Who Did Peter Say Jesus Was?

Why did Jesus ask the disciples, “Who do you say that I am?”

Answer to the question Jesus had a lot of questions for the disciples.Query was one of His favorite teaching techniques, and he used it frequently.One of the queries Jesus posed to the disciples was, ″Who do you claim that I am?″ (Who do you say that I am?).(See also Luke 9:20.) This inquiry elicited an answer that is both informative and entertaining for all of us.It is vital to understand the context in which Jesus asked the question ″Who do you claim that I am?″ In a private prayer session, while his disciples were present, Jesus inquired of them, ‘Who do the people believe I am?’ ‘Some believe it is John the Baptist, some believe it is Elijah, and yet others believe it is one of the prophets from long ago who has come back to life,’ they responded.

“ ‘But what about you?’ he inquired of her.’Can you tell me who you think I am?’ “ The response came from Peter: ″God’s Messiah.″ (See Luke 9:18–20.) Matthew 16 and Mark 8 both have accounts that are similar.More than only identifying Jesus as the Christ, according to Matthew, Peter also declared Jesus’ divine nature: ″You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God,″ he said, according to Matthew (Matthew 16:16).Jesus’ query, ″Who do you say I am?″ was not a show of ignorance; He was fully aware of everything, including what was going through the minds of the disciples.

  1. It is also important to note that the query was not inspired by any sense of self-importance or vanity; Jesus did not preen and had no desire to fish for praises.
  2. His inquiry, on the other hand, was intended to compel the disciples to assess their own degree of trust.
  3. In the immediate aftermath of His inquiry, it becomes evident why He asked them the question that he did.
  4. When Jesus first entered the room, he asked a relevant question: ″Who do they think I am?″ (Luke 9:18).
  5. In answer, the disciples repeated the many things they had heard: the viewpoints included several personages who had been raised from the dead, indicating that the people regarded Jesus as someone remarkable.
  6. However, all of the predictions made by the crowd were incorrect.
  1. Therefore, Jesus addresses the inquiry to his followers themselves: ″Who do you claim that I am?″ he asks.
  2. Or, to put it another way, are you following the crowd?
  3. Are you sticking with the common wisdom about Me?
  4. Are you sticking with the conventional wisdom about Me?
  5. Or do you have an alternative, more perceptive response?

What are your genuine thoughts?Peter then takes the initiative.The apostle Peter responds to the question by reaffirming his belief that Jesus was the long-awaited Messiah and, more importantly, that he was God’s Son.This was after the disciples witnessed several miracles including the raising of a widow’s son in Nain, the calming of an approaching storm, the casting out of numerous demons from a man in the Gerasenes, and the feeding of 5,000 people.The disciples were well aware that Jesus was more than a prophet; He was one-of-a-kind; He was, in fact, God manifested in human flesh.

The blessedness of Peter’s faith is expressed by Jesus in response to Peter’s declaration: ″Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, for this was not revealed to you by flesh and blood, but by my Father who is in heaven″ (Matthew 16:17).God’s grace had opened the disciples’ eyes to see Jesus for who He actually was, and they had come to recognize Him as such.To this end, Jesus addresses his disciples and receives the proper (divinely inspired) response from Peter when he asks, ″Who do you claim that I am?″ A watershed moment in Jesus’ teaching work with His followers is marked by this event.Afterwards, the Lord begins to impart additional information to His disciples, which they found both shocking and humbling: ″From that time on, Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer greatly at the hands of the elders, chief priests, and teachers of law, and that he must be killed and then raised to life on the third day″ (Matthew 27:51-53).(Matthew 16:21).

Jesus had withheld information about His death and resurrection from His followers until they had passed a vital milestone: specifically, that their faith had matured to the point where they could proclaim their belief that Jesus was the Son of God.The way the disciples dealt with the fresh information of Jesus’ death would be determined by their perception of Jesus himself.Due to the fact that He is the Son of God, they should be able to place their faith in Him—even to the point of embracing His death (and resurrection) without being unsettled.Unfortunately, as demonstrated by Peter’s response in Matthew 16:22–23, the disciples were having difficulty comprehending what Jesus was now teaching them.Even though they had trust in Jesus as the divine Son of God, the disciples were thrown into disarray when the prophecy of Jesus’ death and resurrection was delivered (see Mark 9:32).The question ″Who do you claim that I am?″ that Jesus asks is an excellent illustration of one of His teaching techniques.

  1. Asking a question necessitates participation, encourages critical thinking, and elicits a thoughtful response.
  2. Jesus’ inquiry and following teaching further demonstrate the progressive nature of God’s revelation as well as the importance of continuing to grow in our understanding of God.
  3. The revelation of God’s message has taken place gradually throughout history, beginning with Genesis and continuing until the end of the canon of Scripture.
  4. In other words, he did not release any more information than mankind need or was capable of receiving at any one time.
  5. Furthermore, Jesus’ delaying of bringing up the issue of His death and resurrection shows that the disciples’ faith needed to deepen to the point where they could hear and comprehend what He was saying.

We are all called to continue to develop our faith.There is always something new to learn about Christ.″So, let us go beyond the fundamental teachings of Christ and allow ourselves to be brought to maturity″ (Hebrews 6:1).Questions concerning Luke can be found here.What was the purpose of Jesus’ question to the disciples, ″Who do you claim that I am?″

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5 Things You May Not Know About Peter in the Bible

Simon Peter, also known by the names Peter, Simon, and Cephas, was one of the first 12 apostles, or the earliest disciples of Jesus Christ, who lived during the time of the New Testament.Following Jesus’ ascension to the right hand of the Father, Peter was appointed as the apostles’ leader.The fact that Peter, along with James and John, was chosen by Jesus to be there throughout key pivotal times of His ministry says volumes about his importance, not only in Jesus’ life, but also in the Gospel of John.Peter is well-known for a variety of accomplishments.He was not just a fiery and vocal follower, but he was also one of Jesus’ closest companions and a cornerstone of the early Christian church.

″And when James and Cephas and John, who appeared to be pillars, recognized the grace that had been granted to me, they extended the right hand of fellowship to Barnabas and me,″ the Bible says.Paul writes in Galatians 2:9 that he is a servant of God.Peter had a strong personality and was energetic, but he could also be impetuous and arrogant at times.While Peter has many positive characteristics, he also possessed some negative characteristics.

  1. Despite this, the Lord picked him and shaped him into the person He had in mind for him all along.
  2. In Jesus Christ, Peter found the strength to face any challenge, whether it was stepping out of a boat onto a raging sea or crossing the threshold of a Gentile home for the very first time.
  3. Here are five interesting facts about Peter from the Bible that you may not have known.

He Was a Follower of John the Baptist

Peter, who was known at the time as Simon, was a follower of John the Baptist and was one of the very first disciples that Jesus summoned, along with his brother Andrew, to be his follower (John 1:35-29).It is believed that Simon came from Bethsaida and later settled in Capernaum, both places on the coast of the Sea of Galilee.He was married, and he, James, and John were all partners in a successful fishing business that they ran together.Following John the Baptist’s proclamation that Jesus was the Lamb of God, Simon’s brother Andrew decided to join Jesus and eventually came to know him personally (John 1:35-26).In an instant, Andrew ran out to find his brother and take him to see Jesus.

Peter received a new name from Jesus when they first met: Cephas (Aramaic) and Peter (Greek), both of which imply ″rock.″ Later, Jesus publicly invited Peter to follow Him, and a miraculous catch of fish demonstrated His invitation (Luke 5:7).Peter immediately left everything behind in order to follow Jesus (Luke 5:11).

He Was the First to Call Jesus the Son of the Living God

Peter was not only one of the first disciples to be called by Jesus, but he also served as their primary spokesperson, both for good and for ill.Some people believe that Peter had a particular insight into Jesus’ identity, and this is something he is credited with.Peter was the first to refer to Jesus as the Son of the Living God — the Messiah, a title that appears in Mark 8:29, Luke 9:20, and Matthew 16:16-17, among other places.In response to Jesus’ question, ″Who do you claim that I am?″ Peter responds, ″The Messiah.″ When Jesus summoned him, Peter recognized that He was a representative of God, yet he felt unworthy to be in Jesus’ company (Luke 5:6-8).Jesus, on the other hand, didn’t dither and informed Peter and Andrew that He would make them fishers of men right away (Mark 1:17).

The apostle Peter was also a witness to several of Jesus’ miracles, and he was present with John and James when Jesus appeared on the Mount of Transfiguration.This was the point at which Jesus’ humanity was revealed in order to demonstrate the splendor of His Divinity (Matthew 17:1-9).

There Were Instances Where Peter Moved Hastily

Peter was the one who got out of the boat to walk on the water to Jesus (Matthew 14:28-29), and he was the one who immediately lost sight of Jesus and began to sink (Matthew 14:30).According to Matthew 16:22, it was Peter who summoned Jesus aside to reprimand Him for speaking of His death, and he was immediately corrected by the Lord (Matthew 16:23).Matthew 17:4 reveals that it was Peter who proposed the construction of three tabernacles to honor Moses, Elijah, and Jesus, and he fell to the ground in horrified silence as he witnessed God’s grandeur (Matthew 17:5-6).When Peter took his sword and charged towards the servant of the high priest (John 18:10), he was quickly ordered to sheath his weapon by the other disciples (John 18:11).When Peter claimed that he would never leave the Lord, even if everyone else did (Matthew 26:33), he subsequently denied that he ever knew the Lord (Matthew 26:34).

(Matthew 26:70-74).

He Was Instrumental in Establishing Jesus’ Church

The Lord Jesus was his loving and steadfast Guide throughout his life.The Bible’s version of Matthew 16:18-19 reaffirms Simon as Peter, the ″Rock,″ and promises that he would play an important role in the establishment of Jesus’ Church.After His resurrection, Jesus explicitly identified Peter as one who needed to hear the Good News.Peter accepted Jesus’ invitation (Mark 16:7).As part of the miracle of the enormous catch of fish, Jesus made a point of forgiving and rehabilitating Peter, as well as re-commissioning him as an apostle, which was a first for him (John 21:6; 15-17).

God had a significant role in the establishment of the church through Peter.On the Feast of Pentecost, it was Peter who was the first to preach the Gospel (Acts 2:14-47).Peter was also the first to bring the Gospel to the Gentiles, which was a first for the Church (Acts 10:1-48).In a way, Peter was the rock upon which the church was built.

  1. This argument is used by the Catholic Church to demonstrate that it is the only authentic church in the world.

He Died As a Martyr in Rome

Peter is said to have died as a martyr, according to tradition.When he was offered the option of how he should die, he stated, ″I’d like to be crucified upside-down since I am unworthy to die as my Lord did.″ He was later executed.The Scriptures do not mention Peter’s appeal in this regard.John 21:16-19, on the other hand, implies that Peter would die a martyr’s death: ″Very truly I tell you, when you were younger you dressed yourself and went wherever your heart desired; but when you are old you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you, and someone else will lead you to a place you do not want to go.″ Jesus stated this to point to the type of death that Peter would undergo in order to glorify God.And he told him, ″Follow me!″ he shouted.

Early church history indicates that this occurred somewhere between AD 67 and AD 70 since Peter was imprisoned for the sake of Christ and was executed after being released out of jail.Peter’s life has a wealth of valuable lessons that we may apply to our own.One of the most important lessons is that Jesus utilizes those who seem unlikely to be heroes.Peter was a Galilean fisherman, but Jesus asked him to be a fisher of mankind, and so he became one.

  1. Peter was prepared to give up everything he had in order to follow Jesus, and God utilized him in miraculous ways.
  2. People were taken aback by the fact that Peter talked with confidence and courage despite the fact that he had no formal education.
  3. Peter was articulate, but he was also unexceptional.
  4. Also recognized was his association with Jesus, and they were able to see via his example that aligning one’s self with Jesus made all the difference.

Where did Peter say Jesus was the Son of God?

The Confession of Peter as depicted in Luke 9:20 is shown in a stained glass window. ″But who do you think I am?″ says the narrator. When asked who he was, Peter replied, ″The Christ of God.″

Did Peter say Jesus was the Son of God?

Peter said, ″You are the Christ, the Son of the Living God,″ which means ″you are the Christ.″ Jesus declared that Peter had been blessed because God had revealed this to him.

What did Peter say about Jesus?

Simon Peter said, ″You are the Christ, the Son of the living God,″ which means ″you are the Christ.″ ″Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, for this was not revealed to you by a human being, but by my Father in heaven,″ Jesus said.

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Did Peter call Jesus the Messiah?

15 ″But what about you?″ he said, referring to himself. ″Can you tell me who you think I am?″ 16 Simon Peter said, ″You are the Messiah,″ referring to Jesus. ″You are the Son of the living God,″ says the Father. 17 ″Blessed are you, Simon, son of Jonah!″ said Jesus in response.

What were Peter’s last words?

″I adore you and look forward to seeing you again.″ These were some of the final words my father uttered to me before passing away.

Who is the Rock Peter or Jesus?

″You are the Christ, the Son of the living God,″ Peter had confessed after receiving a revelation from the Father: ″You are the Son of the living God.″ He then received the following declaration from Our Lord: ″You are Peter, and on this rock I will build my Church, and the gates of Hades will not be able to prevail against it.″ Christ, the ″living Stone,″ promises his Church, which was founded on Peter, of the…

Does Peter call Jesus God?

The Confession of Peter as depicted in Luke 9:20 is shown in a stained glass window. ″But who do you think I am?″ says the narrator. When asked who he was, Peter replied, ″The Christ of God.″

Did the disciples know Jesus was God?

None of his disciples had any notion that he was the Son of the Living God. … The historical Jesus did not refer to himself as God or believe himself to be God, and he did not consider himself to be God… None of his disciples had any notion that he was the Son of the Living God. The Gospel of John, or the final Gospel, does contain a passage in which Jesus refers to himself as God.

How did Peter feel after denying Jesus?

As a result of Jesus’ imprisonment, Peter denied knowing him three times. However, after the third denial, Peter heard the rooster crow and remembered the prophecy as Jesus turned to gaze directly at him. Peter then burst into tears of frustration. The Repentance of Peter is the name given to this final occurrence.

What did Jesus call himself in the Bible?

″Son of Man,″ according to the Synoptic Gospels, is what Jesus refers to himself as.

When did the disciples realize that Jesus was the Son of God?

Jesus did not plainly and unmistakably disclose that He was God until later in His mission – maybe as late as Matthew 16:16–19 – in order to avoid confusion.

What was Jesus last command?

It is commonly referred to as the ″New Commandment″ in Christianity, and it refers to Jesus’ commandment to ″love one another,″ which, according to the Bible, was given as part of his final instructions to his disciples after the Last Supper had concluded and after Judas Iscariot had left the scene in John 13:30.

What did the Transfiguration reveal?

In the Gospel of Matthew, the story of Jesus’ transfiguration serves as a further revelation to some of his followers of his true nature as the Son of God. A mountain that is not named is mentioned in the gospels as being visited by Jesus and his companions Peter, James son of Zebedee, and John the Apostle (see Matthew 16:1-11).

How did Peter died according to the Bible?

St. Peter is said to have died as a martyr for his Christian faith. Due to his belief that he was unworthy of dying in the same manner as Jesus Christ, Peter was crucified upside down.

What was the last thing Jesus said to Peter?

″Simon son of John, do you honestly love me more than these?″ Jesus said of Simon Peter after they had finished eating. ″Yes, Lord,″ he acknowledged, ″you are aware of my affection for you.″ ″Feed my lambs,″ Jesus instructed.

Where does Peter die in the Bible?

Peter was crucified in Rome during the reign of Emperor Nero, according to Christian legend.

Lesson: On This Rock – Peter’s Confession of Christ

Make use of this children’s Sunday School lesson to inspire youngsters to come to faith in Jesus on their own. Bibles, a huge rock, a church figure or picture (I used a Christmas ornament depicting a church), playing cards, a tray of sand and a tray of rocks for each student, drawing paper, crayons, or colored pencils are all necessary materials for this activity.

Intro Activity: Christian Story Interview 

Make pairs of pupils who will then ask each other the following questions.They will next act as a reporter and convey their partner’s responses.They have the option of writing down their replies if they so like.What’s your name, by the way?When was the first time you heard about Jesus?

Who was the first person to tell you about Jesus?Who is the most influential in your decision to believe in Jesus?What role do they have in your decision to follow Jesus?What is Jesus to you, and what does he represent?

Lesson

Students should be questioned.What motivates you to attend church?What do you believe is the most crucial thing for Christians to believe when you go to church, according to you?(See Matthew 16:13-14 for further information.) In the vicinity of Caesarea Philippi, when Jesus visited His followers, He inquired, ‘Who do they claim the Son of Man is?’ They said, ″Some believe it is John the Baptist, some believe it is Elijah, and yet others believe it is Jeremiah or one of the prophets.″ Is it possible to believe that?Some people believed that Jesus was John the Baptist or one of the old prophets who had come back to life, but this was not the case.

(See Matthew 16:15-16 for further information.) ″How about you?″ says the narrator.He inquired.’Can you tell me who you think I am?’ Peter said, ″You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God,″ and that was the end of it.″ What was the purpose of Jesus asking His followers who they believed He was?When it came to Jesus, He did not want His disciples to just take in what other people had to say about Him.

  1. Jesus understands that each of us must determine who we believe Jesus to be for ourselves.
  2. We can’t merely go to church and declare ourselves to be Christians because our parents or grandparents urge us to do so.
  3. And we can’t merely believe in Jesus because other people believe in Him; we have to be convinced ourselves.
  4. If we want to believe in Jesus, we have to believe in him because we want to believe in Jesus for ourselves.
  5. Who was it that Peter claimed to be Jesus?
  6. (The Messiah, also known as the Son of God.) (See Matthew 16:17-18 for further information.) I say to you, Simon son of Jonah, that you are blessed, because this was not revealed to you by man and blood, but by My Father in heaven.’″ As a result, I tell you that you are Peter, and that on this rock I will build My church, and that the gates of Hades will not be able to conquer it.″ In His teachings, Jesus promised to build His church on solid rock.
  1. (Exhibit to pupils your rock with the church perched on top of it.) Peter’s faith in Jesus as the Messiah and Son of God is the rock on which the church is built.
  2. We must believe two things about Jesus: that He is God’s Son and that He came to save us.
  3. This is the most crucial thing we must believe about Him.
  4. That is the first and most significant thing that the church must believe, thus it is placed at the bottom of the list and serves as a foundation for the remainder of the church’s beliefs.
  5. To summarize, you must make the decision to believe in Jesus for yourself, rather than simply listening to what others have to say about Him or believing in Jesus because other people have.

And the most crucial thing to believe is that Jesus is God’s Son and that He has come to deliver us from our sinful state.

Game: Sand vs. Stone 

Give each youngster a tray filled with sand and a tray filled with pebbles to work with.After that, give each student a deck of playing cards from which to construct two-card churches.They’ll use five cards to construct a church on the sand, and five cards to construct a church on the rock foundation.When they’re completed, instruct them to softly blow on the side of each church building.Give them a point if one of their churches is still standing after a while.

This game has the potential to produce a large number of winners.Students should be reminded that believing in Jesus is the basis upon which the church is built.

Craft: Laying the Foundation 

Assign pupils with sketching supplies and ask them to create an image of their church sitting on a giant boulder. Instruct the pupils to write on the rock, ″Jesus is God’s Son, the Messiah (or Savior),″ or something like.

Closing Prayer

We are grateful to You, Jesus, for coming to save us.We hope that You may assist everyone of us in believing in You for our own sakes.Amen.You may also find this lesson in my book, The Parables and Teachings of Jesus Vol.2, which is available on Kindle or in print.

The following is the new Sunday School curriculum: Our Bible teachings are designed to hold the children’s attention while also demonstrating how God’s Word may make a difference in their lives.Every series is adaptable enough to accommodate a diverse age range while remaining reasonably priced for small congregations.Download a free Bible lesson in pdf format, or have a look at our most recent Sunday School curriculum for children.

Peter’s declaration of faith (Matthew 16:13-20) – The identity of Jesus – CCEA – GCSE Religious Studies Revision – CCEA

  • What does the Bible’s account of Jesus’ life teach us about his identity?
  • Examine the evidence
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Summary

″Who do people claim the Son of Man is?″ Jesus inquired of his followers when they were in the district of Caesarea Philippi.″Some believe it is John the Baptist, some believe it is Elijah, and yet others believe it is Jeremiah or one of the prophets,″ they responded.″Who do you believe I am?″ Jesus inquired.Peter said, ″You are the Christ, the Son of the Living God,″ which means ″you are the Christ.″ Jesus declared that Peter had been blessed because God had revealed this to him.And he went on to say ″you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church.″ As Peter awaited authorization, Jesus told them not to tell anybody that they were seeing the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Understanding the text

To find out whether his followers were grasping his identity, Jesus instructed them to listen to what other people were saying. The disciples responded with four different Biblical characters, all of whom were already deceased at the time of their responses.

  1. Some people believed that Antipas, Herod’s son, had resurrected John the Baptist after his death, but others believed that he had died in vain.
  2. Elijah — a prophet from the Old Testament who, according to Jewish tradition, will return to Earth to usher in the Messiah
  3. A second Old Testament prophet, Jeremiah was persecuted for proclaiming God’s message and proclaimed the necessity for a new covenant between God and His people
  4. Jeremiah was one of the other prophets.

What do the disciples think?

In response, Peter, who is frequently called upon to speak on behalf of the disciples, says, ″You are Christ, the Son of the living God.″ While with Jesus, the disciples listened to his teaching and witnessed many miracles, all of which they recorded.Jesus, on the other hand, claims that it is God who has assisted Peter in comprehending this.Jesus commends Peter for speaking up and offers major promises to him and the rest of the Church in response.″You are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church,″ he declares emphatically.The name Peter is spelled Petros in Greek, which was the original language of the New Testament.

This is also the term for ‘rock’ in the Greek language, thus Jesus is creating a play on words with this phrase here.

What does this mean?

  • There is now a schism within the Christian Church about this subject. Some believe that the term ″rock″ does not apply to Peter in the literal sense, but rather to the words he spoke when he affirmed that Jesus is the Christ, God’s Son. This faith, according to Jesus, was to serve as the foundation of the Church
  • Peter himself is like the first stone laid in the foundation of God’s house. The Church, which is God’s edifice, is built on the foundation of Jesus Christ. Known as the Apostle Peter, he was the first person to publicly announce his faith in Jesus, and he went on to become an influential leader and teacher in the early Church. On the day of Pentecost, he was the first to begin preaching, and more than 3000 converts were added to the church that day.
  • The Roman Catholic Church maintains that Peter was elevated to the position of Pope at Caesarea Philippi, and that the keys on the papal coats of arms represent the authority he was granted.
  • Throughout the centuries, according to Catholic belief, this power has been passed down via generation after generation of Popes all the way up to the current day.
  • The Pope, in his capacity as God’s ambassador on Earth, has the authority to pardon sins and to approve or ban activities on the planet.
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Bible Gateway passage: Matthew 16:13-20 – New International Version

New International Version(NIV) Version

Peter Declares That Jesus Is the MessiahA)″>(A)

13 When Jesus came to the region of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say the Son of Man is?” 14 They replied, “Some say John the Baptist;B)″>(B) others say Elijah; and still others, Jeremiah or one of the prophets.”C)″>(C) 15 “But what about you?” he asked. “Who do you say I am?” 16 Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”D)″>(D) 17 Jesus replied, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, for this was not revealed to you by flesh and blood,E)″>(E) but by my Father in heaven.F)″>(F) 18 And I tell you that you are Peter,G)″>(G) and on this rock I will build my church,H)″>(H) and the gates of Hades will not overcome it. 19 I will give you the keysI)″>(I) of the kingdom of heaven; whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”J)″>(J) 20 Then he ordered his disciples not to tell anyoneK)″>(K) that he was the Messiah. Read full chapter dropdown New International Version (NIV)Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.NIV Reverse Interlinear Bible: English to Hebrew and English to Greek. Copyright © 2019 by Zondervan.
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Bible Gateway Matthew 16: NIV

Matthew 161 (Matthew 161 is a number that refers to the number 161 in the Bible).In response, the Pharisees and Sadducees approached Jesus and put him to the test by demanding him to show them a sign from heaven.2 He responded by saying, ″You declare in the evening that ″It will be fine weather because the sky is red,″3 and in the morning that ″Today it will be stormy because the sky is red and overcast,″3 respectively.You are able to decipher the look of the sky, but you are unable to decipher the indications of the times around you.The corrupt and adulterous age seeks a miraculous sign, but none will be given to them save the sign of Jonah, which will be delivered to them by God.″ After that, Jesus left them and disappeared.

5 When they were crossing the lake, the disciples failed to bring bread with themselves.6 ″Take care,″ Jesus cautioned the disciples.″Be on your alert against the yeast of the Pharisees and Sadducees,″ Jesus warns his followers.″It’s because we didn’t bring any bread,″ they concluded after discussing the situation among themselves.

  1. 8 Jesus, who was aware of their conversation, inquired, ″Why are you, people of little faith, joking about about not having enough food to feed yourselves?
  2. 9 Do you still have a problem understanding?
  3. Don’t you remember the five loaves you baked for the five thousand people, and how many basketfuls you gathered to feed them all?
  4. 10 Or the seven loaves for the four thousand people, and how many basketfuls of food did you collect in total?
  5. 11 How is it that you are unable to comprehend that I was not speaking to you regarding bread?
  6. However, be on the lookout for the yeast of the Pharisees and Sadducees.″ 12 At that point, they realized that he was not advising them to be cautious around the yeast used in bread, but rather to be cautious around the teaching of the Pharisees and Sadducees.
  1. Thirteenth, when Jesus arrived in the neighborhood of Caesarea Philippi and inquired of his followers, ″Who do people claim to be the Son of Man?″ 14 They said, ″Some believe it is John the Baptist, some believe it is Elijah, and yet others believe it is Jeremiah or one of the prophets.″ 15 ″But what about you?″ he said, referring to himself.
  2. ″Can you tell me who you think I am?″ The response came from Simon Peter who said, ″You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.″ 17 Jesus said, ″It is written, ″It is written, ″It is written, ″It is written,″ ″Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, since this information was not given to you by a human being, but rather by my heavenly Father.
  3. I declare that you are Peter, and that I will build my church on this rock, and that the gates of Hades will not be able to stand in its way.
  4. 19 I will give you the keys to the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you release on earth will be loosed in heaven; everything you bind on earth will be loosed in heaven.″ 20 Then he issued a warning to his disciples, telling them not to tell anybody that he was the Messiah.
  5. 21, 22 Starting from that point on, Jesus began explaining to his followers that he would have to go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, chief priests, and teachers of the law, and that he would be murdered and resurrected to life on the third day as a result of his suffering.

22 Peter drew him aside and began to reprimand him verbally.″Never, Lord!″ he said emphatically.″This will never happen to you!″ says the author.23 Then Jesus turned to face Peter and shouted, ″Satan, get out of my way!You are a stumbling block for me because you are preoccupied with things that are not of God, but are rather of man.″ 24 Then Jesus addressed his followers, saying, ″If anybody wishes to follow me, he or she must deny themselves, take up their cross, and walk the path set before them.

25 For whomever wishes to save his or her life will lose it, but whoever wishes to lose his or her life for me will get it.26 When a guy acquires the whole world, but loses his soul, what is the point of having everything?Or, rather, what can a man provide in return for his soul?27 Because the Son of Man is coming in his Father’s glory, accompanied by his angels, and he will repay each individual according to what he has accomplished.28 I tell you the truth, some of those who are standing here will not die until they see the Son of Man appear in his kingdom, and I believe this is true.″

  1. Some early versions do not have the remainder of verse 2 or the entirety of verse 3.
  2. Alternatively, Messiah
  3. also in verse 20.
  4. Peter is referring to rock, or hell, or the inability to show oneself stronger than it.
  5. Or have been
  6. or have been
  7. or have been
  8. The Greek word translated as ″life″ or ″soul″ appears in verses 26 and 27.

Peter’s declaration about Jesus (Matthew 16: 13–20) – The identity of Jesus – CCEA – GCSE Religious Studies Revision – CCEA

  • In addition to being referred to as the Son of God, the Son of Man and the Messiah, How did he come to hold these positions, and why?
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During this occurrence in Caesarea Philippi, Jesus was revealed as the awaited Messiah.The narrative is based on a dialogue between Jesus and his followers in which he confronts them with doubts regarding his identity.We can see that the Jewish people believed that Jesus was either John the Baptist, Elijah, Jeramiah, or another prophet, depending on the source.When Jesus was explicitly asked, ″Who do you claim that I am?″ Peter, Jesus’ closest disciple, was the one who spoke out first.″You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God,″ Peter says in answer, demonstrating a thorough understanding of Jesus’ status.

After then, Jesus instructed the disciples not to inform anybody about what had occurred.This is a good illustration of the messianic secret.Peter is a significant character in this novel.Considering the fact that he went on to become the first Pope, we may assume that this episode gave Jesus confidence that Peter was following him for the correct reasons.

  1. The rock on which Jesus would build his church is described by Jesus as ″you are the rock.″ The name Peter was changed from Simon because the word Peter signifies ‘rock’ in Latin.
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Confession of Peter – Wikipedia

The Confession of Peter as depicted in Luke 9:20 is shown in a stained glass window.″But who do you think I am?″ says the narrator.When asked who he was, Peter replied, ″The Christ of God.″ Confession of Peter (translated from the Matthean Vulgate Latin section title: Confessio Petri) is a term used in Christianity to refer to a passage of the New Testament in which the Apostle Peter professes Jesus to be the Messiah (Jewish Messiah).According to the three Synoptic Gospels (Matthew 16:13–20, Mark 8:27–30, and Luke 9:18–21), the announcement was made in three parts.Depending on which gospel is being read, Peter either says: ‘You are the Messiah’ or ‘the Christ’ (Mark 8:29); or ‘You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God’ (Matthew 16:16); or ‘You are God’s Messiah’ or ‘The Christ of God’ (Matthew 16:17); or ‘You are God’s Messiah’ or ‘The Christ of God’ (Matthew 16:18); or ‘ (Luke 9:20).

The declaration of Jesus as Christ is key to Christology; the Confession of Peter and Jesus’ acceptance of the term ″Messiah″ make a decisive statement in the New Testament narrative regarding the person of Jesus Christ.The announcement of Jesus as Christ is crucial to Christology.When Jesus makes this proclamation in this New Testament narrative, he not only accepts the titles Christ and Son of God, but he also declares the proclamation to be a divine revelation by stating that his Father in Heaven had revealed it to Peter, thus unambiguously declaring himself to be both Christ and the Son of God.As part of the same text, Jesus appoints Peter as his successor as head of the Apostles, saying, ″Upon this rock I will build my church.″ Though most Christian faiths believe that the phrase is true in terms of the apostle Peter, they differ in their understanding of what happens after Peter.

  1. It is also known as the Confession of Peter, and it is the name of a liturgical feastday that is commemorated by various Christian denominations, most of which are associated with the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity.

Gospel accounts

Narrative comparison

The following comparison table is mostly based on the English translation of the New Testament provided by the New International Version (NIV) of the Bible.

  • Matthew Mark Luke (Matthew Mark Luke) is a pseudonym for Matthew Mark Luke (Matthew Mark Luke) who is a pseudonym for Matthew Mark Luke (Matthew Mark Luke) who is a pseudonym for Matthew Mark Luke (Matthew Mark Luke) who is a pseudonym for Matthew Mark Luke (Matthew Mark Luke) who is a pseudonym for Matthew Mark Luke (Matthew Mark Luke) who is What other folks have to say Matthew 16:13–14 is a biblical passage. ″Who do they claim the Son of Man is?″ Jesus inquired of his followers when he arrived in the district of Caesarea Philippi.
  • They said, ‘Some believe it was John the Baptist, some believe it was Elijah, and still others believe it was Jeremiah or one of the prophets.’
  • Mark 8:27–28 (KJV) As they continued their journey, Jesus and his followers arrived at the towns around Caesarea Philippi. On the way, he inquired of them, ‘Who do people believe I am?’
  • They said, ‘Some believe it is John the Baptist, some believe it is Elijah, and yet others believe it is one of the prophets.’
  • Luke 9:18–19 (KJV) At one point, while Jesus was praying in private and his disciples were there, he inquired of them: ‘Who do the people think I am?’
  • They said, ‘Some believe it is John the Baptist, some believe it is Elijah, and yet others believe it is one of the prophets from long ago who has come back to life.’
  • What the apostles have to say Matthew 16:15–16 is a passage from the Bible that says ‘But what about you?’ he inquired of her. ‘Can you tell me who you think I am?’
  • When Simon Peter responded, he said, ″You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.″
  • 8:29 (Matthew 8:29) ‘But what about you?’ he inquired of her. ‘Can you tell me who you think I am?’
  • When Peter responded, he said, ‘You are the Messiah.’
  • Luke 9:20 (NIV) ‘But what about you?’ he inquired of her. ‘Who do you claim I am?’ said the narrator
  • Peter responded, ‘God’s Messiah.’

Peter is chosen by Jesus.Mat.16:17–19 (KJV) ‘Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, for this was not revealed to you by man and blood, but by my Father in heaven,’ Jesus said.As a result, I tell you that you are Peter, and that I will build my church on this rock, and that the gates of Hades will not be able to conquer it.If you obey my commands on earth, whatever you bind on earth will also be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will also be loosed in heaven,’ says the Lord.

The disciples are brought to a halt by Jesus. Matthew 16:20 After then, Jesus instructed his followers not to inform anybody about his being the Messiah.

    Mark 8:30

  • Jesus warned them not to tell anyone about him.
  • Luke 9:21 (KJV) Jesus sternly advised them not to tell anybody about what happened.

    Background and setting

    As a part of the Gospel narrative, this pericope and the tale of Jesus’ Transfiguration, which follows it, come near the middle of the book of Matthew’s narrative, and together they signal the beginning of Jesus’ gradual reveal of his identity to his followers.The action takes place in Caesarea Philippi, northeast of the Sea of Galilee, and within the Tetrarchy of Philip.It marks the beginning of Jesus’ final trip to Jerusalem, which culminates in the Crucifixion and Resurrection.As recorded in Matthew 16:13, Mark 8:27, and Luke 9:18, Peter’s Confession begins as a conversation between Jesus and his followers.Jesus begins by inquiring about the existing ideas about himself held by ″the masses,″ inquiring: ″Who do the multitudes believe that I am?″ (Matthew 16:13) They provide a number of possibilities that were popular at the period, ranging from John the Baptist to Elijah, Jeremiah, or one of the (other) prophets, among others.

    Following in the footsteps of Jewish medieval rabbi David Kimhi and theologian John Lightfoot, the Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges suggests that Jeremiah ″is mentioned as a representative of the Prophets″ because ″the book of Jeremiah came first of the Prophets, following the books of Kings,″ according to the Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges.This set of assumptions regarding Jesus’ identity was presented earlier in the Gospel account, in Mark 6:14-16, by individuals in Herod Antipas’ court, who were perplexed as to whether Jesus was the resurrected John the Baptist.

    Proclamation and acceptance

    Following his inquiry into the opinions of ″the masses,″ Jesus inquires of his followers about their own opinions: ″But who do you claim that I am?″ says Jesus in all three Gospel narratives.″You are the Christ, the Son of the living God,″ Simon Peter is the only one who responds.Only in Matthew 16:17 does Jesus express gratitude to Peter for his response, and he goes on to say that this insight is the cornerstone of the Christian faith.This begins with: ″Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-jonah, for flesh and blood have not shown it vnto thee, but my Father who is in heaven.″ This is followed by: ″Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-jonah, for flesh and blood have not revealed it unto thee, but my Father who is in heaven.″ Jesus, in his blessing of Peter, not only acknowledges Peter’s use of the labels Christ and Son of God, but he also declares the announcement to be a divine revelation, claiming that his Father in Heaven had revealed it to Peter.Jesus asserts himself to be both Christ and the Son of God in this declaration, and by confirming both names as divine revelation, he reveals himself to be both.

    The reference to ″my Father″ is notable in that, throughout the New Testament, Jesus never refers to anybody other than himself when making such statements; nevertheless, while addressing the disciples, he refers to them as ″your Father,″ therefore omitting himself from the relation.

    Selection of Peter

    When Jesus says, ″And I say also unto thee, that thou are Peter,″ the Bible continues: ″And I say also unto thee, that thou art my church, and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.″ And I will hand over the keys to the kingdom of heaven to you as a reward.In this passage, the word ″Peter″ is rendered as ″petros,″ while the word ″rock″ is rendered as ″petra.″ Although it is a play on words, if the original language was Aramaic, the term ″kepha″ is the same in both circumstances if the language is Aramaic.Petros and petra were both used to refer to solid pieces of rocky earth in ancient Greece, and some scholars believe that this difference was made.However, Greek usage in antiquity appears to have been less exact.According to Matthew 18:17, the word ″church″ (ekklesia in Greek) is only used one more time in the Gospels before referring to the community of believers at the time of Jesus’ death and resurrection.

    The phrase ″gates of hell″ (of Hades) relates to the underworld, also known as the home of the dead, and it alludes to the fact that the powers hostile to God have been unable to defeat the church.According to Matthew 23:13, the keys of the kingdom of heaven correspond to the metaphor of the Kingdom of Heaven as a ″place to be entered,″ where the entry to it might be closed off.″Whatever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven: and whatever thou shalt free on earth shall be loosed in heaven,″ says Peter, further establishing his power.In light of the power conferred by this verse, as will be examined further below, many Christian groups have attributed varying meanings to it.

    Jesus silencing the disciples

    Towards the end of the Synoptic Gospels’ accounts, Jesus instructs his followers not to tell anyone about their encounter with him as the Messiah, a theme known as the Messianic Secret.

    Denominational issues

    Interpretations

    A number of Christian groups interpret Matthew 16:18 in a variety of different ways.The majority of denominations believe that the phrase is true with regards to Peter, although they disagree on what happens following Peter.A stained-glass window in a Catholic church showing St.Peter’s Basilica in Rome sitting ″upon this rock,″ a reference to Matthew 16:18, is seen through the window.The majority of modern Catholics take Jesus’ statement as meaning that he was establishing his church on the rock of the Apostle Peter and the succession of popes who claim Apostolic succession from him.

    Illustration of Article VII: Of the Church from the Augsburg Confession, which asserts that ″the church is the source of all truth and goodness.″ ″.there is only one holy Church that will last eternally.As a society of saints, the Church is a place where the Gospel is correctly preached and the Sacraments are correctly delivered.″ The rock mentioned in Matthew 16:18 relates to Jesus’ doctrine and ministry as the Christ, a point of view that was examined extensively in the 1537 Treatise on the Origin of Species.In the Roman Catholic Church, Jesus’ words ″upon this rock I will build my church″ are regarded as the basis of the theory of the papacy, according to which the Church of Christ is based on Peter and his successors, the Bishops of Rome, as the foundation of the Church of Christ.It is believed that the following remark by Jesus, ″and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it,″ serves as the foundation for the theory of papal infallibility.

    1. Some Protestants feel that the passage says that Peter was the cornerstone of the Church, but they do not believe that it relates to the uninterrupted line of popes, such as the Bishops of Rome, who have presided over the church since its founding.
    2. In most cases, people interpret the phrase ″and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it″ to suggest that the Church will never be extinguished completely.
    3. A number of Protestant evangelical organizations believe that Peter’s ″confession″ is ″the rock on which the Church of Jesus will be built,″ which means that the church will be founded only on Jesus as the foundation stone of his church, as stated in the book of Revelation.
    4. This view is frequently supported by the argument of the distinction between petros and petra in the Greek language (″You are Peterand on this rockI will build my church.″) The Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox churches interpret Jesus’ words ″whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven″ as conferring onto Peter the same blessing that was eventually granted upon all of the Apostles collectively in the Gospel of Matthew.
    5. However, the Orthodox believe that, while the Church as a whole is infallible, any person, regardless of their status, might fall victim to error.
    6. In relation to these interpretations, ecumenical talks have been conducted among representatives from various churches, but no definitive consensus has been reached.

    Commemorations

    At Nantes Cathedral, there is a plaque that reads, ″Thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church.″ Observed on February 22nd in the General Roman Calendar, the Feast of the Chair of St.Peter is celebrated by the Roman Catholic Church.The feast is observed on the 18th of January according to the General Roman Calendar of 1960.The Feast of the Confession of St.Peter is observed on the 18th of January by several Anglican and Lutheran congregations.

    Although technically an octave rather than a week, the Confession of Peter marks the beginning of the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity (which is really an octave rather than a week), which was previously known as the Octave of Christian Unity.It is an international Christian ecumenical celebration that began in 1908 and continues to this day.It takes place from the 18th to the 25th of January (the Feast of the Conversion of Saint Paul).

    See also

    • The chronology of Jesus
    • Peter’s denial of Jesus
    • The New Testament portrayal of Jesus’ life
    • the Transfiguration of Jesus

    References

    1. A b c d e f g Who do you think I am, exactly? essays on Christology by Jack Dean Kingsbury, Mark Allan Powell, and David R. Bauer, published in 1999 under the ISBN 0-664-25752-6, page xvi Page 885 of The Collegeville Bible Commentary: New Testament by Robert J. Karris, published in 1992 under the ISBN 0-8146-2211-9
    2. It should be noted that various translations of Luke’s version include a few more words, specifically, ‘You are’ and’sent from’ or ‘whomhas sent’. The name v is rendered as ‘Anointed One’ in some versions, similar to how it is rendered in the other gospels, rather than ″the Christ″ or ″the Messiah.″ ″Luke 9:20″. Biblehub.com. 2011. Retrieved 8 January 2021.
    3. a b The Gospel of Matthew by Rudolf Schnackenburg 2002 ISBN 0-8028-4438-3 pages 7-9
    4. a b The Gospel of Matthew by Rudolf Schnackenburg 2002 ISBN 0-8028-4438-3 pages 7-9
    5. a b c d A single teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one teacher, one
    6. The Cambridge Companion to the Gospels by Stephen C. Barton ISBN 0-521-00261-3 pages 132-133
    7. ″Online Bible – New International Version″. Biblehub.com. 2011. Retrieved 8 January 2021.
    8. ″Online Bible – New International Version″. Biblehub.com. 2011. Retrieved 8 January 2021.
    9. ″Online Bible – New International Version″. Biblehub.com. 2011. Retrieved 8 January 2021.
    10. ″Online Matthew 16:14
    11. Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges on Matthew 16
    12. John Lightfoot’s Commentary on the Gospels on Matthew 16 and on Matthew 27 (all accessed on 25 January 2017)
    13. Matthew 16:15
    14. Matthew 16:18
    15. Matthew 16:19
    16. Matthew 16:20
    17. Matthew 16:21
    18. Matthew 16:22
    19. Matthew 16:23
    20. Matthew 16:24
    21. Matthew 16:25
    22. Matthew 16: In addition, see: a b The Gospel of Mark, Volume 2 by John R. Donahue and Daniel J. Harrington 2002 ISBN 0-8146-5965-9 page 336
    23. c Christology and the New Testament by Christopher Mark Tuckett 2001 ISBN 0-664-22431-8 page 109
    24. d Peter: Disciple, Apostle, Martyr by Oscar Cullman 2011 ISBN 1602584133 page 20
    25. e Christology and the New Testament by Christopher Mark Tuckett

    Saint Peter the Apostle

    Top Questions

    Who was St. Peter?

    How did St. Peter die?

    What is St. Peter the patron saint of?

    (Died 64 CE in Rome), disciple of Jesus Christ who was recognized as the leader of the 12 disciples in the early Christian church and as the first of the Roman Catholic Church’s uninterrupted succession of popes.His original name was Simeon or Simon, and he was the first pope to be elected by the Roman Catholic Church in its unbroken succession of popes.At the beginning of Jesus’ career, Peter, a Jewish fisherman, was called to be a follower of Jesus.During his time with Jesus, he was given the name Cephas (from Aramaic Kepa; hence Peter, from Petros, a Greek translation of Kepa).

    The man and his position among the disciples

    The New Testament contains the only reliable sources of information on Peter’s life, which are the four Gospels, Acts, the writings of Paul, and the two letters that bear the name of Peter.He was most likely known by his Hebrew given name, Simeon, or by the Greek variant of that given name, Simon, when he was younger.The former is mentioned just twice in the New Testament, but the latter is mentioned 49 times.During important occasions (John 21:15, according to the Gospel of John), he was addressed as ″Simon, son of John.″ The name Simon is used 17 times in the Gospel of John, while the compound of Simon Peter is used just once in the rest of the Bible.Despite the fact that Paul has a strong preference (8 times out of 10) for the Greek transliteration Kphas (Latinized as Cephas) of the Aramaic name or title Kepa, which means ″Rock,″ the Greek translation Petros appears about 150 times throughout the Gospels and Acts of the Apostles.

    There is indirect evidence that Peter was the son of John and that he was married from the Synoptic Gospels (Gospel of Matthew 8:14) and Paul (First Letter of Paul to the Corinthians 9:5), as well as from the New Testament.His family originally originated from Bethsaida in Galilee (John 1:44), but during the time of Jesus’ ministry, Peter and his brother St.Andrew resided in Capernaum, near the northwest end of the Sea of Galilee, where they were in partnership as fishermen with St.James and St.

    1. John, the sons of Zebedee (Gospel According to Luke 5:10).
    2. Many things about Peter may be gleaned from the New Testament, either openly from the words made by and about Peter, or indirectly through his actions and reactions, which are revealed in a number of situations in which Peter plays a key role.
    3. In his relationships with the church of Antioch, for example, he was at first willing to eat with Gentiles but eventually refused to do so (Letter to the Galatians 2:11–14).
    4. As well as being strong, he could be steadfast (Acts of the Apostles 4:10–10; 5:1–10).
    5. Occasionally, he is represented as reckless and hasty (Luke 22:33, for example), or as impatient and capable of tremendous rage (Luke 22:34, for example) (John 18:10).
    6. He is frequently shown as kind yet forceful, and, as seen by his professed love for Jesus in John 21:15–17, he is shown to be capable of immense loyalty and affection.
    1. In Acts 4:13, the New Testament states that Peter was uneducated in the sense of having had no training in the Mosaic Law.
    2. It is also questionable whether or not he knew Greek.
    3. He appeared to learn slowly and make mistakes over and over again, but subsequently, when he was given more responsibility, he proved that he was mature and capable of handling it.
    4. Even though all of the Gospels agree that Peter was invited to follow Jesus at the beginning of his career, the details of when and where the event occurred are described differently in each Gospel.
    5. Luke (5:1–11) very briefly mentions James and John, and he completely ignores Andrew, while highlighting Peter’s appeal.

    Matthew (4:18–22) and Mark (Gospel According to Mark 1:16–20) both mention the call of the four men and agree with Luke that the incident took place at the Sea of Galilee.Matthew and Mark also include the call of the four men in their respective gospels.This is stated in the Gospel of St.John (1:28), which claims that Andrew—who had previously been a follower of St.John the Baptist (1:35), and had heard John say that Jesus was the Lamb of God—left John and presented Peter to ″the Messiah,″ who at that time gave him the name (or title) Cephas (i.e., Peter, or Rock).

    According to the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, and Luke), the call to Peter was extended in Galilee when Jesus first began his activity in that region, and this is most likely right.The Gospel is a collection of stories about Jesus Christ.According to John, this passage is perhaps more theologically motivated than historically motivated; the author of John wishes to emphasize that Peter recognized Jesus’ messiahship from the beginning and that Jesus had recognized Simon as the ″rock″ from their very first meeting, as he has done elsewhere.The Synoptic Gospels are essentially consistent in the degree of emphasis they place on Peter’s leadership among the Twelve Apostles, although there are some discrepancies between them as well.For example, in one instance, Matthew and Luke indicate that Peter was the one who questioned Jesus about a parable, while Mark refers these statements to the entire group of disciples who were there (Matthew 15:15; Luke 8:45; and Mark 7:17).

    The Synoptic Gospels all agree that Peter acted as the group’s spokesperson, was the most outstanding member, and had a certain level of precedence over the other disciples, albeit to varying degrees of emphasis.When the disciples are addressed in the Bible, Peter is almost always the first to be mentioned (Matthew 10:2–4, Mark 3:16–19, Luke 6:14–16, Acts 1:13; see only Galatians 2:9 for examples).Although it is unclear whether or not Peter’s status in the apostolic church was largely owing to the Gospel story being read back into it, his assertive personality was undoubtedly a role in this decision.Those who were not direct disciples of Jesus respected Peter’s authority as well, as was the case when the collectors of the temple tax contacted him for information about the tax (Matthew 17:24).On another occasion, he sought clarification from Jesus on behalf of the disciples, this time with customary haste (Matthew 15:15), this time questioning the interpretation of a parable or a statement (Matthew 18:21).While speaking as an individual and as a spokesman of the Twelve Apostles, he made a plea for personal preference in the kingdom of heaven as a recompense for his devoted devotion to Christ (Matthew 19:27, 28).

    1. On a number of times, Peter is the only one addressed by name, with the rest of the group referred to as just accompanying him (Mark 1:36; Luke 8:45).
    2. Even though the three disciples closest to Jesus (known as the ″pillars″—Peter, James, and John) are mentioned in a single occurrence, it is typically Peter who is the only one who

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