How Did Jesus Learn Obedience Through Suffering

What Does it Mean That Jesus Learned Obedience By the Things He Suffered?

The book of Hebrews describes the Old Testament, and in particular, the Law of Moses, as well as what the Jews were unaware of until Jesus fulfilled the Law of Moses and that He wished to draw them into a covenant relationship with Himself (Hebrews 8:1-13; 9:15). Hebrews chapters 4-10 show how the Levitical Priesthood and Temple are no longer on earth, but are now in heaven, which is why Jesus is our perfect, ultimate, and everlasting High Priest, as explained in the book of Hebrews.

The Context ofHebrews 5:8

The context of Hebrews 5:8 is found in Hebrews 4:14-5:10, which discusses Jesus’ credentials to serve as the High Priest in heaven for all people and throughout all of time. The book of Hebrews, as well as other places in the New Testament, introduces Bible readers to Jesus as both completely God and fully man. In addition, we learn from this part of Scripture that Jesus is innocent and that, as a result of His unique character and experience, He is the only one who can fully connect to every difficulty we confront.

Hebrews 5:8Is a Vivid Picture of the Life of Jesus

We have a dramatic picture of Jesus’ time on earth running throughout Hebrews 5:8, which is a single statement that extends across three chapters. As the limitless Son of God, Jesus experienced the limitations of time and space in the same way that every human does. God the Father could have produced Jesus as a fully mature adult, but he chose not to do so. When Jesus was sentenced to die for the remission of sins, he left heaven and traveled across time and space (Philippians 2:5-8). (Matthew 1:21).

Because He is totally God, Jesus had no need to learn anything because He already knew everything.

Because of the Incarnation, Jesus acquired obedience, not in the sense that he disobeyed or had rebelliousness to tame, but in the sense that he fully joined the human experience and learnt to obey.

  • As a child, Jesus followed His parents (Luke 2:51)
  • As an adult, Jesus obeyed the law completely (Matthew 5:17)
  • As a prophet (Matthew 3:15), Jesus completed all righteousness. John 8:28
  • 15:10
  • Hebrews 10:9
  • All of Jesus’ actions during His life were in complete accord with the Father’s desire.

Jesus was also aware of what obedience required before to the Incarnation, but it was only through personal experience that He came to understand what obedience entailed, both through the good and the difficult times of His mission. Jesus was obedient to God the Father in every situation and with every individual he encountered (Isaiah 50:5-6).

Jesus Learned from His Suffering

As the Bible states in Hebrews 5:8, “through what He endured,” Jesus also learnt obedience. The Lord Jesus did not have to suffer because he was the Son of God, but as the Son of Man, he was needed to learn the lessons of obedience. The Greek wordpasch, which is translated as experienced in Hebrews 5:8, alludes to painful events like as sickness (Mark 5:26) or persecution (Acts 8:1). Hebrews 5:8 is designed to convey the idea of enduring a difficult process that leads in change for the sufferer (Romans 5:3; 2 Corinthians 1:3-9), which is also the message intended in this verse.

After going through this procedure, Jesus was declared perfect, which implies complete, as in having completed the entire term of school or training in question.

As for Jesus, He finished His race with integrity and a thorough comprehension of the human situation and suffering. He is the only one who can do this. Human obedience was complete for Christ, who followed through with it by undergoing excruciating pain.

Jesus Is a Fully Qualified High Priest

His qualifications for the position of everlasting High Priest are “crowned with glory and revered because he endured death” (Hebrews 7:25). (Hebrews 2:9). Because of His perfection, Jesus refers to His ministry as one in which we are saved. He is now competent to serve as “the source of eternal salvation for everyone who obey him,” as the Bible states (Hebrews 5:9). The High Priesthood of Jesus is not transitory, as was the Levitical Priesthood, but rather eternal (Hebrews 5:10). However, Hebrews 7:23-28 provides a succinct summary of the eternal consequences of Jesus’ life and death, which may be seen throughout the Scriptures.

Jesus, as well as the Apostles Peter and Paul, preached that every Christian would have to endure trials and tribulations (John 15:21; 16:33;1 Peter 4:12-19;2 Timothy 3:12).

We may be encouraged by Hebrews 4:14-16 because Jesus is both entirely God and totally man, and as a result, He knows exactly what we are going through.

Because we do not have a high priest who is unable to empathize with our weaknesses, but rather one who has been tempted in every way we are, but has come out unscathed.

Grace, Prayer, and Perseverance in the Christian Life

Jesus was a veteran of every hardship and circumstance, and he was no stranger to pain and suffering. Throughout His earthly existence, Jesus stayed faithful to God. He was able to give Himself as the spotless, sacrificial atonement for sins because He totally fulfilled the requirements of the Old Testament Law. Sinners who place their faith in Christ are saved, and they are able to approach Him with confidence, knowing that His mercy and grace are sufficient to supply their every need as a result.

  • Because of Jesus’ redeeming act, Christians may endure in the face of life’s problems.
  • Prayer is a tremendous resource for the people of God, and it is one that they must not overlook if they are to develop in Christ and endure in the face of difficulties.
  • Every Christian is expected to approach God with the pleasure, reverence, expectancy, and confidence that come from being God’s chosen sons and daughters, among other things.
  • ” A throne of grace is a location designed just for you: go down on your knees and approach your Savior in simple faith, for it is he who is the throne of grace.

iStock/Getty Images Plus/kevron2001 iStock/Getty Images Plus/kevron2001 Dave Jenkins and his wife, Sarah Jenkins, are in a happy marriage. He is a writer, editor, and public speaker who resides in the lovely state of Oregon.

What does it mean that Jesus learned obedience by the things He suffered (Hebrews 5:8)?

QuestionAnswer “Though he was a son, he learnt obedience through what he endured, and, once perfected, he became the source of eternal salvation for those who obey him, and he was appointed by God to be high priest in the order of Melchizedek,” according to Hebrews 5:8–10. As with any scripture, interpreting these verses requires a comprehension of the surrounding context. In the entire epistle, the Hebrews are given an explanation of their own Scriptures. As the writer leads them away from what they were familiar with—the Old Testament, particularly the Law of Moses—and towards what they had not known until now—the revelation of how Jesus fulfilled the Old Testament and brought them into a New Covenant with God—they are transformed.

  • It is important to note that the immediate context of Hebrews 4:14 through 5:10 is concerned with Jesus’ credentials to serve as the one and only High Priest in heaven for all people throughout all of time.
  • He can completely connect to our challenges because of Jesus’ unique character and experience, which allows Him to fulfill the priestly duties needed by the Law in order to forgive our sins.
  • His being was that of the infinite Son of God, yet he was subjected to the same physical limitations that we are in terms of space, time, and life.
  • Instead, Jesus descended from heaven and inhabited time (Philippians 2:5–8), where He lived as a normal human being from birth to manhood and finally died for Himself.
  • As God, Jesus didn’t have to learn anything, including obedience; yet, during His incarnation, Jesus chose to confine Himself to the human experience and not the divine one.
  • Jesus “learned obedience” not in the sense that He was prone to disobedience and had to reign in His rebelliousness, but rather in the sense that He completely joined the human experience and learnt obedience from it.
  • Throughout His life, Jesus was entirely dedicated to carrying out the Father’s desire (John 8:29; 15:10; Hebrews 10:9).

“The Sovereign Lord has opened my ears; I have not been disobedient, and I have not turned away,” the Son said in every scenario, no matter how tough it appeared.

Generally speaking, the Greek word translated “suffered” in Hebrews 5:8 alludes to going through painful experiences like as sickness (Mark 5:26) or persecution (Acts 8:1).

The meaning of the term is conveyed in Hebrews 5:8 when it is utilized (see also Hebrews 2:10).

Jesus had been “made flawless” as a result of this procedure.

Our eternal High Priest, “now crowned with glory and honor because he endured death,” is qualified to be our eternal High Priest because of Christ’s absolute human obedience, which was achieved through tremendous suffering (Hebrews 2:9).

Jesus’ high priesthood is not a temporal Levitical priesthood, but is an eternal priesthood “in the order of Melchizedek,” which means “in the order of Melchizedek” (verse 10).

But Jesus lives eternally, and thus possesses a perpetual priesthood.” Due to his constant presence and intercession for those who come to God through him, Jesus is able to save those who approach God through him totally.

Unlike the other high priests, he is not required to give sacrifices on a daily basis, first for his personal sins and then for the sins of the people, as is the case with the others.

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“Because the law selects men who are weak in every way, the oath, which came after the law, designated Christ as high priest, who has been made perfect forever,” writes the writer of Hebrews in chapter 7:23–28.

Questions regarding the Hebrews (Continued) When Scripture says that Jesus acquired obedience via the things He endured (Hebrews 5:8), what exactly does it mean?

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How Did Jesus ‘Learn Obedience’ and ‘Become Perfect’?

Transcript of the audio In response to a very excellent question, Chris from South Carolina writes: “Pastor John, hello! It seems clear that if Jesus matured spiritually (and Chris quotes Luke 2:52, which is an incredible reference), spiritual development in its core must be characterized by something other than a reduction in sin. The substance (or possibly the ‘objective’) of spiritual progress that the sinless Jesus was striving to achieve is unclear. That is an excellent question. So, allow me to insert a couple of additional Scripture passages underneath Luke 2:52 so that we may understand just how important this question truly is.

  1. Likewise, he gained in intelligence and gained in favor with God, and so on.
  2. Now, to add to Luke 2:52, Hebrews 2:10 says, “It was appropriate that he, for whom and by whom all things exist, should make the founder of their salvation complete through suffering, in bringing many sons to glory.” God is completing Jesus’ perfection via his suffering in this passage.
  3. However, there is one more paragraph.
  4. Combining these factors results in Jesus growing in understanding, gaining his favor with God and men, becoming perfect through suffering, and learning obedience as a result of the things that have happened to him.
  5. In other words, what does it mean to learn obedience or be perfected, to put it another way.
  6. What exactly is the goal?
  7. Let’s make sure that neither Chris, I guess, nor I, none of us, is simply arbitrarily presuming that Jesus never sinned, as if we have a theology that he is sinless and we are just going to assume that he never sinned, regardless of what the scriptures indicate.

This is not something we are assuming.

It is for this reason why it is so crucial.

“We do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we do have one who in every regard was tempted as we are, but without sin,” says Hebrews 4:15.

The same is true in Hebrews 9:14.

The author, who claimed to have learnt obedience, also claimed to have never sinned.

And we’re only attempting to obtain a glimpse into the mind of the Bible’s author.

And here’s what I propose: “Jesus was not just progressing toward a completed, tested perfection, but was also progressing toward the fulfillment of a perfect redemption for us sinners.” As the phrase implies, Jesus progressed from untested obedience into pain, and then through the experience of suffering into tested and proved obedience.

  1. As a result, every hour of Jesus’ life was filled with new challenges, especially near the conclusion of his life, such as: Can I withstand this agony that I have never known before, this new obedience that I have never performed before in all the history of creation?
  2. And the answer given by Hebrews is affirmative.
  3. The things that he experienced taught him obedience, and in the course of perfect learning and demonstrated, tested obedience, he failed not once, not twice, not even once.
  4. Do you think he’ll keep adding obedience to obedience until he’s grown into the complete, perfect and tested man?
  5. Moreover, I believe the answer to Chris’s question regarding what Jesus was going toward is not only that he was progressing toward a perfected and tested perfection, but that he was progressing toward the fulfillment of a perfect redemption for sinners like us.
  6. In other words, as Jesus took on the role of Savior for sinners, he was carrying out all that the Father considered necessary.
  7. And in response to Chris’s inquiry regarding what the ultimate objective is, there is one more indication in Hebrews 2:10 that he should consider.
  8. What is it that God is up to in putting Jesus through this process of learning obedience via pain?
  9. Please pay attention one again.
  10. If it was right for the God “for whom all things exist” — for whom all things exist — to bring “many sons to glory” by perfecting Christ through suffering, then it was fitting for that specific God to bring “many sons to glory” by perfecting Christ through suffering.
  11. As a result, this is the method of rescuing sinners that would demonstrate that everything, even the death of Christ, is done for the glory of God.

So, the final answer to Chris’s question about why Christ matured and learnt obedience and why he was refined through suffering is because, in addition to being a perfect Savior for us, he also exalted God more thoroughly than any other method of salvation could have done.

Hebrews 5:8 Although He was a Son, He learned obedience from what He suffered.

New International Version (New International Version) Despite the fact that he was a son, he learnt obedience as a result of his suffering. New Living Translation (New Living Translation) Despite the fact that Jesus was God’s Son, he learnt obedience from the circumstances that happened to him. Version standardized in English Despite the fact that he was a son, he learnt obedience through the trials he endured. Berean Study Bible (also known as the Berean Study Bible) Despite the fact that He was a Son, He learnt obedience through His suffering.

  • The King James Version of the Bible He learnt obedience via the things that he endured despite being a Son;New Testament The King James Version (KJV) is a translation of the King James Bible.
  • The New American Standard Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.
  • NASB (National Association of School Boards) 1995 Despite the fact that He was a Son, He learnt obedience by the horrors that He endured.
  • The Bible with an amplification system Despite the fact that He was a Son, He learnt obedience through the suffering He endured.
  • Despite the fact that he was the Son, he learnt obedience through his suffering.
  • Despite the fact that He was God’s Son, He learnt obedience through the suffering He endured.
  • He learnt obedience through his suffering despite the fact that he was his Father’s Son.

The Bible of Douay-Rheims And, despite the fact that he was the Son of God, he learnt obedience by the things that he went through: Translation of the Good News However, despite the fact that Jesus was God’s Son, he learnt to be obedient via his sufferings.

Standard Version in its literal sense Despite the fact that He was a Son, He learnt obedience by the horrors that He endured.

Despite the fact that he was a son, he learnt obedience as a result of what he went through.

Despite the fact that he was a son, he learnt obedience via the things that happened to him.

Despite the fact that he was a Son, he learnt obedience by the horrors that he endured.

Young’s Literal Translation of the Text Because he was a Son, he learned by the things that happened to him – the obedience, the humility, and the love.

Context The Most Excellent High Priest.

8Despite the fact that he was a Son, he learnt obedience through his suffering.

References to Other Sources 50:5The Lord GOD has opened My ears, and I have not been stubborn or turned away from His voice.

10:18 (John 10:18) No one can take it away from Me; instead, I choose to lay it down on My own.

“This is a directive from My Father,” says the author.

1 Thessalonians 2:2 However, in these latter days, He has spoken to us via His Son, whom He has designated as the heir of all things and through whom He has created the world.

Despite the fact that he was a Son, he learnt obedience via the experiences that he went through; he was.

And, once again, I will be a Father to him, and he will be a Son to me?.

yet.

As a result, when he enters the earth, he declares, “Thou wouldest not offer sacrifice or offering, but a body hast thou prepared me:.” “The Lord GOD has opened my ear, and I have not rebelled, nor have I turned away back.” (Isaiah 50:5,6).

Then he had to put up with him.

– It is possible that these words are connected to what came before (implying that He was heard because of His reverent fear, rather than because He was God’s Son in the traditional sense); however, they are even more closely associated with the following sentence, “Though He was a Son, HelearnHis obedience by the things which He suffered.” While Jesus held the disposition of obedience before He suffered, it was only by His deeds that He could demonstrate that He possessed that disposition.

  • The progression from obedience’s disposition to its manifestation in deed is a practical learning of the virtue of obedience (Lnemann).
  • Commentaries that run in parallel.
  • despite or notwithstanding.
  • I exist in the first person singular present indicative; it is a protracted form of a primary and deficient verb; it is in the first person singular present indicative.
  • He had a revelation (emathen) The Aorist Indicative Active tense is in the third person.
  • SingularStrong’s 3129:Prolongation of a primary verb; to learn.
  • From the word hupakouo, which means attentive hearing, as in compliance or acquiescence.
  • It is a fundamental particle that means “away,” or “away” in multiple contexts.
  • He was in pain.
See also:  Why Did Jesus Die At The Age Of 33

Return to the previous page AlthoughEnduredGod’sLearnedObedienceOrdersPainSufferedSufferingsUnderwent Continue to Next Page AlthoughEnduredGod’sLearnedObedienceOrdersPainSufferedSufferingsUnderwentLinks Hebrews 5:8 (New International Version) Hebrews 5:8 (New Living Translation) ESV (English Standard Version) Hebrews 5:8 Hebrews 5:8 (NASB) NASB ebrews 5:8 King James Version Hebrews 5:8 (Hebrews 5:8) BibleApps.com Hebrews 5:8 Biblia Paralela (Parallel Bible) Chinese Version of Hebrews 5:8 Hebrews 5:8 (French translation) Greek New Testament Hebrews 5:8 Catholic Bible Hebrews 5:8 (New Testament Letters) He was still a Son, but had learnt something (Heb.

He.

What does it mean that Jesus learned obedience by the things He suffered (Hebrews 5:8)?

According to Hebrews 5:8–10, “Despite the fact that he was a son, he learnt obedience by his suffering. Moreover, after being made perfect, he was appointed by God as a high priest in the order of Melchizedek, and as such, he became the source of eternal salvation for all those who follow him.” In order to completely comprehend the implications of this verse, we must first examine the surrounding Scriptures to provide context. Hebrews 8:1–13 and Hebrews 9:15–17 explore the Hebrews’ interpretations of the existing Old Testament Scriptures, notably the Law of Moses, and explain how Jesus fulfilled the Old Testament covenant and inaugurated a new covenant.

  • According to Hebrews 4:14–5, this specific verse (Hebrews 5:8–10) is part of a wider framework that concerns Jesus’ qualifications to serve as the one and only High Priest in heaven for all of time and all humanity.
  • Although Jesus did not sin, He went through the same human challenges and was subjected to the same temptations as we are.
  • Jesus, on the other hand, learnt in the sense that He experienced what it was like to obey.
  • The pain Jesus underwent throughout His earthly existence was necessary in order for Him to gain the virtue of submission.
  • After His crucifixion and resurrection, Jesus was qualified to serve as the ideal High Priest of the entire world for all time.
  • Inherent in its meaning is also a positive change of the victim as a result of the trials and tribulations he has endured (2 Corinthians 1:3–9; Romans 5:3; 1 Peter 1:3).

The suffering of Jesus the man resulted in His being “made perfect.” In this context, the term “perfect” refers to the state of being “complete.” When Jesus went through the full range of human suffering, He did so while remaining completely obedient and without sinning, which solidified His qualification to be our eternal High Priest: “For the suffering of death, Jesus was crowned with glory and honor, and it was through the grace of God that he was able to taste death on behalf of all people.

  • In fact, it was right that he, for whom and by whom all things are created, should make the founder of their salvation complete by suffering in the process of bringing many sons to glory “(See also Hebrews 2:9–10).
  • When we do, it is critical that we remain completely dedicated to God and faithful to His commands.
  • According to Hebrews 4:14–16: “Due to the fact that we now have a great high priest who has gone through the heavens, namely, Jesus the Son of God, let us keep our confession firm.
  • Let us therefore approach the throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to assist us in our time of need.” Jesus has been through every trial and tribulation that we have faced; He is no stranger to pain.
  • As a result, when we place our faith in Him, we are freed from sin and are able to approach Him with confidence, knowing that we will be met with kindness and grace.
  • What was the point of Jesus having to suffer so much?

Is it really so significant that Jesus was baptized? What was the reason for His baptism? What were the most significant events in Jesus’ life? What is the significance of the Bible’s silence on Jesus’ childhood? Return to the page: The Truth About Jesus Christ.

How did Jesus learn obedience?

When children reach adulthood, they must understand the importance of obedience. In the absence of teaching a youngster to respect his or her parents and instructors, he or she becomes disruptive and nasty. Hebrews 5:8 says that, “despite the fact that He was a son, He learnt obedience through the things He suffered.” Was it necessary for Jesus to acquire obedience? This is an odd concept, to say the least. Was He not always blameless and without flaws?

Jesus was struggling with God’s plan

However, the book of Hebrews informs us that, despite the fact that He was a son, He learnt obedience by the suffering He endured. As a result, he had to learn to say “yes” to God’s intentions for his life in order to succeed. Throughout the Bible, there is one instance in which we witness Jesus struggle with the Father’s plan for His life. When He was alone in the garden of Gethsemane, right before He would be arrested, this was the exact time. Jesus dreaded the ‘cup’ that He would have to drink.

Jesus entrusted Himself to His father

After kneeling down, Jesus “made supplications to the Father, weeping and crying out in the presence of all those who were present, asking that He would save Him from death” (Hebrews 5:7). It was not just any prayer, but a heartfelt plea to God for assistance! But even in this moment of suffering, Jesus said, “Nevertheless, not My will, but Yours be done” (Luke 22:42). According to our passage in Hebrews, Jesus was heard because of his regard. (See also Hebrews 5:7).

Salvation in Jesus’ obedience

Did this suggest that Jesus was exempt from having to drink the cup of affliction? No, but God sent an angel to give Him the strength he would need to bear everything that would come his way. (See also Luke 22:43) It is because of Jesus’ obedience that there is now redemption available to anybody who follows Jesus’ commandments!

Learn to be like Jesus

Jesus was a fully realized human being, exactly like us. He needed to learn how to be respectful. He prayed to God with great sincerity and reverence, exactly as we are expected to do when we pray to God. Despite the fact that Jesus did not always obtain what he asked for, he did have the strength to say “yes” to God’s intentions for His life. Follow in the footsteps of Jesus, and learn to be submissive to Him! There is an eternal redemption available to you.

Suffering and Obedience

Last week, we discussed how, in God’s plan of redemption, it was essential for the Son to take on the role of High Priest (Heb. 5:5–6). Today, we’ll look at how the Son became the High Priest. Sonship and priesthood, as well as god and humanity, are fully linked in the person of Jesus Christ, who is the embodiment of both. After informing us in 5:5–6 that Jesus had been designated priest by the Father, verses 7 and 8 briefly detail some of the experiences Jesus had while carrying out His priestly duties on the planet.

  1. 7).
  2. It may come as a surprise to us that Jesus experienced considerable sorrow as a result of His imminent death.
  3. Jesus’ suffering becomes more apparent when we consider that he was going to endure the entire brunt of the Father’s wrath against sin.
  4. Christ’s agony in Gethsemane merely serves to emphasize the fact that He is truly a human being.
  5. This passage appears to be difficult to comprehend at first look.
  6. Given that Christ was sinless, wouldn’t it make sense that obedience would come entirely naturally to Him?
  7. It is his opinion that when the Bible speaks of Christ learning obedience, it is referring to the experience of learning obedience.

Coram Deo

After understanding the purpose for the Incarnation, a brilliant scholar once stated that he could never believe in a God who would not or could not take on the characteristics of a human being. Our God is infinitely greater than any alternative because of the incarnation of the Son of God and His blameless experience of everything we experience. Thank Him for loving us so much that He chose to become like us.

For Further Study

New International Version (New International Version) (NIV) Despite the fact that He was a Son, He learnt obedience by the horrors that He endured. Despite the fact that he was a Son, he learnt obedience by the horrors that he endured; Despite the fact that He was a Son, He learnt obedience through the suffering He endured. Despite the fact that He was a Son, He learnt obedience by what He endured. The things that he suffered taught him obedience, despite the fact that he was the Son. Even though he was the Son, he learnt obedience through the things that he suffered.

In spite of the fact that he was the Son, he was taught obedience by his sufferings.

Despite the fact that he was Son, he learnt obedience through the things that he endured; despite the fact that he was Son, he learned obedience from the things that he endured And, despite the fact that he was the Son of God, he learnt obedience by the things that he went through: Despite the fact that Jesus was the Son of God, he nevertheless suffered, and it was through his sufferings that he learnt to fulfill God’s commands.

  • Despite the fact that he was the Son, he learnt obedience via the circumstances that happened to him.
  • Despite the fact that he was a son, he learnt obedience through the trials he endured.
  • And, despite the fact that he was the Son, he learnt obedience by the things that he endured.
  • However, despite the fact that Jesus was God’s Son, he learnt to be obedient via his sufferings.
  • Despite the fact that Jesus was the Son of God, he learnt to obey as a result of his suffering.
  • While yet a man on earth, Christ, in frantic prayer and anguish of tears, pleaded with the one who could rescue him from death to come and save him from his sins.
  • However, as the Son of God, he was still required to demonstrate the true meaning of obedience by everything that he endured.
See also:  Why Jesus Isn T God

And, despite the fact that Jesus was God’s Son, he had to learn the hard way what it was like to obey when doing so resulted in suffering.

God responded to him as a result of his reverence for God.

Then, having reached the pinnacle of his development and having been appointed by God as high priest in the order of Melchizedek, he became the source of eternal salvation for those who come to him in faith and obedience.

Despite the fact that he was a son, he learnt obedience as a result of his ordeal.

Despite the fact that he was a Son, he learnt obedience from the things that he endured;Despite the fact that He was a Son, He learned obedience from the things that He endured.

In spite of the fact that he was God’s Son, Jesus learnt obedience through his suffering.

Despite the fact that he was a son, he learnt obedience via the things that happened to him.

But it was through suffering that he discovered what it meant to obey.

Despite the fact that he was a son, he learnt obedience as a result of his suffering.

Even though He was God’s Son, He learnt to obey through the trials and tribulations he endured.

And, despite the fact that he was God’s Son, he learnt obedience through the trials that he endured.

And, despite the fact that He was the Son, He nonetheless learnt obedience by the things that he endured.

Despite the fact that he was a Son, he learnt obedience by the horrors that he endured.

When he was God’s Son, he learnt obedience from the things that he endured; via his role as a Son, he did learn obedience from the things that he endured – the obedience to the Father.

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No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without the express written permission of the copyright owner.

The Lockman Foundation published the New American Standard Bible (NASB) in 1960, 1971, 1977, 1995, and 2020 under the trademark New American Standard Bible®.

;New American Standard Bible 1995(NASB1995)New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, New American Standard Bible®, The Lockman Foundation acquired copyright rights in 1960, 1971, 1977, and 1995.

  1. Catholic Book Publishing Corporation reserves all rights.;New Catholic Bible(NCB)Copyright 2019 by Catholic Book Publishing Corp.
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  6. Holy Bible in the New International Version®, often known as the NIV®, is a translation of the New International Version®, which is a translation of the Holy Bible in the New International Version®, NIV®.
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;New Life Version(NLV)Copyright 1969, 2003 by Barbour Publishing, Inc.;New Living Translation(NLT)Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright 1996, 2004, 2015 by Tyndale House Foundation;New Living Translation(NLT)Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright 1996, 2004, 2015 by Tyndale House Foundation Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188, has granted permission for this use.

  • New Matthew Bible(NMB)Copyright 2016 by Ruth Magnusson; All rights reserved (Davis).
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;New Revised Standard Version, Anglicized Catholic Edition (also known as the NRSV) (NRSVACE) The National Council of Churches of Christ in the United States of America’s Division of Christian Education published the New Revised Standard Version Bible: Anglicized Catholic Edition in 1989, 1993, and 1995 under the copyright of the National Council of Churches of Christ.

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courtesy of Five Talents Audio This is the Newly Revised Standard Version (RSV) The Revised Standard Version of the Bible was published by the National Council of Churches of Christ in the United States of America in 1946, 1952, and 1971 under the copyright protection of the Division of Christian Education.

Revised Standard Version Catholic Edition is protected by intellectual property rights (RSVCE) copyright 1965, 1966, National Council of Churches of Christ in the United States of America Division of Christian Education, Revised Standard Version of the Bible: Catholic Edition Permission has been granted to use.

;Tree of Life Version(TLV)The Bible is translated into the Tree of Life (TLV).

The Speaker’s Voice (VOICE) The Voice Bible is a book that contains information about how to speak in a particular voice.

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The term “World English Bible” is a registered trademark.

; Worldwide English (New Testament) (WE) was published in 1969, 1971, 1996, and 1998 by SOON Educational Publications; Wycliffe Bible (WYC) was published in 2001 by Terence P. Noble; and Young’s Literal Translation (YLT) was published by Public Domain in 1969, 1971, 1996, and 1998.

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