Who Prophesied The Birth Of Jesus In The Old Testament

7 Prophecies That Foretold Jesus’ Birth

A woman caught in adultery was brought before Jesus by the Jews, and they begged him to pronounce judgment on her. This is the context of the passage. In all likelihood, this episode was staged so that if Jesus stated they should stone her, the Jews would immediately report Him to the Romans, who were in charge of civil law at the time. If Jesus stated that they should not stone her, the Jews would accuse Him of disobeying the law of Moses, and He would be condemned. The religious leaders were hypocrites who orchestrated the entire scenario in order to try to ensnare Jesus in his own trap.

This is one of the few known examples of Jesus penning anything.

It is mentioned in the Mishnah that people used to write their names in the sand to communicate (Shabbath12.

of the Talmud, p.

This is most likely since, once He had finished writing on the ground, He invited those who were there to throw the first stone at His command.

Using the woman’s accusations as a foundation for His writing demonstrated His divinity and demonstrated that He had the ability to read the hearts of people.

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Evidence or Faith?

The passage is set in the context of the Jews bringing a woman who had been caught in adultery and asking Jesus to pass judgment on her. This scenario was plainly a ruse: if Jesus stated they should stone her, the Jews would immediately report Him to the Romans, who would then prosecute Him under civil law. They would accuse Jesus of breaking the law of Moses if He indicated that they should not stone her. The religious leaders were hypocrites who orchestrated the entire scenario in order to capture Jesus.

  • As far as we know, Jesus never wrote anything else.
  • The Mishnah makes mention of the practice of writing on the sand (Shabbath12.
  • of the Talmud, p.
  • This is most likely since, once He had finished writing on the ground, He invited those who were there to throw the first stone.
  • The fact that Jesus wrote on the ground of the woman’s accusers’ misdeeds demonstrated His divinity and His ability to discern the minds of mankind.

Old Testament Prophecies about the Birth of Jesus

According to the Hebrew Bible, which is known to Christians as the Old Testament, the notion of anointed one of God who would come to usher in a period in which all peoples of the world will dwell together happily and righteously is introduced. These ideas, according to Jewish tradition, are indicated in the account of creation. Rabbinical thought holds that God desired for humans to live with Him in a paradise, which is why He created the Garden of Eden. Human sin necessitated our expulsion from the garden; nonetheless, when Adam and Eve were banished from the garden, God did not destroy Eden.

  • According to Judaism, the Messianic Age is the period of time during which the Messiah will restore us to the sort of world that God intended when he created us.
  • A significant number of these having to do with the impending birth of the Messiah – which Christians remember as the celebration of Christmas!
  • Consider the scenario in which ancient manuscripts from 600 to 1,000 years ago are discovered in Waco, Texas, and are being studied.
  • The scrolls foretell that someone of direct descent to George Washington will be born in our time, according to the predictions.
  • The scrolls also show that the individual will be born in the town of Azle, in Tarrant County, Texas, according to the information provided.
  • At the time of his birth, dignitaries from other nations would miraculously become aware of him and go to him to revere him and offer him with valuable presents, believing he was a divinely appointed emissary.
  • This would be revealed by our fictional predictions.

To safeguard this precious kid from the oppressors, his father would transport him to another nation, where he would remain until his father returned with him.

Consider the possibility that all of this came to pass within our lifetime, fulfilling the prophecies contained in these centuries-old scrolls.

Take a look at some of the prophesies that were made about the birth of Jesus.

Abraham’s descendants will be blessed, according to Genesis 22:18, which states that “all nations on earth will be blessed.” Christians believe that Jesus is the one who brings this promise to fruition.

“I see him, but not at this time; I view him, but not close.” Numbers 24:17.

According to Isaiah 11:1, He is descended from Jesse, the father of King David: “A shoot will grow from the stump of Jesse, and a branch will bring fruit from his roots.” It is the Lord’s spirit that will fall upon him.” We know He is descended from King David because of Jeremiah 23:5-6: “The days are coming, says the Lord, when I will raise up for David a righteous Branch, a King who will reign wisely and do what is just and right in the country.

His name will be known as “the Lord our righteous savior,” which means “the Lord our righteous savior.” We have the following prophecy from 2 Samuel 7:12-13, which was actually spoken by Samuel to King David, reaffirming that Jesus is descended from King David: “When your days are over and you rest with your fathers, I will raise up your offspring to succeed you, who will come from your own body, and I will establish his kingdom.” The one who will build a home for my Name, and I will establish the throne of his dominion for all time,” declares the Lord.

In accordance with the prophecy of Micah 5:2, we know that He was born into the tribe of Judah in the region of Ephrathah, in the town of Bethlehem: “But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, though you are small among the clans of Judah, out of you will come for me one who will be ruler over Israel, whose origins date back to ancient times.” According to Isaiah 7:14, He was born of a virgin: “Therefore, the Lord himself will give you a sign: The virgin will be with child and will give birth to a son, and you will name him Immanuel.” He was born of a virgin, according to the Bible.

  1. In Hebrew, the nameImmanuel means “God with us,” and it refers to Jesus’ divinity as well.
  2. “May the desert tribes bend down before him, and his adversaries lick the dust from their boots.” May the kings of Tarshish and distant seas pay homage to him and honor him with gifts.
  3. Hopefully, all kings will bow down to him and all countries will serve him.” As a part of his attempt to murder Jesus, King Herod massacred a large number of children at the time of His birth.
  4. This is foretold in Hosea 11:1: “When Israel was a youngster, I loved him, and I named him my son out of Egypt.” We come to the end of our examination of these ancient works by marveling at them as a group.

However, they are made even more incredible when we consider how unlikely it was that any of these prophesies would be realized. but they were! Dr. David Teitelbaum is a neurologist who practices in New York City.

11 Times the Old Testament Predicts Jesus’ Birth and Death

The Bible’s prophetic character is one of the most important facts of the Bible’s canon. Scripture contains many prophesies that have already come true, as well as many that are still to be fulfilled – such as the second coming of Jesus Christ – that we are still expecting to be fulfilled. To be sure, before he comes a second time, he must first come a first time. The prophecy of Jesus’ first coming can be found throughout the Old Testament. Possibly you are asking where in the Old Testament did Jesus’ birth and death are predicted.

Old Testament Prophecies of Jesus

Please allow me to take a minute to address another point before we get started on the answer to the question of where the Old Testament anticipates Jesus’ birth and death. What makes you think you can put your faith in biblical prophecy? Fortunately, the solution is given in the actual text of the Bible: “You may wonder, ‘How can we tell when a word has not been revealed by the Lord?'” If anything that a prophet announces in the name of the Lord does not occur or come to pass, it is considered to be a message that the Lord has not spoken.

You may determine whether or not Scripture is prophetically accurate by asking one simple question: Did it come to pass?

Let’s take a look at some of the Old Testament prophecies that were fulfilled.

When it comes to answering the topic of where in the Old Testament Jesus’ birth and death are predicted, I wish to categorize the answers into two groups.

Old Testament Predictions of Jesus’ Birth

Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/Iukbar1. 3:15 (Genesis 3:15) “And I will create animosity between you and the woman, as well as between your progeny and hers; he will crush your head, and you will strike his heel,” the prophet says. Almost from the beginning of time, soon after Adam and Eve defied him, God made it clear that the seed of the woman, Eve, would be used to bring about a savior’s arrival. God revealed straight immediately that this seed would be the one who would smash the serpent’s head in the Garden of Eden.

The book of Genesis is attributed to Moses, who is considered its author.

2.Genesis 12:3 (the third verse) I will bless those who benefit from your blessings, and I will condemn those who benefit from your curses; and through you, all peoples on earth will benefit.” Throughout this passage, God is promising Abraham that he would be transformed into a powerful nation.

  1. In this benediction, the entire human race is directed toward the One who will rescue peoples from every tribe and tongue on the face of the planet.
  2. 3.
  3. This passage of Scripture alludes to the way in which he would be born, as well as to one of the titles given to Christ: Immanuel, which literally translates as God with us.
  4. This was written more than 700 years before the birth of Christ.
  5. It is estimated that Micah wrote this prophesy roughly 800 years before the birth of Jesus Christ.
  6. “When Israel was a youngster, I adored him, and I adopted him as my son after fleeing Egypt.” Hosea also wrote this prophesy, which was penned roughly 800 years before the birth of Christ.
  7. Remember that the Israelites were slaves in Egypt at the time of God’s deliverance.

In addition, keep in mind that Joseph and Mary fled to Egypt with the newborn Jesus in order to avoid the murder at the hands of Herod. This passage can be used to either of two circumstances. Matthew, on the other hand, made reference to it in his works (Matthew 2:14-15).

Old Testament Predictions of Jesus’ Death

Photo courtesy of Getty Images (1971yes). Psalm 22 is one of the few passages in the Bible that precisely prophesies Christ’s death. I’d like to draw your attention to a couple verses from this Psalm. The verse “My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?” in Psalm 22:1 is a powerful statement of faith. All who see me make fun of me; they throw insults at my face while shaking their heads.” 7.Psalm 22:7-8 ‘He puts his confidence in the Lord,’ they say, and they pray that the Lord will save him.

All of my skeletons are on show, and people ogle and gloat at my expense.

I only want to draw attention to the numerous allusions to Christ’s real crucifixion that appear throughout this Psalm.

  • “My God, my God, why have you left me?” Jesus cried out in anguish. The Bible (Matthew 27:46, Mark 15:34) says that The people mocked Jesus and hurled insults at him while shaking their heads (Matthew 27:39, Mark 15:29)
  • They cried out, “He trusts in the Lord, let the Lord save him” (Matthew 27:41-43)
  • They nailed him to a cross, piercing his hands and feet (Matthew 27:35)
  • They divided his clothes and cast lots for them (Matthew 27:35, Mark 15:24, Luke

According to some critics, the precision and specificity of David’s prophesy lead them to think that it was penned after Jesus’ crucifixion had already occurred. However, according to the evidence, this was penned some 1000 years earlier. In the unlikely event that someone might ever inquire as to where the Old Testament anticipates Jesus’ birth and death, you ought to bring this Psalm up in conversation. This is especially true if you are discussing his death. Isaiah 53 is another another excellent scripture to consult.

  1. 9.
  2. 10.
  3. He was carried to the slaughter like a lamb, and, just as a sheep before its shearers remains mute, he did not open his mouth.” 11.
  4. As previously said, when you study the scriptures, you will be amazed at how accurate and dependable Bible prophesies are.
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What Does All This Mean?

Several critics have suggested that David’s prophesy was penned after the crucifixion had already occurred, based on its precision and precise character. This was written around 1000 years ago, according to the evidence. You should include this Psalm in any discussion on where the Old Testament anticipates Jesus’ birth and death if someone ever brings it up. It’s especially true if you’re referring about his passing. Isaiah 53 is another excellent chapter to consult. However, I would want to draw attention to a few specific lines in this chapter.

53:5 is the ninth verse.

53:7 is the tenth verse.

He was carried to the slaughter like a lamb, and, just as a sheep before its shearers remains mute, so he did not open his mouth.

The Bible’s accuracy and dependability as a source of information is once again demonstrated when you study the passages. Consider the test of prophesy accuracy mentioned in Deuteronomy, and you will find that the Bible passes without a hitch.

Old Testament Prophecy and the Birth of Christ

As we begin the season of Advent, we look forward to the celebration of the birth of the Messiah on Christmas Day. We wait and consider what it means that Jesus fulfilled the prophesies of the Old Testament, particularly the prophecies that promised the birth of the Messiah. It is necessary to look at three particular predictions regarding Christ’s birth that are recorded in the books of Isaiah and Micah.

He would be preceded by a forerunner (Isaiah 40:3–5)

It is heard crying out: “In the wilderness, prepare the path of the LORD; build straight in the desert a roadway for the LORD our God.” Every valley will be raised, and every mountain and hill will be lowered; the uneven terrain will be leveled, and the rough spots will be made clear. This is the plan. And the glory of the LORD will be revealed, and all flesh will behold it together, for the LORD has spoken through his lips.” Isaiah 40:3–5 follows up on promises made in chapter 35 and proclaims that they will be fulfilled.

  1. 40:1: Yahweh directs his celestial council to “comfort, comfort my people.” His Word does not return empty but achieves the purpose for which it was sent (55:10–11).
  2. One voice in the celestial assembly responds, and Isaiah serves as Yahweh’s spokesperson (40:6; cf.
  3. The person with this voice will appear in the fullness of time (Gal 4:4), and he will be identified as John the Baptist, the herald of the Christ (Mt 3:1–3; Mk 1:1–4; Lk 3:1–6; Jn 1:19–23).
  4. Jn 3:26–30; 1 Cor 3:7).
  5. (This is an adaptation of Isaiah 40–55, Concordia Commentary.)

The Savior would be born in Bethlehem (Micah 5:2)

The only exception is you, O Bethlehem Ephrathah, who are too little to be counted among the clans of Judah. From you, O Bethlehem Ephrathah, will come forth someone who will be king in Israel, whose coming forth is from long ago, from ancient times. It is possible to read Matthew 2 as a continuous narrative, with the opposing figures of the two kings, Herod and Jesus, occupying the center of the story throughout the chapter. However, because the Magi are only mentioned in verses 2–12, we have a legitimate reason to analyze the significance of this unit while still accepting the overall flow of the chapter.

We learnt from the story of Joseph and the naming of Mary’s child that human beings would neither grasp nor believe in God’s ways of functioning via his Son, the Son of David and the Son of God, unless God intervenes and reveals them to them by interruption and revelation.

The contrast between the two rulers, as well as the difference between the unexpected believers who arrive in Jerusalem, serves to propel the story of chapter 2 ahead in even more striking ways.” (This is an adaptation of Matthew 1:1–11:1, Concordia Commentary.)

The Messiah would be born of a virgin (Isaiah 7:14)

In contrast to these clans of Judah, who are too little to be included among them, from you will come forth someone who will reign over Israel, whose coming forth dates back to ancient times. O Bethlehem Ephrathah, you are too small to be counted among these clans of Judah. According to certain interpretations, the entire chapter of Matthew 2 is one continuous story, with the opposing figures of Herod and Jesus dominating the narrative throughout. Due to the fact that the Magi are only mentioned in verses 2–12, we are justified in pondering the significance of this unit while remaining mindful of the overall flow of the chapter.

We learnt from the story of Joseph and the naming of Mary’s child that human beings would neither grasp nor believe in God’s ways of functioning via his Son, the Son of David and the Son of God, unless God intervenes and reveals them to them by revelation and interruption.

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According to the Bible, God had a plan to deliver redemption through Christ to all individuals who would choose to believe and follow Him even before the world was created (1 Peter 1:19-20). God foresaw that we would require a Savior. He was well aware that we would require liberation. Moreover, He provided a means, in the person of His One and Only Son, so that we may obtain forgiveness, as well as discover fresh life and hope in Him (John 3:16). Prophecies about the Messiah, who was to come, can be found all across the Bible, especially in the Old Testament, where they are interwoven through word after verse.

  • These prophecies spoke of His birth as well as his life and trip to the cross, as well as the power of His Resurrection.
  • One and only God has the ability to plan those particular specifics and see that they are all carried out as planned.
  • He is the Word of God.
  • He is the Way, the Truth, and the Life.
  • And the entire message of Christmas is wrapped up in Him, God’s greatest gift, who came to earth as a little infant with one strong purpose: to rescue a lost world.

He is the embodiment of the Christmas message. Here are ten particular prophesies about the birth of Jesus Christ that were fulfilled. Photo courtesy of Getty Images / MKucova

The birth of Jesus: A prophetic chorus after centuries of silence

The Bible teaches us that God had a plan to deliver redemption through Christ to those who would choose to believe and follow Him even before the world was created (1 Peter 1:19-20). A Savior was foreordained by God, who knew we’d need one. He foresaw the necessity of releasing us from our captivity. And He provided a means for us to obtain forgiveness, as well as fresh life and hope, via the sending of His One and Only Son (John 3:16). Prophecies about the Messiah, who was to come, can be found all across the Bible, especially in the Old Testament, where they are interwoven into verse after verse.

  • These prophecies spoke of His birth as well as his life and death on the cross, as well as the triumphant force of His resurrection.
  • One and only God has the ability to design those particular specifics and see that they are all carried out in their entirety.
  • He is the manifestation of the Word in the universe.
  • Him to whom you turn for guidance is the only way to find your way.
  • Ten precise prophesies about the birth of Jesus Christ are presented here for your consideration: Getty Images / MKucova is credited with this image.

The virgin shall conceive

She will give birth to a son, whose name you will give him as Jesus, because he will redeem his people from their sins.” All of this occurred in order to fulfill the prophecy of the prophet: “Behold, the virgin shall conceive and have a son, and they shall name him Immanuel” (Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall name him Immanuel) (which means, God with us). (See Matthew 1:21-23 and Isaiah 7:14 for examples.) Matthew, writing for a Jewish audience, makes frequent and early use of Old Testament predictions to demonstrate to his readers that Jesus was the long-awaited Messiah, a descendant of David and Abraham, as prophesied by the prophets.

The name Jesus (“God is salvation”) and the title Immanuel (“God with us”) are paralleled in Matthew’s gospel because they both depict Mary’s child, the incarnate Son of God who will rescue his people from their sins via his sacrifice.

Born in Bethlehem of Judea

He asked of them as to the location of the Christ’s birth. “In Bethlehem of Judea, for it is stated in the prophet: “‘And you, O Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, are by no means least among the rulers of Judah; for from you shall come a king who will shepherd my people Israel,'” they informed him. (Matthew 2:4-6; Micah 5:2-5; see also Micah 6:2-5) After that, the link between Herod, the Roman-appointed ruler of Judea and Jesus Christ, who would one day be recognized as the genuine king of Israel, is explored in Matthew’s next group of prophetic quotations.

The place, Bethlehem, was a well-kept secret since it had been foretold by the prophet Micah, who lived at the same time as Isaiah.

The Messiah had existed before the beginning of time and would rule the whole world in the name and majesty of God. He would be a king and shepherd to his people, governing the entire world in the name and majesty of God.

Out of Egypt I called my son

And he sprang up and fled to Egypt, where he remained until Herod’s death. He grabbed the infant and his mother in the middle of the night. This was in order to fulfill the prophecy of the prophet, according to which the Lord said, “Out of Egypt I called my son.” Hosea 11:1 and Matthew 2:14-15 are examples of this. Because he had been informed of Herod’s deadly scheme, Joseph and his family escaped to Egypt, fulfilling the prophecy of the prophet Hosea. On the surface, the relationship appears to be tenuous, as Hosea’s remark in context alludes to God’s deliverance of Israel from Egypt during the Exodus from Egypt.

According to this interpretation, the Exodus represents God summoning and redeeming his people via his genuine Son, Jesus Christ.

Rachel weeping for her children

The prophet Jeremiah prophesied that “a sound was heard in Ramah, crying and loud sorrow, Rachel sobbing for her children; she refused to be comforted because they were no longer alive.” That prophecy came true. Jeremiah 31:15; Matthew 2:17-18; compare Matthew 2:17-18; Jeremiah 31:15 Not all predictions are nice, and certainly not all messianic prophecies are joyful. After being foiled by the Magi and determined to assassinate the newborn king, Herod orders the massacre of every male child under the age of two who lives in or near Bethlehem, as well as the surrounding area.

They also serve to depict the darkness that exists in the world, against which the light of the soon-to-arrive Saviour shines even more brightly than usual.

He would be called a Nazarene

And he went and lived in a place called Nazareth, in order that the prophecies about him would be fulfilled, and so that he would be known as a Nazarene. Christ’s teaching on the subject is found in Matthew 2:23; see also Isaiah 11:1–5 and 53:3). In this particular instance, Matthew is not quoting directly from a prophesy. As a matter of fact, neither the words “Nazareth” nor the term “Nazarene” occur anywhere in the Old Testament. Matthew, on the other hand, is referencing to a general tone among the prophets, of whom he talks as a group in this passage.

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Furthermore, at the time of Jesus, people from Nazareth were hated and rejected, and the prophet Isaiah predicted that the Christ would be despised and rejected.

The spirit and power of Elijah

He will turn many of Israel’s children to the Lord their God, and he will go before him in the spirit and might of Elijah, turning the hearts of fathers to their children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just, in order to prepare a nation for the Lord. Compare Luke 1:16-17 with Malachi 4:5-6 for more information. The author of Luke wrote with a Hellenistic gentile audience in mind, putting together an orderly account of Jesus’ life for them, in contrast to the author of Matthew. By allowing prophetic quotations to be heard via the mouths of the characters in his story, rather than placing them in an editorial manner.

The angel, in doing so, bridges the 400-year gap in prophesy with an unequivocal declaration: the messianic forerunner was on his way, and the Messiah himself would not be long after him.

The Son of the Most High

“And behold, you will conceive in your womb and give birth to a son, whose name will be Jesus,” the prophet says. He will be magnificent, and he will be referred to as the Son of the Most High. He will inherit the throne of his father David, and he will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and there will be no end to his kingdom,” the Lord God says. 2 Samuel 7:12-16; Isaiah 9:6-7) (Luke 1:31-33; compare 2 Samuel 7:12-16; Isaiah 9:6-7) In the following chapter, the angel Gabriel makes a similar announcement to Mary, this time regarding the miraculous birth of her own son, Jesus, according to Luke.

The promise made to King David by God through Nathan the prophet, that one of David’s descendants would sit on his throne and rule an everlasting kingdom, is one of the most important.

Abraham and his offspring

So, Mary expressed herself as follows: “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Saviour. He has aided his servant Israel in recollection of his compassion, just as he promised to our forefathers, to Abraham, and to their descendants for all of time. (See Luke 1:46-47, 54-55, and Genesis 12:3, 17:4-5, and 22:18 for examples) When faced with the possibility of bearing God’s Son, Mary bursts into song with her exuberantMagnificat, which is replete with parallels to Old Testament themes, most notably the song of Hannah, among others.

With her connection to Abraham’s offspring and to the Abrahamic covenant, Mary becomes the first person in the New Testament to link Abraham’s offspring with The Messiah, who would fulfill all of the promises made to Abraham and through whom the nations would be blessed.

Prepare the way of the Lord

The Lord says to the child, “You will be called a prophet of the Most High; for you will go before him to prepare his ways, to give knowledge of salvation to his people in the forgiveness of their sins, because the tender mercy of our God will visit us from on high to give light to those who sit in darkness and in the shadow of death, and to guide our feet into the path of peace.” (Luke 1:76-79; see also Malachi 3:1; 4:2; Isaiah 9:1-2; 40:3-5; and other passages.) At the time of the birth of John the Baptist, his father Zechariah utters a messianic poetry of his own, relying on a range of Old Testament themes, such as the covenant with Abraham and the redemption via the line of David, as Mary had done.

Isaiah and Malachi predictions are referenced by Zechariah in relation to his own son, and he alludes to them as well.

In his wake would rise the Christ, the sun of righteousness, who would shine upon those who were living in darkness and under the shadow of death, bringing them light and hope.

A light for the Gentiles

“Lord, now you are letting your servant depart in peace, according to your word,” he said, lifting him up in his arms and blessing God, saying, “For my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the presence of all peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles and glory for your people Israel.” (See Luke 2:28-32, as well as Isaiah 9:1-2, 42:1-7, and 49:5-6) The remarks of Simeon, an elderly man who observes the presentation of Jesus at the Temple in Jerusalem, carry on the subject of messianic light introduced by Luke earlier in the chapter.

As a fulfillment of multiple prophesies recorded in the book of Isaiah, Simeon sees the infant as the Messiah who would bring light and salvation to both Jews and Gentiles.

That Luke included Anna the prophetess in this section is no accident; after all, she was from Asher, which was even more apart from Jerusalem in terms of geography and spirituality than either Zebulun or Naphtali.

Conclusion: A Christmas chorus of prophecy

The fulfillment of Old Testament prophesy may not be the most joyous or vivid subject of the Christmas narrative, but it is one of the most significant and significant. Despite this, both Matthew and Luke sprinkled their Nativity narratives with a slew of prophetic allusions to the birth of Jesus. They did this regardless of whether their intended audience had a strong belief in prophecy (as in the case of Matthew’s Jewish readers) or a weak belief in prophecy (as in the case of Luke’s Hellenistic gentile readers).

  1. God has always spoken and acted in the real world, via real events and real human lives, and this has never changed.
  2. The genuine God, not some obscure god of fiction and tradition, has performed marvelous things throughout history – none more so than the birth, life, death, and resurrection of his only begotten Son.
  3. It is not only about experiencing all of the seasonal emotions that the Christmas tale is about.
  4. And it is about God fulfilling those promises hundreds of years later, at the time and place of his choice, via the birth of his Son, Jesus Christ.
  5. In her role as managing editor of Focus on Faith and Culture, an e-newsletter produced by Focus for the Family Canada, Subby Szterszky is responsible for the editorial direction of the publication.

The Focus on the Family (Canada) Association is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. All intellectual property rights are retained. If you like this post and would like to learn more, we’ve included some useful resources below for you.

Three Ancient Prophecies About the Birth of Jesus

It’s possible that no other individual in history has gotten as much attention as Jesus of Nazareth did. Scholars and historians are enthralled by the prospect of unraveling the riddles surrounding his life, death, and resurrection. Though it may seem unbelievable, what has been recorded about Jesus before his birth is much more astounding than all the volumes published about his life after his birth. As Jesus said in Luke 24:44 and John 5:46, the Hebrew Scriptures were written about him, even going so far as to imply that Moses himself wrote with him in mind!

  1. Prophecies are sometimes thought of as vague, Nostradamus-style predictions concerning future events, which is not quite correct.
  2. These prophesies (which were often made thousands of years before Christ’s birth) illustrate that the Bible is more than just a collection of historical documents and poetic compositions.
  3. 2 Pet 1:19-21 (New International Version) The biblical writers were able to depict future events in great detail because they were accompanied by the Holy Spirit, who knows the beginning from the conclusion of everything.
  4. To give you something to think about as Christmas approaches, here are three predictions concerning Jesus’ birth to mull over: 1.
  5. Although you are too little to be counted among the clans of Judah, from you will come forth for me one who will rule over all of Israel, and his coming forth is from the beginning of time, from the beginning of time.
  6. More than 700 years before Jesus’ birth, the prophet Micah spoke of a ruler who would emerge from the town of Bethlehem, and whose coming forth would be from “ancient days,” according to Micah 5:2.
  7. Micah anticipated that this eternally existing one would be born amid the slums of Bethlehem, and he wrote about it here.

Bethlehem literally translates as “bread house” in Hebrew.

In his teachings, Jesus referred to himself as “the bread of life” (John 6:35).

2.

As a result, the Lord himself will provide you with a sign.

Isa 7:14; see also Matthew 1:23 Isaiah’s ministry, like that of the prophet Micah, took place hundreds of years before the birth of the Messiah, and he predicted that the Messiah’s birth would be miraculous.

This, like the prophesy of Micah, emphasizes the divine nature of the one who would be born into the world.

The virgin birth emphasizes the fact that redemption is entirely the work of God.

Some of the most important Old Testament savior figures were born to moms who were having problems conceiving their children.

When everything seemed lost, God worked against the odds to reveal his might and majesty.

Considering the impossibility of Jesus’ virgin birth, we may see the divine method in which he entered the world, and it prepares us to anticipate him as the ultimate deliverer of God’s chosen people.

Because Jesus was begotten by the Holy Spirit (Matt 1:18), he was able to assume the whole of human nature while remaining sinlessly pure and perfect.

3.

I will create animosity between you and the woman, as well as between your offspring and her children; he will bruise your head, and you will bruise his heel, as a result of my decree.

In addition to revealing why Jesus came, this prophesy also foreshadows the way in which he would be crucified.

In order to rehabilitate mankind, Jesus was born, and he was crucified in order to redeem humanity.

Throughout the Old Testament, each book is like a river, carrying us all the way down to the stable in Bethlehem.

Through this time of year when we recall the birth of Christ, let us take a look back at his entire life, marveling at the prophetic testimony and rejoicing in the greatest gift of all: Jesus.

Editor’s note: We’ve put together a Christmas devotional to help you get a better understanding of what this season is about. Each day features a prophesy concerning Christ and the fulfillment of that prophecy for you to read and reflect on. Sign up here to obtain a digital copy of the book.

The Ten: Prophecies pointing to Jesus’ birth

“When Israel was a youngster, I adored him, and I adopted him as my son after fleeing Egypt.” While the nation of Israel’s founding myth begins in Egypt, Matthew (2:13-15) also relates Jesus’ exile in Egypt to Hosea’s prophesy, which is a significant distinction.

Psalm 2—Kings will bow to God’s son

Throughout the psalms, the psalmist speaks of the earth’s monarchs banding together against God and “His anointed.” God addresses the Anointed One as His Son, declaring, “I will give you the nations as your inheritance,” and cautioning, “therefore, you rulers, exercise caution.” In this scene, we see Herod attempting to destroy Jesus, but the “wise kings” of the East chose to prostrate themselves before him in the manger.

Isaiah 7:14—A virgin birth?

Consequently, “the Lord himself will give you a sign: the virgin will conceive and give birth to a son, whom she will name Immanuel,” says the prophet. Matthew expressly connects Jesus’ birth to Isaiah’s prophesy (Matthew 1:22–23), a miraculous occurrence made all the more astounding by the fact that it was foreseen hundreds of years before it occurred.

Isaiah 9:6,7—A famous prophecy

“For to us a child has been born, and to us a son has been given.” And he will be referred to as “Wonderful Counselor,” “Mighty God,” “Everlasting Father,” “Prince of Peace,” and other titles. This wonderful news was announced by the prophet Isaiah many years before the birth of Jesus, and it was echoed in the angel’s promise to Mary and the message to the shepherds. In addition, the divine names of God were carried by the son or kid of promise.

See also:  How Did Mary Give Birth To Jesus

Isaiah 11:1—(Branch from Jesse) bear fruit

“From the stump of Jesse will grow a shoot, and from his roots will grow a Branch that will yield fruit.” In addition, 2 Samuel 7:12–16 appears to infer that David will have an endless line and that the Messiah would establish His kingdom as David’s Heir. Both Matthew and Luke include David as a descendant of Jesus in their genealogies.

Malachi 3:1—Christ comes to the temple

“Then, all of a sudden, the Lord you seek will appear in his temple, and the messenger of the covenant, whom you seek, will appear,” declares the LORD Almighty. “The messenger of the covenant, whom you seek, will appear.” Despite the fact that Christ visited the temple several times during His life, only two individuals remember His first visit to the temple for purification privileges as a baby: Anna and Simeon. Earlier, Simeon had been told he would meet Jesus before he died, and he was overjoyed when he did!

Numbers 24:17—A Christmas star

“A light will shine out of Jacob, and a sceptre will rise out of Israel,” says the prophet. During this early and formative period in Israel’s history, a star is expected to come out of Jacob, signaling to the birth of a monarch. Possibly, this was one of the prophesies that prompted the magi to go out on their adventure.

Micah 5:2—The Messiah will come from Bethlehem

However, despite your tiny size among the clans of Judah, “from of you will come for me One who will be king over all Israel,” says the prophet. When Herod directed the magi to Bethlehem, it’s likely that his academics were referring to this passage in the Bible.

Luke 1:67-79—Zechariah’s prophecy

A “horn of Salvation” from the “house of David,” according to Zechariah’s hymn, has been brought up by God to save the world.

He also declares that his own son, John, will be a voice in the desert for the people of Israel (see Isaiah 40:3).

Isaiah 53:3—Lowly station

“He was disliked, and we regarded him in low regard, like someone from whom people kept their faces concealed.” Many people believe that Isaiah’s prophecy is connected to Jesus’ life of frugality. The fact that He was nurtured in Nazareth in Galilee and was born in a manger indicated that His beginnings were lowly, and that He was in no way the regal heir that the Jews had expected (see Matthew 2:23).

What Are the Prophecies about Jesus?

A future Messiah, who has been anointed by God to liberate His people from injustice, is prophesied about in the Old Testament, which contains over 300 predictions. The life, death, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth, as recorded in the New Testament, heralds the fulfillment of those prophesies. In His own words, Jesus declared that He was the anticipated Messiah (John 4:25-26). The gospels also demonstrate how Jesus fulfilled the messianic prophesies and, in the end, rescued mankind from the oppression of death by promising eternal redemption to everyone who believe in him (John 3:16).

What Are the Prophecies about the Messiah’s Birth?

The birth of the long-awaited Messiah was recounted in great detail in the Old Testament. In particular, the prophets predicted that the Savior would be born of a woman and that he would battle Satan in order to redeem mankind from Satan’s deceit of our forefathers and mothers (Genesis 3:15). According to Genesis 12:3; 17:19; Numbers 24:17, the Savior would come from the line of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and from the tribe of Judah (Genesis 12:3). (Genesis 49:10). Furthermore, Scripture foretold that the Messiah would be born at Bethlehem (Micah 5:2), to a virgin who would give birth to Him under the name “Immanuel” (Isaiah 7:14).

Jesus’ Birth Fulfils the Prophecies about the Messiah’s Birth

Because Jesus of Nazareth was born of a woman, he was able to rescue mankind from the consequences of the Fall of Adam, and he destroyed the Devil’s work by overcoming death in His triumphant Resurrection (1 John 3:8). The Savior’s lineage was also fulfilled by Jesus, who is a direct descendant of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and the tribe of Judah, and therefore fulfills the predictions regarding the Savior’s descent (Matthew 1:1-16). Furthermore, as foretold, Jesus was born to a virgin in the town of Bethlehem, as promised (Luke 1:27; 2:4-7).

Furthermore, Jesus was certainly known asImmanuel.

The prophet Isaiah predicted that the Messiah will be known by numerous names in addition to the name “Immanuel,” including: “Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace,” among others (Isaiah 9:6).

What Are the Prophecies about the Messiah’s Early Life?

Because Jesus of Nazareth was born of a woman, he was able to rescue humanity from the consequences of Adam’s sin and undo the devil’s work by overcoming death in His triumphant Resurrection on the third day of the week (1 John 3:8). The Savior’s lineage was also fulfilled by Jesus, who is a direct descendant of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and the tribe of Judah, and therefore fulfills the predictions regarding the Savior’s genealogy (Matthew 1:1-16). More importantly, just as prophesied, Jesus was born in the town of Bethlehem to a virgin (Luke 1:27; 2:4-7).

Aside from that, Jesus was in fact known as Immanuel.

The prophet Isaiah predicted that the Messiah will be known by numerous names in addition to the nameEmmanuel, including: “Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father,” and “Prince of Peace” (Isaiah 9:6).

Jesus’ Early Life Fulfils the Prophecies about the Messiah’s Early Life

As foretold, Jesus spent His early years in Egypt in order to avoid being implicated in the Massacre of the Innocents, which was carried out by King Herod (Matthew 2:13-15). Furthermore, as had been promised, after Herod’s death, Jesus and His family relocated from Egypt to Nazareth (Matthew 2:19-23). It was John the Baptist, who served as a foreshadowed messenger in the wilderness, paving the way for the Lord. He did so by preaching a message of baptism and repentance of sins, which prepared the way for the Messiah (Matthew 3:1-6).

A voice from heaven then revealed to John that Jesus was God’s son, and he baptized Jesus in the name of God (Matthew 3:13-17).

What Are the Prophecies about the Messiah’s Ministry?

The messianic predictions predicted that Galilee would be selected among the nations to witness the birth of “a great light,” a male child who would dispel the darkness of the world (Isaiah 9:1-6). According to Isaiah 30:15, the Messiah would speak about repentance and be a compassionate redeemer who would maintain justice and heal the damaged (Isaiah 30:16–17). (Isaiah 42:1-4; 61:1-2). In addition, the Savior would speak in parables that would fall on deaf ears (Psalm 78:2-4; Isaiah 6:9-10) and accomplish several miracles (Psalm 78:2-4; Isaiah 6:9-10).

These other characteristics of the Deliverer were also foretold in the prophecies: a devoted priest who would accomplish God’s will (1 Samuel 2:35); a prophet chosen from among the Israelites (Deuteronomy 18:15); and an unassuming monarch who would ride on a donkey toward adoring crowds (Deuteronomy 18:18).

Contrary to this portrayal of the future Messiah as one who brings peace and healing, the prophets also predicted that the Messiah would be rejected by His own people (Psalm 69:8), but would be accepted by the Gentiles (Isaiah 11:10).

Last but not least, prophesy said that rulers will plot to assassinate the Messiah (Psalm 31:13).

Jesus’ Ministry Fulfils the Prophecies about the Messiah’s Ministry

In accordance with Scripture, Jesus’ mission started in Galilee, where he served as the “great light” that banished the darkness by teaching a life of repentance and transformation (Matthew 4:12-17). Aside from that, Jesus taught in parables that puzzled a large number of people (Matthew 13:10-15, 34-35), and he did a slew of miracles (Matthew 11:2-5). In addition, Jesus fulfilled the messianic prophecies by serving as: the faithful priest who atoned for the sins of others through His human death and divine resurrection (Hebrews 2:17); the Jewish prophet who was rejected by His own people (Matthew 13:54-58); and the humble king who rode into Jerusalem on a donkey and was greeted by adoring crowds (Matthew 23:23).

Furthermore, the fact that Jesus’ disciples come from a variety of backgrounds confirms the prophesy that everyone has the potential to be a co-heir to God’s Kingdom (John 12:18-21).

What Are the Prophecies about the Messiah’s Betrayal?

According to the prophets, someone who had had a meal with the Messiah (Psalm 41:9) would betray Him for 30 pieces of silver, which would be used to purchase a potter’s field later on in the Messiah’s life (Zechariah 11:12-13). The Messiah’s closest allies would flee from him in the event of his betrayal (Psalm 31:11).

Jesus Was Betrayed in the Manner Prophesized

The Apostle Judas Iscariot betrayed Jesus for 30 pieces of silver, just as had been promised by the prophecy (Matthew 26:14-16; 47-50). That blood money was eventually utilized to purchase a potter’s field in the vicinity (Matthew 27:3-10). In addition, following Judas’ betrayal, Jesus’ other followers “deserted him and fled” from the scene (Mark 14:50).

What Are the Prophecies about the Messiah’s Death?

After being falsely accused and being beaten, humiliated, and spat upon, Isaiah portrays how the Messiah will stay mute in the face of his accusers (Isaiah 53:7;Isaiah 50:6). The Savior would likewise be “pierced for our transgressions,” so that we would be healed as a result of His wounds (Isaiah 53:5). A similar prophecy was disclosed by the prophet Daniel, who stated that the “Anointed One would be put to death and will have nothing” (Daniel 9:26). The death of the Messiah was described in greater detail by King David.

The Savior would die in the midst of criminals (Isaiah 53:9), and people would put their hands on His garments (Psalm 22:18).

Jesus Died in the Manner Prophesized

Anyone who is familiar with Jesus’ Passion understands that He carried out the predictions of the Messiah’s death to the the last torturous detail, and that is what makes His death so remarkable. Specific to His crucifixion, Jesus chose to keep silent in the face of false allegations and was beaten, insulted, and spit upon before to His death on the cross (Mark 14:57-61; 15:16-20). The Savior’s hands and feet were pierced by nails during His crucifixion, but his bones were not fractured as a result of the amputation (Luke 24:39-40;John 20:24-27;John 19:33-37).

Last but not least, the prophecy of relentless disdain was fulfilled when bystanders ridiculed the Crucified Christ by stating that if He was the Chosen One, He should rescue Himself (Luke 23:35).

What Are the Prophecies about the Messiah’s Resurrection?

By asserting that God would not leave the Messiah to the realm of the dead or allow the Messiah’s physical body to decay, King David predicted the Messiah’s resurrection and the restoration of all things (Psalm 16:10). Also in David’s writings, the Messiah predicted that he will ascend to Heaven and sit at God’s right hand (Psalm 110:1). Isaiah also prophesied that the Messiah’s death would act as the final sacrifice for sin, allowing God’s people to be redeemed (Isaiah 53:5-12). The Messiah’s pain, on the other hand, would be repaid in that He would ultimately defeat death (Isaiah 25:7-8) and “see the light of life and be pleased” (Isaiah 53:11).

Jesus Was Resurrected in the Manner Prophesied

As prophesied, Jesus triumphed over death by rising triumphantly from the grave (Matthew 28:5-10). In the following days, Jesus appeared to several of His followers (Matthew 28:16-17), who subsequently testified that the Messiah had risen from the dead, that His body had not decayed, and that He had ascended into Heaven to sit at the right side of God, just as the prophets had spoken (Acts 2:24-36). At long last, Jesus’ death and resurrection brought Scripture to fulfillment in that He was the ultimate sacrifice who rescued humanity from death by providing us with a pathway to eternal life via His sacrifice (1 Corinthians 15:54).

What Does This Mean?

The prophets of the Old Testament went to considerable efforts to chronicle the Messiah’s life, death, and victorious resurrection, and they did so in great detail. A millennium later, Jesus of Nazareth fulfilled these prophesies in such meticulous detail that there can be no question that He was the prophesied Messiah. Images courtesy of iStock/Getty Images Plus/Osobystist Dolores Smythis is a spiritual and parenting writer who has been published all across the country. She finds inspiration for her writing in the ordinary things that happen in her life.

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