What Day Of The Week Was Jesus Crucified Lds

The Day Christ Died – Was it on a Thursday or Friday?

Following the teachings of Jesus, Christian tradition places his final lunch with his followers on Thursday evening and his crucifixion on Friday, which we name “Good Friday.” We now know that there is a one-day holiday. Wednesday night was Jesus’ final dinner, and he was crucified on Thursday, the 14th of the Hebrew month Nisan, the following day. The actual Passover dinner was served on Thursday night, at sundown, to mark the beginning of the 15th of Nisan. That Passover supper was never consumed by Jesus.

on Thursday afternoon, according to his family.

This alternate chronology allows all of our parts from our different sources, including the Synoptic Gospels, the Gospel of John, and the Gospel of Peter, to fit together seamlessly and accurately.

Everyone concluded that the allusion to “the Sabbath” had to be referring to Saturday, which meant that the crucifixion had to have taken place on a Friday.

  • In the year 30 AD, Friday, the 15th of the Jewish month of Nisan, was also a Sabbath, resulting in two Sabbaths occurring back to back – Friday and Saturday – for the first time in recorded history.
  • As is typically the case, the gospel of John retains a more exact chronology of what transpired during the time period under consideration.
  • John is well aware that the Jews would be gathering for their customary Seder supper on Thursday night.
  • Some have even suggested that Jesus may have eaten the Passover meal a day early, knowing full well that he would die the next day.
  • However, the fact remains that Jesus did not partake in the Passover meal in 30 CE.
  • He had been hurriedly interred in a tomb until after the festival, when proper and complete Jewish burial rites could be carried out in accordance with tradition.
  • As an example, in Luke, Jesus tells his disciples at the last meal: “I sincerely desired to share this Passover with you before I suffered, but I will not share it until the fulfillment of this Passover in the kingdom of God” (Luke 22:14).
  • Furthermore, all of our records state that Jesus shared “a loaf of bread” with his disciples, using the Greek word (artos) that refers to an ordinary loaf, not the unleavened flat bread or matzos that Jews eat with their Passover meals.
  • If this meal had been the Passover meal, Paul would have wanted to say something like that, but he doesn’t want to.
  • Sanhedrin 67a and 43a)

On what day of the week was Jesus crucified?

Although the Bible does not specify the day of the week on which Jesus was crucified, the two most frequently accepted theories are that it occurred either on Wednesday or on Friday of that week. It has been suggested that He was crucified on a Thursday, which some believe is a reasonable compromise. “For as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of a great fish, so the Son of Man will be three days and three nights in the center of the earth,” Jesus declared in reference to Himself (Matthew 12:40).

What’s three days?

Also controversial is the definition of “three days” in the important texts that speak of Christ’s resurrection, which is disputed by certain scholars. When it came to counting days, the Jewish thinking at the time was that even half days were still considered as one day. For those passages, some versions include the phrase “on the third day,” but not all of them. Not to mention the fact that not everyone believes that the phrase “on the third day” is an accurate translation of those texts. In fact, Mark 8:31 states that Jesus will be raised “after” three days, not “before.” In numerous ways, depending on which side of the argument is being advanced, the concept of “three days” can be expanded.

The Argument for Friday

Those who argue for the crucifixion taking place on a Friday do so in the context of the Jewish thinking of the historical period we discussed before, which renders the notion of “day” somewhat ambiguous. To put it another way, it might be considered three days if Jesus was buried for a portion of Friday, all of Saturday, and then a portion of Sunday. Mark 15:42, which states that Jesus was killed “the day before the Sabbath,” is one text that supports a Friday crucifixion. If this was referring to the weekly Sabbath (which is kept on Saturdays), then the crucifixion would have occurred on Friday.

“On the third day,” according to both scriptures, Jesus would be raised from the dead.

The Argument for Thursday

When arguing for the Thursday Crucifixion, proponents employ an enlarged understanding of the phrase “three days.” As an illustration: Consider the following scenario: you visit your friend after school on Monday, but he is missing from school every day until you see him in the morning on Thursday. “I haven’t seen you in three days!” you could exclaim, despite the fact that officially it has only been 60 hours (2.5 days). If Jesus was crucified on Thursday evening, this would explain how they were able to claim that it took three days to execute him.

Some have estimated that up to 20 events take place within the timeframe, with one of those days being the Sabbath (Saturday), during which Jews were ordered to take time off from their work. Having an extra day or two would alleviate the difficulty with the timing.

The Argument for Wednesday

According to the reasoning presented on Wednesday, Jews kept TWO Sabbaths that week due to Passover (Mark 15:42; Luke 23:52-54). The Old Testament has evidence that the high holy days of Passover were referred to as “Sabbath” days, despite the fact that they did not occur on the seventh day of the week. (See Leviticus 16:29-31, Leviticus 23:24-32, and Leviticus 39.) The first Sabbath would have occurred on the evening of Jesus’ crucifixion, according to tradition. The second Sabbath would have been the usual weekly Sabbath, as was the case previously.

  1. If there were two Sabbaths, they would be able to do so.
  2. With this interpretation of two Sabbaths and a Wednesday crucifixion, we are able to resolve the problem of the biblical story of the women and the spices while maintaining a literal interpretation of Matthew 12:40.
  3. The holiday of Passover was observed from sunset Wednesday to sunset Thursday (the first Sabbath).
  4. In Israel, Jews keep their weekly Sabbath from sunset on Friday to sunset on Saturday; hence, this was the second Sunday in a seven-day period, and so the ladies would have rested.
  5. Although the Bible does not specify the precise moment He rose from the dead, we do know that it was before Sunday morning since that is when the women came back.
  6. One of the problems with the Wednesday crucifixion argument is found in the book of Luke, chapter 24.
  7. While telling Him about Jesus’ crucifixion (Luke 24:21), they don’t recognize Him and say, referring to the fact that “this is the third day since these things occurred.” If we count the days from Wednesday to Sunday, we have four days in all.

Still confused?

I understand that it’s all a little complicated since we don’t have a specific Scripture reference that tells us what day of the week it is at this point. Scholars attempted to piece together all of the evidence, but came up with a variety of conflicting interpretations. The fact that Jesus was killed on a specific day of the week doesn’t really important when we look at the broader picture, though. It seems likely that God would have made that knowledge available to us quite simply through His Word if it was vital for us to know (1 Corinthians 14:33).

At the end of the day, what counts is whether or not we think Jesus is who He claims to be, that the events that transpired during this time period actually occurred, and what those events mean to us as Christians.

It makes no difference whether Jesus was killed on a Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday. No matter what day it was, we may be certain that it DID happen, and that we have been blessed with the greatest gift that anybody could ever receive: salvation through faith in Jesus Christ.

TL;DR

Although the Bible does not specify the day of the week on which Jesus was crucified, the most frequently accepted theories are that it occurred on a Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday of that week. We know that there were three days between Jesus’ crucifixion and His resurrection (Matthew 12:40), but the exact day on which the crucifixion took place is still up for discussion. And it’s completely inconsequential. What counts in the end is whether or not we believe that Jesus is who He claims to be, that the events that transpired during this time period occurred as they were said to have occurred, and what those events signify to us as believers: salvation via Jesus Christ.

Writer/Editor: Catiana N.K.

Cat is the web producer and editor for 412teens.org. She has a background in journalism. She enjoys listening to audiobooks, cooking for the people she cares about, and illuminating a place with Christmas lights. Catiana likes spending time with her two teenage children, five socially awkward cats, and her incredible friend-family when she is not writing, cooking, or sketching.

The Real Day of Jesus’ Death

An LDS archaeologist has arrived to a different conclusion about the day of Jesus’ death than what has generally been thought to be true. The reason behind this is as follows. See “The Restoration of Priesthood Keys on Easter 1836, Part One and Part Two” for an alternate point of view on the subject. Now that Easter season has here, we may once again reflect on Jesus Christ’s sacrifice on the cross, his crucifixion, and his resurrection. The New Testament is clear in saying that Jesus rose from the dead on the first day of the week, which we refer to as Sunday.

  • As opposed to this, the evidence from both the New Testament and the Book of Mormon indicates that Jesus was crucified on Thursday, the fifth day of the week.
  • On the fifth day of the week, which we refer to as Thursday, it is revealed in that article that Jesus was crucified and killed.
  • Also of note is that the calendar date for that Thursday was April 6, according to the Julian calendar, which was in use at the time in Rome.
  • For the time being, I’ll just go over a couple of the most important aspects.
  • There are at least a dozen passages that indicate his body being in the tomb of Joseph of Arimathea for three days, and it is possible that there are more.
  • Furthermore, the language used in them may appear unclear, since some passages state that Jesus would rise from the tomb on “the third day” (for example, Matthew 16:21), while others state that he would rise “after three days” (for example, Luke 24:44).
  • According to Luke 24:20-21, the sole after-the-fact record of how much time passed between the crucifixion and the resurrection is contained in the story of the two disciples chatting with the risen Lord on the road from Jerusalem to Emmaus, which takes place on the way to Emmaus.

Afterwards, Cleopas stated that “this is the third day since these things were completed.” In particular, the time is precise: Sunday was the third day after Jesus was crucified, which implies that Saturday was the second and Friday was the first day sincethe incident – plainly suggesting that it took place on Thursday.

And, because it makes use of the phrase “the third day,” it is highly likely that the several predictive statements in the four gospels that make use of the phrase “the third day” are to be interpreted in the same way – that Jesus rose on the third day since (that is, the third day after) his execution.

  • The classic Friday-for-the-crucifixion paradigm only permits for Jesus to have been in the tomb on Friday night and Saturday night, according to the biblical narrative.
  • Golgatha The question has long been raised as to how Jesus could have been executed on a Thursday given the four gospels all claim that the day after his death was a Sabbath.
  • The answer to this question is unequivocally No.
  • Passover is observed on the seventh day of the week, regardless of the day of the week it occurs.
  • A particular term for the Festival Sabbath exists in Hebrew as well; it is referred to as aYom Tov, which translates as “Good Day.” My article in the BYU Studies Quarterly shows how the Gospel of John identified the Festival Sabbath that followed Jesus’ crucifixion.
  • In the study published in the BYU Studies Quarterly, it is also proved that the Yom Tov”high day” of Passover happened on a Friday in the year AD 30.
  • In order to avoid going into too much detail on the historical and astronomical calculations that allow us to establish the day and date of Passover in different years during Jesus’ lifetime, readers are encouraged to go to the page linked above for more information.
  • The reason why AD 30 (rather than AD 33) must be the year of Jesus’ death is explained by his known lifetime, which according to the Book of Mormon was 33 years, and the latest feasible date at which he might have been born, which was the winter of 5/4 BC.
  • Finally, the Book of Mormon contains important information that points to Thursday as the day of the crucifixion, as previously stated.
See also:  Where Mary And Joseph Married When Jesus Was Born?

Following the storm, which lasted three hours, there was total darkness over the entire area for three days, which served as a symbol of Jesus’ death and coincided with the time when his corpse was placed in the tomb in Jerusalem, according to tradition (see 3 Nephi 8:19-2010:9, compare 1 Nephi 19:10 and Helaman 14:20).

  1. In light of the fact that Jesus died at “the ninth hour,” around 3:00 PM Jerusalem time, the hour of his death would have been around 7:00 AM Central Time in America.
  2. If Jesus’ crucifixion is to be imitated on a Friday at 3:00 PM Jerusalem time, then the onset of darkness in America must occur at 7:00 AM on Friday morning.
  3. As for the possibility of three days of darkness before Jesus’ resurrection, this was ruled out by the fact that he rose from the dead and left his tomb early on Sunday morning in Jerusalem, which was long before midnight on Saturday night in America.
  4. And the darkness on Friday and Saturday is just two days, not three, as some people believe.
  5. As a result, the statistics from the Book of Mormon, which mentions three days of darkness, plainly imply that the day of the crucifixion must have fallen on a Thursday.
  6. Jesus Christ’s atoning sacrifice for us all was accomplished on Thursday, according to both the New Testament and the Book of Mormon, Another Testament of Jesus Christ.

Jeffrey R. Chadwick is a professor of archaeology and Near Eastern studies at Brigham Young University, as well as a religious education professor of church history and Jewish studies. He is also the director of the Jerusalem Center. He may be reached at the following address:

What day of the week was Jesus crucified?

Friday is traditionally considered to be the day on which Jesus was crucified. While some current academics believe that He was crucified on Wednesday or Thursday, others believe that He was crucified earlier. The theories’ supporting arguments are discussed in further detail below. The Gospels claim that Jesus died on the day before the Sabbath, which lends support to the notion of a Friday crucifixion. “And when evening had come, because it was the day of Preparation, that is, the day before the Sabbath, Joseph of Arimathea, a respected member of the council, who was also himself seeking the kingdom of God, took courage and went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus,” Mark 15:42-43 says.

As a result, it appears that Mark is explicitly referring to Christ’s death on Friday.

In Jewish timekeeping, a portion of a day was treated as if it were a whole day.

In Matthew 16:21 and Luke 9:22, we learn that Jesus foretold His own death and resurrection on the third day.

It is in this passage that Jesus declares, “For just as Jonah was swallowed up by a colossal fish for three days and nights, so will the Son of Man be swallowed up by the earth for three days and nights.” Because Jesus was not in the grave for “three nights,” some believe that either Jesus’ prediction was incorrect or that the crucifixion took place sooner than Friday as stated in the Bible.

  • The scripture stating that Jesus would be in the grave for three days and three nights does not necessarily imply that He would be in the dead for exactly 72 hours as stated in the Bible.
  • Jesus’ connection to Jonah’s story was intended to convey the idea that Jesus, like Jonah, would appear to have passed away from this world.
  • In addition, some who argue for a Thursday or Wednesday date believe that there were too many events that occurred between the crucifixion and the resurrection for the time period to be accurate.
  • The incidents might have taken place between Friday and Sunday, according to a thorough investigation of the evidence.
  • After the first one, which happened on the evening of the crucifixion (Mark 15:42; Luke 23:52-54), the ladies went out and bought spices (Mark 15:42; Luke 23:52-54).
  • According to this interpretation, the Passover was the first Sabbath, and the normal Sabbath (Saturday) followed only a few days later.
  • And, based on the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, it appears that He was crucified on Friday, rather than the previous day.
  • What are the meanings of Christ’s last seven statements, and what are they about?

What happened to Jesus during the three days that elapsed between His death and resurrection? What are some of the reasons why I should believe in the resurrection of Jesus Christ? Return to the page: The Truth About Jesus Christ.

Was the Savior crucified on a Thursday or a Friday?

Greetings, Gramps. Is it more likely that the Savior was crucified on a Thursday or a Friday? It appeared to be a Thursday to me. Take a look at Matthew 12:40. “For just as Jonas spent three days and three nights in the belly of the whale, so will the Son of Man spend three days and three nights in the center of the earth.” Friday is the day of the week, according to the world and the Church. Do you have any opinions on this? Once again, thank you for taking the time to read this and for your consideration.

This is something we may deduce from the following information: During the season between Passover and Pentecost, it was usual for Jews to fast twice a week, on Mondays and Thursdays, as part of their religious obligations.

(See, for example, Bruce R.

As a result, when Jesus had completed all of his teachings, he addressed his followers, saying: “Ye know that after two days is the Passover, and the Son of man is betrayed to be crucified.” The leading priests, as well as the scribes and elders of the people, were gathered together in the palace of the high priest, who was known as Caiaphas.

But they refused to allow it on the feast day for fear of causing a commotion among the guests (Matthew 26:1-6).

Later on in the evening, he arrives with the other twelve.

Jesus, who had been betrayed by Judas, was captured that night and executed the next day, on Friday, at the hands of the Romans.

How Does the Book of Mormon Help Date Christ’s Death?

The BMC Team has contributed to this post. 14th of April, 2017 KnoWhy300 Using images from BYU’s Virtual Scriptures App and Christ’s Image by Heinrich Hofmann, we have created a representation of Calvary. The Bible says, “And there shall be no light upon the face of this country, even from the time that he shall experience death, for the space of three days, until he shall rise again from the dead.”

The Know

The Book of Mormon describes the exact day on which the Nephites beheld the foretold sign of Christ’s death, as recorded in the Bible (3 Nephi 8:5).

1 This extraordinary level of attention to detail on the part of the Nephite record-keepers may be able to answer at least two concerns that New Testament scholars have been debating about the chronology of Christ’s death in the wilderness.

What Year Did Christ Die?

The first question refers to the year in which Christ was crucified, as stated in the Bible. In the New Testament, the crucifixion of Christ is linked to a Passover feast that took place under the rule of Pontius Pilate (AD 26–36). According to experts, the years AD 27, 30, and 33 are the only years under the rule of Pontius Pilate in which the eve of Passover and Passover itself occurred within a three-day window of time prior to Sunday, the day of the Resurrection, based on astronomical data.

assume that Jesus was murdered in 30,” based on other considerations involved in linking the Gospel stories to verifiable historical events.

courtesy of lds.org The Book of Mormon, according to the meticulousness of the Nephite record-keepers, contributes to further narrowing the scope of Christ’s life’s duration even more.

6According to LDS archaeologist Jeffrey Chadwick, when the Book of Mormon is combined with additional evidence from the New Testament, archaeology, astronomy, and history, AD 30 is proven to be the accurate year “beyond any reasonable question.” 7

On What Day of the Week Did Christ Die?

The second issue refers to the day of the week on which Christ was crucified, which is Sunday. Christ was crucified on a Friday, according to long-standing tradition, and this tradition is supported by the majority of New Testament scholars. 8However, a small number of experts have proposed that Christ died on a Thursday rather than a Wednesday. The resurrection taking place after three days (Matthew 27:63; Mark 8:31), as well as the fact that it has been three days after the crucifixion, are best explained by a Thursday, according to these experts (Luke 24:21).

Since certain festival days, such as Passover, were regarded as “Sabbaths,” regardless of what day they fell on the week (Leviticus 23: 7–8, 11, 15, 21, 24, 39), 12it is possible that the Sabbath following Christ’s crucifixion was not Saturday (the regular Jewish Sabbath), but the first day of Passover (a special “Sabbath,” or “high day,” which most likely fell on Friday in AD 30).

Helaman 14:20–27; 1 Nephi 19:10; Helaman 14:20–27) foretold that there would be three days of darkness beginning at the moment of Christ’s crucifixion and ending at his resurrection.

A Friday crucifixion results in just two days of darkness in the New World because of the time difference between Jerusalem and the New World.

14A Thursday crucifixion, on the other hand, “perfectly fits the timetable necessary for three days of darkness to have transpired in America before to Jesus’ resurrection,” according to the New Testament (see table).

15 The chart was created by Book of Mormon Central. The time difference between Jerusalem and the New World is eight hours, and the Jewish ritual of beginning a new day at sunset is reflected in both time zones.

The Why

Readers should not be shocked that the Book of Mormon, as a second testimony to Jesus Christ, provides more clarity regarding the time of events in the Savior’s life. All who believe in the Book of Mormon should be aware of the manner in which this sacred book might shed light on the timing of an event as significant as the death and burial of Jesus Christ. Jeff Chadwick expressed this viewpoint in his writing: “As a Latter-day Saint, I am not only obligated but also personally grateful to accept and present data from the Book of Mormon, whose genuine historical reliability I am both spiritually and materially convinced of, in order to corroborate the evidence of the New Testament and other avenues investigated.” In this article by Greg K.

  • While openness and flexibility to new evidence and alternative interpretations should always be maintained, the dating strongly supported by the Book of Mormon deserves serious consideration by all Latter-day Saints.
  • This gives profound significance to the timing of His church’s restoration, which occurred exactly 1800 years after the Savior’s death.
  • “No words in all of Christendom mean more to me than those spoken by the angel to the grieving Mary Magdalene and the other Mary as they approached the tomb on the first day of the week to care for the body of their Lord,” President Monson said.
  • Hinckley taught, “The utter sadness that comes with death, the grieving that accompanies the departure of a loved one, are only tempered by the knowledge of the Resurrection of the Son of God on the first Easter morning.” “.
  • The Bible and the Book of Mormon, taken together, provide compelling evidence that Jesus Christ is alive and well!
  • These additional biblical and prophetic evidence of the Resurrected Lord should be appreciated and treasured by Latter-day Saints.

Further Reading

“Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” BYU Studies 54, no. 4 (2015): 135–191. Jeffrey R. Chadwick, “Dating the Death of Jesus Christ.” “When was Jesus born?” ask Lincoln H. Blumell and Thomas A. Wayment in their book “When was Jesus born?” ‘A Response to a Recent Proposal,’ in BYU Studies 51, no.

3 (2012): 64–70, is an example of this. Journal of Book of Mormon Studies16, no. 1 (2007): 56–73, 86. David B. Cummings, “Three Days and Three Nights: Reassessing Jesus’s Entombment,” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies16, no. 1 (2007): 56–73, 86.

  • 1.See 1 Nephi 12:1–3, 5
  • 19:10–11
  • And Helaman 14:20–27 for further information. The following articles provide additional information on the prophecy and its fulfillment: 1. Book of Mormon Central, ” Why Did Samuel Make Such Chronologically Precise Prophecies?(Helaman 13:5),”KnoWhy184 (September 9, 2016)
  • 2. Book of Mormon Central, ” What Caused the Darkness and Destruction in the 34th Year?(3 Nephi 8:20),”KnoWhy197 (September 28, 2016)
  • 3. See Matthew 26–27
  • Mark 14–15
  • Luke As a general rule of thumb, most academics agree that the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, and Luke) disagree with John on whether Jesus died on the day before Passover (14th of Nisan) or on the day of Passover (14th of Nissan) (15th of Nisan). See, for example, Lincoln H. Blumell and Thomas A. Wayment’s “When Was Jesus Born?” The Life and Teachings of Jesus Christ, 3 vols., eds. Richard Neitzel Holzapfel and Thomas A. Wayment, Salt Lake City, UT: Deseret Book, 2005), 1:391–392
  • Stanley E. Porter, “Chronos and the New Testament,” BYU Studies 51, no. 3 (2012): 65
  • Richard Neitzel Holzapfel, Eric D. Huntsman, and Thomas A. Wayment,Jesus Christ and the World See Chadwick, “Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” pp. 165–172, for a reconciliation that favors the 14th of Nisan as the date of Jesus’ death. According to Craig L. Blomberg, in The Historical Reliability of the Gospels, 2nd edition (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2007), 221–225, the 15th of Nisan is the most likely date for Jesus’ death. For further information on the dating of Pilate’s administration, see Emily Cheney, “Pilate, Pontius,” in Eerdmans Dictionary, 1058
  • 3.Chadwick, “Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 156
  • And the chart on page 157 of Chadwick’s book. Adding AD 36, according to Porter’s “Chronology of the New Testament,” page 250, but he also states that “27 is too early and 36 is too late” to be compatible with other criteria. “When was Jesus born?” ask Blumell and Wayment in their book “When was Jesus born?” The range of probable dates is expanded from 64–70 due to the likelihood of misidentification of the new moon in the calendar year. To this point of view, Chadwick’s article “Dating the Death of Jesus Christ” (158–165) answers. The book of Mormon supports a death date in AD 29, according to Randall P. Spackman’s “Introduction to Book of Mormon Chronology: The Principal Prophecies, Calendar, and Dates,” (FARMS Preliminary Reports, 1993), 60–68, plus appendix 2, but this date has received little support from New Testament scholars
  • 4.Porter, “Chronology of the New Testament,” 250. See Chadwick, “Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” pp. 139–142, for evidence that this is the consensus position of most experts on the subject. In addition, see Wayment, “The Birth and Death Dates of Jesus Christ,” 393–394
  • Holzapfel, Huntsman, and Wayment,Jesus Christ and the World of the New Testament, 44
  • John H. Walton and Craig S. Keener, eds.,NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2016), 1593, 1667, 1863–1864
  • Ben Witherington III, “Images of “It turns out that the year AD 30 is the same year that many academics have recognized as the year of Jesus’ death.” • Porter’s Chronology of the New Testament (Volume 5), page 250. See, for example, Paul Barnett’s Jesus and the Rise of Early Christianity: A History of New Testament Times (Jesus and the Rise of Early Christianity: A History of New Testament Times). (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), 155
  • 6.See Book of Mormon Central, “How Does the Book of Mormon Help Date the First Christmas?(3 Nephi 1:13),”KnoWhy255
  • 7.See Book of Mormon Central, “How Does the Book of Mormon Help Date the First Christmas?(3 Nephi 1:13),”KnoWhy255
  • 8.See Book of Mormon Central, “How Does the Book of Mormon Help Date the First Christmas?(3 Nephi 1:13) (December 21, 2016). See also Jeffrey R. Chadwick, “Dating the Birth of Jesus Christ,” BYU Studies49, no. 4 (2010): 17–18
  • Chadwick, “Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 142–149
  • Chadwick, “Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 190
  • Chadwick, “Dating the Death of Jesus Christ Blumell and Wayment’s “When was Jesus Born?” is a classic work that represents this orthodox viewpoint while also strongly opposing the Thursday theory. The numbers 65–66 and 78–79 are nn.51–57. In response, see Chadwick, ” Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 176–177, 179–180, n.108
  • 9.See Chadwick, ” Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 176–177, 179–180, and n.108. 172. 10.See Chadwick, ” Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 174–177
  • Cummings, ” Three Days and Three Nights,” 59
  • Chadwick, ” Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 174–177
  • Chadwick, ” Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 177–182
  • 12.See Chadwick, ” Dating the Death of Jesus 13
  • Chadwick, “Calculating the Date of Jesus Christ’s Death,” 138
  • Cummings, “Three Days and Three Nights,” 61
  • In AD 30, there is some uncertainty about whether or not the new moon would have been observed on the correct day, making it possible that the 14th of Nisan (the day before Passover, and most likely the day of crucifixion) occurred on either Thursday (the correct day) or Friday (if the new moon was observed a day late). As a result, the 15th of Nisan (the first day of Passover) would fall on either Friday (the correct day) or Saturday (the incorrect day) (if the new moon was observed a day late). “Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 154–158 in Chadwick, “Dating the Death of Jesus Christ.” Because the majority of scholars believe the crucifixion occurred on Friday, the 30th of Nisan, rather than the 14th of Nisan, they believe the new moon was not observed on the correct day, and that the 14th of Nisan was therefore one day late, falling on a Friday. In the end, it appears that Chadwick’s position (that AD 30 is the year, and thus Christ’s death occurred on a Thursday (the correct day for the 14th of Nisan) is the more consistent one. As a matter of fact, Blomberg (Historcity of the Gospels, 221-225) favors AD 30 precisely because it is the only year in which the 15th of Nisan falls on a Friday, and he, unlike most New Testament scholars, prefers the Synoptic chronology (Christ dying on the first day of Passover) to that of John. 14.Cummings, ” Three Days and Three Nights,” 63, cf. pp. 60–63
  • Chadwick, ” Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 182–188
  • 15.Chadwick, ” Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 184, cf. the charts on pp. 186–187
  • 16.Chadwick, ” Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 184, cf. the charts on pp. 186–187
  • 16.Chadwick, ” Dating In addition, see figs. 1 and 2 in Cummings, ” Three Days and Three Nights,” 62–63
  • 16.Chadwick, ” Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 190, capitalization altered
  • 17.Chadwick, ” Dating the Death of Jesus Christ,” 136
  • 18.Thomas S. Monson, ” He Is Risen,” Ensign, May 2010, 89, online at lds.org
  • 19.Gordon B. Hinckley, ” This Glorious
See also:  What Does Jesus Say About Cremation?

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Christ was Crucified on Thursday

Caiaphas was present during the crucifixion. Copyright and Intellectual Property are protected. Not every Christian church, especially during the Easter season, posts a timetable of the final week of Christ’s life on its website or in its bulletin. Because Christians are aware that the Jewish Sabbath is observed on Saturday and that Christ’s corpse was removed from the crucifixion because the Sabbath was approaching, they have inferred that He was killed on a Thursday. The customary Jewish Sabbath begins at sunset on Friday night and ends on Saturday morning.

As a Jewish conversion to the Catholic Church who lived in Israel for eight years, I have gained valuable knowledge and experience that I can apply to my studies.

High Holy Days and Sabbaths

In Judaism, the High Holy Days are all observed on Saturdays and Sundays. Jews observe two Sabbath days consecutively when a High Holy Day falls on a Friday or Sunday, and since Rosh HaShanah (Jewish civil new year, also known as the Feast of Trumpets) is a two-day holy festival in Israel, Jews can observe three Sabbath days consecutively if two High Holy Days fall on Friday or Sunday. On the Sabbath days of the year Christ died, there were two of them in a row: the first day of Passover, which was observed from Thursday evening to Friday evening, and the normal Sabbath, which was observed from Friday night to Saturday evening.

The “preparation” referred to the preparations for the Passover.

The Shape of the Passover Week

While there existed a temple in Jerusalem, Jews were obligated to make three pilgrimages to the temple each year in order to commemorate seven highly significant feasts that were celebrated there. Jews would make their annual journey to Jerusalem in the spring to give sacrifices and to commemorate three festivals: Passover, the Feast of Unleavened Bread, and “Bikkurim”—the first fruits offering for the “favored son.” In order to testify of Christ and to teach the concepts of sacrifice and repentance—both of which are core Aaronic Priesthood teachings—Christ established the Law of Moses as a schoolmaster law.

  1. The Israelites were in the desert when God dictated the holy days and associated customs, with the exception of the Passover, which He instituted just before they left Egypt.
  2. He set the offering for the 14th of Nisan, which is the Jewish New Year’s Day.
  3. To keep themselves safe from the destructive angel, they sacrificed the lambs and painted the blood of the slain lambs on the lintels of their entrances on the 14th.
  4. They were rushing, and as a result, their loaves did not have enough time to rise, resulting in a loaf of unleavened bread.
  5. There was one more holy day that had been decreed by God.
  6. He stated to celebrate it on “the day following the Sabbath that falls during Passover/Feast of Unleavened Bread.” Do you see why this would result in thousands of years of debate among Jewish scholars?

Was the Lord referring to the day following the regular Sabbath or the day after the Sabbath of the High Holy Days? Jews are still divided on this issue, thus they have decided to observe this small holiday on the 16th of Nisan.

The Special Message of Bikkurim

As long as there remained a temple in Jerusalem, Jews were obligated to make three pilgrimages to the temple each year in order to commemorate seven highly symbolic feasts in the city. Every spring, Jews would go to Jerusalem, where they would give sacrifices and commemorate the three major Jewish feasts of the year: Passover, the Feast of Unleavened Bread, and “Bikkurim,” the first fruits offering for the “favored son.” In order to bear witness to Christ and to teach the concepts of sacrifice and repentance—both of which are core Aaronic Priesthood teachings—Christ established the Law of Moses as a schoolmaster law.

  • Except for the Passover, which He instituted soon before the Israelites left Egypt, He dictated the holy days and their patterns while they were in the desert.
  • Nisan 14th, and he planned to give the Passover sacrifice on that day.
  • To keep themselves safe from the destructive angel, they sacrificed the lambs and painted the blood of the sacrificial lambs on the lintels of their entrances on the fourteenth.
  • Because of their hurry, their loaves did not have enough time to rise, resulting in unleavened bread.
  • After that, the Lord prescribed one additional day of fasting and observance.
  • He stated that it should be celebrated on “the day following the Sabbath that falls during Passover/Feast of Unleavened Bread.” Was the Lord referring to the day after the regular Sabbath or the day following the Sabbath of the High Holy Days?

Following Christ to the Cross

As a result, on Wednesday night, when He created the symbolism of the sacrament, Christ and His apostles had the Passover meal together. Why did He choose to rejoice one night earlier than the rest of the world? It was originally intended to endure 8 days when Christ commanded the complete three-festival Passover celebration, but by the time He was born, the Jews had reduced it to just 7 days. The Old Testament pattern was followed by Christ, His disciples, and the Essenes. In order to suffer in Gethsemane, and ultimately to be betrayed and imprisoned, Christ had to leave that Wednesday Passover feast.

On Thursday afternoon, he was nailed to a cross.

He was brought down from the cross just before sunset on Thursday, the first day of Passover Week’s High Holy Day, marking the beginning of Passover Week.

He arose on the morning of Bikkurim, the day when the Honored Son wave offering was presented. Richard K. Scott produced a study in which he used the Book of Mormon story to demonstrate that Christ was crucified on Thursday. It may be found on the Perks area of ThirdHour’s website.

Was Jesus Crucified on Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday?

Everyone is aware that Jesus was killed on the Friday before Easter, right? And, of course, we’ve always commemorated His crucifixion on the Friday before Easter Sunday, haven’t we, throughout history? Is Friday, however, the proper day? Is a Friday crucifixion permissible according to Scripture? Or do the Feasts of the Lord signal the beginning of a new day? And what about the words of Jesus? Is it feasible that the crucifixion took place on a Wednesday or a Thursday instead of Tuesday? What does the Bible tell about the world?

A Weak Friday

In the Bible, there is virtually little proof that Jesus was crucified on Friday. The following verse provides the most significant support for it: 15:42 (Matthew 15:42) And now that the time had arrived, because it was the day before the Sabbath, which meant it was the preparation day. It is important to remember that the Jewish day began in the evening hours (at dark) and ended at the conclusion of the day’s daylight (signified by nightfall of the next day). Accordingly, on Saturday at nightfall (which we would consider Friday night), the Jews observed their weekly Sabbath, which lasted through Saturday’s late afternoon and evening (which the Jews would consider the beginning of Sunday).

Every weekly Sabbath was preceded by a day of preparation on the day before it.

The day before the Sabbath, according to Mark 15:42, was the day of preparation, and Jesus was crucified on that day.

Is this, however, correct?

Additional Sabbath Days

In addition to the weekly Sabbath, there are a number of additional Sabbaths to observe. Weekly Sabbaths and extra Holy Days of Convocation were proclaimed by God to be a time of rest for His people, and God decreed rest for His people. These Sabbaths are collectively referred to as “seasons” (Genesis 1:14) or “God’s allotted periods” (Leviticus 23:2), and they include the following: Sabbaths are observed on a weekly basis. The Fifty-two Days of Passover: 7 Shavout, the Feast of the Seventh Day of the Weeks (Pentecost) 1st of Teruah (Twelfth of Teruah) (Feast of Trumpets) 1st of October is Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) Sukkot is celebrated for one week (Feast of Tabernacles) Shimini Atzeret is a one-person band from Israel (8th Day of Assembly) 1 day is equal to 70 Sabbaths.

Because Jesus was crucified on the day of preparation, it was thought to have occurred in the afternoon on Friday the thirteenth. There is a logical flaw in this reasoning because the Sabbath mentioned in Mark 15 is the Feast of Unleavened Bread, which is one of the seven Holy Days of Passover.

The Passover Sabbath

In addition to being known as the Feast of Unleavened Bread, the Feast of the Passover was observed in honor of the Israelites’ liberation from Egyptian slavery. This feast is established for Nisan 15 (Leviticus 23:6), which might fall on any day of the week depending on the lunar calendar. As a High Sabbath (a day of rest), this feast day is also referred to as a High Day, and it was preceded by a whole day of preparation. John 19:31 (KJV) As a result, because it was the Preparation Day, and because the corpses could not be left on the cross on the Sabbath (because it was a holy day), the Jews petitioned Pilate to have their legs severed and their bodies removed from the cross.

See also:  Who Was The First Disciple Of Jesus Christ

Nisan 14 is the date when Jesus was crucified, according to this.

Three Reasons forThursday Crucifixion

In addition to being known as the Feast of Unleavened Bread, the Feast of the Passover was observed in honor of the Israelites’ liberation from Egyptian servitude. Because Nisan 15 (Leviticus 23:6) is a fixed day in the Hebrew calendar, it might fall on any day of the week in practice. There was a day of preparation before this feast day, which is a High Sabbath (a day of rest), also known as a High Day. John 19:31 is a verse from the Bible that states that Consequently, because it was the Preparation Day, the Jews petitioned Pilate to break their legs and have their corpses removed from the cross so that their bodies would not be left on the crucifixion on the Sabbath (because the Sabbath was a holy day).

Nisan 14 is the date of Jesus’ crucifixion, according to one interpretation.

Why a Thursday crucifixion?

The first and most compelling argument in favor of a Thursday crucifixion comes straight from the teachings of our Lord. Matthew 12:40 (KJV) Because, just as Jonah spent three days and three nights in the belly of the whale, so will the Son of Man spend three days and three nights in the depths of the earth, according to the Scriptures. For “three days and three nights,” Jesus indicated emphatically that He would be in the”heart of the earth. ” It is my understanding that those words mean exactly what Jesus stated.

Jewish Days

To better comprehend this, I’d like to remind you that the Jewish 24-hour day began at nightfall and finished the following day after the daytime hours of the previous day (unlike our day that starts at 12 am and ends 24 hours later). Genesis 1:5 is a verse that describes the beginning of the creation of the world. Moreover, God named the light Day, while the darkness he designated as Night. The first day began in the evening and continued until the morning. In the Genesis story, God split the 24 hour day into two portions, which were referred to as night and day.

His remarks were in reference to the two elements that make up a complete day of work.

The 40 days in the desert were precisely separated into day and night in Matthew’s account: “.

This plainly states that Jesus did not eat throughout the 40-hour period of daytime and 40-hour period of darkness in the New Testament.

Knowing He was brought into the wilderness following His baptism, which occurred during the daytime hours, we may see why He mentioned 40 days before forty nights in the verse above. It all started with a specific time of day (isn’t it wonderful how accurate the Bible is?).

Two Parts to a Jewish Day

Following the pattern established in Genesis 1, the 24 hour day is divided into two sections in Matthew 4:2. A similar conclusion may be drawn from Jesus’ remark concerning the time period following His death and before His resurrection. He stated that he would stay “in the center of the ground” for three days and three nights, according to the Bible. It is important to note that Jesus was not referring to His body being buried in an above-ground tomb. He was referring about His spirit, which left His body at the time of His death (3 p.m.) and entered Abraham’s Bosom, which is the center of the world.

Thursday Crucifixion—Three Days and Three Nights

Following the pattern established in Genesis 1, the 24-hour day is split into two sections in Matthew 4:2. Jesus’ remark concerning the time period following His death and before His resurrection is also accurate. He stated that he would be “in the core of the ground” for three days and three nights, and that he would be alone. Please keep in mind that Jesus was not referring to His body being buried in an above-ground grave. When He died at 3 p.m., His soul left His body and entered Abraham’s Bosom, the center of the earth, he was speaking about His soul.

Thursday—3pm Death

THE FIRST DAY IS THURSDAY, NISAN 14.

Friday—A High Holy Day Sabbath

First day of the week is on Nisan 14, which is a Thursday.

Saturday— The Weekly Sabbath

THE THIRD NIGHT IS SATURDAY NIGHT, NOVEMBER 16. DAY 3 = Saturday, the 16th of Nisan. It would have been the Day of Preparation for both the High Sabbath/Feast of Unleavened Bread (Friday, Nisan 15) and the weekly Sabbath (Saturday, Nisan 16) on Thursday, Nisan 14. (Saturday, Nisan 16).

Sunday—“when it was yet dark”

The third night of Nisan 17 is on Sunday night (remember this precedes the daytime hours). According to Scripture, Jesus resurrected from the grave before the start of Sunday’s daylight hours: Matthew 28:1 (KJV) To visit the tomb at the conclusion of the sabbath, as the sun rose higher in the sky at the beginning of the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary arrived. The Bible says in John 20:1 On the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene arrives at the sepulchre early in the morning, when it is still dark, and witnesses the stone being removed from the sepulchre.

Jesus resurrected from the dead on Sunday night, before the sun came up (nighttime hours preceded the daytime hours).

Thursday Crucifixion—Three Days and Three Nights

The third night of Nisan 17 is Sunday evening (remember this precedes the daytime hours). According to Scripture, Jesus resurrected from the dead before the start of Sunday’s daylight hours. Matthew 28:1 is a verse that states that Mary Magdalene and the other Mary arrived at the sepulchre at the end of the sabbath, as the sun began to rise toward the first day of the week. The Bible says in John 20:1, ” After a long journey, Mary Magdalene finally arrives at the sepulchre on the first day of the week, when it is still dark.

According to Matthew and John, the ladies went to the tomb on Sunday morning and discovered it empty before it was time for the daytime hours of that day. Before dawn on Sunday morning, Jesus appeared to his disciples and ascended into heaven (nighttime hours preceded the daytime hours).

Thursday Crucifixion

In the books of John and Mark, there are two further allusions to the number of days. Jesus used the terms “in three days” and “after three days” to describe his time on earth. There are differences in the counting methods used for each.

“Inthree days”—John 2

John and Mark each have two additional references to the number of days. During his ministry, Jesus used the words “in three days” and “after three days.” Each of them has a unique technique of counting.

  1. Thursday day equals 12 hours
  2. Friday night and Friday day equals 1 day
  3. Saturday night and Saturday day equals 1 day
  4. Sunday night equals 12 hours.

Six and a half days plus three days is a total of three days.

“Afterthree days”—Mark 8

Mark 8:31.he started to tell them that the Son of Man would suffer many things, including being rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, as well as being murdered and rising from the dead after three days.he began to teach them that This technique considers each daytime period as a single day, with the resurrection occurring “after three days” according to this method. This begins with the day of Jesus’ crucifixion because the day had not yet come to an end by the time Jesus died in the afternoon.

Problems with aWednesdayCrucifixion

Matthew 12:40 (KJV) Because, just as Jonas spent three days and three nights in the belly of a whale, so will the Son of Man spend three days and three nights in the center of the earth, according to the Scriptures. Wednesday Crucifixion—Four Days and Four Nights of Fasting and Prayer A Wednesday crucifixion corresponds to four days and four nights, in accordance with Jesus’ words in Matthew 12:40 that he would be crucified “three days and three nights.” It doesn’t jive with what Jesus said in the Bible.

In Three Days and After Three Days— Too ManyDays

2:19 John 2:19 Jesus responded by telling them, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will rebuild it back to its former glory.”

  1. A half day on Wednesday
  2. A full day on Thursday
  3. A half-day on Friday
  4. A full-day on Saturday
  5. A half-day on Sunday.

Total: eight and a half days = four days, which is too many days for a Wednesday crucifixion.

“Afterthree days”—Mark 8

Mark 8:31 (NIV) .he started to tell them that the Son of Man would have to endure many things, including being rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, as well as being slain and rising from the dead after three days. Jesus rose from the dead on Sunday after four days, four days after Wednesday (day 1), four days after Thursday (day 2), four days after Friday (day 3) and four days after Saturday (day 4). This was an excessive number of days for a Wednesday crucifixion.

Problems with aFridayCrucifixion

8:31 (Matthew) .he proceeded to tell them that the Son of Man would have to go through many trials, be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, and be crucified, only to rise from the dead three days later to complete his mission on earth. Because of the crucifixion on Wednesday (day 1), it was four days before Jesus rose from the dead on Sunday. He had been crucified on Wednesday, thus it was four days after Thursday (day 2), Friday (day 3) and Saturday (day 4).

In Three Days and After Three Days—TooFewDays

2:19 John 2:19 Jesus responded by telling them, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will rebuild it back to its former glory.”

  1. Weekends consist of Friday night and Saturday day, with Sunday night and Sunday day consisting of half-days.

Weekends consist of Friday night and Saturday day, with Sunday night and Sunday day consisting of half-day.

“Afterthree days”—Mark 8

Friday night and Saturday day are both half days; Sunday night and Sunday day are both half days;

In Conclusion

Friday day = 1/2 day; Saturday night and; Saturday day = 1 day; Sunday night = 1/2 day;

Thursday Crucifixion—Three Days and Three Night

The Day of Preparation officially began on Thursday night. There were several significant events, including Jesus’ Last Supper in the upper room, Jesus’ final speech with His followers, and Jesus’ arrest in the Garden of Gethsemane. The trials and crucifixion took place during the day on Thursday, and Jesus breathed His last and died at three o’clock in the afternoon.

Review of counting:

Jesus died at 3 p.m. on Thursday, which is Day 1 (afternoon hours). His spirit was transported deep into the earth’s core. His corpse was laid to rest before the sun set. Then the day of the High Sabbath started. NIGHT 1 is the first night of the week on Friday (the High Sabbath) Friday is the second day of the week (the High Sabbath) NIGHT 2 is the night before Saturday night (the weekly Sabbath) Saturday is the third day of the week (the weekly Sabbath) NIGHT 3 is on a Sunday night. On Sunday, Jesus resurrected from the dead before the sun came up.

…He is not here: for he is risen, (Matthew 28:6)

Jesus died at 3 p.m. on Thursday, which is day one (afternoon hours). In the depths of the soil, his spirit was absorbed. Despite the late hour, his corpse was laid to rest before sunset. Then came the beginning of the Great Sabbath. NIGHT 1 is the first night of the weekend on a Friday (the High Sabbath) DAY 2 is Friday, which is the second of the week (the High Sabbath) NIGHT 2 is the night before Saturday (the weekly Sabbath) 3rd day of the week is Saturday (the weekly Sabbath) NIGHT 3 is on a Sunday evening.

Women arrived at Christ’s tomb before daybreak, according to Scripture.

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