Jesus: Who Do You Say I Am Life Magazine

LIFE Jesus: Who Do You Say That I Am?: Editors of Life: 9781603201742: Amazon.com: Books

Awarded the Wilbur Award twice for outstanding religious story in a national magazine, LIFE Books managing editor Robert Sullivan also wrote the New York Timesbest-selling biography of Pope John Paul II, which was published by LIFE Books in 2003 and 2006. The author contributes his knowledge of Christianity to this book, which includes language that has been informed by some of the world’s greatest scholars, theologians, and religious luminaries. After seemingly appearing out of nowhere, Jesus grew up to be a thinker, teacher, and preacher in his short life—which may have been as little as 32 years—whose words and acts changed the world and laid the groundwork for the world’s most popular religion.

The editors of LIFE magazine travel to Nazareth in quest of Jesus of Nazareth, the carpenter’s son who would one day have a profound impact on the world.

We will also travel to the Vatican, to African missions, to the Glide Memorial Church in San Francisco, and to every other place where Jesus has risen in the name of the Father.

LIFE Jesus: Who Do You Say That I Am?: LIFE Special – 2018-12-21 SIP, Meredith: 9781547847051: Amazon.com: Books

In this presentation, the historical context is provided for the story of Jesus of Nazareth: the events that occurred before, what Jesus meant in His time, and what He means in our time. It is filled with beautiful photography of the locations, maps of Jesus’ world, and masterful artwork created to tell his story. LIFE Jesus is a treasure trove of spiritual understanding that is overflowing with wisdom. With the help of LIFE’s trademark narrative, you’ll travel back in time to the beginning of time and learn about the Prophets, as well as the Old Testament and the New Testament—the bedrock upon which the world’s largest religion, which has more than 2.3 billion Christians around the world, is built and maintained.

LIFE In chapters such as He Came to Save Sinners; And on the Third Day He Rose Again; and He Is All Things to All Men, Jesus demonstrates why this is so important.

With the help of LIFE Jesus, the image becomes increasingly obvious.

Please keep in mind that this is an authorized edition of a book published by the Meredith Corporation and distributed by Amazon. Printed on demand for immediate fulfillment, this edition features a matte interior paper of superior quality and a high gloss exterior paper.

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$29.00 plus $32.27 in additional fees Editors of the Life Magazine by the author. The book is in hardcover. Trade based on age level. The year of publication 2012 is designated as the publication year. The total number of pages is 112. 232.901 is a Dewey Decimal number. Illustrated Yes. College Graduate Beginner is the grade level.

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  • Robert Sullivan, managing editor of LIFE Books, has twice been won the Wilbur Award for the best religion feature in a national magazine. He is also the author of LIFE’s New York Times best-selling biography of Pope John Paul II, which was published in 2005. The author contributes his knowledge of Christianity to this book, which includes language that has been informed by some of the world’s greatest scholars, theologians, and religious luminaries. After seemingly appearing out of nowhere, Jesus grew up to be a thinker, teacher, and preacher in his short life—which may have been as little as 32 years—whose words and acts changed the world and laid the groundwork for the world’s most popular religion. However, the biography as detailed in the New Testament and apocryphal sources only provides us with a limited amount of information. The editors of LIFE magazine travel to Nazareth in quest of Jesus of Nazareth, the carpenter’s son who would one day have a profound impact on the world. Denis Waugh, the legendary photographer, previously performed a detailed, vivid, and dramatic photographic pilgrimage to the Holy Land exclusively for LIFE magazine, and those photographs will serve as the foundation for our journey. We will also travel to the Vatican, to African missions, to the Glide Memorial Church in San Francisco, and to every other place where Jesus has risen in the name of the Father. In the final portion of the book, we will look at Christianity in the modern world: Its very significant position in our turbulent globe continues to be undiminished.

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  • ISBN-139781603201742
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  • The title of the book is Jesus: Who Do You Say That I Am
  • Author Editors of Life Magazine
  • Magazine Format Hardcover
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  • Subject Biblical Studies / Jesus, the GospelsActs, Christian Church / Leadership, Religious, General, Christianity / General, Middle East / General
  • Publication Year 2012
  • Subjects Biblical Studies / Jesus, the GospelsActs, Christian Church / Leadership, Religious, General, Christianity / General, Middle East / General BiographyAutobiography, Travel, Religion
  • Number of Pages112 Pages
  • GenreBiographyAutobiography, Travel, Religion

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LIFE Magazine Jesus: Who Do You Say That I Am?

In this presentation, the historical background is provided for the tale of Jesus of Nazareth: the events that occurred before, what Jesus meant in His time, and what He means in our time. It is filled with magnificent photographs of the locales, maps of Jesus’ world, and great artwork made to convey his tale. LIFE Jesus is a treasure trove of spiritual enlightenment that is bursting with wisdom. With the help of LIFE’s trademark narrative, you’ll travel back in time to the beginning of time and learn about the Prophets, as well as the Old Testament and the New Testament—the bedrock upon which the world’s largest religion, which has more than 2.3 billion Christians around the world, is built and maintained.

LIFE In chapters such as He Came to Save Sinners; And on the Third Day He Rose Again; and He Is All Things to All Men, Jesus demonstrates why this is so important.

With the help of LIFE Jesus, the image becomes increasingly obvious.

Printed on demand for rapid fulfillment, this edition features a matte internal paper of superior quality and a high gloss exterior paper.

Jesus : Who Do You Say That I Am? by Life Magazine Editors: Good (2012) 1st Edition.

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About this title:

Goodreads has supplied the following book ratings: 3.54 average rating (24 ratings) Synopsis: Awarded the Wilbur Award twice for outstanding religious story in a national magazine, LIFE Books managing editor Robert Sullivan also wrote the New York Timesbest-selling biography of Pope John Paul II, which was published by LIFE Books in 2003 and 2006. The author contributes his knowledge of Christianity to this book, which includes language that has been informed by some of the world’s greatest scholars, theologians, and religious luminaries.

  • However, the biography as detailed in the New Testament and apocryphal sources only provides us with a limited amount of information.
  • Denis Waugh, the legendary photographer, previously performed a detailed, vivid, and dramatic photographic pilgrimage to the Holy Land exclusively for LIFE magazine, and those photographs will serve as the foundation for our journey.
  • In the final portion of the book, we will look at Christianity in the modern world: Its position as a major player in our turbulent world continues to be very impactful.
  • With his experience on the subject of Christianity, he contributes to this book, which also includes writing that has been informed by the world’s greatest researchers, theologians, and religious luminaries.
  • Luce, the magazine’s founding editor and publisher, in 1936 with the publication of LIFE magazine.

In addition to the New York Times best-seller One Nation, they have released books on a wide range of themes, including LIFE Picture Puzzle and The American Journey of Barack Obama. The section titled “About this title” may refer to a different edition of this title.

Bibliographic Details

Jesus: Who Do You Say That I Am? is the title of this chapter. Publisher:LifePublication Date:2012 Binding:Hardcover Good condition of the book. Printed in the United States in the first edition.

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Who Do You Say I Am?

What did Jesus say and do, and who was he in the first place? Is it true that Jesus was risen from the dead? Christians began to worship Jesus for a variety of reasons and at different times. These are fundamental concerns that go to the heart of Christian religion. For dealing with them, Christians today require applicable knowledge and interpretative possibilities, which are provided by the three huge volumes addressed in this section. Everyone who reads through these three works thoroughly will find them to be academic, positive, constructive, and typically orthodox in their theology, and those who do so will wish to go back to them whenever the need or interest arises.

  • G.
  • B.
  • Dunn, on the other hand, brings a unique viewpoint to Jesus and the Jesus tradition that makes excellent sense.
  • To be clear, our knowledge of Jesus derives from what the first-hand accounts of his life tell us, and the most plausible assumption is that the steady core of their testimony provides a credible picture of the things Jesus said and did.
  • He believes that the tradition-building process began during Jesus’ actual mission, rather than after the resurrection.

After reviewing the search for the historical Jesus and outlining his own approach, Dunn turns his attention to the mission of Jesus, beginning with the baptism of John and moving on to the kingdom of God, the audiences for Jesus’ message, the nature of discipleship, the question of Jesus’ self-understanding (what others thought Jesus was like, how Jesus saw his role), and the climax of Jesus’ mission (the resurrection) (his death and resurrection).

“Christianity in the Making” is a three-volume project by Dunn, who is a professor of New Testament at the University of Durham in England.

27 and 150.

This study is both informative and occasionally fascinating to read because of Dunn’s idea of a stable but flexible oral tradition, as well as his rigorous studies of comparable texts in the Gospels (including those of John and Thomas), as well as his cautious but fair historical judgements.

His last observation is that “the would-be disciple still hears and meets Jesus through the Jesus tradition.” They will question Dunn’s reliance on oral tradition (always a slippery concept), his ease in moving from the Jesus tradition to Jesus (Jesus remembered is something in between the historical Jesus and the Jesus depicted in Scripture), and his reliance on the “stable core” of the Jesus tradition (is this simply an appeal to the lowest common denominator?

While Dunn begins this trilogy by making an articulate case for seeing resurrection as a “metaphor,” the second volume in the trilogy invites us to think beyond that ambiguous term to something more concrete.

Christian Origins and the Question of God” is the title of a five-volume project that he is now working on.

The Resurrection of the Son of God (Fortress, 817p, $49; 0800636155) is the latest installment in the series, and it argues that the only possible explanation for how early Christianity began and developed in the manner that it did is that Jesus’ tomb was truly empty, that people truly did meet Jesus as alive again, and that the best historical explanation for these phenomena is that Jesus was indeed raised bodily from the dead.

Wright begins by establishing the context by referring to beliefs about the afterlife that can be found in ancient paganism, the Old Testament, and postbiblical Judaism.

Following that, he analyzes resurrection in early Christianity outside of Paul’s writings—that is, in Gospel traditions outside of the Easter narratives, noncanonical early Christian literature, and hope in the person of Jesus as Messiah and Lord—as well as in the person of Jesus as Messiah and Lord.

  1. He closes with reflections on Easter and history, as well as on the risen Jesus’ status as the Son of the Father.
  2. With this precise and detailed definition, he is able to demonstrate that all of the intimations of immortality from the Greco-Roman civilization that have been put up to “explain” the resurrection of Jesus have failed to do so in any meaningful way whatsoever.
  3. Paul’s letters, which date back to the first century and were written in the early 50s, are the first full manuscripts in the New Testament.
  4. The resurrection, for Paul and those to whom he spoke, was more than a metaphor or a lyrical method of expressing themselves.

In contrast to the Synoptic Gospels, which, aside from their Easter narratives, generally speak about resurrection in the context of Second Temple Judaism, in John and in almost all early Christian writings (with the exception of a few clearly gnostic works), the hope of resurrection remains constant into the third century, a hope that is based on the resurrection of Jesus himself.

Through an examination of each Gospel’s account of the empty tomb and appearances, Wright demonstrates how the individual Evangelists reworked the traditions for their own theological purposes without losing sight of the underlying subject matter, and how the traditions give every indication that they were intended to refer to actual events that occurred on the third day following Jesus’ death.

  1. When it comes to the resurrection of Jesus and its relevance for Christian living, The Resurrection of the Son of God presents a compelling proof of what the New Testament says and does not say about the event.
  2. Whatever the merits of his arguments, he definitely does us a favor by clarifying what the Scriptures say about Jesus’ resurrection and explaining why it is such a crucial part of Christian life and belief.
  3. Did they consider him to be a celestial being?
  4. A detailed, educated, and balanced treatment of these essential and challenging questions is provided by Larry W.
  5. According to him, his work is a historical investigation into the beliefs and religious practices that constituted devotion to Jesus as a divine figure in the earliest Christian communities, as well as into the role of Jesus in the religious life and thought of the earliest Christians.
  6. 30 to 170.
  7. Hurtado’s work is structured around three primary theses.
  8. Rather than reflecting a gradual development, it represents an explosion that has been present from the beginning of the game’s existence.
  9. This great devotion to Jesus, which included reverencing him as divine, was presented and expressed within the framework of an exclusiveist monotheistic viewpoint, which was a third point to consider.
  10. Although some critics have complained that he has an overly mild picture of “proto-orthodoxy” and does not do credit to the more exotic strains of early Christianity, on the whole, his viewpoints appear to be consistent with the literary sources and historical evidence available to him.

A historical analysis, Hurtado’s magnum opus not only has great relevance for theologians working on Christology, but it also provides the general public with what appears to me to be an accurate and stimulating account of what the majority of early Christians understood and believed about Jesus, as well as their experiences of him in their worship.

Yet, their writings together make an outstanding trilogy concerning the person of Jesus and his relevance throughout the history of the Christian faith.

Daniel J. Harrington is a lawyer. In addition to being a professor of New Testament at Weston Jesuit School of Theology in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Daniel J. Harrington is also the general editor of New Testament Abstracts.

Who do you say I am?

When his disciples were having a conversation with him, Jesus questioned them, “But what about you? “Can you tell me who you think I am?” (Matthew 16:15, New International Version) Christology is a crucial topic of theology, and the solution to this essential issue is tied to this area of study. Christology, as the name implies, is the study of Christ – his nature, his mission, and other aspects of his personality. A theological basis establishes a clear understanding of God, His essence, and His purpose for redemption of human beings and the restoration of a fallen creation.

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However, there is no Christianity if Christology is not present.

Therefore, knowledge about Christ is not only necessary, but also personally rewarding.

Christ and His Claims

The fact that Christ genuinely existed as a historical person is a fundamental component of Christ on which we must all agree, regardless of individual criticism to the contrary. This indicates that he was not a legendary, mythical, or fictitious hero in the traditional sense. He did, in fact, live in the first century, and the New Testament gives the most complete and accurate chronicle of his life and work to that time period. In addition, it is critical that we comprehend his character. Christ asserted his divinity.

Two such instances are found in the Gospels, when Jesus forgives sins and is met with the retort, “Who can forgive sins but God alone?” (Who can forgive sins but God alone?) The following passages are from Matthew 9; Mark 2; and Luke 5.

Why?

According to John 10:33, one of the reasons for wishing to put Jesus to death was because of his teachings: “We are not stoning you for any of them.

Human and Divine

However, Jesus also possesses a human nature, which leads to the discussion of another crucial aspect of Christology. Jesus is both both God and totally man in one person. He is neither a fifty-fifty mix of God and man, nor is he some bizarre hybrid of the two species. However, striving to comprehend Christ’s divine and human natures in their whole is difficult. A challenge, on the other hand, is not the same as a contradiction. The attempt to comprehend the link between Christ’s divine and human natures is a component of what is known as the hypostatic union, which means “union of the two natures.” Jesus does not have a button or switch on the back of his body that could be pressed or flipped to switch him between God and Man modes.

If, as some believe, the nature of Christ and what he accomplished for us are essential to our salvation and redemption, we’d best make certain that our beliefs about Jesus are true.

Purpose and Proof

But what was it that Jesus came to accomplish? He was on a definite mission, one that had been set by God. Jesus came to earth to die as a sacrifice for the sins of humanity. This is referred to as the atonement, and it will be discussed in greater depth in another article in this series (“What must I do in order to be saved?”). Not only was Christ’s birth amazing, given that he was born to the Virgin Mary, but his whole life was filled with marvels as well. From walking on water to restoring sight to the blind and permitting the lame to walk, Jesus’ career was packed with miracles and wonders to see.

Christ’s own physical resurrection from the dead, following his death on the cross, was the greatest miracle of all.

Who is Jesus?

Even though certain parts of Christology appear impersonal, unimportant, or remote, it is critical to remember that what we know about Jesus is immensely relevant and, more importantly, profoundly personal to our lives today. Even though John 3:16 is frequently cited, its profundity makes it worthwhile to repeat it here: “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” When Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life,” he claimed to be the only means by which humans may be saved from sin.

  • “There is no other way to the Father but through me” (John 14:6).
  • Jesus is, without a doubt, an excellent moral instructor, but he is also much more.
  • “Jesus is Lord,” was the simple statement that the early church used to express their belief.
  • However, either Jesus is the Lord or he isn’t.
  • “Can you tell me who you think I am?” In Matthew 16:15, the Bible states that The significance of our unique response cannot be overstated.

Christ, the Son of the Living God

When taken together, all of the evidence for Christianity forms a compelling cumulative case argument for the reality of Jesus and his claims. Christians are not aiming to be judgemental or narrow-minded in their approach to the exclusive claims of Jesus; rather, they are only wanting to convey the truth. The claims of Christ are not a question of personal preference, and they are not intended to make individuals feel at ease. Instead, they are concerns of truth, intended to make us uncomfortable as we come to terms with the fact that we are fallen humans in desperate need of genuine salvation.

Christology assists us in determining the correct response and, in doing so, transforms our lives for the better, so enabling us to transform the world for the glory of the Lord.

“You are the Christ, the Son of the living God,” the apostle Paul says (Matthew 16:16).

Instead, Jesus said, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, for this was not revealed to you by a human being, but by my Father who is in heaven” (Matthew 16:17).

“To him who is able to preserve you from falling and to present you before his glorious presence without fault and with great joy – to the only God our Savior be glory, majesty, power, and authority, through Jesus Christ our Lord, before all ages, now and forevermore!” wrote the apostle Jude (Jude 24-25).

C.A. Blaising’s “Hypostatic Union” is discussed in Walter Elwell’s Evangelical Dictionary of Theology (Baker Books, 1984), under the heading “Hypostatic Union.” With the help of people like you, we are able to help families thrive.

Encountering Jesus: Who Do You Say that I Am?

James Martin, S.J. is a Jesuit priest. James Martin, S.J. is a Jesuit priest. Was it a spiritual awakening to be introduced to both the Christ of faith and Jesus the Christ of history? Is it possible to get to know Jesus via his teachings in the Gospels? Father We can better comprehend what the Son of God has to do with the carpenter from Nazareth thanks to the work of Jim Martin, S.J., author of the New York Times bestselling Jesus: A Pilgrimage. James Martin, S.J., is a Jesuit priest, author, and editor-at-large for America, the national Catholic magazine.

  • Fr.
  • Econ.) from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business in 1982, with a specialty in finance, after attending the University of Pennsylvania.
  • Martin also got his M.Div.
  • from Boston College in 1999.
  • Martin is the author of a number of publications.
  • It is a travel narrative combined with biblical research and spiritual reflections on the life of Christ.
  • In 2012, he published Between Heaven and Mirth: Why Joy, Humor, and Laughter are at the Heart of the Spiritual Life (HarperOne).
  • His other publications include The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything: A Spirituality for Real Life (HarperOne, 2010), which was a New York Times bestseller and was nominated for a 2010 Christopher Award, as well as being the number one best-selling Catholic book of the year.

Still Awaiting the Messiah

“This isn’t how things are meant to work.” This is a notion that stays in the back of our brains, occasionally whispering its inquiry in the middle of a particularly difficult day, and other times demanding our attention as our eyes scan the headlines on television. There are several reasons to be depressed in the world in which we live. Our bodies are afflicted with sickness, our families are experiencing relationship difficulties, and our churches appear to be struggling to survive in a culture that is becoming increasingly post-Christian.

  1. Wars are raging.
  2. Poverty contributes to the spread of illnesses and the continuation of modern-day slavery.
  3. Is there any impact on our everyday lives from the arrival of a child Messiah?
  4. Isn’t our God a God of life, a God who designed with brilliant creativity, giving us extravagant gifts in the form of mammoth sunflowers, freshly fallen snow, laughing children, mossy mountains, and newborn babies?
  5. The call of this Advent season is to return to the waiting for the Messiah that we experienced last year.
  6. “Be born in us today,” we say as a petition to God.
  7. We must search for the kingdom of God in our midst even as we slog through the unpleasant realities of our world and press forth through the everyday moments of life — going to work, paying bills, chauffeuring children to after-school activities, and putting supper on the table.
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Sure, they’d heard rumblings about the impending Messiah throughout the years, but they weren’t convinced.

Their understanding of the issue would never be able to compete with that of religious authority.

Still, they had heard stories about this Messiah from their moms, friends or religious leaders, and something deep inside them recognized the truth in what they were hearing.

It’s possible that there’s something more to life than eating, sleeping, and minding sheep.

It was under their careful supervision that they were able to find safe resting locations for the night ahead.

I have fantastic news to share with you that will bring tremendous delight to the entire community.

Their hearts hammered as they pondered, “Could it be true?” their brains raced.

It’s true that the kingdom of God was bursting through in the most unexpected of ways and to the most unexpected of individuals.

After getting to their feet, they secured their sheep and started off in search of the child Messiah.

Those shepherds were enthralled by every word of joy spoken by those heavenly hosts, and they spread the good news to everybody who would listen.

“The shepherds returned, celebrating and thanking God for all they had heard and seen, which had happened exactly as they had been informed” (Luke 2:17–18, 20; emphasis added).

A Messiah who was born in the midst of barn animals and announced by a band of shepherds was not their concept of greatness and glory in their eyes.

“This isn’t how things are supposed to work,” they reasoned.

In the English language, “Messiah” refers to the Hebrew word for Messiah, while in the English language, “Christ” refers to the Greek word for Messiah, which is “Christ.” Both of these phrases refer to “the anointed one,” or, to put it more accurately, “the one who has had oil poured on him.” It is this ritual of anointing with oil that is used to signify someone’s elevation to the position of king or priest.

  • Despite the fact that the term “Christ” (Greek for “Messiah”) is frequently used to describe Jesus in the New Testament, this was not the way Jesus characterized himself.
  • “‘But what about you?’ the questioner said.
  • Later, in Matthew 16:15–17 and Matthew 20:20, Jesus instructed his followers not to inform anybody that he was the Messiah.
  • Jesus was well aware that the phrase has political and theological connotations.
  • Fear, on the other hand, was not the factor that prevented Jesus from openly proclaiming His actual identity.
  • “From that point on Jesus started to explain to his followers that he must travel to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, the chief priests, and the teachers of the law, and that he must be slain and raised from the dead on the third day” (Matthew 16:24-26).
  • It was the formation of a kingdom based on submission and sacrifice, rather than dominion and prosperity, that occupied the majority of Jesus’ time as Messiah.

Then he said, “Today this scripture is fulfilled in your hearing,” which was followed by applause.

He has also sent me to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.

As the Messiah, Jesus lived out His messianic anointing by exhibiting the love, generosity, and freedom that God was building in His kingdom.

The winds of the kingdom were felt as He breathed life back into those who had died and freed folks from demonic oppression.

The ways of God’s kingdom were illustrated when Jesus allowed room for loud children to bring joy into the world and empowered women who were gifted to lead.

Living Expectantly In his book “Being Disciples,” Rowan Williams describes discipleship as a state of being, a posture of anticipation as we eagerly anticipate signs of the kingdom of God breaking through.

Each time we seek the company of the Holy Spirit in prayer, or we search for the revelation of God in Scripture, or we find ourselves in the presence of another disciple, we are asking, “What is Jesus Christ giving me here and now?” (fmchr.ch/rwdisciples2).

We will watch as children open flaps on Advent calendars, and we will light candle after candle around the wreath each Sunday until the day of Christ’s nativity.

We enter as best we can into the story of the Jewish people who spent centuries longing for the Messiah, hopes waning and waxing with the passing of time.

If we take one look at the day’s news, we know we’re living in the already-but-not-yet kingdom of God.

Yes, at the moment Mary birthed Jesus in the bleak stable, the kingdom of God broke into our world.

Jesus made it clear that God’s kingdom-work would be carried on by all who choose to follow Him:“Very truly I tell you, whoever believes in me will do the works I have been doing, and they will do even greater things than these, because I am going to the Father” (John 14:12).

As Jesus’ disciples we are called to see the world’s brokenness and to lament, “It’s not supposed to be this way.” At the same time we are to live with expectancy, paying attention to how Jesus is bringing the healing and wholeness of God’s kingdom into the world right now.

When we pray, “Your kingdom come, your will be done on earth as it is in heaven” (Matthew 6:10), we are declaring the hope Jesus brought into the world and our commitment to join Jesus in bringing this hope to the broken places in our world.

We are joining Jesus in His work when we care for widows and orphans, clothe the naked, and feed the hungry.

We are joining Jesus in His work of building the kingdom when we invite the lowly or despised to join us for a meal, when we courageously call out systemic injustices, when we offer dignified work to those who have been oppressed.

Yes, our world is broken.

But the hope of the Messiah breaks through our darkness.

A kingdom demonstrating God’s justice and love has already been established by our Messiah, and our Messiah has delegated to us the responsibility of carrying on His work.

Melanie Eccles serves as the lead pastor of the Monroe Free Methodist Church in Monroe, Michigan, where she was ordained in 2007.

Her educational background includes a Master of Arts degree in spiritual development and leadership, as well as a Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy and religion, from Spring Arbor University, where she graduated with honors. More of Melanie Eccles’ writing may be found at melanieeccles.com. 2

Jesus: Who Do You Say That I Am? (Hardcover)

$24.95 Currently available on our shelves Aurora’s warehouse is located in the city. As of 9:33 a.m. on February 25th, there were no shortages (REL)

Description

Awarded the Wilbur Award twice for outstanding religious story in a national magazine, LIFE Books managing editor Robert Sullivan also wrote the New York Timesbest-selling biography of Pope John Paul II, which was published by LIFE Books in 2003 and 2006. The author contributes his knowledge of Christianity to this book, which includes language that has been informed by some of the world’s greatest scholars, theologians, and religious luminaries. After seemingly appearing out of nowhere, Jesus grew up to be a thinker, teacher, and preacher in his short life—which may have been as little as 32 years—whose words and acts changed the world and laid the groundwork for the world’s most popular religion.

The editors of LIFE magazine travel to Nazareth in quest of Jesus of Nazareth, the carpenter’s son who would one day have a profound impact on the world.

We will also travel to the Vatican, to African missions, to the Glide Memorial Church in San Francisco, and to every other place where Jesus has risen in the name of the Father.

About the Author

Awarded the Wilbur Award twice for outstanding religious story in a national magazine, LIFE Books managing editor Robert Sullivan is also the author of Pope John Paul II, a New York Times bestseller biography published by LIFE Books. With his experience on the subject of Christianity, he contributes to this book, which also includes writing that has been informed by the world’s greatest researchers, theologians, and religious luminaries. The editors at LIFE magazine are committed to upholding the traditions of excellence in photography, journalism, and the telling of the story of our country and the world that were established by Henry R.

Its authors have written books on a wide range of themes, including the New York Times bestseller One Nation, the LIFE Picture Puzzle, and The American Journey of Barack Obama, among others.

Language:English

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