Why Did Joseph Of Arimathea Bury Jesus

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After the Crucifixion, Joseph of Arimathea, a wealthy Jewish businessman, buried the corpse of Jesus Christ in his own tomb. The man himself is the subject of several stories, including one that he traveled to Britain with the child Jesus and another that, after the Crucifixion, he transported the Holy Grail to Glastonbury, Somerset, where he constructed the world’s first Christian temple.

The story of Joseph of Arimathea

The tale of Joseph of Arimathea is recorded in each of the four gospels of the New Testament. Joseph was a wealthy man who came from the Judean town of Arimathea. A nice and just man who managed to be a member of the Council (the Sanhedrin) while also being a covert supporter of Jesus – which is why he did not participate in the Council’s persecution of Jesus. Immediately following Jesus’ death, Joseph petitioned Pilate for permission to remove Jesus’ body and properly bury it. The permission was obtained, and the body was removed from the scene.

When they buried Jesus, they did so in an unfinished tomb that may have been meant for Joseph himself, and it was secured by a large stone rolled against the doorway.

What the Bible says about Joseph of Arimathea

It is recorded in each of the four gospels that Joseph of Arimathea’s life was retold. A prosperous businessman from the Judean town of Arimathea, Joseph moved to Jerusalem to establish his own business. A decent and just man who managed to be a member of the Council (the Sanhedrin) while also being a covert supporter of Jesus – which is why he did not participate in the Council’s activities against Jesus. Following Jesus’ death, Joseph approached Pilate and requested permission to remove Jesus’ body and properly bury it.

After wrapping the body in fabric and adding myrrh and aloes, Joseph and Nicodemus buried the body.

The legends of Joseph of Arimathea

The historical figure Joseph of Arimathea, however, is significantly more complex than what is revealed in the gospels. Other tales have sprung up around him, and they are all fascinating.

  • He was the first person to introduce Christianity to Britain, having been dispatched by St Philip with other followers
  • He constructed Britain’s first church (some believe this was the world’s first church)
  • And he was the first person to be martyred for his faith. He was Mary’s uncle, and so Jesus’ great-uncle
  • He was also Mary’s brother. he was a merchant who traveled to England in order to purchase Cornish tin
  • He brought Jesus with him to England when Jesus was a teenager (local legends claim that among the places they visited were St Just in Roseland and St Michael’s Mount)
  • He brought to England two vials containing the blood and sweat of Jesus (or two vials containing the sweat of Jesus)
  • He brought the Holy Grail to England and hid it in a well at Glastonbury, now known

Joseph was related to Jesus

Possibly based on the custom that the senior male relative of a crucified person was required to deal with the body, this narrative has been told. Given the fact that Jesus’ father was no longer alive, it is reasonable to assume that Joseph of Arimathea volunteered for the job because he was connected to Jesus in some manner.

Joseph of Arimathea in England

Possibly based on the custom that the senior male relative of a crucified person was required to deal with the body, this myth came to be. Joseph of Arimathea may have volunteered for the role because Jesus’ father was no longer alive; thus, it shows that he was perhaps connected to Jesus in some manner.

Joseph visited England with the young Jesus

One of the most persistent tales of early English Christianity is that Joseph of Arimathea traveled to the West Country of England with a teenage Jesus, according to which the two met. In both Somerset and Cornwall, Joseph and Jesus are said to have made a surprise visit. Van Morrison, a contemporary troubadour, has set the legend to music with his song Summertime in England, which was released in 2011. Why don’t you come down to Avalon with me? In the Church of St. John, during the summer months in England.

  1. Summertime In England is a song by Van Morrison from the album Common One.
  2. However, this poem by William Blake, which is based on the same event and was notably put to music by Sir Hubert Parry as ‘Jerusalem,’ is considerably more well-known: And did their feet in ancient times walk along the lush hills of England’s mountains?
  3. Do you know whether the holy visage shone out onto our misty hills?
  4. Bring me my flaming gold bow, please!
  5. Bring me my spear, please!

Immediately, bring me my chariot of fire! I will not give up the mental battle, nor will my sword fall asleep in my hand, until we have completed the construction of Jerusalem in England’s beautiful and peaceful country. William Blake was a poet and artist who lived in the 18th century (1757-1827)

The legend of the Glastonbury Thorn

According to one of the most persistent tales of early English Christianity, the young Jesus traveled through the West Country of England with Joseph of Arimathea on his journey. It has been claimed that Joseph and Jesus paid visits to both Somerset and Cornwall. Summertime in England, a song written by modern troubadour Van Morrison, is a tribute to the legend. Why don’t you come down to Avalon and meet up with me? England’s Church of St. John was filled with people throughout the summer months.

  • Song by Van Morrison from the album Common One, Summertime in England.
  • A poem by William Blake, based on the same narrative and notably arranged to music by Sir Hubert Parry in the form of ‘Jerusalem,’ is considerably more widely known: And did those old feet walk along the lush hills of England’s mountains?
  • In our misty hills, did the heavenly countenance shine out or was it hidden?
  • Bring my blazing gold bow to me, please.
  • Send someone to fetch my spear for me.
  • Immediately, get me my fiery chariot!
  • Sir William Blake (William Blake) was an English poet and painter who lived during the Renaissance period (1757-1827)

Meet Joseph of Arimathea: Secret Disciple and Donor of Jesus Christ’s Tomb

FollowingJesus Christ has always been risky, but for Joseph of Arimathea, it was particularly hazardous at the time. The Sanhedrin, the Jewish court that sentenced Jesus to death, included him as a significant member. Joseph of Arimathea placed his reputation and his life in danger by standing up for Jesus, but his faith far surpassed his fear of losing his position in the community.

Question for Reflection

In order to avoid the Jews, Joseph of Arimathea had been a covert disciple of Christ. After the crucifixion, he went to Pilate and begged for Jesus’ corpse in a strong and unapologetic manner. Joseph took a chance on his reputation with the religious leaders in order to provide a befitting burial for his Lord. With his act of laying Jesus’ body in his own personal tomb, Joseph shown both enormous love and tremendous courage. Is it fear that prevents you from being a covert follower of Jesus? Would speaking out for your Christian religion jeopardize your professional reputation?

He is one of only two religious figures from his day who is still recognized and remembered by Christian Christians today.

Nicodemus is the other character.

Joseph of Arimathea in the Bible

Joseph of Arimathea is mentioned in the Bible in several places, including Matthew 27:57, Mark 15:43, Luke 23:50-52, and John 19:38. Joseph would have been a resident of Jerusalem at the time of Jesus’ crucifixion since he was a member of the Sanhedrin, although he was born and raised in a Judean village known as Arimathea before coming to Jerusalem. Scholars are split on the location of Arimathea, although some believe it to be in the mountainous region of Ephraim near the town of Ramathaim-zophim, where Samuel the prophet was born.

Among its seventy-one members were some of the wealthiest and most prominent persons in Jerusalem and the surrounding area.

Joseph is described as wealthy by Matthew, a fact that is supported by his possession of a tomb cut into the rock. Although there is no evidence in Scripture as to what Joseph’s occupation was, unverified folklore claims that he was a merchant in metal items.

Secret Disciple

In fact, Joseph was a follower of Jesus Christ, according to all four Gospels; nevertheless, John emphasizes that this was done in secrecy (John 19:38) until the time of Christ’s burial. According to Mosaic law, the remains of individuals who were executed by hanging from a tree must not be permitted to remain on the tree for more than one night (Deuteronomy 21:22-23). Because Jesus’ death happened at three o’clock in the afternoon, there was only a small amount of time to bury him before the Sabbath began at sundown at that time.

Even though it put his life in danger, Joseph’s willingness to properly bury the deceased demonstrated that he was a faithful Jew.

Joseph of Arimathea lowers Jesus from the cross, engraving by Gustave Dore (1832-1883), from The Holy Scriptures, which includes both the Old and New Testaments: The Old Testament, by Gustave Dore Mark 15, Volume 2, 1869-1870 edition, translated from the Latin Vulgate by Antonio Martini (1721-1809), with friezes by Enrico Giacomelli, from the Latin Vulgate.

Joseph of Arimathea generously offered his new tomb as a place for Jesus to be laid to rest.

(NIV) According to Jewish tradition, Jesus’ body was anointed with spicy oils of myrrh and aloes, wrapped in a linen cloth to keep it fresh, and put in the tomb that had previously been unoccupied.

Character Strengths

  • Despite the pressures from his colleagues and the Roman authorities, Joseph maintained his faith in Jesus. His faith was unwaveringly upheld, and he put his trust in God to deal with the consequences. The Bible states that Joseph was “expecting the Kingdom of God,” which indicates that he expected the Kingdom to come through Jesus Christ (Mark 15:43
  • Luke 23:51)
  • Luke 23:50 describes Joseph of Arimathea as a “good and upright man.”

Life Lessons From Joseph of Arimathea

It is possible that our trust in Jesus Christ will cost us a lot of money in the future. Without a doubt, Joseph was despised by his contemporaries for caring for Jesus’ corpse, but he refused to let that stop him from following his convictions. It is possible that doing the right thing for God can cause hardship in this life, but it will result in eternal blessings in the next.

Key Bible Verse

John 19:38-42 (KJV) Later on, Joseph of Arimathea approached Pilate and requested the corpse of Jesus be returned to him. Now, Joseph was a follower of Jesus, but he did so in secret because he was afraid of the Jewish authorities’ reaction. He arrived and removed the body from the scene with Pilate’s consent. He was joined by Nicodemus, the man who had previously visited Jesus in the middle of the night. Nicodemus arrived with a combination of myrrh and aloes weighing around seventy-five pounds.

According to Jewish funeral practices, this was done in this manner.

Immediately adjacent to where Jesus was crucified, there was a garden in which a new tomb had been built, in which no one had ever been placed before. They put Jesus in the tomb since it was the Jewish day of Preparation, and because it was close by and convenient. (NIV)

Sources

  • “Joseph of Arimathea,” or “Joseph of Arimathea.” The New Compact Bible Dictionary may be found at newadvent.org. T. Alton Bryant was in charge of the editing.

3 Things We Can Learn from Joseph of Arimathea

Jesus’ corpse was taken away from him by Pilate, and Joseph of Arimathea, a prominent member of the Sanhedrin who himself looked forward to the coming of the kingdom of God, came and courageously went to Pilate and demanded that Jesus’ body be returned. After purchasing some linen fabric, Joseph carried him down to the basement and covered him in the linen. Then he buried him in a tomb he had dug out of the rock and rolled a stone on the tomb’s entrance. The story of Joseph of Arimathea has piqued my interest, and I confess it.

  • But who exactly was he?
  • First and foremost, all four Gospels demonstrate that, despite his membership in the Sanhedrin, Joseph was a devout follower of Jesus Christ.
  • (Matt.
  • As an additional detail, John informed his readers that, while Joseph was a follower, he kept it a secret out of concern that the Jews would discover his identity.
  • According to Luke’s Gospel, Joseph disagreed with the Sanhedrin in their attempt to put an end to Jesus’ ministry, although that disagreement alone may not have shown Joseph as a follower of Jesus to the fullest extent.
  • Joseph’s plea was astounding since he stood to lose everything: his money (Matt.27:57), his power as a member of the Sanhedrin, his reputation, and perhaps his life if he went through with it.
  • Joseph’s identity had been revealed.
  • It was a done deal.
  • What, on the other hand, can we take away from Joseph’s story?
  1. Don’t just go along with the crowd. Joseph had confidence in Jesus and was regarded as one of his disciples. This occurred despite the fact that he was a member of the Sanhedrin, a group of Jews who were passionately opposed to Jesus Christ. Joseph, on the other hand, maintained his trust in Jesus and continued to have confidence in Him despite his circumstances
  2. Follow Jesus. It is unclear how loud Joseph was in his opposition to the Sanhedrin’s conduct toward Jesus, but he was clearly opposed to their intention to kill him. We do, however, know for a fact that Joseph took a huge risk by approaching Pilate and requesting the corpse of Jesus. For example, Jesus stated in Luke 9:24 (CSB), “For anyone wishes to save his life will lose it, but whomever wishes to lose his life because of me will save it.” Trust in God’s timing. In the days and weeks leading up to the crucifixion, it’s likely that Joseph had no clue that he would have the opportunity to be the one to respect Jesus’ body by burying it according to custom. However, when the moment came, he took a leap of confidence. The appropriate position, the right location, and the right time were all there for Joseph while Jesus’ twelve disciples were dispersed
  3. Joseph acted at the perfect moment.
See also:  How Do You Have A Relationship With Jesus Christ?

It’s possible that you’re at the right position at the right moment to make a difference for Christ. It might happen today or perhaps next week, but the important thing is to be prepared. For Joseph of Arimathea, the window of opportunity had opened, and he took advantage of it. What opportunities are in store for you? Fran Trascritti is a writer who lives in Italy.

Reader Interactions

Your presence at the appropriate time and location for Christ’s sake may be advantageous. It might happen now, tomorrow, or even next week; the important thing is to be prepared.

In the case of Joseph of Arimathea, an opportunity presented itself, and he took advantage of it. Are you aware of the chances that are available to you right now? Fran Trascritti is a writer who lives in the United States of America.

Coram Deo

The act of hiding our loyalty to Christ is a sin (Matt. 10:32–33), yet it is not a sin that is unforgivable. Important is that we repent of feeling ashamed or fearful about our affiliation with Christ and openly proclaim that we are His disciples. This is the first step. This is exactly what Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus did when they were tasked with transporting Jesus’ body to the tomb. Please, if we have ever been embarrassed of Jesus, let us repent today and beg the Lord to give us the courage to be acknowledged as Christ’s disciples.

For Further Study

How God worked through Nicodemus and Joseph to provide the most powerful argument for the Christian faith in history. A decision was reached somewhere between Jesus’ trial before the Sanhedrin and his execution that Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus would make their secret faith public by an unusual gesture. They may have been worn out by the long days, disillusioned by their fellow Pharisees’ embrace of injustice, or grieving over the death of the one on whom they’d pinned their hopes for a messianic Messiah when they made the decision to grant Jesus what Israel refused to grant him during his lifetime: recognition as King.

  1. Jesus and the two insurrectionists who perished with him on the cross would have their corpses taken because Jewish officials had demanded that the bodies not be left on the crosses overnight in violation of the law, as was the case with other victims of the crucifixion that night.
  2. Jesus, on the other hand, died several hours earlier and did not require his legs to be broken.
  3. Pilate was taken completely by surprise by Joseph’s proposal.
  4. Perhaps Pilate felt happy that the Jesus issue had been resolved at long last.
  5. This was perhaps much more surprising to him than the rest of it.
  6. Typically, a criminal would be dropped into an empty grave or pauper’s field, where he or she would be buried in ignominy behind a mound of rocks, according to tradition.
  7. Joseph and Nicodemus, as well as the ladies who accompanied them to the burial of Jesus, had a lot of significant things to contemplate at this point.

Not in an empty field, but rather in a tomb belonging to a wealthy individual, thereby fulfilling the prophecy of the prophet Isaiah (Isa.

It was critical for them to not only remove Jesus’ corpse from the cross but also bury him as soon as possible before nightfall and the start of the Sabbath on Passover week, when all activity was required to halt.

It was likely near Golgotha, where Jesus was crucified, but outside the city gates.

It was seventy-five pounds, according to John 19:39, which was an astonishing sum, evocative of Mary of Bethany’s ostentatious show of washing Jesus’ feet with expensive ointment in the Gospel of John.

They had to gently wrap him in bandages and anoint his corpse with myrrh as a preservative as well as aloes and scents to reduce the stink of decomposition, which they had to do with care because he was dead.

Two high-ranking religious officials, bending down and working themselves to exhaustion in order to please their Lord.

Then, as they went about their arduous work, rushing against the clock to get him into Joseph’s tomb before the sun set, uncertainty and worry crept into their hearts as they did it.

As God, how could Jesus allow himself to be imprisoned by the Sanhedrin and killed by the Romans if he was the Son of God?

Their private religion, the secret they had whispered to each other in the halls of Jerusalem, would suddenly be made public, and they were not prepared for it to happen.

After they had deposited the blood-stained corpse in the tomb, it would soon spring to life, throwing off the textile wrappings and so the bonds of death.

While Joseph was busy preparing the tomb, he was unaware that it would only serve as a temporary resting place for the Son of God.

As a testimony to Christ’s victory over the curse of sin, Joseph’s valuable real estate would be preserved for future generations.

Both tombs are devoid of any remains.

It’s understandable for us to be perplexed as to why Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus kept their religious beliefs to themselves.

However, I believe that this viewpoint is unjust and myopic.

At times, Jesus did not talk or move around in a public manner, knowing that his adversaries were after him but that his time had not yet arrived.

This isn’t necessarily indicative of cowardice.

It is vital to make public proclamations, but it is also important to “aim to live a peaceful life” (1 Thess.

4:11).

Their courage appeared when it was most needed, and it did not come at a more inconvenient time.

The Sanhedrin appeared to be the last place you’d expect to discover followers of Jesus.

These were pinpricks of light in a dark world, and it was spreading among the mighty.

His bodily death was evident to them both; he was a lifeless body dripping with blood and water.

28:11–15).

Without the empty tomb, we are, in the words of Paul, “the most unhappy of all mankind” (1 Cor.

Because of their humble acts of fidelity, the hidden disciples were able to proclaim the good news of God’s redeeming love to the entire world.

Daniel Darling has more to say about it » The following is an excerpt from The Characters of Easterby The following article first published on Thinke: Daniel Darling (Moody Publishers, February 2021). Organd has given permission for this re-posting.

Who was Joseph of Arimathea?

Using Nicodemus and Joseph, God was able to craft the most crucial apologetic for the Christian faith. A decision was reached somewhere between Jesus’ trial before the Sanhedrin and his execution that Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus would make their secret faith public by an unusual act. They may have been worn out by the long days, disillusioned by their fellow Pharisees’ embrace of injustice, or grieving over the death of the one on whom they’d pinned their hopes for a messianic Messiah when they made the decision to grant Jesus what Israel had refused to grant him during his lifetime: recognition as King.

  1. Jesus and the two insurrectionists who perished with him on the cross would have their corpses taken because Jewish officials had demanded that the bodies not be left on the crosses overnight in violation of the law, as was the case with other victims of the crucifixion on that night.
  2. But Jesus died much sooner, and his legs did not have to be broken like they did with the other victims.
  3. Pilate was taken aback by Joseph’s request, which he denied.
  4. Possibility that Pilate was relieved that the Jesus issue had been completely resolved A member of the Sanhedrin stood before him, eager to compromise his position and reputation in order to offer Jesus a king’s funeral.
  5. What Joseph and Nicodemus are doing is exactly that.
  6. That Pilate approved their request and that they chose to openly associate themselves with an enemy of the state, one who had been sentenced to death for treason and rebellion, were both exceedingly rare events in the Roman world.
  7. The first reason was that they wanted to show Jesus the honor that he deserved as King of the Jews in death, something he had not received during his lifetime.

53:9).

Because of its location near Golgotha, where Jesus was killed, yet outside the city walls, Joseph’s tomb made sense as a burial location for Jesus.

“I am the Lord your God,” Joseph said.

Peeling Jesus’ bleeding body from the crucifixion and transporting him the distance to the tomb while his bodily fluids were still pouring was a tough undertaking.

In the case of Joseph and Nicodemus, this was a gesture of affection.

I believe their friends and relatives are perplexed as to why these two powerful men would show such concern for a rejected Messiah and a reviled opponent of the Roman Empire.

What would be the next chapter in their lives?

Where were the soldiers of heaven when he needed them most, fighting for his life?

Nicander and Joseph were unaware that Jesus’ death on the cross did not mark the end of his life, but the beginning of the end of theirs.

He couldn’t have realized that the costly embalming ointments and fragrances used to give Jesus a burial worthy of a King were only meant to be utilized for a short time.

Neither this cemetery nor the graves of those who believe in Jesus as their Savior would be filled for eternity.

Many times, I’ve had the pleasure of traveling across Israel, where I’ve seen both of the places where it’s probable that Jesus was laid to rest.

Suddenly, the darkest night of their lives, when darkness appeared to engulf them and the entire world, was transformed into the beginning of something quite different.

See also:  Why Did Judas Betray Jesus Yahoo

By being more open about our beliefs, we view ourselves as having greater bravery.

In various people and settings, courage may take on a variety of appearances.

For example, Christians in closed nations who are laboring to slowly plant seeds of gospel testimony or Christians in important leadership positions who must evaluate their remarks in order to effectively manage their influence are examples of situations when caution is the finest witness.

The concept of this is difficult for us to fathom in an age where we believe that every idea must be conveyed on every platform at all times.

4:11) and to be “quick to listen, slow to speak, and slow to anger” (1 Thess.

(James 1:19).

The presence of Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea in the Easter tale, on the other hand, demonstrates how God works in mysterious ways to accomplish his objectives in the world as well as the gospel’s ability to function even in the most unexpected locations.

The kingdom of God was spreading among the destitute and outcasts at the same time as it was spreading among the powerful, in the very councils that had sentenced him to death.

A significant amount of the most compelling evidence for the resurrection of Jesus was gathered by members of the very body that had condemned him to death.

It was so obvious that nobody could miss the miracle that Jesus’ opponents were forced to pay Roman soldiers assigned to guard him to lie about it (Matt.

And they buried Jesus in a conspicuous location where no one could miss the miracle.

According to Paul, “of all men most wretched” are those who do not believe in the empty tomb (1 Cor.

God’s redeeming love was broadcast to the entire world by God’s hidden disciples, who did so via quiet acts of commitment.

Daniel Darling has more to say : The following is an excerpt from The Characters of Easterby Thomas Mann Author Daniel Darling (Moody Publishers, February 2021) was first featured onThinke.com. With permission, organd has re-posted it here.

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Joseph and Nicodemus Bury Jesus’ Body (19:38-42) – IVP New Testament Commentary Series

The tale of Jesus’ burial in John’s gospel may serve to further establish the notion of Jesus’ royal character. The huge amount of spice employed (v. 39) clearly demonstrates their devotion to Jesus, just as the extravagant nature of Mary’s gift earlier in the chapter did (12:3). At least some royal funerals were characterized by the use of large amounts of spices (2 Chron 16:14; JosephusAntiquities of the Jews17.199). It is possible that the fact that Joseph’s tomb is a garden tomb (v. 41) implies more links with monarchy, given that the kings of Judah were buried in garden tombs (2 Kings 21:18, 26), including King David, suggests further associations with royalty (Neh 3:16 LXX; cf.

  1. There were many of people besides kings who had lavish funerals and were buried in garden tombs, but given all of the emphasis placed on Jesus as king in the Passion story, such features may continue the theme at the burial of Jesus.
  2. 41).
  3. Brown (1970:959) cites John85.4 as an example.
  4. Additionally, it may be connected to the topic of the formation of the new community: Jesus has reordered the lives of his mother and the Beloved Disciple (Vv.
  5. Mt 12:46-50 par.
  6. Lk 8:19-21).
  7. Indeed, in this narrative, we observe the addition of two more members to this family.

He was a disciple, to be sure, but he did so in secrecy out of fear for his life from Jewish authorities (v.

In addition, Nicodemus, despite the fact that he was not officially designated as a “disciple,” had visited Jesus in the middle of the night(v.

As a result, they are two of the individuals mentioned previously who were hidden believers “because they preferred honor from others over praise from God” (12:42-43).

According to the Synoptics, Joseph was a rich member of the Sanhedrin who was looking forward to the arrival of the kingdom and who had refused to agree to the Sanhedrin’s judgment of Jesus when it was announced (Mt 27:57; Mk 15:43; Lk 23:50-51).

39).

T.

In any event, they are two guys who wield considerable power, privilege, and fortune.

37).

It is odd that these two men come out of hiding and publicly link themselves with Jesus at the time of his death, given that they would have assumed his movement had come to an end by then.

By taking this step, they are making the degree of their dissatisfaction known to their fellow Jewish leaders.

The Romans would frequently keep the body on the cross for days at a time, though they would occasionally allow the family to remove the body for burial.

Consequently, Joseph had no claim to the body and, depending on how Pilate saw the situation, would have put himself in grave jeopardy.

Furthermore, by permitting Jesus to be buried in a dignified manner, Pilate would be able to aggravate the Jewish leadership even more.

It was instead possible to place the seventy-five pounds of spices, which were most likely in granular or powder form, beneath, surrounding and inside the body, as well as in the strips of linen that they used to wrap the corpse.

42; Robinson 1985:282-83).

As Brown (1994:2:1265) points out, there is no indication that Jews draped their corpses in strips, as Egyptian mummies did, and the Synoptics state that a single sheet was used as the primary covering for their corpses (Mt 27:59 par.

Lk 23:53).

Brown (1994:2:1265) suggests that the term “grave garments” can apply to a single sheet (see Brown 1994:2:1265) or can be used more broadly to refer to “grave clothing” in general (Robinson 1985:291).

When Joseph and Nicodemus perform this step, it marks a shift in their personal discipleship, since they are plainly breaking apart from the rest of the Jewish leadership.

If they miss the Passover itself, according to some accounts of the dating (see comments on 18:28 and 19:14), this means that Christ has replaced the Passover for them, which is consistent with John’s emphasis on Jesus as the Lamb of God and the fulfillment of the Jewish feasts in general, and the fulfillment of the Passover in particular.

The generosity of InterVarsity Press allows us to make the IVP New Testament Commentaries available to you.

Joseph of Arimathea

QUESTION: Who was Joseph of Arimathea, and what was his significance? ANSWER:Please keep in mind that the material contained in this page was gathered from a variety of sources and is not limited to solely biblical texts. The stories have been passed down through generations through traditional papers, and their accuracy cannot be verified. Joseph of Arimathea was a bit of a puzzle to figure out! His prior name was Joseph de Marmore, according to history, since he resided in Marmorica in Egypt before he came to Arimathea, and this was the reason for his previous name.

  1. Because of his kinship with Mary, he was considered a Great Uncle of Jesus.
  2. There are little verified data concerning Joseph’s life other from the fact that he was a rich man.
  3. It is a well-documented fact that Britain was the world’s leader in tin mining during the time in question.
  4. Joseph of Arimathea was not one of Jesus’ original twelve apostles, but he was a disciple of Jesus and a prominent figure in his own right, despite his lack of apostle status.
  5. Considering that he was a top counselor and a voting member of the Sanhedrin 2, which officially desired Jesus’ murder, we can guess that he did not consent to, or agree with, the decision to press Pontius Pilate to inflict the death penalty on Jesus.
  6. Jesus was clearly unpopular with the leaders of the church, and showing support for Him in public did not earn them any respect in their estimation (John 19:38).
  7. The fact that this has occurred is noteworthy in and of itself.

Instead, Joseph of Arimathea was chosen.

Joseph removed the body from the scene and buried it in his own tomb.

3 In accordance with other historical traditions, Joseph of Arimathea traveled to Gaul with the apostle Phillip, Mary Magdalene, Lazarus, and others at some point between the years A.D.

63 in order to preach to the people of that region (the year is in dispute).

When Joseph’s company reached the English Channel, Phillip dispatched Joseph and 12 followers to the Island of the Britons, which was the furthest reaches of the Roman Empire at the time.

They became stranded in the marshes of Glastonbury.

He said that he, his traveling mates, and themselves were all exhausted.

On the spot, Joseph constructed a church (Vetusta Ecclesia) out of mud and wattle and ruled that 12 monks shall always dwell in that most hallowed of locations.

6 As well, it is said that Joseph was able to collect some of Christ’s blood and perspiration after His side had been wounded when He was hanging on the cross.

Joseph is claimed to have brought the cup with him on his journey to England, where he is said to have concealed it in the bottom of a deep well known as the ‘Chalice Well’ or the ‘Blood Well,’ near the town of Glastonbury.

The high iron level in the water is responsible for the red colour.

Joseph of Arimathea at Glastonbury,” by Lieutenant Colonel Smithett Lewis (Glastonbury Vicar).

and A.D.

It was common for them to be led by a High Priest.

A religious, civil, and criminal case might be heard by this tribunal. This image is courtesy of the Merriam-Webster Dictionary. 4Joseph of Arimathea” by Hampton Rod and Fox Seth. 3Gospel of Nicodemus” by Hampton Rod and Fox Seth. 5 Timescapes Themes of time and history include:

Who was Joseph of Arimathea?

Because he feared the Jewish leaders, Joseph of Arimathea remained a secret follower of Jesus throughout his life. He is probably best known for his actions in requesting Jesus’ body from Pilate and then burying it in his own tomb. Get your free Bible study guide by clicking on the following link: A stepping stone to a fulfilling life Joseph of Arimathea is mentioned in each of the four Gospels (Matthew 27:57-61, Mark 15:42-47, Luke 23:50-54, and John 19:38-42) during the time period surrounding Jesus’ crucifixion and burial (Matthew 27:57-61, Mark 15:42-47, Luke 23:50-54, and John 19:38-42).

Joseph of Arimathea

According to the Gospel of Luke, Joseph of Arimathea was a “good and just man” who refused to assent to the Sanhedrin’s “decision or deed” to kill Jesus because he believed Jesus was innocent. (See also Luke 23:50 and 51.) In spite of the fact that he was a prominent member of the Jewish council (Mark 15:43), he was “awaiting the kingdom of God” (Luke 23:51). Joseph of Arimathea followed Christ in secret, and yet he had the bravery to approach Pilate and request the corpse of Jesus. (See Mark 15:43 for further information.)

1. He stood for what was right

In Luke 23:51, it is said that Joseph of Arimathea did not “agree to their decision and deed” in relation to the Jewish council’s execution of Jesus, and that he “did not consent to their choice and deed.” Consider how difficult it must have been to listen to your fellow council members disparage Jesus verbally and then witness the conclusion of their hate for Jesus at the cross.

2. He was from Arimathea

According to Matthew 27:57, Joseph was from the town of Arimathea. The Greek term for Arimathea (), which is transliterated as “harimathaia,” literally translates as “heights.” In Hebrew, the term Arimathea means “hill,” and it is transliterated as “ramah,” which means “hilltop.” There appear to be four places in Palestine with the name Ramah, one of which is the birthplace of Samuel (1 Samuel 1:19, the priest who served during the time of Saul and a portion of David’s reign, and another which is the birthplace of David (1 Samuel 1:19, the priest who served during the time of Saul and a portion of David’s reign).

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According to Thayer’s Greek Lexicon, Joseph of Aramathea was most likely born on Mt Ephraim, the same location where Samuel was born.

3. He was a secret follower of Jesus

According to the Bible’s account in John 19:38, Joseph of Arimathea secretly accompanied Christ because he was afraid of Jewish persecution. It wasn’t until after Jesus’ death that he publicly declared his commitment to Jesus, just as Nicodemus had done. In the aftermath of Jesus’ death, Joseph of Arimathea didn’t give a damn about what people around him thought, and he removed Jesus off the cross.

4. He was a good and just man

According to Luke 23:50 and 51, Joseph of Arimathea was “a righteous and just man” who was looking forward to the coming of the kingdom of God.

He may have even harbored secret hopes that Jesus was the Messiah and that His kingdom would come to pass during Joseph’s time on earth.

5. He was a prominent Jewish leader

The renowned member of the Jewish council (Mark 15:43), Joseph of Arimathea would have been well-known to the general public and respected by many of his colleagues if he had been alive today. Although he was in a prominent position, this did not prevent him from finally expressing his complete support for Jesus after His death.

6. He was wealthy

Additionally, Matthew 27:57 mentions that Joseph of Arimathea was a wealthy individual. This is demonstrated by the way Joseph is described in the Bible:

  • He was a prominent member of the Jewish council (Mark 15:43)
  • He had an unused tomb carved out of rock (John 19:41)
  • He was a prominent member of the Jewish council (Mark 15:43)
  • The tomb was placed in a garden, according to John 19:41

7. He cared for Jesus

Joseph of Arimathea’s wealth, on the other hand, had no effect on his character, personality, or dedication, as can be seen in the way he and Nicodemus treated Jesus after His death was announced. Besides asking for Jesus’ corpse with confidence, Joseph of Arimathea also pulled Jesus down from the cross and covered His body in linen with tenderness and care.

8. He was courageous

When it came to character, personality, and dedication, Joseph of Arimathea’s wealth did not limit him, as seen by the way he and Nicodemus treated Jesus following His death. But Joseph of Arimathea did more than just beg for Jesus’ corpse. He brought Jesus down from the crucifixion and wrapped His body in linen, a gesture that was both tender and meticulous.

9. He was a planner

Joseph of Arimathea had a tomb built for himself, which he used as a burial site. He had made preparations for his death and was prepared to die. Joseph of Arimathea is said to have deposited Jesus’ body in his new tomb, which he had hewn out of the rock, and then he left, according to Matthew 27:60, “and he rolled a big stone against the door of the tomb, and fled.” Joseph of Arimathea was constructing a burial site for himself when he became aware of his Master’s need, and he acted immediately and freely to put Jesus in his own tomb “where no one had ever slept before” (Matthew 27:51).

(Luke 23:53).

Conclusion:

In preparation for his own burial, Joseph of Arimathea had a tomb built for him. He had made preparations for his death and was prepared to die in that state of readiness. Joseph of Arimathea is said to have deposited Jesus’ body in his new tomb, which he had hewn out of the rock, and then he left, according to Matthew 27:60, “and he rolled a big stone on the door of the tomb and withdrew.” However, upon seeing his Master’s need, Joseph of Arimathea immediately and voluntarily placed Jesus in his own tomb “where no one had ever lay before.” Joseph of Arimathea was preparing a burial site for himself when he discovered his Master’s need (Luke 23:53).

Why did joseph of arimathea bury jesus?

Joseph of Arimathea had a tomb built just for himself. He had prepared for his own death and was prepared to die. Joseph of Arimathea is said to have deposited Jesus’ body in his new tomb, which he had hewn out of the rock, and then he left, according to Matthew 27:60. Joseph of Arimathea was constructing a burial site for himself when he became aware of his Master’s need, and he acted immediately and cheerfully to put Jesus in his own tomb “where no one had ever slept before” (Luke 23:53).

Why did Joseph bury Jesus?

A nice and just man who managed to be a member of the Council (the Sanhedrin) while also being a covert supporter of Jesus – which is why he did not participate in the Council’s persecution of Jesus.

Following Jesus’ death, Joseph approached Pilate and requested permission to remove Jesus’ body and properly bury it.

Why was Jesus buried in a borrowed tomb?

Good Friday comes to a close with Jesus’ burial in a tomb that has been “borrowed.” It is borrowed in two ways: first, since it was not His own, but rather belonged to Joseph of Arimathea; and second, because it was not His own, but rather belonged to Joseph of Arimathea. It was borrowed for a short period of time, and Jesus did not remain there. This is significant in more ways than one, though.

What did Joseph of Arimathea do for Jesus?

According to all four of the canonical gospels, Joseph of Arimathea was the man who claimed responsibility for the burial of Jesus following his crucifixion and death.

Where was Joseph of Arimathea buried?

It is possible to enter the tomb of Joseph of Arimathea through a chapel located behind the Tomb of Jesus, which is located at the western end of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. There were 27 questions that were connected.

How old was Joseph when Jesus died?

According to the apocryphal History of Joseph the Carpenter, written in the fifth or sixth centuries, Joseph died peacefully at the age of eleven, in the presence of Jesus (who was then around nineteen years old), Mary, and angels, according to a lengthy description.

What did Nicodemus do after Jesus died?

The last character in the story is Nicodemus, who arrives after the Crucifixion of Jesus to bring the usual embalming spices as well as to aid Joseph of Arimathea in preparing the corpse of Jesus for burial (John 19:39–42).

Where did Jesus go in the missing years?

He (Jesus) spent six years in the towns of Puri and Rajgir, which are close to Nalanda, the ancient Hindu center of study. Then he traveled to the Himalayas, where he spent time in Tibetan monasteries studying Buddhism before returning to Judea, where he was 29 years old at the time of his return.

Who were the 3 Marys at the cross?

Puri and Rajgir, close to Nalanda, the historic seat of Hindu learning, were the locations of his (Jesus’) six-year sojourn. After that, he traveled to the Himalayas, where he studied Buddhism in Tibetan monasteries before returning to Judea through Persia at the age of 29.’

Where is Jesus buried now?

The tomb may be found in Jerusalem in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. It is the most frequently regarded burial place for Jesus Christ in the world today. Many believed the tomb to be no more than 1,000 years old at the time of its discovery.

Why did Mary visit the tomb?

What was she looking for when she went to the tomb? The only possible response is the most clear and straightforward: she adored Jesus. If it meant only sitting next to his tomb, she was content to be in his company. Mary’s love was genuine because she had been set free by the love of Christ.

What is the name of the tomb Jesus was buried in?

Hebrew: ), also known as the Garden Tomb, is a rock-cut tomb on the outskirts of Jerusalem that was discovered in 1867 and is regarded by some Protestants to be the place of Jesus’ burial and resurrection. By using radiocarbon dating, Israeli archaeologist Gabriel Barkay has determined that the tomb dates to the 8th–7th centuries BC.

Who was the man who helped Jesus carry the cross?

(Mt. 27:32) As they were leading him away, they apprehended a man named Simon of Cyrene, who had come from the countryside, and they nailed the cross on his back and forced him to drag it behind Jesus.

Where did Jesus go for 30 years?

Accord to this literature, which Notovitch had translated into French, Jesus had spent his “missing years” – the years between his infancy and the beginning of his ministry – studying Buddhism in India, according to the Gospel of Matthew.

He had returned to the Middle East and the life that we are all familiar with from the New Testament when he was around 30 years old.

Did Jesus have a wife?

According to a new book, Jesus Christ was married to Mary Magdalene and had two children with her.

When Did Jesus realize he was the son of God?

Immediately following Paul the Apostle’s conversion and subsequent recovery, according to Acts 9:20, “he went around proclaiming Jesus as the Son of God” in synagogues across the region.

What happened to Mary Magdalene after Jesus died?

“Straightway in the synagogues, he proclaimed Jesus as the Son of God,” according to Acts 9:20, following Paul the Apostle’s conversion and subsequent recovery from illness.

Why did Nicodemus not follow Jesus?

Come and see what I’m up to, and all of your questions will be addressed. “Come with me and follow me.” As a result, Nicodemus’ decision, based on his fear, not to follow Jesus would constitute a setback in both his conflict between faith and fear, as well as his struggle with doubt.

Is the Gospel of Nicodemus true?

As well as the Acts of Pilate (Latin: Acta Pilati, translit. Praxeis Pilatou), the Gospel of Nicodemus is an apocryphal gospel that claims to have been derived from an original Hebrew work written by Nicodemus, who appears in the Gospel of John as an associate of Jesus. It is the second most popular apocryphal gospel after the Gospel of John.

What was Jesus last name?

As well as the Acts of Pilate (Latin: Acta Pilati, translit. Praxeis Pilatou), the Gospel of Nicodemus is an apocryphal gospel that claims to have been taken from an original Hebrew book authored by Nicodemus, who appears in the Gospel of John as a companion of Jesus.

Who is the real father of Jesus?

Life of Jesus in a nutshell He was born to Joseph and Mary somewhere between 6 bce and just before the death of Herod the Great (Matthew 2; Luke 1:5) in 4 bce, according to the earliest known accounts. However, according to Matthew and Luke, Joseph was solely his legal father in the eyes of the law.

What was the age difference between Mary and Joseph?

Similarly, in another early work, The History of Joseph the Carpenter, which was produced in Egypt during the sixth and seventh century AD, Christ himself narrates the account of his stepfather, indicating that Joseph was 90 years old when he married Mary and died at the age of 111 years.

What was Joseph to Jesus?

Joseph was the earthly father of Jesus, the man who was charged with the responsibility of raising the Son of God. As an additional talent, Joseph was a carpenter or skillful artisan. He obeyed God despite the fact that he was being severely humiliated. He did the right thing in front of God, and he did it in the proper manner.

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