How Was Jesus Nailed To The Cross

Was Jesus really nailed to the cross?

The crucifixion of Jesus is undoubtedly one of the most well-known images to have emerged from the Christian tradition. The ceremony takes place on Good Friday, which is considered to be one of the holiest days in the Christian calendar. But what exactly was the crucifixion? And what was the reason for Jesus’ death in this manner? The crucifixion was a technique of punishment used by the Romans. Suspended from a massive cross, a victim would finally succumb to asphyxiation or weariness — it was a long, drawn-out, and excruciating process that took several hours.

Because, as King of the Jews, Jesus threatened Roman imperial dominance (Matt 27:37; Mark 15:26; Luke 23:38; John 19:19–22), the Gospels describe this as the reason for Jesus’ death.

In Christian tradition, it is thought that the limbs of the cross will be nailed to the wood of the cross, with dispute centered on whether nails would puncture the hands or the more structurally solid wrists.

In reality, the only archaeological evidence for the practice of nailing crucifixion victims comes from the grave of Jehohanan, a man who was crucified in the first century CE, and it is an ankle bone from his tomb.

Gospel accounts

It is possible that certain early Gospels, such as the Gospel of Thomas, did not include the tale of Jesus’s execution, preferring to concentrate on his teaching instead. However, one of the few things that all four of the canonical Gospels agree on is Jesus’ death via crucifixion. The events surrounding the crucifixion are depicted in significantly different ways in the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. There is no mention of Jesus being nailed or tied to the crucifixion in any of the four Gospels of the New Testament.

  1. Perhaps it is because of this text that the widespread belief that Jesus’ hands and feet were nailed to the crucifixion rather than chained to it has developed.
  2. Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons The Account of Peter, a non-canonical gospel written in the first or second centuries CE, tells in detail how the nails were taken from Jesus’ hands after he had died in verse 21.
  3. “And they were hearing a voice from the sky saying, ‘Have you made proclamation to the fallen-asleep?'” says the cross in verses 41-42.
  4. Several people have claimed to have discovered the real nails with which Jesus was crucified throughout the course of the last few years.

This obsession with the nails, which has persisted despite the fact that the earliest gospels make no mention of Jesus being nailed to the crucifixion, is a puzzle to me.

Depictions of the crucifixion

Given that crucifixion was a humiliating way to die, it isn’t unexpected that Christians needed some time to accept the picture of Christ on the cross. What is unexpected is that the first depiction of the crucifixion turns out to be a representation of a cross. However, rather than the religious icons with which we are acquainted — representations that commemorate Jesus’ crucifixion – this oldest image looks to be some late second century satirical graffiti that is directed against Christian believers.

  • Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons The Alexamenos Graffito, as the artwork is known, depicts a person with the head of a donkey standing on a cross, with the words “Alexamenos worships his God” written underneath.
  • The fact that the graffito was definitely not created by a Christian demonstrates that non-Christians were aware with certain fundamental parts of Christian thought as early as the second century.
  • This piece of carved jasper from the second or third century portrays a man on a cross, surrounded by magical symbols.
  • The British Museum is a place where you may learn about the history of the United Kingdom.
  • The crucified Christ is shown on the Constanza diamond, who is flanked by the apostles.
  • CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 International License It is believed by scholars that the Constanza gemstone, as it is sometimes called, goes back to the fourth century CE.
  • Tradition demands this prevalent image of Jesus’ death on the crucifixion since the evidence from antiquity does not give a definitive answer as to whether Jesus was nailed or tied to his cross.
  • As a vivid extension on the crucifixion, this stands out as a welcome addition to the Gospels’ relative reticence on the subject.
  • Emperor Constantine eventually put a halt to the practice of crucifixion as a means of death, not for ethical grounds, but out of reverence for Jesus Christ.

Faculty member at the University of Sheffield, Meredith J C Warren is a lecturer in Biblical and Religious Studies. The original version of this article appeared on The Conversation. See the source article for more information.

Opinion

During Holy Week in Guatemala, worshippers participate in the Jesus of Nazareth Merced procession, in which they carry a figure of Jesus Christ. Photo by Johann Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images. ) ) Christians throughout the world are commemorating Jesus’ death on Good Friday, followed by a celebration of his resurrection on Easter Sunday, as part of their religious traditions. However, despite the fact that the cross appears often in Christian artwork and Western culture as a whole, misconceptions and myths about its history, origins, and appearance continue to circulate.

  • Myth number one: The cross on which Jesus died was a stake divided by a horizontal beam.
  • In addition to emoji (which include both the two-beamLatin cross and theOrthodox cross, also known as the Suppedaneum cross, which has an additional bar towards the bottom), this variant of the cross may be found on anything from roadside monuments to church steeples.
  • It is important to note that the Greek and Latin terms for “cross” (stauros” and “crux”) do not necessarily refer to the cross that most people are familiar with.
  • In most historians’ estimations, Jesus’ cross was T-shaped, with the vertical section notched to allow the executioners to bind the victim to the crossbeam before raising it and setting it securely into the top of the cross.
  • It is said to bore a better resemblance to the item on which Jesus died than the crosses that are more usually shown in Christian art.
  • 2Jesus was nailed on the cross with nails driven through his hands and feet, which is incorrect.
  • This includes classics such as Sandro Botticelli’s ” Mystic Crucifixion ” and Diego Velázquez’s ” Christ Crucified “, as well as lesser known works.
  • In reality, the only time such nails are mentioned in the Gospels is in the book of John, in the tale of the doubting Thomas, who wants to see the marks of the nails on Jesus’ hands to ensure that he is indeed experiencing the risen Jesus (John 20:25).

However, while archaeologists have discovered physical evidence of nails being used to fasten the feet of crucifixion victims, it would have been impossible to nail the condemned to a cross using only nails because the bones in the hands and wrists would not have been able to support the weight of the body.

  1. Suffocation, rather than blood loss, would be the cause of death in this scenario.
  2. 3Jesus (or a bystander) was the one who carried the crucifixion to the cross of Calvary.
  3. Either man is seen bearing a big, wooden cross with both a vertical and a horizontal beam in Christian art (including renderings by Michelangelo, El Greco, and Titian), which is a common motif.
  4. According to historians of ancient execution procedures, such LaGrange College professor John Granger Cook, to the degree that the condemned carried their own crosses, they would have been handed only the horizontal component.

For nearly 1,000 years, the Christian church emphasized paradise rather than the Crucifixion, according to two authors writing in the UU World magazine; in Slate, scholar Larry Hurtado argued that “there was, in short, little to be gained in proclaiming a crucified savior in a setting in which crucifixion was a grisly reality,” noting that “some early Christians attempted to avoid reference to Jesus’ crucifixion.” Although it is true that crosses were relatively uncommon symbols for Christians to employ before to the middle of the fourth century, More than that, the earliest depictions of crosses depict them as delicate, gem-studded staffs rather than as robust implements of execution.

It wasn’t until the 6th century that depictions of Jesus’ crucifixion became increasingly common, with no regular occurrences before then.

“When they crucified Him, driving in the nails, they pierced His hands and feet; and those who crucified Him parted His garments among themselves,” wrote Christian thinker Justin Martyr in a long dialogue with a non-Christian interlocutor in the 2nd century, emphasizing the humiliation and suffering of Jesus’ execution and emphasizing the humiliation and suffering of Jesus’ execution.

  • The disappearance of the cross or crucifix from visual art may be difficult to explain; nevertheless, timed with the increase of pilgrimage to the Holy Land and the locations of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection, its reemergence may give useful hints.
  • Some people were even given the opportunity to receive a sliver of the sacred wood.
  • Myth No.
  • Some people are completely sold on this concept.
  • Many ancient faiths utilized symbols comparable to the cross (and Egyptian Christians even adopted the ankh, which is an Egyptian hieroglyph for “life”), but two intersecting lines are a straightforward and extremely common figure.
  • While it is easy to recognize parallels between religious artwork from different traditions, it is also rather simple to identify differences between them as well.

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When Jesus was nailed to the cross, did the nails go through His hands or His wrists?

QuestionAnswer The topic of where the nails were set relates to the debate of whether Jesus was crucified on a cross, a pole, or a stake, which is discussed further below. Some experts believe that if He had been crucified on a cross, as history has it, the hands would not have been able to support His weight since they were not strong enough. So they hypothesize that the nails were really in His wrists, which are regarded to be stronger and more capable of supporting His weight. Others have argued that His hands would have been strong enough, given that His feet were also nailed and would have sustained a portion of His weight, as well.

  1. While historical experts disagree on the placement of the nails during Jesus’ crucifixion, or the placement of nails in anyone else’s for that matter, the Bible simply states that Jesus had wounds in both of His hands (John 20:25-27).
  2. However, the Greek word for “alsocheir” is used in this passage.
  3. Experiments have demonstrated that both methods are effective, and that any method might have been employed in the crucifixion of Jesus.
  4. We are aware that there are five wounds: the hands, the side, the feet, and the back of the head.
  5. To all those who would ever accept in Him as their Savior, the scars on His flesh provided spiritual healing from sin.
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Where were Jesus’ hands nailed?

It is true that when Christ was crucified, the nails were hammered into his wrists rather than his hands, according to certain accounts. A. The nails in the palms of Our Lord’s hands are depicted in the majority of traditional religious art depicting the Crucifixion. However, if the nails had been bored through the palms of Christ’s hands, the weight of his delicate flesh would have ripped the hands away from the nails. As a result, we must conclude that when our Lord was crucified, the nails were driven through his wrists rather than his ankles, unless his arms were also tied to the crossbeam by cords to sustain His weight.

  1. Due to the strength of the ligaments that connect these bones, they would be better able to withstand the weight of the victim’s body hanging from the cross compared to the ligaments that connect the bones of the palm.
  2. The Greek term for “hand” (cheir) can refer to anything below the middle of the forearm, which is what is being translated here.
  3. Peter’s “hands,” despite the fact that the chains would have probably been placed around what we would call the “wrists” in our modern language.
  4. There is an image of a crucified guy on the wall that has been magically made.
  5. If the artwork was a counterfeit from the Middle Ages, as some claim, the bloodstains would very surely have been represented on the palms, as they were in the religious art of the time.

An further consequence of a nail puncturing the anatomical wrist is an injury to the median nerve, which will most likely cause the thumb to bend inward. Perhaps this explains why the thumbs of the victim who is shown on the Shroud are not visible on the Shroud. PT

What Was the Shape of Jesus’ Cross?

An interesting topic regarding the form of the Crucifixion cross of Jesus came to my attention recently after I delivered a keynote address at an international conference. In an attempt to dispute the customary form of the cross, he had been approached by Jehovah’s Witnesses. As they pointed out, “cross” (stauros) is merely a Greek word that may signify any of three things: a “upright pole,” a “upright stake,” or a “torture stake.” His Jehovah’s Witness guests reported that Jesus was indeed nailed to a straight stake with a single spike through his hands and another through his feet, as described by the visitors from the organization.

There are a number of evidence indicators provided in the scripture to assist us in understanding the real form of Jesus’ crucifixion, despite the fact that the Greek terms used for the cross in the New Testament are not precise about its shape (“stauros” = stake / pole and “xulon” = timber / tree).

“(The Jews caught outside the walls of Jerusalem) were first whipped, and then tormented with all kinds of tortures, before they died, and were then crucified before the wall of the city.”, Josephus wrote about the siege of Jerusalem in 70AD.

The first-century Roman philosopher Seneca the Younger described crucifixion in a variety of ways, saying, “I find in front of me crosses not all alike, but made differently by different people: some hang a man head downwards, some force a stick upwards through his groin, some stretch out his arms on a forked gibbet” (Seneca the Younger, “To Marcia on Consolation,” in Moral Essays, 6.20).

  1. It is possible to bind or fasten the victim’s hands with a single piece of rope or a single nail if the wood is cut into this shape, as many Jehovah’s Witnesses believe.
  2. There are other names for this cross, including “St.
  3. This building was built from a horizontal beam that was joined at the top of a vertical stake, resulting in a “T” shape when assembled.
  4. It was either fastened jointly or individually to the bottom of the vertical pillar where their feet rested.
  5. Using a vertical stake, a horizontal cross beam (referred to as a “patibulum”) was put across the upper section of the stake, leaving a “tip” that extended above the patibulum to complete the construction.
  6. On either side of the patibulum, victims were nailed to the structure with their arms spread in front of them.
  7. Crux Decussata is the letter X.

Andrew’s Cross”) takes its name from the Roman numeral ten (“decussis”), which means “decus” in Latin.

Their feet were either fastened to the bottom ends of the X or tied to the bottom ends of the X separately.

Despite the fact that the data is restricted, I believe that the conventional form (the “Crux Immissa”) is the most reasonable inference from the facts because of the following reasons.

The original meaning of the terms “stauros” and “xulon,” like the meaning of other words in other languages, has evolved with time.

For him, the name “stauros” literally translated into the Greek word for “pole.” However, during the time of Christ, the Romans were still employing the Greek language, albeit with certain modifications to give the terms a larger meaning.

When the Romans utilized this kind of punishment, they had to alter the existing Greek language to make it more appropriate for their needs.

David Black explains that “(the original meaning of a word) employed alone cannot effectively account for the meaning of a word since meaning is constantly susceptible to change.

Therefore, it is essential for the New Testament student to understand if the original meaning of a term has survived to a later period.

As a result, according to Kittel’s Theological Dictionary, “stauros” is defined as follows: “There are three main types in terms of shape.

Alternatively, it was made consisting of an upright with a cross-beam above it.

572).

572).

Descriptions of ancient non-biblical sources include the following: An extensive collection of ancient, nonbiblical materials eliminates or at least complicates one form of the cross (“Crux Simplex”) and makes the possibility of another shape (“Crux Decussata”) highly improbable.

Having stretched out both of his arms and bound them to a piece of wood that spanned over his breast and shoulders as far as his wrists, the men who were assigned to escort the slave to his punishment trailed after him, shredding his nude body with whips.” VII, 69:1-2.) (Roman Antiquities, VII, 69:1-2) The word “xulon” was employed by Dionysius to refer to the horizontal “patibulum.” The Epistle of Barnabas is a letter written by Barnabas (90-135AD) In this pseudepigraphic letter, which was employed by many Christians in the early Church to depict the form of the cross as it was understood at that time in history, we may read: And Abraham circumcised eighteen males and three hundred females from among his family, according to the Torah.” So, what exactly was the wisdom that was imparted to him?

Understand that He says the eighteen first, and then after an interval of three hundred years, He says the three hundred years.

Here is where you will find JESUS (IHSOYS).

As a result, He reveals Jesus in the first two letters, and the crucifixion in the last letter.” (See also Barnabas 9:7) The author, in reference to the tale of Abraham in the Old Testament, made the analogy between the cross of Jesus and the letter “T.” (which had the numeric value of 300).

They were murdered with the sword whenever he brought them down from their height.” (12:2) (Barnabas 12:2) (Barnabas 12:2) In this passage, the author compares the cross of Jesus to a passage from the Old Testament (this time from the life of Moses), interpreting the shape of Jesus’ cross as requiring him to “stretch out his hands,” as required by the shape of the cross.

  • Solomon’s Odes are a collection of eulogies (1 stto 3 rdCenturies) These odes, which are generally regarded as having Christian origins, were written by a number of authors over the course of the first three centuries.
  • “For the expansion of my hands is His sign, and my extension is the straight cross,” the author wrote.
  • Justin Martyr (100–165 AD) was a Christian martyr who lived between 100 and 165 AD.
  • For one, a spit is transfixed entirely through the lamb’s body from the lower regions to the head, and another is transfixed across the back, to which the lamb’s legs are linked.” The dialogue with Trypho in Chapter XL is an example of this.
  • Other passages by Justin Martyr describe the cross of Jesus in a similar manner, drawing analogies between it and a sail mast and staysail, or describing the position of Jesus on the cross with outstretched hands.
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Oneirocritica (“The Interpretation of Dreams”), a five-volume Greek book, in which he portrayed prisoners being crucified: “Because he is a criminal, his height and the extension of his hands will be used to crucify him” (Oneirocritica 1:76) In this era of time, according to Artemidorus, offenders were crucified by the Romans on a cross that was double the width of it and twice the height of it.

  1. Lucian(125-180AD) This early Greek rhetorician produced a number of artistic, satirical, and cynical works that have survived to the present day.
  2. The trial in the Court of Vowels took place on 12.4-13.
  3. In addition, the “Crux Decussata” is usually omitted because of the allusions to certain “T” forms in the literature.
  4. It is past time to investigate the most reliable source of knowledge we have concerning Jesus’ death on the cross: the historical record.

Here are several hints from the New Testament; arguably the most clear is Jesus’ portrayal of crucifixion in the Gospel of John, when he informs Peter how he would die in a way comparable to Jesus’ death: John 21:18-19 (KJV) As a child you used to gird yourself and walk wherever you pleased; as an adult, however, you will stretch out your hands and someone else will gird you and transport you to a location you do not wish to visit.” This, he explained, was a reference to the manner in which he would honor God via death.

  • Peter was warned by Jesus that he would die with his hands held out in front of him.
  • If Peter died on the crucifixion in the manner of Jesus, his cross would have to be one of three types: a “Crux Commissa,” a “Crux Immissa,” or a “Crux Decussata” in order for his hands to be spread out in prayer.
  • If the “Crux Simplex” had been used to crucify Jesus, it is likely that his hands were fastened in place with a single nail, according to tradition.
  • For the second time, this implies that Jesus’ cross would have had to be either a “Crux Commissa,” a “Crux Immissa,” or a “Crux Decussata” in order for more than one nail to be used to secure Jesus’ hands together.
  • The location of the sign identifying Jesus at the site of crucifixion was recorded by the Gospel authors as follows: Matthew 27:37 (KJV) It was written above His head, “THIS IS JESUS THE KING OF THE JEWS,” that the charge against Him was leveled against Him.
  • This may be deduced using the conventional “Crux Immissa” formula.
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  • The design of the cross is not important to our Christian faith, but it does offer us with a fascinating opportunity to apply our investigative Case Making abilities.
  • This book teaches readers the ten principles of cold-case investigations and then applies these concepts to the claims of the gospel authors in order to investigate them.

The book is complemented by an eight-sessionCold-Case Christianity DVD Set (as well as a Participant’s Guide) that may be used to assist individuals or small groups analyze the evidence and make their case for Christianity.

Was Jesus Really Nailed To The Cross?

The crucifixion of Jesus is undoubtedly one of the most well-known images to have emerged from the Christian tradition. The ceremony takes place on Good Friday, which is considered to be one of the holiest days in the Christian calendar. But what exactly was the crucifixion? And what was the reason for Jesus’ death in this manner? The crucifixion was a technique of punishment used by the Romans. Suspended from a massive cross, a victim would finally succumb to asphyxiation or weariness — it was a long, drawn-out, and excruciating process that took several hours.

  1. Because, as King of the Jews, Jesus threatened Roman imperial dominance (Matt 27:37; Mark 15:26; Luke 23:38; John 19:19–22), the Gospels describe this as the reason for Jesus’ death.
  2. In Christian tradition, it is thought that the limbs of the cross will be nailed to the wood of the cross, with dispute focusing on whether nails would puncture the hands or the more structurally solid wrists.
  3. In reality, the only archaeological evidence for the practice of nailing crucifixion victims comes from the grave of Jehohanan, a man who was crucified in the first century CE, and it is an ankle bone from his tomb.
  4. Accounts from the Gospels It is possible that certain early Gospels, such as the Gospel of Thomas, did not include the tale of Jesus’s execution, preferring to concentrate on his teaching instead.
  5. The events surrounding the crucifixion are depicted in significantly different ways in the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.
  6. The Gospel of John, on the other hand, describes wounds on the hands of the rising Jesus.
  7. The Account of Peter, a non-canonical gospel written in the first or second centuries CE, tells in detail how the nails were taken from Jesus’ hands after he had died in verse 21.

In verses 41-42, the cross responds to God by speaking with its own voice, saying: “A voice from the heavens asked, ‘Have you made proclamation to the fallen-asleep?’ they thought they heard it.

Several people have claimed to have discovered the real nails with which Jesus was crucified throughout the course of the last few years.

This obsession with the nails, which has persisted despite the fact that the earliest gospels make no mention of Jesus being nailed to the crucifixion, is a puzzle to me.

What is unexpected is that the first depiction of the crucifixion turns out to be a representation of a cross.

The Alexamenos Graffito, as the artwork is known, depicts a person with the head of a donkey standing on a cross, with the words “Alexamenos worships his God” written underneath.

The fact that the graffito was definitely not created by a Christian demonstrates that non-Christians were aware with certain fundamental parts of Christian thought as early as the second century.

This piece of carved jasper from the second or third century portrays a man on a cross, surrounded by magical symbols.

It is believed by scholars that the Constanza gemstone, as it is sometimes called, goes back to the fourth century CE.

Tradition demands this prevalent image of Jesus’ death on the crucifixion since the evidence from antiquity does not give a definitive answer as to whether Jesus was nailed or tied to his cross.

As a vivid extension on the crucifixion, this stands out as a welcome addition to the Gospels’ relative reticence on the subject.

Emperor Constantine eventually put a halt to the practice of crucifixion as a means of death, not for ethical grounds, but out of reverence for Jesus Christ.

Faculty member at the University of Sheffield, Meredith J C Warren is a lecturer in Biblical and Religious Studies.

See the source article for more information.

Although the crucifixion is frequently connected with Jesus, this horrible manner of death was in use long before the birth of Jesus.

In the 4th century B.C., Alexander the Great introduced the practice to the countries of the eastern Mediterranean region.

The sole archaeological evidence of crucifixion, on the other hand, dates back to the first century A.D.

An iron spike had been hammered through the heel bone, indicating that the individual had been nailed to a cross.

The most famous mass crucifixion occurred centuries before Jesus and was carried out by the slave and gladiator Spartacus, whose life has been the subject of several books and films.

The uprising was destroyed, and while Spartacus was almost certainly killed in the last fight, more than 6,000 of his comrades were caught and executed at the direction of Roman general and politician Marcus Licinius Crassus, who was also Spartacus’ patron.

Is It True That Jesus Was Nailed To The Cross?

As legend has it, the apostle Peter, who is revered as the founder of the Roman Catholic Church, had an even more horrifying death when he was crucified upside-down on Vatican Hill during the reign of Emperor Nero, a practice that is still practiced today.

Stew, lamb, and wine are on the menu for the Last Supper.

Andrew felt he was unworthy of being executed on the same style of crucifixion as Jesus since he was not a Christian.

Photos: An Ancient Tomb Holds the Key to the Jesus Mysteries Women were crucified as well, but on a far less frequent basis.

Julia, patroness of the island of Corsica, is possibly the most well-known example of this phenomenon.

Julia, who was born in Carthage, was sold to a Syrian trader called Eusebius, who transported her to the island of Corsica.

Felix tortured and crucified her on a crucifix about the year 439 A.D.

In the 16th century, the practice of crucifixion was revived in Japan as a method of killing Christians.

At 1597, 26 Japanese Christians were hung to crosses in Nagasaki, Japan, and were eventually recognized martyrs by the Roman Catholic Church.

By the 17th century, the crucifixion was being utilized against non-Christians as well as Christians.

However, while there have been allegations that German forces crucified a Canadian soldier on a tree during World War I, it is clear that the cruel punishment was employed by Japanese soldiers during World War II.

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A member of the group, Herbert James “Ringer” Edwards, was crucified for 63 hours before he died.

According to Amnesty International, the crucifixion occurs after the beheading, when the body is hanged in public display as a deterrent to future executions.

Ruben Enaje, a 55-year-old carpenter and sign maker from the Philippines, will be nailed to a cross for the 30th time on Good Friday this year in the city of San Fernando, where he currently resides.

The crucifixion reenactment is projected to draw some 20,000 onlookers, despite the fact that the Catholic Church does not condone the use of nails, even if they are sanitized.

Jesus is nailed to the Cross

Via Crucis, Scuola Veneta – Sec. XVIIICattedrale – PadovaELEVENTH STATIONJesus isnailed to the CrossV/. Adoramus te, Christe, et benedicimus tibi.R/. Quia per sanctam crucem tuam redemisti mundum.From the Gospel according toMatthew27:37-42 And over his head they put the charge against him, whichread, �This is Jesus the King of the Jews�. Then two robbers were crucifiedwith him, one on the right hand and one on the left. And those who passed byderided him, wagging their heads and saying, �You who would destroy the templeand build it in three days, save yourself! If you are the Son of God, comedown from the Cross�. So also the chief priests with the scribes and eldersmocked him, saying, �He saved others; he cannot save himself. He is the Kingof Israel; let him come down now from the Cross and we will believe in him�.MEDITATION Jesus is nailed to the Cross. The shroud of Turin gives us anidea of the unbelievable cruelty of this procedure. Jesus does not drink thenumbing gall offered to him: he deliberately takes upon himself all the painof the Crucifixion. His whole body is racked; the words of the Psalm have cometo pass: �But I am a worm and no man, scorned by men, rejected by the people�(Ps22:7). �As one from whom men hide their faces, he was despised.surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows� (Is53:3f.).Let us halt before this image of pain, before the suffering Son of God. Let uslook upon him at times of presumptuousness and pleasure, in order to learn torespect limits and to see the superficiality of all merely material goods. Letus look upon him at times of trial and tribulation, and realize that it isthen that we are closest to God. Let us try to see his face in the people wemight look down upon. As we stand before the condemned Lord, who did not usehis power to come down from the Cross, but endured its suffering to the end,another thought comes to mind. Ignatius of Antioch, a prisoner in chains forhis faith in the Lord, praised the Christians of Smyrna for their invinciblefaith: he says that they were, so to speak, nailed with flesh and blood to theCross of the Lord Jesus Christ (1:1). Let us nail ourselves to him, resistingthe temptation to stand apart, or to join others in mocking him.PRAYER Lord Jesus Christ, you let yourself be nailed to the Cross,accepting the terrible cruelty of this suffering, the destruction of your bodyand your dignity. You allowed yourself to be nailed fast; you did not try toescape or to lessen your suffering. May we never flee from what we are calledto do. Help us to remain faithful to you. Help us to unmask the false freedomwhich would distance us from you. Help us to accept your �binding� freedom,and, �bound� fast to you, to discover true freedom.All:Pater noster, qui es in c�lis:sanctificetur nomen tuum;adveniat regnum tuum;fiat voluntas tua, sicut in c�lo, et in terra.Panem nostrum cotidianum da nobis hodie;et dimitte nobis debita nostra,sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris;et ne nos inducas in tentationem;sed libera nos a malo.Sancta mater, istud agas,Crucifixi fige plagascordi meo valide.� Copyright 2005 – LibreriaEditrice Vaticana

Was Jesus Really Nailed to the Cross?

If you ask yourself this question, you’ll probably get a simple answer: nails were used to fasten Jesus to his cross. Because the Gospels are silent on this particular moment of the crucifixion, how do we know that nails were used? If you take a look at the four Gospel accounts of the crucifixion itself, you will see that they make no mention of Jesus being nailed to the cross. For some, this may come as a surprise because we have such vivid images of the incident in our minds. But consider the sections in question further.

  1. There are certain noteworthy aspects of the way the evangelists handled the actual crucifixion that should be noted.
  2. Following that, there is a lack of specificity.
  3. Also absent are particular references to responses or anguish, as well as specific recalls of certain biblical passages.
  4. The sound of these few words resonates in the ears of anybody who has attended a Palm Sunday or Good Friday liturgy in recent memory.

According to the Greek historian Heroditus, Policrates was slain and then crucified on a pole as a measure of humiliation, but Artayctes was captured and “nailed to boards and hanged.” He was stoned to death in front of his father, and his kid was similarly treated.” Heroditus, as well as other ancient writers like as Seneca, Varro, Cicero, and Plautus, as well as Josephus, consider this to be excruciatingly savage and deplorable.

  • And the practice was not limited to the city-state of Rome.
  • This type of punishment was intended to invoke Deuteronomy 21:22–23 in order to demonstrate that those who were executed had been cursed by God.
  • No other method of assassinating Jesus could have conveyed the same message of cruelty and damnation as the cross.
  • The cross itself differed from one region of Rome to another.
  • When this was done, it was either put at the top to produce a capital “T” (crux commissa, which is today known as a Franciscan cross or Tau) or somewhat further down to create a lowercase “T.” (crux immissa).
  • A sedile (a sort of peg) was occasionally inserted into the vertical post of the cross and used to hold them in place.
  • Feet and heels were tied or fastened to the uprights to keep them in place.
  • People were crucified upside down and their genitals were impaled, according to Seneca the Younger, who mentions several versions.
  • As a result, we can observe that nailing was a regular practice during the crucifixion.
  • As a result, an evangelist would not be required to disclose the nails used.
  • If Jesus was nailed to the cross, does the New Testament make any reference to this fact?

Saint Thomas states in John 20:25, “Unless I see in his hands the print of the nails, and insert my finger in the mark of the nails, and lay my hand in his side, I will not believe.” He continues, “Unless I see in his hands the print of the nails, and place my hand in his side, I will not believe.” Luke 24:39 has Jesus saying “Look at my hands and my feet,” and it’s reasonable to believe that he’s directing the reader’s attention to his scars.

  1. As John writes, “Put your finger here, and see my hands,” it is clear that he is instructing Thomas to examine his wounds.
  2. Other passages that make reference to the act of nailing (Greek: “proseloo”) include Colossians 2:14, where St.
  3. Additionally, the Old Testament makes a point about piercing one’s own hands and feet.
  4. A portion of it has the phrase “they have wounded my hands and feet.” This translation is contentious, and the problem is far too complex to discuss in this space.

The Greek word “oxyran” in the Septuagint is ambiguous, and it might imply anything from “bored to death” to “bored to death.” Given that the remainder of the chapter is significantly suggestive of the Passion narrative, it’s logical to read this Psalm in the same way we do: “they have wounded my hands and my feet.” This would undoubtedly be an allusion to the nailing that took place during the crucifixion.

The Church’s Proclamation of Faith In the early Church Fathers, references to the crucifixion can refer to different types of crosses, and they frequently allude to the nails as well.

Irenaeus, who also includes the sedile (middle peg) and nails in his depiction of the cross.

With just a few exceptions, the crux immissa (“t”) has long been the most popular cross form.

Nails are also mentioned in other early texts.

A phrase from Isaiah is misquoted in the Letter of Barnabus (which may have been written as early as 70AD) as “Nail my flesh,” implying that the congregations of evil-doers had risen against Jesus.

Justin Martyr recounts in his Dialogue with Trypho (about 150AD).

Ignatius claims in his Letter to the Smyrnaeans (written before to 108AD) that he was “actually hung to a tree in the flesh for our sakes under Pontius Pilate and Herod the Tetrarch” as a result of his efforts on our behalf.

These are only a few examples of the widespread belief that Jesus was crucified and nailed to the wood of the cross.

Despite the fact that the Gospels are mute on the subject of the crucifixion, the Church herself proclaims, this week above all others, that He was pierced for our iniquities and that it is through those wounds that we have been healed.

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