soldiers, during battle.

Mark 15:17 They dressed Him in a purple robe, twisted together a crown of thorns, and set it on His head.

And then they stripped him down to his underwear and put on a scarlet robe over his body. EXPOSITORY (BIBLE IN ENGLISH) – (28) I’m wearing a scarlet dress. Thechlamysorpaludamentum is another technical term that refers to the military cloak worn by emperors while acting in the role of generals, as well as by other officers of high rank in the Roman military (Pliny, xxii. 2, 3). It is referred to as purple by St. Mark and St. John (Mark 15:17; John 19:2); however, the ancients referred to it as “crimson,” and the same color could easily be referred to by either term.

  1. Similar mockery was perpetrated on an idiot in Alexandria, who was duped into representing Herod Agrippa II, according to Philo (in Flacc.p.
  2. Such heinous treatment of condemned prisoners prior to their execution was all too common a practice at the time.
  3. Because they had most likely witnessed or heard about similar insults offered by Herod and his soldiers (Luke 23:21), they reenacted them with even greater severity.
  4. As soon as the cross was laid on the ground, nails were driven through the hands and feet of the sufferer.
  5. This was Christ’s response to the figure of the bold serpent perched atop a stake.
  6. That is to say that they either removed all of his upper garments or removed all of his clothing, which is more likely the latter.
  7. Look at Isaiah 1:18 for more information.
  8. Roman generals and other notable commanders of the Roman army, as well as the Roman governors, wore a robe similar to the one that was utilized in this instance.
  9. Considering that it is impossible for us to believe that Pilate would dress him in a brand-new and magnificent robe, we must assume that this was an old and discarded garment that was now being used to dress the Son of God as a laughing stock.
  10. – (1 Cor 15:16-22; Lu 23:26-31; Joh 19:2, 17).

For further information, read Poole’s article on ” Matthew 27:31.” In addition, they stripped him of his clothes; at the very least, they stripped him of his upper garment: according to Jewish law, for one man to spit on another, as these soldiers later did on Christ, or to strip him of his garment, was punishable by a fine of four hundred pence (z), which was equal to twelve pounds and ten shillings of our money; however, the soldiers were in no danger of being prosecuted for stripping Christ.

This is an example of the lowly position to which Christ was reduced: the clothes on his back appear to be all he possessed in this world, and he is stripped of them: a scarlet robe, or “a red coat,” as the Persic version renders it, is placed on him, which is most likely an old coat belonging to one of their officers.

(z) Miss.

6, Misn.

8.

Bava Kama, c.

A) Alexander ab Alex.

Dier.

1.

28.

Genial.

l.

c.

And then they stripped him down to his underwear and threw on a crimson robe over his shoulders.

It didn’t have any sleeves, so they draped a cloak over his shoulders and wrapped it around him.

Nevertheless, these vulgar and impudently rude soldiers dressed Jesus in this adornment in order to make a further mockery of him, this one who was in fact a legitimate King.

27:28 (New International Version) Because His clothing had been removed prior to the scourging (see the critical observations), it is possible to explain the v (see the critical criticisms) (Acts 16:22; Dionys.

ix.

Then, instead of the upper robes (Matthew 27:31), they dressed Him in a redsagum, the ordinary military cloak (Plut.Sert.

The Plutarch’s Demetrius (Plutarch’s Demetrix) is found on pages 41 and 42 in the Moravian Book of the Dead (Moravian Book of the Dead).

xxi.

118, for further information on this military cloak, which was initially employed by the Macedonians in the 5th century.

xv) to be understood as at the very least conveying the impression of purple.

(or.): removing (or putting on) His clothing.

According to the latter, Jesus was taken nude to the praetorium after being scourged, where He was dressed save for His top garment, which they removed and replaced with a cloak (Meyer).

Using a soldier’s scarf as a model, Carr speculates that it may have been Pilate’s (Herod’s, Elsner) worn-out scarf.

A crown is woven from thorns, but it is not hard and pointed, as Meyer and Weiss claim, such that it causes significant agony, but rather youthful, flexible and readily plaited; the goal is to mock rather than to inflict suffering.

They would accept the first thing that came their way.

— : following the investiture follows the homage, which is shown with a modest gesture and a reverent salutation: — : Greetings, King of the Jews.

From Philo (in Flaccum, 6), Loesner extracts a historical parallel in which the youth of Alexandria treat similarly a half-witted person, Karabas, with the ultimate goal of insulting Herod Agrippa (Observ.

T.).

Scarlet robe [number 28 in the alphabet].

If this is a worn-out scarf belonging to Pilate, it is a marked contrast to the “beautiful robe” (Luke 23:11), which Herod’s troops placed on Jesus.

For further information, see the Antonyms Dictionary.

It is said in Matthew 27:28 that they make fun of His kingdom in the same way that the Jews had made fun of His prophetic dignity in chapter 26:68.

As in Revelation 17:4, these terms are utilized in a variety of contexts and at different times.

Textual Commentary on Verse 28.

Mark and to be fairly tautological in this instance.

They tore his clothes from his damaged body, reopening his half-healed wounds for the first time in weeks.

In this case, it was most likely the short military woollen cloak used by officers, which was usually crimson or purple in color and fastened with a buckle on the right shoulder.

No matter what it was, its vibrant colour was appropriate for this parody of imperial majesty.

27:28 (New International Version) King and Emperors, as well as warriors, used to dress in robes, which were rather short.

Matthew 27:28 (NIV) The time is 27:28 NL and Matthew has arrived.

NIV Matthew 27:28 NIV 27:28 KJBMatthew KJ Scripture Application (VMatthew 27:28) The parable of Matthew 27:28 Bible Paraphrase (Matthew 27:28) China’s Bible Version of Matthew 27:28.

french bibl. eMatthew 27:28 German translation of Matthew 27:28 eBible Hu is a website dedicated to the study of the Bible and its interpretation. b

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