Why Was Jesus Called The Word

Why Was Jesus Called the Word of God? (Logos)

The title “Word of God” was one of the titles given to Jesus. We are reading from John’s gospel. Beginning with the creation of the Word, and the Word was in the presence of God, and the Word was God (John 1:1). John also contributed to the text. It was the Word that became human and established his home among us. He has shown himself to us in his whole glory, the glory of the one and only Son of God, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth (John 1:14). It is written in the Book of Revelation.

This Is Not a Definable Term Although there is no explanation provided in Scripture as to why Jesus is referred to be the Word of God, there have been a number of hypotheses put up in the past.

As mentioned in Proverbs 5-8, it has been asserted that Jesus is the incarnation of wisdom.

Pay close heed to my words of knowledge, my son.

  • God’s communication to humanity is represented by the word.
  • Just like Jesus did, He made the Word of God known to all people on the face of the earth.
  • God revealed His word through the prophets in the Old Testament, but in the New Testament, the word of God was revealed in a Person – God the Son – who is the embodiment of the word of God.
  • With the arrival of Christ, the witness that God revealed via the prophets throughout the Old Testament period was now made tangible for human beings.

Why Does the Bible Call Jesus

“Jesus is the Word because it is through him that all things are created,” explains Jonathan, who is eight years old. “What he said came to pass. The Earth and man were created as a result of the words of Jesus. As a result, he is the Word.” Whenever we read the opening word of John’s Gospel, “In the beginning was the Word,” we should instantly think of another Bible passage that opens with the same introductory phrase. “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the world,” the Bible states in Genesis 1:1.

  1. God picked Jesus as his messenger/messiah to inform us about himself, according to John’s presentation of Jesus Christ as the Word through which all things were created.
  2. “No one has ever seen God in his or her entirety.
  3. However, God’s revelation does not stop with creation; rather, it continues throughout history.
  4. God conveyed everything he wished via Jesus Christ’s teachings, life, and work on the cross.
  5. In Greek philosophy, the notion underlying the Word (Logos) is the divine essence that permeates an orderly cosmos and is represented by the letter “L.” The concept of active power is conveyed by the word “word” in the Old Testament.
  6. The Apostle John describes Jesus as the eternal Word, who took on flesh and blood so that we could witness God’s majesty in all his fullness.
  7. God’s word from heaven to earth has come to us in the person of Jesus.

“I also believe that Jesus demonstrated this by dying on the cross for each and every one of our sins.

“I believe the Bible calls Jesus the Word because he tells the truth,” says Leilani, a 10-year-old girl.

He wants us to disseminate the word about him to as many people as possible.” Those who believe in Jesus Christ as the way, the truth, and the life did not get a rose garden as a reward for their faith.

The Apostle John portrays Jesus as a ray of light shining into a dark and foreboding world.

With nails driven into the palms and soles of Jesus’ hands and feet, the wicked one and those under his power believed they had silenced the genuine Word of God.

Even now, some 2,000 years later, deceptive words attempt to rob us of the light of the real Word.

Consider the following: God’s personal message of love, truth, and peace to us is conveyed through Jesus Christ.

Ask yourself this question: Do you recognize Jesus as the genuine Word, who brings light and life into the world?

Please visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com to learn more about Carey Kinsolving and to read features written by other Creators Syndicate authors and artists.

Why is Jesus called the Word?

The gospel of John begins with the words, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” This is a well-known passage. John 1:14-18 makes it quite apparent that the “Word” that John is referring to is none other than Jesus Christ. This verse is one of several obvious and convincing demonstrations of Christ’s divinity that can be found throughout the New Testament. There is one point, however, that people often overlook: why did John refer to Jesus as “the Word”?

1 Throughout the writing of this article, I am indebted to Dr.

In order to learn more about this subject, I recommend you read his excellent publication

The Old Testament Background

In Genesis 1, we learn that God spoke all things into being by speaking them into existence. In Psalm 33:6, it says, “By the word of the Lord were the heavens created, and all their host was created by the breath of His lips.” In the same way that John remarked regarding the Word, “All things were created through Him, and apart from Him, nothing was created that has come into being,” creation was brought about by the Word of God (John 1:3). Furthermore, the Word of God is portrayed multiple times in the Old Testament as one who is sent forth by God to complete a purpose, and who even returns to God after completing the mission: Isaiah 55:10-11 is a biblical passage.

Psalm 107:19-20 (KJV).

It is impossible to stand up to His freezing cold as he scatters ice pieces everywhere.

  • As stated in Psalm 56:4, “I have put my confidence in the Lord, whose word I laud
  • In the Lord I shall not be frightened.” “What can a mere guy do to me?” I wonder.
  • According to Psalm 56:10-11, “I put my confidence in God, whose word I laud
  • In God I put my trust
  • I will not be frightened.” “What can a mere guy do to me?” I wonder.

As stated in Psalm 56:4, “I have put my confidence in the Lord, whose word I laud; I will not be frightened.” ‘What is it that a mere guy can do to me’ ; “I have put my confidence in God, whose word I adore, and I will not be frightened,” says Psalm 56:10-11.

Who am I to be afraid of what a simple man may do to me?”

Jewish traditions

Even just looking at the Old Testament material provides us with some striking connections between Jesus and God’s written Word. However, by the time of the New Testament, Jewish thought had progressed much farther in this area of development. In the words of Dr. Michael Brown, a Messianic Jewish scholar, “Because God was often viewed as ‘untouchable,’ it was vital to create some type of relationship between the Lord and his earthly creation.” Another key link was “the Word,” which was termed memra in Aramaic (from the Hebrew and Aramaic root “to speak,” which was utilized throughout the creation tale in Genesis 1, when God spoke and the material universe came into being).

  • “The Word” was one of the most crucial linkages.
  • Brown, is available online.
  • 18-19 For example, in aTargumof Genesis 28:20-21, Jacob promises that the Word of the Lord shall be his God, rather than pledging that the Lord will be his God.
  • The Targums even have the Word speaking His own words in places like Exodus 20:1, which is a rare occurrence in the Bible.
  • 5ibid.
  • Instead of the Aramaic term “memra,” he used the Greek word “logos” to express himself in his writing.
  • 21-22.
  • TheSamaritansappears to have followed a similar tradition to the early Christians.
  • Even though this booklet was not considered to be inspired or official in any manner, it is a fascinating source of Samaritan tradition and interpretation on a variety of topics.

“God then desired to make a manifestation of His mysteries: now behold, He could not do this Himself, nor could He do it through one who worshiped in the manner of the children of Israel, nor could He do it in writing, nor could He do it through the agency of any of His angels, but only by sending unto him His very Command,” the text says when God is about to confront Balaam.

9 “Tradition Kept: The Literature of the Samaritans,” by Robert T.

Hendrickson Publishers published a book in 2005 titled 72 The Command of God then proceeds to talk with Balaam in the first person, assuming the identity of God in the process.

God, on the other hand, appears before Balaam and reveals His secrets as a result of sending His Command. Just as John 1:18 states, “No one has ever seen God; the only God, who is at the Father’s side, he has made him known,” so too does John 1:18 state, “No one has ever seen God” (ESV).

Conclusions

All of this points to the fact that the Jews of Jesus’ day considered the Word of God to be much more than a simple means of communication through language. The Word was alive, intimate, and participatory. It was a living thing. It was sent by God to reveal God, yet it spoke in the person of God, and it is deserving of adoration and honor as such. The Word might legitimately be differentiated from God, yet it could also legitimately be referred to be the one and only true God. According to John, “the Word was with God, and the Word was God,” and this is true.

For example, Dr.

Brown, is available online (Baker Books, 2000) 22 As a result, John carefully articulated the truth that Jesus was totally and completely the one true God, but that He did not exhaust everything that God is, by employing the terminology of “the Word.” The Father who sent Jesus is also the one real God, according to the Bible.

It was for this reason that John referred to Jesus as “the Word.”

Verse by Verse Ministry International

According to John’s Gospel, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God,” or “In the beginning was God.” Why am I unable to comprehend the meaning of “the Word?” Is the “Word” a human being? What makes you think a word can be God? Among the most significant works in the New Testament, the prologue to John’s gospel stands out because it is possibly the most succinct and unequivocal explanation of Jesus’ spiritual identity elsewhere in the New Testament. While essentially stating that Jesus is and has always been God, John’s prologue also attempts to clarify, to a certain extent, the nature of Jesus’ existence and His place within the Godhead in the Gospel of John.

John 1:1In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.John 1:2He was in the beginning with God.John 1:3All things came into being through Him, and apart from Him nothing came into being that has come into being.

The Greek wordlogosto is used by John to characterize Jesus “before the beginning,” meaning before the beginning of time and the beginning of creation. Logos is a Greek term that literally translates as “word,” but more precisely, it refers to the spoken word or a statement. According to the Gospel of John, Jesus is God’s spoken word. John then goes on to clarify that the Word (Jesus) was both “with” God and “was” God at the same time. As a result of this remark, two major inferences about Jesus and the Trinity may be drawn: Despite the fact that Jesus is God and has existed since the beginning as God, his existence is somehow unique from that of God the Father.

  • In this way, we may understand the mystery of the Trinity: the three Persons of the Godhead are one God, yet they are also different from one another.
  • We can see from this remark that Jesus is referred to as the “Word” by John.
  • As a result, God the Father does not have any physical substance.
  • Second, we are aware that the Holy Spirit, the third part of the Trinity, is also a spirit alone and, as a result, is not visible to the naked eye (John 3:6-8).
  • As a result, Jesus is the only member of the Godhead who has taken on physical form, and as a result, He is the member of the Godhead who is accountable for the creation of all things physical on the planet.
  • In Colossians 1:15-17, Paul reiterates the same point.
  • As a result, because He is incarnate, Jesus may be perceived in a physical sense by those who see Him.
See also:  Why Did Jesus Go To Hell After He Died

As a result, Jesus serves as both the source of all creation and an agent of the Godhead in the world of men.

Scripture says that God spoke the universe into existence and that it was formed by his word (note the repeating phrase in Genesis 1, “Then God said.”).

For the reason that Jesus was the One who created all things, as John stated in verse 3, we might refer to him as the Logos, or spoken Word of God (Greek: logos).

First and foremost, when we wish to order anything to occur in the environment around us, we must first conceptualize the notion in our brains.

They are imperceptible, yet they are undeniably real.

If we want our ideas to become apparent in some way, they must first make their way from the invisible domain of our minds into the visible realm of the physical world.

Our thoughts are sent from our brain to our lips, where they are transformed into logos: spoken words.

This straightforward comparison can assist clarify how God the Father collaborated with God the Son (i.e., the Word) to bring about the beginning of Creation.

When John declares that Jesus is the Word, he is conveying this message.

Up to the time that Jesus took action and created the cosmos, there was no tangible manifestation of God’s presence on the earth.

Later, Jesus appeared in Person to meet with His creation, and when He proclaimed His words to His followers, He accomplished the Father’s objective by delivering a tangible manifestation of the Godhead to His creation, which was the Father’s intention all along.

Heb. 1:1God, after He spoke long ago to the fathers in the prophets in many portions and in many ways,Heb. 1:2in these last days has spoken to us in His Son, whom He appointed heir of all things, through whom also He made the world.Heb. 1:3And He is the radiance of His glory and the exact representation of His nature, and upholds all things by the word of His power.

To depict Jesus “at the beginning,” or before the beginning of time and creation, John uses the Greek wordlogosto. It literally translates as “word,” however it refers to the spoken word or a remark in this case. As recorded by John, Jesus is God’s spoken message. John then clarifies that the Word (Jesus) was both “with” God and “was” God at the same time in the beginning of time. Two key inferences may be drawn from this remark about Jesus and the Holy Trinity: Despite the fact that Jesus is God and has existed since the beginning as God, his existence is somehow unique from that of God the Father, as follows: During the same period of time, Jesus was both “with” and “was” God.

  • In verse 3, John claims that it was the Word (Him) who was responsible for the creation of all things on the planet.
  • As a result, God the Father is devoid of any bodily substance.
  • Second, we are aware that the Holy Spirit, the third component of the Trinity, is also a spirit alone and, as a result, is not visible to the human eyes (John 3:6-8).
  • Consequently, Jesus is the only member of the Godhead to take on physical form, and as a result, He is the Godhead member who is accountable for the creation of all things physical.
  • In Col 1:15-17, Paul reiterates the same point.
  • As a result of His incarnation, Jesus is capable of being sensed in a bodily sense.
  • Because of this, Jesus is both the source of all creation and the Godhead’s representative in that creation.

In Genesis 1, God’s spoken word is credited with creating the universe (note the repeating phrase in Genesis 1, “Then God said.”).

For the reason that Jesus, as John stated in verse 3, was the One who created all, we might refer to him as the Logos, or spoken Word of God.

In order to command anything to occur in our environment, we must first form a notion in our brains about what we want to take place.

It is impossible for them to be seen; nonetheless, they do exist.

To some extent, our ideas must transcend the invisible realm of our minds and enter the visible domain of the physical world if they are to become apparent in any manner.

Our thoughts are sent from our brain to our tongue, where they are transformed into logos: spoken language.

It is possible to understand how God the Father collaborated with God the Son (also known as the Word) to bring about Creation via the use of this simple comparison.

When John declares that Jesus is the Word, he is referring to this.

The presence of God had no physical manifestation until Jesus took action and created the universe.

A little time later, Jesus appeared in Person to meet with His creation, and while He talked to His followers, He fulfilled the Father’s plan by offering a bodily depiction of the Godhead in the presence of His creation. This is how Hebrews puts it:

Col. 1:15He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation.Col. 1:16For by Him all things were created, both in the heavens and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities — all things have been created through Him and for Him.

As the Word, Jesus symbolizes the Father’s unseen nature and character to the world because He was the method by which all physical reality came into being, and because He is the One who represents the Father’s invisible essence and character to the world. A similar way that the tangible embodiment of your ideas and personality is manifested via your spoken word, Jesus is the “Word” of an unseen God to His created world.

What do John 1:1,14 mean when they declare that Jesus is the Word of God?

QuestionAnswer This question can only be answered by first comprehending the reason why John penned his gospel in the first place. In John 20:30-31, we can plainly see what he is trying to do. Jesus performed many more miracles in the presence of his disciples, which are not recorded in this book, but these have been recorded so that you may believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God; and that believing you may have life in His name.” “There are many other miracles that Jesus performed in the presence of His disciples, which are not recorded in this book,” says the author.

  1. Beginning his gospel with the words “In the beginning was the Phrase, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God,” John introduces Jesus using a word or a term that both his Jewish and Gentile readers would have been familiar with at the time of Jesus’ birth.
  2. When it comes to God’s “speech,” for example, the “word” of God is frequently personified as an instrument for the implementation of God’s purposes in the Old Testament (Psalm 33:6; 107:20; 119:89; 147:15-18).
  3. A similar concept was employed in Greek philosophy to define the intermediary agent through which God produced material things and mediated with them.
  4. Consequently, the usage of the name Logos would have most certainly evoked images of a mediating principle between God and the rest of the world in the minds of his Greek readers, as well.

However, John goes beyond the popular understanding of Logos that his Jewish and Gentile readers would have possessed, and he depicts Jesus Christ not as a mere mediating principle, as the Greeks understood him, but as a particular figure who is both entirely divine and wholly human at the same time.

If he has seen Me, he has seen the Father; how do you respond to the request, “Show us the Father?”” (See also John 14:9).

Jesus Christ is both fully God and fully man, who came to reveal God to man and redeem all who believe in Him from their sin. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) What does it mean in John 1:14 to say that Jesus is the Word of God, and what does it entail in practice?

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Why Is Jesus Called “the Word” in John 1? (+ More Insights for Your “Come, Follow Me” Study)

Please find below a few ideas from gospel scholars that will help you and your family as you read John 1 this week. These insights will add more depth and perspective to the Gospel of John. In his book The New Testament, Thomas A. Wayment explains: A translation for members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: The author of the Gospel of John, like the authors of the other Gospels, never explicitly refers to himself by name. As stated in the Fourth Gospel, an anonymous disciple has a personal and unique experience of Jesus’ life, which is reflected in the events that are related therein.

  • It is possible that the unidentified disciple’s witness was impacted by the events of Jesus’ final week of life, as the unnamed disciple becomes increasingly important in the tale during Jesus’ final week of life.
  • The author was reluctant to identify himself, despite the fact that he made it plain that he was involved in the plot.
  • Although some early Christians, such as Irenaeus (died 202 CE), believed another disciple named John was responsible for writing the Gospel, the tradition has remained fairly stable that John the early disciple was the author of the Gospel.
  • Immediately upon reading the first few lines, it becomes clear that John was not writing a chronological account of Jesus’s life (John 20:30), but rather a meditation on the significance of Jesus’s existence (John 20:31).
  • Stories and incidents from Jesus’ life were chosen for their relevance and intrigue, rather than for their entertainment value.

Why does he call Christ the Word?

When it comes to explaining Jesus Christ’s position as “the Word,” the editor of The New Testament Study Guide: Start to Finish, Thomas R. Valletta has compiled statements from prophets and academics to do just that: “Christ is the Word or Messenger of Salvation,” according to Elder Bruce R. McConkie’s sermon. Accordingly, John’s interpretation is: “In the beginning there was Christ, and Christ existed with the Father, and he, the Son, had gained godhood himself. ” I. V. John 1:1–2; D amp;C 93:7–8; I.

John 1:1–2.

becomes the Word.” (Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, 1:71; see also JST, John 1:1.) (Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, 1:71; see also JST, John 1:1.) “Jesus is referred to as the Word (see John 1:1; logos in Greek), which is a complicated philosophical word that basically refers to the divine principle of reason that provides order to the cosmos and connects the human intellect with Deity.

  1. 34–35.
  2. via the Son, who thus became the executive through whom the Father’s desire, command, or word was put into action.
  3. Talmage (Jesus the Christ, p.
  4. Wayment The Book of Revelation The opening words of the Gospel of John are derived from an early Christian song that extols Christ as the Word of God, as being equal to the Father, as being the Creator, and so forth.
  5. Comparing D amp;C 93:7–8 to D amp;C 93:7–8, John interacts right away with the concept that Jesus is the word of God’s mouth and the divine word that controls the cosmos.

This line is translated as follows in the Joseph Smith Translation: “In the beginning, the gospel was proclaimed via the Son.” “And the gospel was the Word, and the Word was with the Son, and the Son was with God, and the Son was of God.” “And the gospel was the Word,” says the author.

Why does John say, “No man hath seen God at any time”? What does that mean about modern revelation?

inScripture Study Made Simple: A Step-by-Step Guide, by Thomas A. Wayment The New Testament clarifies:This passage, which asserts that no one has ever seen God, may create concern for certain people since it states that no one has ever seen God. The initial answer is to make a list of persons who have seen visions of God (as in the case of Joseph Smith, who is mentioned in History 1:17). It is vital to note that the concept of “God” is important in the context of this passage. It’s possible that John was attempting to express the concept that no one has yet seen the Son of God as God, or that no one has yet truly seen Jesus as God, in his statement.

See also:  What Does The Bible Say About Prophets After Jesus

“And no man hath seen God at any time; until he has born record of the Son, for it is by him that no man can be saved,” according to the Joseph Smith Translation.

What do we know about the place where Jesus was baptized?

In The New Testament Study Guide: Start to Finish, Thomas R. Valletta provides information from different academics, including the following: ‘Bethabara,’ according to John, is the location where these events took place (John 1:28), which is a geographical name that is confirmed in the Book of Mormon (1 Nephi 10:9). The majority of early Greek manuscripts of the Gospel of John, on the other hand, locate the events of the Gospel in Bethany rather than Bethabara. Some detractors have seized on this as a chance to attack the Book of Mormon for employing a version of the tale that is less well-known and authenticated than the traditional account.

28) say that The Jordan River beyond Bethabara (John 1:28) is a location on the east side of the Jordan River in the neighborhood of the spot where Jesus was baptized by John the Baptist.

This site is verified on a mosaic map of the Holy Land from the Byzantine era, which may be seen in Madaba, Jordan.

He had now reached what appears to have been the most northern point of his Mission-journey, Beth-Abara (‘the house of passage,’ or ‘of shipping,’)—according to the ancient reading, Bethany (‘the house of shipping,’)—one He was baptized here (John 1:28).” (Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah, 193).

How is Jesus Christ the light in your life?

In The New Testament Study Guide: Start to Finish, Thomas R. Valletta gives the following information: John 1:4 begins with the thrilling proclamation that ‘in him there was life, and the life was the light of men,’ which introduces some of the themes that are utilized again throughout the Gospel—namely, that Jesus is the light of humanity and the life of the world.” In spite of this, the world, for the most part, did not acknowledge the Word by which God created it.” Christ and the World of the New Testament (132–33; Holzapfel & Wayment, Jesus Christ and the World of the New Testament).

When was the last time you saw the light of the Savior in your life?

Lead image fromlds.org

“The Bible is the Word of God,” says one of the most often proclaimed fundamentals of the Christian religion. Image courtesy of Pixabay And in response to this, Christians should admit that it most certainly is (Mt 15.6; Heb 4.12)! However, there is another connotation for the phrase “the Word,” which is particularly relevant around Christmastime. “The Word” appears in our conversations and songs about Jesus, His birth and incarnation, and the phrase “the Word” appears, not in reference to the written Scripture, but in reference to Christ Himself: “Word of the Father, now appearing in flesh!” “Hail, hail, the Word become flesh, the Babe, the Son of Mary!” exclaimed the crowd.

  • “The Word” is used as a nickname for Jesus, and it’s a wonderful Christmas scripture, since we, of course, celebrate the birth of Jesus as a human being and his presence among us throughout the Christmas season.
  • Allow yourself to get swept away by the richness of this today: God said in the beginning, “In the beginning was the word, and the word was with God, and the word was God.” He was there with God at the beginning of time.
  • There was life in Him, and that life was the source of illumination for all of mankind.
  • The Word took on the form of a man and established His home among us.
  • It is in this verse that we perceive Jesus, who is referred to as “the Word,” as being both different from God the Father and yet still fully God at the same time.
  • It is brimming with vitality and light in an unbeatable way.
  • Jesus, the epitome of both astounding grace and liberating truth, is the model for us all.

“The Word” is a word that is generally reserved for the Bible; thus, why does Jesus use it to refer to Himself in this context?

And, in keeping with the irritating but occasionally effective tradition of alliterative preaching, the letter “R” is responsible for bringing you today’s column.

The Bible is the Word of God that has been written down for us; it gives us the narrative of our God, who He is, what He is like, what He does, what He is like in nature, what He commands, and so on.

Furthermore, while the Bible is the written Word of God, Jesus is the Word of God manifested in the world.

This is what you would get if you imagined Jesus to look like: While God spoke to our forefathers many times and in many different ways in the past, He has spoken to us in these final days via His Son.

“The Son is the light of God’s glory and the perfect representation of His essence, and He is the source of all life because of His mighty Word.” (See Heb.

The Bible is God’s revelation in written form; Jesus, on the other hand, is God’s revelation in person.

Second, Jesus is the Word of God who has been made manifest.

It says, “As the rain and snow come down from heaven and do not return to it without watering the earth and making it bud and flourish, so that it yields seed for the sower and bread for the eater, so is my Word that goes out from my mouth: It will not return to me empty, but will accomplish what I desire and achieve the purpose for which I sent it.” (Exodus 55.10-11) It is true that when God speaks, things happen.

  1. Going all the way back to Genesis chapter 1, when God created everything, all He had to do was speak – “Let there be.” – and everything came into being.
  2. He simply needs to express himself.
  3. Similar to this, Jesus is the agent of God’s will, dispatched to earth from Heaven in order to accomplish God’s wants and achieve God’s goals on earth.
  4. In this manner, Jesus represents the Word of God made manifest.
  5. God’s Word is replete with promises, revelations, and depictions of God’s character.
  6. Each verse teaches us something different, each one revealing a different aspect or characteristic of who God is, what He desires, and how He acts and interacts with His creation.
  7. “For no matter how many promises God has made, they are all ‘Yes’ in Christ.
  8. Jesus is the culmination of everything that God is and everything that He has promised in the past and in the future.
  9. In this manner, Jesus is the manifestation of the Word of God.
  10. Because He is the Word of God revealed in His fullness.
  11. Because He is the Word of God come to fruition.

******** If you like what you’re reading, you can follow Third Way Christians on Facebook or Instagram, or you can sign up to have new columns sent to you by clicking here! You may also follow Chris’ church teaching on YouTube, which can be found on the Meadow Brook Church website.

In the Beginning Was the Word

Beginning with the creation of the Word, and with God from the beginning of time, the Word became God. He was there with God from the beginning. All things were created through him, and there was no thing created that was not created through him. It is the Gospel of John that paints a picture of Jesus Christ and his redemptive act. It is mostly concerned with the last three years of Jesus’ life, and in particular with his death and resurrection. According to John 20:30–31, it serves a specific purpose: There were many other signs that Jesus performed before his disciples that are not recorded in this book; however, these are recorded so that you may come to know and trust in him as Messiah and as Father, and that by believing you may have life in his name.” “Now Jesus performed many other signs in the presence of his disciples that are not recorded in this book; however, these are recorded so that you may come to know and trust in him as Messiah and as Father.” The book is meant to assist people in coming to faith in Christ and receiving everlasting life.

Written for Non-Christians — and Christians

But don’t get it into your mind that the book is just for nonbelievers as a result of this. Believers in Jesus must maintain their faith in Jesus in order to be rescued at the end of the day. “If anybody does not abide in me, he is cast aside like a branch and withers; and the branches are collected and thrown into the fire and burnt,” Jesus stated in John 15:6. As well as saying in John 8:31, “If you abide in my word, you are truly my disciples.” “Those who believe in Jesus must continue to believe in Jesus in order to be rescued at the end of the day.” As a result, when John wrote, “These are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name,” he meant that he was writing to arouse faith in unbelievers and maintain faith in believers — and in this way, lead both to eternal life in heaven.

Moreover, there may not be a finer book in the Bible to assist you in maintaining your faith and esteem for Christ above everything else.

An Eyewitness Account

This portrayal of Jesus is written by an eyewitness who was there at these incalculably significant episodes in his life. The phrase “the disciple whom Jesus loved” appear five times in this Gospel, which is rather remarkable (John 13:23; 19:26; 20:2, 7; 21:20). According to John 21:20, “Peter turned and saw the disciple whom Jesus loved following them,” which means “Peter turned and saw the disciple whom Jesus loved following them.” It then claims, four verses later (in John 21:24), that the disciple “bears testimony to these things and has recorded these things.” As a result, the person known as “the disciple whom Jesus loved,” who was present at the Last Supper, resting on Jesus’ shoulder (John 13:23), penned this book as his divinely inspired testimony to the events of Jesus’ life and what they meant for us.

Divinely Inspired

One of the reasons I believe it is divinely inspired is that it fulfills a promise made by Jesus to his disciples. In John 14:26, Jesus stated, “The Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things and bring everything to your recollection.” He was referring to the Holy Spirit, whom the Father would send in my name. He also added, in John 16:13, “When the Spirit of truth arrives, he will lead you into all truth, because he will not speak on his own authority, but whatever he hears, that will be what he will proclaim.” As a result, Jesus picked his apostles to serve as his spokesmen and then provided supernatural direction in the creation of Scripture to lay the groundwork for the church’s foundation through the Holy Spirit, as explained above (Ephesians 2:20).

In this regard, we think that John’s Gospel is the inspired message of the Almighty.

John’s First Three Verses

With those two words — “word of God” — we are brought to the very beginning of John’s Gospel. John 1:1–3: In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with the Word, and the Word was with the Word, and the Word was with the Word, and the Word was with the Word, and the Word was with the Word, and the Word was with the Word, and the Word was with the Word, and the Word was with the Word, and the Word was with the Word, and the Word was with the Word, and the Word was with the Word, and the Word was with the Word, and the Word was with God said in the beginning, “In the beginning was the word, and the word was with God, and the word was God.” He was there with God from the beginning.

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“All things were created through him, and there was nothing created that was not created through him.” These are the verses that we will be concentrating on today.

‘The Word’: Jesus

First and foremost, we consider the termword. “In the beginning, there was a Word. According to verse 14, the most crucial thing to know about this Word is as follows: We have seen his glory, the glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth, as he came to be among us. “And the Word became flesh and lived among us.” The Word refers to the person of Jesus Christ. John is well aware of what he is about to write in these twenty-one chapters. The events of Jesus Christ’s life and the teachings of Jesus Christ will be recounted by him.

  1. He was a human being with flesh and blood.
  2. He ate and drank and became exhausted, and John was extremely familiar with him.
  3. As a result, what John is doing in John 1:1–3 is informing us of the most fundamental aspects of Jesus that he is capable of conveying.
  4. He, on the other hand, does not want his readers to have to wait more than three verses to find out what it was that took him so long to figure out.

Jesus in His Infinite Majesty

That is the aim of verses 1–3: to make the point. In reading this Gospel, Jesus wants us to be worshipful, humbly, and submissively, as if we were seeing the creation of the cosmos via the man at the wedding, at the well, and atop the mountain. Do you see and feel what I’m talking about? This is not anything I created. This does not represent the format of my sermon at all. The following is the book’s organizational structure. According to John’s writing, this is exactly the order in which God intended for him to arrange everything.

“With the very first lines that come out of the end of my pen, I shall stun and blow you away with the identity of this one who became flesh and dwelt among us,” John declares.

John want for you to be aware of and believe in a glorious Savior, Jesus Christ. Whatever else you may appreciate about Jesus, John desires for you to come to know and treasure Jesus in all of his great majesty and glory.

Why ‘Word’?

However, we should still inquire as to why he chose to refer to Jesus as “the Word.” It was said in the beginning, “The Word.” What I would say in response to that question is this: John refers to Jesus as “the Word” because he has come to see Jesus’ words and person as truths from God that are so tightly bound together that Jesus himself — in his coming and working as well teaching and dying and rising — was the final and decisive message from God.

  1. Or to put it more simply:what God had to say to us was not only or mostly what Jesus said, but who Jesus was and what he did.
  2. God, on the other hand, was exposing the most important truth about himself and his activity.
  3. “What God had to communicate to us was not just or primarily what Jesus said, but also and especially who Jesus was and what he accomplished,” says the author.
  4. His witness and his person were the Word of truth.
  5. (John 15:7).
  6. He said that his artworks served as a “witness” to his existence (John 5:36; 10:25).

Jesus: God’s Decisive, Final Message

Jesus’ triumphant return is described in Revelation 19:13 (written by the same author as the Gospel): “He comes clad in a garment soaked in blood, and the name by which he is called is the Word of God.” As he returns to the world, Jesus is referred to as “the Word of God.” He then says, “A sharp sword comes from his lips,” which is two lines later (Revelation 19:15). In other words, Jesus hits the nations with the force of God’s message, which he says – the sword of the Spirit — as he speaks it (Ephesians 6:17).

Thus, as John begins his Gospel, he has in mind all of God’s revelation, all of the truth, all of the witness, all of the glory, all of the light, and all of the words that come out of Jesus in his living and teaching, dying, and rising, and he sums up all of God’s revelation of God with the name: he is “the Word” — the first, final, ultimate, decisive, absolutely true and reliable Word of God.

God’s climactic and conclusive Word to the world is revealed in the person of the Son of God incarnate.

Four Observations About Jesus

But what is it that John wants us to know about this guy Jesus Christ, whose acts and words fill the pages of this Gospel?

He wishes to teach us four facts about Jesus Christ, which are as follows: the length of his existence, (2) the core of his personality, (3) his connection with God and (4) his relationship with the rest of the world

1. The Time of His Existence

“In the beginning was the Word,” says verse one. When translated into Greek, the words “in the beginning” correspond to the opening two words of the Greek Old Testament: “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the world. ” Because the first thing John is going to tell us about what Jesus accomplished is that he created the universe, it’s not a coincidence that this happened. In verse 3, he expresses himself in this manner. As a result, the words “in the beginning” signify that there was a Word, the Son of God, before there was any created substance at all.

When John opens his Gospel, he places Jesus, the Christ, the Son of God, in the context of the past, namely the pre-historic past.

In 2 Timothy 1:9, the apostle Paul writes that God gave us favor in Christ Jesus “before the beginning of time.” So, before there was any time or matter, there was the Word, Jesus Christ, the Son of God, who existed before time and before matter.

2. The Essence of His Identity

“The Word was God,” says the last verse of verse one. One of the distinguishing characteristics of this Gospel is that the most important ideas are frequently communicated in the most straightforward terms. This could not be any more straightforward — nor could it be any more demanding. Jesus Christ, the Word who became man and lived among us, was and continues to be God. Let it be known to all that we, the people of Bethlehem — and fact, all real Christian churches — worship Jesus Christ as the Son of the Living God.

  1. In John 10:33, when the Jewish officials declare, “We are not going to stone you because you have done a wonderful thing, but because you, being a man, have made yourself God,” we respond with, “No, this is not blasphemy.
  2. Do you see what this means for our study on the Gospel of John?
  3. It implies that we will be spending week after week getting to know God as we come to know Jesus, as we get to know Jesus.
  4. We encourage you to join us in meeting God as we encounter Jesus, and to ask others to join us as well.

In the final point, I’ll demonstrate it to you in a moment or two. But first, let’s take a look at his connection with the Almighty.

3. His Relationship to God

“The Word was with God,” says the first verse, in the midst of the verse. According to Genesis 1, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” At its core, the major historic theory on God’s triune nature may be found here. I’d want to give a sermon on this topic from the remainder of John’s Gospel and the rest of the Scriptures at some point. Nevertheless, for the time being, merely let the following basic phrase to stand in your thoughts and seep into your heart: God was with the Word, Jesus Christ, and he was God himself.

  1. Moreover, he is God, and he is the image of God, completely reflecting all that God is and standing forth from all eternity as the fullness of divinity shown in a separate Person.
  2. There is only one heavenly essence and three individuals in the universe.
  3. The Father and the Son are the only ones who can save us.
  4. The Holy Spirit will be discussed in greater detail later.
  5. However, it should not be thrown away.
  6. And even his splendor would not be enough to quench your insatiable desire for fresh discoveries of beauty, which would continue indefinitely.
  7. As a result, we have learned about (1) the beginning of his existence (before the beginning of time), (2) the essence of his identity (“the Word was God”), and (3) his connection to God (“the Word was with God.” And so we get to the conclusion of his interaction with the rest of the world.

4. His Relationship to the World

Verse 2–3: “He was with God in the beginning of time. “All things were created through him, and there was nothing created that was not created through him.” In the beginning, the Word became flesh and lived among us, teaching and healing and rebuking and protecting and dying for us. He was the one who created the universe and gave his life for us. Remember to hold on to the mystery of the Trinity that you learned in verse 1. Don’t abandon the song as soon as you reach verse 3. “He was the one who brought everything into being.” Yes, there was another actor acting via the Word.

  1. The Word, on the other hand, is God.
  2. In the creation of all things, he served as the Father’s agent, or the Word.
  3. God, the Word, was the one who created the world.
  4. He is your Savior, your Lord, and your friend.

Jesus Was Not Made

Consider the following scenario: a Muslim, a Jehovah’s Witness, or a member of any branch of Arianism (the old heresy that dates back to the fourth century) claims that Jesus was not God, was not eternal — was not eternally born — but was rather made. He was the very first thing that God created. “The most exalted of the exalted angels.” Alternatively, as the Arians put it, “there was when he wasn’t there.” That is impossible because John has written verse 3 in such a way that it is impossible.

“That is what it means to be God,” says the author.

You would assume that’s enough to put everything to rest.

It is possible, however, for someone to respond, “Yes, but ‘all things’ does not include myself.” Everything, with the exception of himself, is included.

John, on the other hand, did not stop there.

“There was nothing that was produced that was not made because of him.” They also state explicitly, emphatically, and unequivocally that anything that falls within the category of “made” was created by Christ.

Because you can’t bring yourself into existence until you first become one with the universe.

Christ did not come into being. That is what it means to be God, in a nutshell. And the Word was revealed to be God. May the Lord provide us the ability to recognize his magnificence. And bow down before him. Amen.

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