What Does Jesus Preach About The Kingdom Of God

Jesus Preached the Kingdom of God

“The hour has come, and the kingdom of God is at nigh,” says the prophet. — Mark 1:15 (NIV) One of the many reasons Jesus came to Earth was to educate us about the Kingdom of God, which was one of the many purposes of his mission. When Jesus was just getting started in his career, he declared, “I must preach the kingdom of God to the other towns as well, for I have been sent for this purpose.” (See Luke 4:43.) Because the kingdom of God operates in such a completely different manner from the way things operate in our world in so many areas, Jesus had to explain how it works to us.

After a short period of time had passed and his followers had begun to grasp the nature of God’s Kingdom, Jesus sent them forth to do the same thing he had done: He dispatched them to preach the gospel of the kingdom of God and to heal the sick.

For starters, we must recognize that the ideas of the Kingdom still apply to us today.

God’s Kingdom is Here Now

For anyone who might be tempted to believe that the Kingdom of God is something that exists in the distant future or only in eternity, remember that Jesus reminded his followers that the Kingdom of God was already at hand during his lifetime. As an illustration: As a result of John’s imprisonment, Jesus traveled to Galilee, proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom of God and declaring, “The hour has come, and the kingdom of God has come near. Respond to the message by repenting and believing it.—Mark 1:14-15 People were urged to repent since the Kingdom of God was near, according to the preaching of John the Baptist (Matt.

From the very beginning of his own mission, Jesus delivered the same message to the people (Matt.

However, as Christians, we appear to have lost sight of the fact that we are different from one another.

Kingdom of God vs Kingdom of Heaven

Although it can be a bit confusing, the book of Matthew predominantly uses the term Kingdom of Heaven, whereas the other Gospels solely use the word Kingdom of God, this can be explained as follows: It has been suggested that the names are referring to two distinct entities as a result of this misunderstanding. In this way of thinking, the term Kingdom of Heaven refers to the world under the New Covenant, but before Jesus returns to rule politically over the Earth, and the term Kingdom of God refers to the time after Jesus returns physically to rule over the Earth, both of which are referred to as the Kingdom of God.

Personally, I do not believe this to be the case. The fact that those two names are used interchangeably to refer to the same thing makes more sense in my opinion. When you examine the target audience for whom each Gospel writer was writing, that answer makes the most sense.

Intended Audience

Matthew composed his Gospel with the intention of reaching a Jewish audience. Religious Jews will not utter the name of God out of fear, awe, and respect for the Almighty. Typically, when a pious Jew is reading their scriptures (i.e., what Christians refer to as the Old Testament) and they come across the term YHVH in the book, instead of pronouncing that phrase, they will pronounce Adonai, which means “God is kind.” As a result, reading through a book that made repeated references to the Kingdom of God would have been disconcerting to a Jewish readership.

  1. As a result, he relied on Heaven rather than God for the most part in order to overcome the barrier that prevented his Jewish audience from comprehending the broader message.
  2. Matthew may have included those few allusions since Jesus was known for shaking things up and upsetting the Jewish religious establishment, which may explain why he included them.
  3. As a result, the word “Kingdom of God” appears in all of the other Gospels.
  4. His Gospel is jam-packed with action and focuses on the power of Jesus, as well as what Jesus achieved.
  5. Other aspects of Mark’s Gospel were suited to the Romans as well.
  6. He discusses Jewish traditions that the Romans would not have been aware of.
  7. Luke composed his Gospel with the intention of reaching a Greek audience.
  8. He refers to places by their Greek names rather than their Roman names.
  9. John composed his Gospel with a broad readership in mind.
  10. However, John stated that he wrote his tale in order for people to come to believe in Jesus Christ, the Son of God, and as a result of that belief, come to have eternal life via His name (John 20:31).
  11. As a result, when they speak of God’s Kingdom, they never refer to Heaven as a replacement.

Explaining the Kingdom of God

In order to communicate complicated concepts, Jesus was a master at creating word images.

The everyday things that the people he was speaking to were familiar with helped them grasp how profoundly different the Kingdom of God is from the world they were used to living in. A few examples of the metaphors Jesus used to explain the Kingdom of God are included below.

  • Wheat and Tares
  • Mustard Seed
  • Yeast (Leven)
  • A Dragnet
  • A Treasure Hiding in Plain Sight
  • A Pearl of Great Price
  • Maintaining control over business accounts receivable. hiring day laborers
  • Business investing (talents)
  • Inviting guests to a wedding celebration
  • And many more topics. Virgins who are both wise and foolish

The great thing about the method Jesus taught is that we can still clearly grasp what he was saying thousands of years later, in a completely different society and speaking a completely different language than he did when he was first teaching it. It the next time you go through the Gospels, try to do so with an eye toward discovering how things function in the Kingdom of God are different from how things work in the world around you. You might be surprised at what you discover. I have a feeling that will be a really eye-opening experience for you.

10 Connections Between Jesus and the Kingdom of God

The kingdom of God is, at its heart, God’s redemptive dominion on the earth. However, it is easy to ignore this important topic in Jesus’ life, and it is tempting to presume rather than analyze the significance of the kingdom for Jesus. In contrast, if we fail to see the relevance of the kingdom to Jesus, we may fail to recognize its significance for biblical theology and ethical principles. So, how vital did Jesus consider the kingdom of God to be? What was his position in reference to the establishment of the eschatological kingdom?

1. Jesus inaugurates the kingdom.

As a result of Christ’s birth, the kingdom of God does not begin with the coronation of a powerful king, but rather with the birth of a helpless baby. As Jesus’ public ministry begins in Mark, he declares, “The time has come, and the kingdom of God has come near; repent and believe in the gospel” (Mark 1:15). (Mark 1:15). Christ had now officially started what Israel had been waiting for for a long time.

2. Jesus is the kingdom.

The kingdom is located at the location of the monarch. This is precisely why Jesus tells the Pharisees, “The kingdom of God has come among you” (Luke 17:20). (Luke 17:21). According to Graeme Goldsworthy, Jesus symbolizes the kingdom metaphor of God’s people in God’s place under God’s authority, which is represented by the cross. Jesus is the trustworthy ruler of the kingdom as well as the ethical citizen of the kingdom.

3. Jesus purposes the kingdom.

Jesus discloses that the goal of his life is to declare the kingdom of heaven. During a description of his mission, Jesus stated that he “must spread good news about the kingdom of God” (Luke 4:43).

4. Jesus declares the kingdom.

Jesus describes the kingdom and encourages individuals to become a part of it by the words he speaks. According to Luke, Jesus’ ministry consisted on “proclaiming and spreading the good news of the kingdom of God to the people” (Luke 8:1). The announcement of the kingdom was frequently made via the use of parables by Jesus, which served to demonstrate what the kingdom was and how it operated.

5. Jesus demonstrates the kingdom.

Jesus demonstrates the might of the kingdom and his control over the prince of evil via his deeds and activities. “If it is by the finger of God that I drive out demons, then the kingdom of God has come upon you,” Jesus says in response (Luke 11:20). As a result of his words, Jesus not only announces the kingdom, but also proves the kingdom by his deeds.

6. Jesus deploys the kingdom.

Jesus dispatches his followers to serve as ambassadors of the kingdom, heralding the entrance of the kingdom. “The kingdom of God has come close to you,” Jesus tells the 72 disciples as they are dispatched in Luke 10: “The kingdom of God has come near to you” (Luke 10:9). After receiving “all authority in heaven and on earth,” King Jesus sends his discipleship battle plan to the church, which is based on his possession of “all authority in heaven and on earth” (Matt 28:18).

Jesus dispatches his warriors to the front lines of battle in order to combat the dominion of evil.

7. Jesus transforms the kingdom.

Israel’s messianic expectations were predicated on the arrival of a military conqueror who would deliver them from the clutches of their regional adversaries. That is why they attempted to elevate Jesus to the position of king (John 6:15). Jesus, on the other hand, reorients their viewpoint by stating, “My kingdom is not of this world” (John 18:36). It is through Jesus that the kingdom is transformed, demonstrating that it has a holistic character, a redemptive mission, and a cosmic perspective.

8. Jesus purchases the kingdom.

Jesus redeems the kingdom by his victorious death and resurrection on the cross. As he appeases the wrath of God, which has been poured out on people who have rebelled against his reign, Jesus destroys Satan, sin, and death in the process (Col 2:14-15). By breaking the power of the kingdom of darkness, Jesus is able to triumph over the world, the body, and even the Devil. By paying the price of a kingdom people on the cross, Jesus demonstrates that he is the legitimate ruler of the restored kingdom.

9. Jesus concludes with the kingdom.

In his final statements to his followers, Jesus brings his earthly career to a close by defining the nature of the kingdom. “Lord, would you return the kingdom to Israel at this time?” Jesus’ followers inquired of him just before his ascension. (See Acts 1:6) Even at the end of his earthly mission, Jesus was able to clear up any misunderstandings concerning the kingdom. As a result, the kingdom was essential to both the beginning and the conclusion of Jesus’ earthly career.

10. Jesus returns the kingdom.

As a victorious warrior monarch, Jesus makes his triumphal return at the Second Coming of Christ. As he returns to complete the last conquest, the moniker “King of kings and Lord of lords” is inscribed on his body: “King of kings and Lord of lords” (Rev 19:16). At long end, Jesus crushes all of his adversaries as he establishes a new creation kingdom that is a perfect reflection of his just reign in heaven. He brings to a close the conquest that began with his conception. If the kingdom of God was important to Jesus’ life and ministry, then it continues to be crucial to our theology and ethics in the twenty-first century.

What is “the gospel of the kingdom”?

The phrase “the gospel of the kingdom” is becoming increasingly prevalent these days. Numerous individuals believe that when Jesus came “preaching the gospel of the kingdom” (Matt. 4:23), he was preaching a message about the destruction of wicked political authorities, the change of society, and the rising up of those who were oppressed by society. These concepts have the potential to attract a wide range of revolutionaries. Are they, however, the terms used in the Bible when they talk of the gospel of the kingdom?

  1. After listening to Philip the evangelist tell “the good news about the kingdom of God,” men and women were persuaded and baptized as a result (Acts 8:12).
  2. The kingdom of God is drawing near (Mk.
  3. Specifically, he is referring to the fact that God’s salvation authority and dominion has come closer than it has ever been before in all of human history as a result of his own arrival on earth.
  4. 1:18; 2 Cor.
  5. Ultimately, this new creation will be a realm of complete righteousness and harmony, a place where all wrongs will be righted once and for all (Rev.
  6. Even while this gospel of the kingdom has significant worldwide ramifications, it is ultimately a message about what Jesus has done in order to redeem sinners from their sin.
  7. (John 3:5).

6:9-11, 15:50) Finally, the gospel of the kingdom is a message about a king who died for his enemies in order for people who believe in him to inherit the exact kingdom that he acquired for them.

What Is the Kingdom of God? Understanding Its Meaning

The Bible’s Old and New Testaments both reference the Kingdom of God at various points in time. Throughout fact, the term “Kingdom of God” appears more than 70 times in the New Testament, with the Gospel of Matthew accounting for more than a third of all occurrences. As a Christian, it is critical to comprehend the meaning of this term, which can be perplexing to both Christians and non-Christians alike. Would you know what to say if someone asked you what the kingdom of God meant? Would you be able to explain it to them?

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Romans 14:17 is a verse that says Let us examine the phrase’s original Greek and Hebrew meanings, as well as the other expressions that appear throughout the Bible, what it means to seek first the Kingdom of God, and how to live and pray with the Kingdom of God in mind.

OriginMeaning of The Kingdom of God

From the arrival of Jesus Christ to inaugurate the kingdom through the end of redemptive history and the establishment of the Church, we have a clear picture of the Gospel. Several separate passages in the Old and New Testaments relate to the “kingdom of God,” according to Easton’s Bible Dictionary: Matthew 6:33, Mark 1:14-15, and Luke 4:43 are all references to the “kingdom of Christ,” according to Easton’s Bible Dictionary.

  • “The kingdom of heaven,” according to Matthew 13:41 and 20:21
  • “the kingdom of Christ and God,” according to Ephesians 5:5
  • “the kingdom,” according to Mark 11:10
  • “the kingdom of heaven,” according to Matthew 3:12 and 4:17
  • And “the kingdom of God,” according to Matthew 13:29.

No matter how the words Christ, God, and heaven are phrased differently in different parts of the Bible, all of them express the same notion in different ways. Listed below are three aspects that the Kingdom of God entails. On earth and in heaven, the reign of Jesus Christ is established. 2. The benefits and advantages that accrue as a result of living under Christ’s authority 3. The people who are the subjects of this kingdom, or the Church To what extent was the concept of the Kingdom of God critical to the success of the mission?

Jesus Christ himself not only stated, “I am the way, the truth, and the life,” “The coming of the kingdom of God is imminent.

“I will not drink again of the fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it anew in the kingdom of God,” Jesus said at the Last Supper, referring to the resurrection (Mark 14:25).

Why Does Matthew Use “Kingdom of Heaven” Instead of “Kingdom of God”?

Throughout the Gospel of Matthew, we see Matthew use the phrase “kingdom of heaven” to allude to the declaration of Jesus Christ’s rule and the good news of His reign, as well as the announcement of His death and resurrection. He does this out of respect for the Jews, who are forbidden from speaking the hallowed name of God in public. No difference in theology or meaning exists between the kingdom of God and heaven; Matthew is just employing an indirect word to show respect for the reader’s intelligence because intelligence is a virtue.

He proclaims the advent of the kingdom at the outset of Jesus’ public ministry, and at the conclusion of the book, in the Olivet Discourse, he talks of the final completion of the kingdom’s arrival on earth.

Author for Christianity.com Contributing Editor Chris Swanson summarizes the situation as follows: “In reality, there is no actual separation between the Kingdom of Heaven and the Kingdom of the Almighty.

Jesus Christ was granted the power to reign by the Father, and he is now seated at the right side of the Father in the heavenly realms.

Christ will subsequently bring this law from Heaven to Earth at a predetermined future period, namely at the hour of Christ’s later return. So Christ will rule with the authority and power of God as well as the authority and power of the heavenly realms.”

What Does It Mean to “Seek First the Kingdom of God”?

Matthew 6:33 says, “But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things will be added to you.” This is a passage that every Christian should memorize and recite often. Prayer is what Jesus instructed us to practice “Your kingdom has come to pass. Your task has been completed. As it is in heaven, so it is on earth” (Matthew 6:10). This is a prayer for the day when God will bring heaven to earth and establish His dominion over all of creation on the globe. God’s plan for the planet Earth is still in the works.

  1. So it is something that will happen in the future.
  2. This is the time when Jesus is in command.
  3. In the kingdom of God, when you submit to His authority and allow Him to direct your life, you are in the presence of God.
  4. The following is an excerpt from Harvest Ministries’ “First Things First” (used by permission).

Praying “The Kingdom Come”

If you choose to pray in this way, here is how: “‘Our Father in heaven, hallowed be Your name; Your kingdom come; Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.'” Please provide us with our daily bread today. Let us ask you to forgive us our debts, just as we have forgiven our creditors. “And do not lead us into temptation, but preserve us from the wicked one,” the Bible says. Matthew 6:9-13 is a biblical passage. Our prayers are taught to us in what is generally known as the “Lord’s Prayer,” in which we are taught to pray not only for God’s will to be done in our lives, but also for God’s saving Gospel to be preached across the world.

Then we are asked to be witnesses of Jesus, to tell others about Him, and to remain completely submitted to His purpose for our life, which is the last call.

When he asked Jesus about it, he received the following response: “Truly, truly, I say to you, until one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.” 3:3 (John 3:3)

What Does it Mean that the Kingdom of Heaven is at Hand?

Repent, because the kingdom of heaven is near at hand,” the Bible says. Matthew 3:2 is an example of a parable. When God came to earth in the form of a man, the Kingdom of Heaven became more accessible to us. This is what the apostle John was referring to when he proclaimed, “The Kingdom of Heaven is at hand.” He meant that the kingdom of heaven, manifested in the Person of the King, is now open to all people. The Jewish religious leaders were searching for a physical kingdom, not a spiritual one, as they went on their search.

Despite the fact that Jesus Christ lives and reigns in the hearts of all Christians today, the Kingdom of Heaven will not be fully recognized until all evil on the globe has been judged and eradicated totally.

He will return as ruler and judge, and he will rule over all of the world when the time comes.

They now have a position in the presence of Jesus.

Christians have a deeper relationship with Jesus than they would have if they were subjects of an earthly monarch. Chris Swanson, a contributing writer at Christianity.com, wrote the following excerpt: The Kingdom of Heaven is Near (What Does It Mean That the Kingdom of Heaven is Near?)

What Is The Kingdom: The Kingdom Jesus Preached

To comprehend what Jesus was referring to when he said, “the kingdom of God,” we must first comprehend what a kingdom is in the first place. For those of us in the Western world who hear the phrase, we may conjure up images of monarchs ruling over empires such as England. A regent of a kingdom is someone who is in charge of the affairs of the kingdom. That kingdom is a realm in which they actively govern and reign over the people. And so, what exactly did Jesus mean when he declared that God has a kingdom and that it has drawn near?

What Is The Kingdom Of God?

Jesus described the kingdom of God as being not restricted to a specific physical city, country, or geographical mass – not even to the confines of ancient Israel – when he spoke about it. The kingdom of God, on the other hand, was the dynamic dominion of God over heaven and earth, as well as over all things visible and invisible. For the ancient Jews, the concept of the “Kingdom of God” was an established theological reality that they could embrace or reject. After hearing the teachings of prophecy from figures such as Isaiah, Israel came to think that God is the one real King and Creator of the universe.

24:8-10), and he will one day completely display that authority on earth via a chosen regent – an anointed one (Is.

On that day, God’s people, Israel, will be liberated from their oppressors and reunited with their homeland after a lengthy period of exile.

The inhabitants of the globe will be ruled by God’s anointed and appointed King, who will govern with justice, kindness, and love.

Jesus Inaugurates The Kingdom

Jesus, the son of a carpenter and a Jew, is born in Palestine during the first century AD. He takes his place in a synagogue to read from the Old Testament one day when he is a young man. A revered text, which speaks of the anointed King who is yet to come, is his selection. Isaiah 61:1 is the source of this quote from the venerable prophet. Here’s how it went down: “He rose up to read, and the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was brought to him. Unrolling it, he came across the passage that read: ‘The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor.’ ‘He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and sight restoration for the blind, to set the oppressed free, and to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor,’ says the prophet.

  1. The eyes of everyone in the congregation were focused on him.
  2. By his resurrection from the grave (Luke 24:1-6), God would authenticate that Jesus was really the rightful King of the earth.
  3. He would proclaim, in word and deed, that God’s kingdom was truly among them.
  4. Then, by death on a cross, he would offer himself as a sacrificial lamb, the “suffering servant,” for the sins of humanity (Is.
  5. By his resurrection from the dead (Luke 24:1-6), God would verify that Jesus was indeed the true King of the world.

Additional Articles in this Series: 1.Does Theology Matter? 2.The Kingdom Jesus Preached3.Your Will Be Done4.The Now of the Kingdom 5.Implications of the Kingdom 6.The Not Yet of the Kingdom 7.Shalom 8.How Do We Become Kingdom People? 9.Both/And 10.The Reign and Rule

Why did Jesus talk so much about the kingdom of God?

Q. It seems to me that Jesus spoke a lot about the kingdom of God. The majority of biblical instructors appear to be more concerned with salvation and redemption. What exactly is the distinction, and why does it matter? The kingdom of God, as you correctly point out, served as a focal point of Jesus’ teaching. Jesus went around ” spreading the good news of God,” according to the gospel writers, as they summarize his teaching. As he put it, “the moment has arrived.” ‘The Kingdom of God is drawing closer.

  1. “This is what the kingdom of God is like,” or “What shall we describe the kingdom of God is like,” was a common way for Jesus to begin his parables.
  2. So, what precisely is the kingdom of God, and how does it manifest itself?
  3. In other words, God’s kingdom is present on earth whenever and wherever God’s will is carried out, just as it is in heaven—without any opposition or opposition.
  4. A common commitment to treat people with the compassion, generosity, mercy, and love that Jesus taught us to have is the primary application of this principle in interpersonal interactions.
  5. Take note, then, that the kingdom of God is largely a community in our day and age.
  6. Take note of how this contrasts with the emphases you indicated, which are on “salvation” and “redemption,” respectively.
  7. The question is, how do these two techniques interact with one another.
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It embraces and accepts them as an indication of God’s forgiveness for their sins and wrongdoing.

In God’s presence, life begins within the “circle of warmth and light,” and it extends from there into all of time and space.

As a result, it should serve as our beginning point.

The Rev.

Christopher R.

For the past twenty-five years, he has been involved in parish and student ministry.

His Understanding the Books of the Bible study guide series is based on this structure, as is his Understanding the Books of the Bible blog.

Harvard University awarded him a Bachelor of Arts in English and American Literature and Language in addition to a Master of Arts in Theological Studies from Gordon-Conwell.

He received his Ph.D. in the History of Christian Life and Thought, with a minor concentration in Biblical Studies, from Boston College, which is affiliated with Andover Newton Theological School. View all of Christopher R Smith’s blog entries.

What, When, and Where Is the Kingdom of God?

Over 80 times throughout the New Testament, the phrase ‘Kingdom of God’ (also known as ‘Kingdom of Heaven’ or ‘Kingdom of Light’) is used to refer to God’s kingdom. The majority of these allusions are found in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. While the specific word “God’s Kingdom” is not present in the Old Testament, the reality of God’s Kingdom is articulated in a manner that is comparable to that found in the New.

Key Takeaways

  • One way to describe the Kingdom of God is as the eternal state in which God is sovereign and Jesus Christ reigns forever
  • There are more than 80 references to the Kingdom of God in the New Testament alone. The teachings of Jesus Christ are centered on the Kingdom of God
  • Hence, The Bible refers to the Kingdom of God by several other titles, including the Kingdom of Heaven and the Kingdom of Light.

The fundamental focus of Jesus Christ’s message was the coming of the Kingdom of God on the earth. But what exactly does this statement mean? Is the kingdom of God a geographical location or is it a spiritual reality that exists right now? Who are the subjects of this kingdom, and what is their history? In addition, does God’s kingdom exist now, or is it only to be found in the future? Let’s look for solutions to these issues in the pages of the Bible.

The Kingdom of God According to the Bible

The Kingdom of God was the overarching topic of Jesus Christ’s discourse. What exactly does this statement mean? Are we talking about a geographical location or a spiritual reality that is now taking place? How many people are considered to be the subjects of this realm? In addition, does God’s kingdom exist now, or is it merely a concept that will be realized someday? To find solutions to these issues, let us go to the Bible.

Jesus and the Kingdom

The Kingdom of God was the fundamental focus of Jesus Christ’s discourse. However, what exactly is meant by this phrase? Is the kingdom of God a geographical location or a spiritual reality that exists right now? Who are the subjects of this kingdom, and what are their names? In addition, does God’s kingdom exist now, or is it simply a possibility in the future? Let’s look for solutions to these questions in the Bible.

Summary of the Kingdom of God

For simplicity’s sake, the Kingdom of God can be defined as the realm in which Jesus Christ rules as King and God has absolute control over all things. This Kingdom exists (in part) in the lives and souls of the redeemed now, and it will exist in perfection and fullness in the future, as well as in the present.

Sources

  • The Gospel of the Kingdom, or the Gospel of the Kingdom, Ron Rhodes’ Bite-Size Bible Definitions are based on the work of George Eldon Ladd’s Theopedia.

What is the gospel of the kingdom?

Answer A number of phrases and references to “the gospel of the kingdom” as well as “the kingdom of God” and “the kingdom of heaven” are frequently heard in connection with the Lord Jesus and His activity on the world. The word gospel simply means “good news,” while the phrase “kingdom” is derived from the Greek wordbasileia, which literally translates as “the realm in which a sovereign king governs.” The word gospel is derived from the Greek wordbasileia, which translates as “the realm in which a sovereign king rules.” Because Christ’s kingdom is not of this world for the time being, the word kingdom is used consistently throughout the New Testament to refer to the dominion of Christ in the hearts of Christians (John 18:36).

He said that “the kingdom of God is close” as he began His earthly mission, which would last for three years (Luke 10:9; cf.

As recorded in Mark 1:14–15, Jesus’ primary focus during His earthly ministry was “the gospel of God,” with the message, “The time has come, and the kingdom of God has come; repent and believe in the gospel.” “Now after John was arrested, Jesus came into Galilee, proclaiming the gospel of God, and saying, ‘The time has come; the kingdom of God has come; repent and believe in the gospel.” The following is Jesus’ explanation of His kingdom when asked to define it: “The kingdom of God is not arriving in ways that can be witnessed.

The kingdom of God is in the midst of you” (Luke 17:20–21).

This is the message of repentance, salvation, and restoration that God has made available to anyone who would believe in Jesus Christ as their Savior and Lord.

If a person chooses to continue in their sin, they will be unable to participate in the kingdom of God (1 Corinthians 6:9–10; Galatians 5:19–21).

As Paul writes in Romans 6:18–19, “the gospel of the kingdom is the good news that we may be set free from our enslavement to sin if we repent and turn to God.” Even though our Redeemer has arrived, it is difficult to enter God’s kingdom, not because God demands us to meet unreasonable criteria, but because we do not want to repent and alter our ways.

Many people would prefer to hold on to their old sinful identities rather than allow Jesus to re-create them (2 Corinthians 5:17).

“Ambassadors” for our heavenly Father are described in Second Corinthians 5:20, where God’s children are referred to as “ambassadors.” Spiritual ambassadors of God’s kingdom, in the same way that an earthly foreign ambassador keeps his or her national identity while representing his or her country in another, owe their loyalty to God even when they are physically present in this world.

Due to the fact that this is not our home (Romans 12:1–2; 1 John 2:15–17), we are under no need to adhere to the habits, values, and lifestyle of this world.

Consequently, even if we must remain here until God takes us home, we are not to live for ourselves or in accordance with the values of this world.

Citizens of the kingdom of God are assigned to this location by our heavenly Father, the King. A kingdom mentality equips us to make more informed judgments as we spend our lives in promoting the gospel of Christ’s reign on earth.

The Kingdom of God Is at Hand

Answer On several occasions, the term “gospel to be preached” and the phrases “kingdom of God” and “kingdom of heaven” are used in connection with the Lord Jesus and His mission on earth. When translated as “kingdom,” the Greek wordbasileia refers to the realm in which a sovereign king governs and is simply translated as “good news.” The phrase “gospel” simply means “good news,” and the term translated as “kingdom” refers to the Greek wordgospel. Given that Christ’s kingdom is not of this earth at this point in time, the word “kingdom” is used consistently throughout the New Testament to refer to Christ’s authority in the hearts of believers (John 18:36).

  • Matthew 4:17).
  • The following is Jesus’ explanation of His kingdom when asked to define it: “The kingdom of God is not arriving in ways that can be seen.
  • The kingdom of God, according to Romans 14:17, is a matter of “righteousness, peace, and joy in the Holy Spirit,” among other things.
  • Participants in His eternal kingdom include those who embrace His gift (John 1:12).
  • In spite of the fact that mercy is extended to anybody who will accept it, Jesus cautioned that entering His kingdom would be extremely difficult and that only a small number of people would succeed (Matthew 7:14).
  • Even though our Redeemer has arrived, it is difficult to enter God’s kingdom, not because God demands us to meet unreasonable criteria, but because we do not wish to repent and alter our ways.
  • Many people would prefer to hold on to their old immoral identities rather than allow Jesus to re-create them in his image.
  • Citizens of the kingdom of heaven are those who believe in and receive the gospel of the kingdom (Galatians 4:3–9), and they are released from their bonds with this world.
  • Spiritual ambassadors of God’s kingdom, in the same way that an earthly foreign ambassador maintains his or her national identity while representing his or her country in another, owe their loyalty to God even when they are physically present in this world.
  • Due to the fact that this is not our home (Romans 12:1–2; 1 John 2:15–17), we do not need to adhere to the habits, values, and lifestyle of this world.
  • We are not to live for ourselves or in accordance with the values of this world, even if we must remain here until God calls us home.

On assignment from our heavenly Father, the King, citizens of the kingdom of God have taken up residence here. A kingdom mentality equips us to make more informed judgments as we spend our lives in promoting the gospel of Christ’s reign on Earth.

What did Jesus mean when He said, “The kingdom of God is at hand”?

Many people have struggled to grasp the meaning of this question. Some have concluded that the Kingdom is only within one’s own heart, which is incorrect. Several people have speculated that it is the Catholic Church. Others believe that this Kingdom is located in the celestial realms. Few have been able to correctly reconcile the teachings on this subject found in the Old Testament with what has been revealed in the New Testament, but that is changing. Before we can understand what Jesus meant when he said that the Kingdom of God was “near hand,” we must first study what the Scriptures have to say about the Kingdom of God prior to Jesus’ discourse on the subject.

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The Kingdom of God is mentioned in the Old Testament

As king of Babylon in his second year, King Nebuchadnezzar was visited by a dream in which he foresaw the rise of three huge gentile nations that would succeed his own Babylonian Empire (Daniel 2:1-43). These succeeding empires turned out to be the Medo-Persian, Greek, and Roman empires, according to historical records. A night vision disclosed the secret to Daniel, after which God delivered the interpretation of the king’s dream to Daniel through his intermediary, Daniel. As a result, Daniel prayed to the God of the universe.

“And in the days of these kings, the God of heaven will establish a kingdom that shall never be destroyed; and the kingdom shall not be left to other people; it shall break in pieces and consume all of these kingdoms, and it shall stand forever,” according to the final section of the dream and its explanation (verse 44).

Through the prophet Zechariah, God reinforced this point by stating that “And The Lord Shall Be King Over All the Earth” (and The Lord Shall Be King Over All the Earth) will occur at Christ’s second return to Earth.

The Holy Bible, New King James Version (NKJV) was published in 1982 by Thomas Nelson and is known as the New King James Version (NKJV) “Zachariah 14:9 (Zechariah 14:9).

The Holy Bible, New King James Version (NKJV) was published in 1982 by Thomas Nelson and is known as the New King James Version (NKJV) “>19:16 (UTC).

What and where does Christ say the Kingdom will be?

When Christ arrived on earth in the form of a human being, it was evident that the Kingdom of God had not yet taken control of the planet, and the early Christians were anxiously awaiting its establishment. Unfortunately, throughout the decades after Christ’s death, this doctrine about the Kingdom of God as a kingdom that would come to earth and replace all human governments was gradually eroded from mainstream Christianity. The historian Edward Gibbon chronicled how the belief that the Kingdom of God is an actual kingdom progressively faded away from mainstream Christianity, as previously mentioned in this series.

See the section below under “The Four Elements of a Kingdom” for a more in-depth discussion of how the Kingdom of God will really be a physical kingdom on earth.

It was Jesus’ teachings that “the kingdom of God is at hand” (as well as his statement, “The time has come, and the kingdom of God is at hand.”) “Repent, and put your faith in the gospel.” The New King James Version (NKJV)The Holy Bible, New King James Version 1982 by Thomas Nelson”>Mark 1:15) began to contribute to the understanding of the Kingdom of God when it was first published.

Who will be in the Kingdom of God?

Even though Christ manifested himself as a human being, it was apparent that the Kingdom of God did not yet rule over the world, and the early Christians looked forward to its advent with bated breath. Unfortunately, throughout the decades after Christ’s death, this doctrine about the Kingdom of God as a kingdom that would come to earth and replace all human governments was gradually eroded by mainstream Christianity. The historian Edward Gibbon chronicled how the belief that the Dominion of God was a physical kingdom progressively faded away from mainstream Christianity, as previously mentioned in this series.

Continue reading “The Four Elements of a Kingdom” in order to have a better understanding of how God’s Kingdom will really be a physical kingdom on our planet.

It was Jesus’ teaching (and statement, “The hour has come, and the kingdom of God is at hand”) that “the kingdom of God is at hand.” Make a repentant decision and put your faith in the gospel.” As early as Mark 1:15, the Holy Bible, New King James Version (published in 1982 by Thomas Nelson) began to contribute to our knowledge of the Kingdom of God.

Seek ye first the Kingdom of God

Even though God’s Kingdom will not be established on earth until the coming of Jesus Christ, He wants His people to be actively pursuing His Kingdom at the present time. “But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things shall be added unto you,” Jesus said in His Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 6:33, King James Version). When we seek God’s Kingdom “first,” we are indicating that it is the most important thing in our life. When Jesus compared the Kingdom to a “pearl of great worth,” he was illustrating his argument (Matthew 13:45-46).

  1. It is possible to pray for it on a regular basis.
  2. Accordingly, pray: “Our Father in heaven, hallowed be Your name,” says the author of the prayer.
  3. When we desire God’s righteousness, we are also seeking God’s Kingdom in the sense that we are preparing to be rulers with Christ in God’s Kingdom.
  4. Living today according to God’s rules helps us absorb God’s values and prepare for our future duties aiding Jesus in His position as “King of kings and Lord of lords,” as described in the Bible (Revelation 19:16).

The Church and the Kingdom of God

In part because Christians are required to pursue God’s Kingdom right now, some have come to believe that the Church is God’s Kingdom on this planet. While God desires for Christians to be “the light of the world,” as Jesus said in Matthew 5:14, the Church is not the Kingdom. In the words of the late Herbert W. Armstrong, an excellent method to express the relationship between the Church of God and the Kingdom of God can be found. According to this religious educator, the Church represents the Kingdom of God in its infancy.

The Holy Spirit convicts us of our sins and, following our repentance and baptism, motivates and enables us to conduct our lives in accordance with God’s will.

“Now this I declare to you, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God, nor can corruption inherit incorruption,” Paul said.

“For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be resurrected incorruptible, and we will be transformed,” says the apostle Paul.

Having established the fundamentals of what the Kingdom of God is and what God wants of us in our preparation for it, let us now analyze a few passages that are frequently misinterpreted in the Bible.

Is the Kingdom of God within you?

When the Pharisees questioned Jesus about when the Kingdom of God would arrive, He said, “The kingdom of God does not come with observation; nor will they exclaim, ‘See here!’ or ‘See there!’ for actually, the kingdom of God is within you.” — (Luke 17:20-21, italics in original.) Some have drawn the incorrect conclusion from this scripture that the Kingdom of God only resides in the hearts and minds of individuals.

  • While the Kingdom of God presently exists in heaven, it is destined to expand to include all peoples and countries on this planet in the future, according to Scripture.
  • What Christ was expressing was that He was standing in the middle of them as a representative and the future King of this coming Kingdom.
  • Despite the fact that God’s Kingdom is to be in our hearts and brains, the Kingdom of God is considerably more than a philosophic frame of reference.
  • The Holy Bible, New King James Version (NKJV) was published in 1982 by Thomas Nelson and is known as the “New King James Version.” See the Life, Hope, and Truth article “The Kingdom of God Is Within You” for more on Luke 17:20-21.

Citizenship in heaven

Because our citizenship is in heaven, from where we also anxiously await the Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ, we are called to be a people of prayer. The Holy Bible, New King James Version (NKJV) was published in 1982 by Thomas Nelson and is known as the New King James Version (NKJV). “Paul writes in Philippians 3:20, “Our citizenship is in heaven,” Paul stated. “Our citizenship is in heaven.” Some have incorrectly thought that this scripture suggests that Christians must go to heaven in order to become a part of God’s Kingdom, which is not the case.

While the Kingdom of God presently exists in heaven, it is destined to expand to include all peoples and countries on this planet in the future, according to Scripture.

During Christ’s second coming, the “times of restoration of all things” will come to the earth (whom heaven must receive until the time of restoration of all things, which God has prophesied through the mouth of all of His holy prophets from the beginning of time).

More information on the good news of the Kingdom of God that Jesus delivered (Mark 1:15) may be found in the following linked articles:

  • “Messiah’s Message: Gospel of the Kingdom” is the title of the book. “The Time Has Come: 4 Proofs Jesus Was the Messiah,” for example. “The Messiah’s Message: Repent.”
  • “The Messiah’s Message: Believe in the Gospel.”
  • “The Messiah’s Message: Repent.”

The Four Elements of a Kingdom

In order for a human government to exist, four fundamental notions must be understood. These are the ones:

  1. Territory. A civic power must have territory over which it may exercise its jurisdiction in order to function properly. Borders divide nations for the purpose of establishing who has control over what. Subjects. Every government must have a set of subjects over which it exercises authority. Laws. There are laws in every country, and residents are obliged to follow them. Furthermore, compliance with these rules is enforced by the establishment of courts of law by the federal government. As soon as laws are violated, sanctions are set and implemented against those who broke them. Ruler. Every government must have a ruler in order to function. No matter what kind of government is in place, someone must be in charge of the subjects and in charge of overseeing the government.

It is anticipated that the Kingdom of God will be established on the world when Jesus Christ comes. It will consist of the following four elements:

  1. The entire globe will be under the dominion of the Kingdom of God, which means that the Kingdom of God will rule over it. It will have as its subjects any and all living beings on the planet
  2. A kingdom governed by the rules of God described in the Bible will rule over the people. And the ruler will be none other than Jesus Christ

a little about the author

David Treybig

David Treybig is a spouse, father, and grandpa who lives in the United States. His wife, Teddi, and he have two adult children and seven grandkids between them. He is now serving as the pastor of the Church of God, a Worldwide Association congregation in Austin, Texas. He has been in the pastoral ministry for more than 40 years, serving as a pastor in churches in six different states. More information can be found at Read on for more information.

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