Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed The Bible And Why

Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why – Kindle edition by Ehrman, Bart D. Religion & Spirituality Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.

While researching the Bible in its original languages, world-renowned biblical scholar Bart Ehrman was taken aback by the number of errors and deliberate revisions that had been introduced by previous translations. In Misquoting Jesus, Ehrman explains the tale of the faults and alterations that ancient scribes made to the New Testament, and he demonstrates the significant influence that these mistakes and changes had on the Bible that we now use. A personal perspective on how his study of the Greek manuscripts led him to reject his earlier ultraconservative beliefs on the Bible serves as the framework for his tale.

In spite of this, these manuscripts were manually copied by scribes who were profoundly impacted by the cultural, religious, and political debates of their day for almost fifteen hundred years, until the advent of the printing press.

This is the first time that Ehrman has explained where and why these modifications occurred in the New Testament, and how academics go about re-creating the New Testament in its most original form as nearly as they can.

Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why

In his early research into the Bible’s original languages, world-renowned biblical scholar Bart Ehrman was astounded to discover the large number of blunders and purposeful adjustments that had been made by earlier translators. Using the New Testament as a case study, Ehrman explains the history of the errors and alterations that ancient scribes made to the text, as well as the significant influence these changes had on the Bible that we use today. A personal perspective on how his study of the Greek manuscripts led him to renounce his formerly ultraconservative beliefs on the Bible serves as the framework for his tale.

Although these manuscripts were hand written for than fifteen hundred years by scribes who were highly affected by the cultural, religious, and political debates of their day, they are now considered to be among the world’s most important historical documents.

This is the first time that Ehrman has explained where and why these modifications occurred in the New Testament, and how academics go about re-creating the New Testament in its most original form as nearly as they possibly can.

Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why

HarperOne is the publisher. The date of publication is November 1, 2005. English is the language of instruction. ISBN-10: 0060738170 Hardcover with 256 pages of text. The following are the dimensions: 6 x 0.89 x 9 inches

FROM LIBRARY JOURNAL

HarperOne is the publishing house. First published on November 1st, 2005 0060738170 ISBN: 0060738170 Language: English Hardcover with 256 pages of content. The following are the dimensions: 6 x 0.89 x 9.

FROM BOOKLIST

Editor in Chief: HarperOne Date of publication: November 1, 2005 Language: English ISSN: 0060738170 ISBN-13: 0060738170 Hardcover with 256 pages of text 6 x 0.89 x 9 inches in size

ProgressiveChristianity.org : Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why

While researching the Bible in its original languages, world-renowned biblical scholar Bart Ehrman was taken aback by the number of errors and deliberate revisions that had been introduced by previous translations. In Misquoting Jesus, Ehrman explains the tale of the faults and alterations that ancient scribes made to the New Testament, and he demonstrates the significant influence that these mistakes and changes had on the Bible that we now use. A personal perspective on how his study of the Greek manuscripts led him to reject his earlier ultraconservative beliefs on the Bible serves as the framework for his tale.

  1. In spite of this, these manuscripts were manually copied by scribes who were profoundly impacted by the cultural, religious, and political debates of their day for almost fifteen hundred years, until the advent of the printing press.
  2. This is the first time that Ehrman has explained where and why these modifications occurred in the New Testament, and how academics go about re-creating the New Testament in its most original form as nearly as they can.
  3. Booklist’s reviews are as follows: Ehrman does not subscribe to the widespread notion of the Bible as a miraculously flawless book, believing that it contains abundant evidence of human fallibility as well as ecclesiastical politics.
  4. Ehrman agrees that the majority of textual inconsistencies are insignificant, but that some have significant implications for religious doctrine.
  5. Moreover, Ehrman discusses these processes and their outcomes in a manner that is understandable to non-specialists.
  6. Ehrman’s audience will be greatly divided as a result of his dismissive attitude toward not only the legitimacy of surviving manuscripts, but also the inspiration of the original writers.
  7. Nonetheless, this is an excellent introduction for biblical history collections.
  8. The American Library Association owns the copyright.

This book “provides an enthralling introduction to textual criticism and evidence the Scriptures have been edited.” (Source: The Charleston PostCourier) “This is a rewarding read, regardless of whatever side of the debate you take on Biblical inerrancy.” (Source: Dallas Morning News) “It’s one of the year’s most unlikely bestsellers,” says the New York Times.

(Source: Washington Post) “Misquoting Jesus is a blessing in disguise.” (Source: The Philadelphia Inquirer)

Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why (Paperback)

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Description

Over a period of about 1,500 years, the New Testament manuscripts were transcribed by hand-and errors and deliberate modifications may be found in the several rival manuscript copies. Ehrman makes the provocative argument that many of our widely held beliefs about Jesus’ divinity, the Trinity, and the biblical text’s divine origins have been distorted as a result of both intentional and accidental alterations by scribes, according to the religious and biblical scholar Bart Ehrman. As Ehrman demonstrates in this engrossing and fascinating book, where and why changes were made in our earliest surviving manuscripts, he provides the first comprehensive explanation of how the many variations of our cherished biblical stories came to be, and why only certain versions of the stories qualify for publication in the Bibles we read today.

He concludes his account with a call to action for others.

About the Author

Bart D. Ehrman is one of the most well-known and divisive Bible scholars working in the world today, and with good reason. At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he holds the James A. Gray Distinguished Professorship of Religious Studies. He has written more than twenty books, including the New York Times best-selling series How Jesus Became God, Misquoting Jesus, God’s Problem, Jesus, Interrupted, and Forged. TIME, the New York Times, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, and other magazines have featured him, as well as Dateline NBC, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, CNN, History, and other prominent NPR programs.

Visit the author’s website at www.bartdehrman.com for more information.

Praise For…

In today’s world, Bart D. Ehrman is one of the most well-known and contentious Bible academics working in the field of religion. At the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, he holds the James A. Gray Distinguished Professorship of Religious Studies. He has written more than twenty books, including the New York Times best-selling series How Jesus Became God, Misquoting Jesus, God’s Problem, Jesus, Interrupted, and Forged. TIME, theNew York Times, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, and other magazines have featured him, as well as Dateline NBC, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, CNN, History, and other major NPR programs.

Go to www.bartdehrman.com to learn more about the author.

Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why

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It is important to check your SPAM folder for communications from us since for some reason, our messages are being sent there more frequently than usual:( It has been about 1500 years since the New Testament manuscripts were written by hand, and there are numerous errors and purposeful modifications to be found in the several rival manuscript copies. Ehrman makes the provocative argument that many of our widely held beliefs about Jesus’ divinity, the Trinity, and the biblical text’s divine origins have been distorted as a result of both intentional and accidental alterations by scribes, according to the religious and biblical scholar Bart Ehrman.

Ehrman begins his tale with personal comments on how his study of the Greek manuscripts led him to leave his earlier ultra-conservative views of the Bible.

0060859512 is the ISBN for this book (9780060859510)

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Please check your SPAM folder for communications from us; for some reason, our messages are being sent to this folder at a higher rate than usual. It has been about 1500 years since the New Testament manuscripts were transcribed by hand, and there are numerous errors and deliberate modifications across rival manuscript copies. Ehrman offers the bold argument that many of our commonly held ideas about Jesus’ divinity, the Trinity, and the biblical text’s divine beginnings have been distorted as a consequence of both purposeful and inadvertent revisions by scribes, as demonstrated in his book The Scribes’ Codex.

Personal observations on how his study of the Greek manuscripts led him to reject his once-extremely conservative views of the Bible serve as the framework for Ehrman’s tale.

(9780060859510)

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Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why, by Bart D. Ehrman

One of the world’s foremost specialists in biblical studies provides an excellent introduction to current Bible scholarship. In this lecture, Dr. Bart Ehrman examines how the New Testament texts have evolved through time and details the tools academics use to discern what has changed in the texts. The text has been altered both accidentally via scribal faults and deliberately for cultural and political goals through the use of purposeful modifications. Even if some of these modifications are trivial, others have had a significant impact on religious dogma.

See also:  Joey Rory Where Jesus Is

He is the author of more than a dozen books and the James A.

He is a major expert on the early church and Jesus’ life, and he is also a prominent authority on the early church and Jesus’ life.

Review of Bart D. Ehrman, Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why (San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, 2005)

Please keep in mind that this is a condensed version of the review. The complete evaluation is also available on bible.org. Bart Ehrman is a textual critic who is widely regarded as one of the best in North America today. As a teacher and writer, he is logical, funny, and provocative, but he also has a tendency to overstate his points and to make arguments that are not adequately complex in their reasoning. He has written a number of books, the most recent of which being Misquoting Jesus, which is essentially a textbook on New Testament textual criticism.

  1. There are seven chapters in all.
  2. According to Ehrman, this is the first book published for a general readership on the subject of New Testament textual criticism (a field that has been established for about 300 years).
  3. Simply put, the book does not live up to the expectations set out in the title.
  4. Since Ehrman appeared on two NPR programs (the Diane Rehm Show and “Fresh Air” with Terry Gross) in the span of one week (the Diane Rehm Show and “Fresh Air” with Terry Gross), it has risen to the top fifty best-selling books on Amazon.
  5. In the first four chapters of the book, there is nothing earth-shattering to be found.
  6. In these settings, he is particularly provocative, prone to overstatement, and prone to non sequiturs.
  7. and doctorate at Princeton Seminary, which he describes in detail in the book’s introduction.
  8. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 are the most important chapters in the book.
  9. (Oxford, 1993).

to assert, as some have done, that the modifications in our text have no actual influence on what the passages mean or on the theological implications that might be drawn from them.” As a matter of fact, we have seen that the exact contrary is true.” 2 Ehrman cites as instances of theological discrepancies among the variants: (1) a passage in which Jesus is supposed to be furious (Mark 1:41), (2) a text in which “even the Son of God himself does not know when the end will arrive” (Matt 24:36), and (3) an explicit declaration regarding the Trinity in Matthew 28:19.

  1. (1 John 5:7-8).
  2. However, in Mark 3:5, Jesus is described as being enraged, which is indisputable evidence that the original version of Mark is accurate.
  3. While many witnesses describe Jesus as expressing his own prophetic ignorance in Matt 24:36 (“But as for that day and hour, no one knows it—neither the angels in heaven, nor the Son —except the Father alone”), many others do not include the words “not the Son” in their accounts.
  4. In the Olivet Discourse, there can be little question that Jesus expressed his own prophetic ignorance, which is consistent with the Gospels.
  5. 4 One simply cannot argue that the language of Matthew 24:36 affects one’s fundamental theological ideas about Jesus, given that the identical attitude is contained in the Gospel of Mark as well.
  6. 5 As meticulous as Ehrman is in his research, his handling of key theological shifts in the text of the New Testament tends to come under one of two categories of criticism: either his textual judgments are incorrect, or his interpretation of the text is incorrect.
  7. Nonetheless, the findings that he reached there are nonetheless conveyed here, despite the fact that some of the most serious criticisms of his work were leveled at him the first time around.

The Christian community’s Chicken Littles would be forgiven for thinking that he is inciting them to panic in the face of information that they are just not equipped to deal with.

And that approach is more akin to an alarmist attitude than to what a mature, master teacher is capable of providing his or her students.

Finally, with reference to 1 John 5:7-8, nearly no current translation of the Bible has the “Trinitarian phrase,” which has been acknowledged by academics for centuries as having been inserted later on.

One has to ask why this paragraph is even mentioned in Ehrman’s book in the first place.

Through political pressure, the text was forced into our Bibles, where it appeared for the first time in 1522, despite the fact that experts at the time and now recognize that it is not real.

They couldn’t have done it without the aid of a passage that didn’t make it into the Greek New Testament until another century later.

An important difference must be made here: just because a specific passage does not confirm a widely held idea does not imply that the doctrine cannot be found in the New Testament as a whole.

The Trinitarian formula was merely a summary of what they discovered; it did not serve as a basis for their claims.

However, it falls short on true substance when it comes to his principal point of argument.

The typical layman would, however, come away from this book with considerably larger reservations about the words and doctrines of the New Testament than any textual expert would ever accept.

A competent teacher does not produce students who are fearful of everything.

These passages are examined in depth in his book, particularly in chapters 5 and 6.

5 During his discussion of Wettstein’s views on the New Testament text, Ehrman asserts that “as Wettstein continued his investigations, he discovered other passages that were traditionally used to affirm the doctrine of the divinity of Christ that in fact represented textual problems; when these problems are resolved on text-critical grounds, references to Jesus’s divinity are removed in the vast majority of cases” (Misquoting, 113).

  • “Wettstein began carefully considering his own religious views, and he became acutely aware of the difficulty that the New Testament almost seldom, if ever, refers to Jesus as God,” he continues (ibid., 114).
  • Ehrman never refers to this conclusion as solely Wettstein’s; in fact, he appears to agree with such viewpoints on several occasions.
  • A.
  • 64)!

To get a more balanced discussion of the evidence, see Reinventing Jesus: What the Da Vinci Code and Other Novel Speculations Don’t Tell You(Grand Rapids: Kregel, 2006), co-authored by J. Ed Komoszewski, M. James Sawyer, and Daniel B. Wallace, which was published in 2006.

Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why (Hardcover)

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About the Author

Bart D. Ehrman is one of the most well-known and divisive Bible scholars working in the world today, and with good reason. At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he holds the James A. Gray Distinguished Professorship of Religious Studies. He has written more than twenty books, including the New York Times best-selling series How Jesus Became God, Misquoting Jesus, God’s Problem, Jesus, Interrupted, and Forged. TIME, the New York Times, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, and other magazines have featured him, as well as Dateline NBC, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, CNN, History, and other prominent NPR programs.

Visit the author’s website at www.bartdehrman.com for more information.

Praise For…

This book “provides an enthralling introduction to textual criticism and evidence the Scriptures have been edited.” — Charleston PostCourier (South Carolina) “This is a rewarding read, regardless of whatever side of the debate you take on Biblical inerrancy.” —Dallas Morning News & Observer “It’s one of the year’s most unlikely bestsellers,” says the New York Times. —Washington Post et al. “Misquoting Jesus is a blessing in disguise.” —The Inquirer of Philadelphia Specifications of the product ISBN:9780060738174 Publisher:HarperOne On November 1st, 2005, the book was released.

The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why @ CenturyOne Bookstore

Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and WhyBart Ehrman
Retail Price:$24.95 CenturyOne Price:$16.95 You Save:$8.00 (32%)Availability: Usually ships within 24 hours.Format:Hardcover, 256pp.ISBN:0060738170Publisher:HarperSanFranciscoPub. Date:November 1, 2005Book Information:DescriptionReviewsAbout the AuthorTable of ContentsCustomer ReviewsFind Similar BooksAverage Customer Review: Order This Book!Item No: 0060738170Safe Shopping Guarantee
DescriptionFromThe Publisher:When world-class biblical scholar Bart Ehrman first began to study the texts of the Bible in their original languages he was startled to discover the multitude of mistakes and intentional alterations that had been made by earlier translators. In Misquoting Jesus, Ehrman tells the story behind the mistakes and changes that ancient scribes made to the New Testament and shows the great impact they had upon the Bible we use today. He frames his account with personal reflections on how his study of the Greek manuscripts made him abandon his once ultraconservative views of the Bible.Since the advent of the printing press and the accurate reproduction of texts, most people have assumed that when they read the New Testament they are reading an exact copy of Jesus’s words or Saint Paul’s writings. And yet, for almost fifteen hundred years these manuscripts were hand copied by scribes who were deeply influenced by the cultural, theological, and political disputes of their day. Both mistakes and intentional changes abound in the surviving manuscripts, making the original words difficult to reconstruct. For the first time, Ehrman reveals where and why these changes were made and how scholars go about reconstructing the original words of the New Testament as closely as possible. Ehrman makes the provocative case that many of our cherished biblical stories and widely held beliefs concerning the divinity of Jesus, the Trinity, and the divine origins of the Bible itself stem from both intentional and accidental alterations by scribes – alterations that dramatically affected all subsequent versions of the Bible.Reviews “Offers a fascinating look into the field of textual criticism and evidence that Scriptures have been altered.” �Charleston PostCourier “Whichever side you sit on regarding Biblical inerrancy, this is a rewarding read.”�Dallas Morning News “One of the unlikeliest bestsellers of the year.”�Washington PostReader’s IndexSend us your favorite quotes or passages from this book.About the AuthorBart D. Erhmanis Bowman and Gordon and Gordon Gray Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Widely recognized for his expertise in the textual criticism of the New Testament, he has published numerous books and articles on the literature and history of early Christianity includingThe New Testament and Other Early Christian Writings: A Reader, After the New Testament: A Reader in Early Christianity, andJesus, Apocalyptic Prophet of the New Millennium.Table of ContentsCustomer ReviewsWrite your own online review.Look for Similar Books by Subject The Orthodox Corruption of Scripture: The Effect of Early Christological Controversies on the Text of the New Testament Peter, Paul, and Mary Magdalene: The Followers of Jesus in History and Legend

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Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why

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Description

Over a period of about 1,500 years, the New Testament manuscripts were transcribed by hand-and errors and deliberate modifications may be found in the several rival manuscript copies. Ehrman makes the provocative argument that many of our widely held beliefs about Jesus’ divinity, the Trinity, and the biblical text’s divine origins have been distorted as a result of both intentional and accidental alterations by scribes, according to the religious and biblical scholar Bart Ehrman. As Ehrman demonstrates in this engrossing and fascinating book, where and why changes were made in our earliest surviving manuscripts, he provides the first comprehensive explanation of how the many variations of our cherished biblical stories came to be, and why only certain versions of the stories qualify for publication in the Bibles we read today.

He concludes his account with a call to action for others.

About the Author

Bart D. Ehrman is one of the most well-known and divisive Bible scholars working in the world today, and with good reason. At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he holds the James A. Gray Distinguished Professorship of Religious Studies. He has written more than twenty books, including the New York Times best-selling series How Jesus Became God, Misquoting Jesus, God’s Problem, Jesus, Interrupted, and Forged. TIME, the New York Times, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, and other magazines have featured him, as well as Dateline NBC, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, CNN, History, and other prominent NPR programs.

He has also been on the show “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.” He resides in the city of Durham, North Carolina. Visit the author’s website at www.bartdehrman.com for more information.

Praise For…

This book “provides an enthralling introduction to textual criticism and evidence the Scriptures have been edited.” — Charleston PostCourier (South Carolina) “This is a rewarding read, regardless of whatever side of the debate you take on Biblical inerrancy.” —Dallas Morning News & Observer “It’s one of the year’s most unlikely bestsellers,” says the New York Times. —Washington Post et al. “Misquoting Jesus is a blessing in disguise.” —The Inquirer of Philadelphia Specifications of the product ISBN:9780060859510ISBN-10:0060859512 Publisher:HarperOne On February 6th, 2007, the publication will be made available.

Book Review: Bart D. Ehrman’s Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why

I was provided with a complimentary copy of this book in return for an honest review. This has no bearing on my overall impression of the book or the substance of my review.

Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why

The paperback edition was published on February 6, 2007, and it contains 266 pages. Check it out on Goodreads or Amazon. Uncovering how and why the Bible is not God’s direct word is presented in this nonfictional narrative.

My Take

This was a great, extremely academic explanation that used scientific and textual investigation to illustrate the method in which humans have changed the words that make up the New Testament over the course of hundreds of years. The amount of time and effort required to determine which copy is the most authentic was and continues to be enormous. The very thought of keeping track of and organizing such a large amount of information gives me a headache! I’d love to have a time machine! Ehrman presents the story in a straightforward manner that avoids placing blame on anyone.

for the sake of greater comprehension In addition to the natural human desire to slant stories, parables, and phrases in order to represent one’s own ideas, it is also a common human reaction.

It all makes sense.

What has been happening with the words of the Bible from the beginning has been summed up in a contemporary expression.

From its inception to its finish, according to Ehrman, the Bible is “a human book.written by different human writers at different periods and in different locations to satisfy different needs.” With “their own points of view, their own beliefs, their own viewpoints, their own needs, their own understandings, their own theologies,” each has “their own perspectives, beliefs, viewpoints, needs, understandings and theologies.” Some of the features are hardly more than commercial hype.

  • Others are more substantial.
  • Ehrman points out that the mustard seed is not the tiniest of all seeds, as is often believed.
  • As Ehrman further points out, neither Jesus’ apostles nor the Church have had access to the great bulk of the original texts, and instead have relied on copies of copies to reconstruct the apostle’s interpretations of Jesus’ words and the acts of the apostles themselves.
  • Paul is distinct from the book of Acts.
  • Consider the game of starting a phrase and whispering it into the ear of the person next to you, which may be played at a dinner table with friends.
  • During a dinner table conversation one night, I whispered this one line to one person after another in about 10 minutes or less.
  • When the fact about the majority of those scribes who could write was merely that they could duplicate the shapes of letters, how could they be considered talented?

The author, according to Ehrman, complained that the scribe they engaged to produce copies of their work was altering the language in their manuscripts!

Alternatively, it might be rewritten to make it more understandable or to represent the point of view of the scribe’s patron.

The overly meticulous who believed that Paul’s remarks should be consistent with Mark’s rather than representing their own distinct points of view.

The reality is that Mary Magdalene had a significant part in the life of Jesus and was, in fact, one of his apostles.

Still, it wasn’t until after Paul that women began to be referred to as inferior, and scribes began to make changes to the text that alluded to women, even going so far as to reverse the naming order of husband and wife pairs in order to present the husband as the primary caregiver.

“Wouldn’t you wish to know what the genuine words of the Bible are?” asks Ehrman, and I agree with his position.

The inks faded, making the lettering much more difficult to see than it already was.

I’m actually amazed that it’s as easily understandable as it is.

Just ask any police officer!

An act that began to draw “an increasing number of highly educated and skilled individuals.” The Old Testament serves as the starting point for the Jewish Bible.

This book, known as the Old Testament, served as the starting point for the Christian Bible.

The Torah was what they were familiar with, and it served as the foundation for Christianity, the world’s second book-oriented religion after Islam.

Individually, the apostles would convert individuals in a certain location and then remain in touch, preach, or resolve conflicts through letters that were read aloud to the congregation.

Some of these letters would be written by disciples of an apostle under his or her own name.

A number of Gospels have been lost, while others have been reconstructed using study conducted by their original and subsequent authors.

Books that served as a starting point for research and introspection.

Christians wrote stories about the approaching apocalypse, in which they theorized about what would happen if the world did not end.

Ehrman also covers early Christians who, based on their own interpretations of the Bible, came up with their own version of how things should be done.

He also brings up an intriguing issue concerning the literacy rates in the ancient world, which is worth noting.

Or, to put it another way, as Ehrman emphasizes.

I believe that preaching came about simply because the majority of the population couldn’t read and so they congregated in a central location where someone would read aloud to them.

In 1707, John Mill published an annotated version of the Greek New Testament, in which he noted “some thirty thousand instances” where the text differed among the extant materials.

These were simply the variants that he mentioned in the published version; they did not represent all of the variations that he discovered.

Oh, my God.

It makes perfect sense.

Think about how many times we as people have attempted to rewrite our own histories (think résumés!) in order to make ourselves appear better!

In an era where a Messiah was viewed as a “powerful warrior or celestial judge,” this was considered significant.

Ehrman brings up an even more fascinating argument, at least historically, concerning Christian persecution at the hands of pagans.

Or, at the very least, anything close to it!

Given the large number of faiths that were practiced throughout that time period, as well as the beliefs of the people at the time, it’s hard to imagine that the vast majority of people would not consider the Christians to be abdicating their responsibilities.

Being antisocial is a bad thing!

When you try to explain it to someone else, you are employing your words to communicate.

It is not the literal word of God, but rather a collection of ideas that serve to strengthen one’s belief in him. A faith that does not require a literal interpretation of the words is not required. It is a belief in the fundamental message.

The Cover and Title

Using scientific and textual investigation to demonstrate the method in which people have been modifying the words that make up the New Testament for millennia, this was a superb and extremely academic presentation. Finding which copy is the more authentic was and continues to be a tremendous amount of work. The mere thought of keeping track of and organizing such a large amount of material gives me a headache! The time machine is something I’d like to own! It is clear that Ehrman is not attempting to assign blame in his explanation.

for the sake of better comprehension Along with the natural human desire to slant stories, parables, and words in order to reflect one’s own beliefs, it is also a normal human reaction to do so.

It’s a logical conclusion.

What has been happening with the words of the Bible since its inception has been summarized in a modern term.

From its beginning to its end, according to Ehrman, the Bible is “a human book.written by different human authors at different times and in different locations to address different needs.” With “their own points of view, their own beliefs, their own viewpoints, their own requirements, their own understandings, their own theologies,” each has “their own perspectives, beliefs, viewpoints, requirements, understandings and theologies.” The majority of the elements are little more than marketing hype, however.

What a surprise!

Many issues, including when Jesus was crucified — after Passover or before; when Joseph and Mary returned to Nazareth; when Paul went to Jerusalem after his conversion; the Adoptionists; Separationists such as the Gnostics; and literally thousands of other issues, are a source of disagreement among the apostles.

  • As the saying goes, “Mark did not say the same thing as Luke said because he did not mean the same thing as Luke.” Compared to Matthew, John is quite different.
  • Likewise, James differs from Paul.” And that is only logical.
  • During a dinner table conversation one evening, I whispered this one sentence to one person after another in under ten minutes or less.
  • When the truth about the majority of those scribes who could write was simply that they could copy the forms of letters, how could they be considered writers?
  • The author, according to Ehrman, complained that the scribe they hired to make copies of their work was changing the words in their manuscripts.
  • In some cases, the text has been rewritten to make it more understandable or to better reflect the patron’s viewpoint.
  • Incompetent scribes, as well as those who became hungry or sleepy, bored, or indifferent, were among those who suffered.

The story of Mary Magdalene, the whore whom I learned about in Sunday School, turns out to be a fabrication created by those who are more interested in keeping women out of any roles in the Church; specifically, they are interested in removing them from the “significant and publicly high profile roles” that they played during the early Church.

So did Paul, who corresponded with and spoke about women who had prominent positions in society, despite his belief that women should cover their heads in church “to demonstrate that they were under authority” and that they “should be pleased with the responsibilities that had been assigned to them.” While proclaiming “that in the future Kingdom there would be equality of men and women,” Jesus also stated, “that in the coming Kingdom there would be equality between men and women.” Perhaps not on the planet, where it would be inconvenient or too extreme, but on another planet, perhaps.

  1. However, it wasn’t until after Paul that women began to be referred to as inferior, and scribes began to alter the text to reflect this, even going so far as to reverse the name order of husband and wife pairs in order to represent the husband as the primary caregiver.
  2. “Wouldn’t you wish to know what the genuine words of the Bible are?” asks Ehrman, and I agree with him completely.
  3. Even more difficult to see was the text because of fading inks on the page.
  4. That it’s so easily readable is a bit of a shock to me.
  5. A police officer will tell you this: Professional writers were first employed by the Church in the fourth century, namely when Constantine the Great, the Roman emperor, converted to Christianity in 312 C.E., according to historian Bart Ehrman.
  6. When it comes to the Jewish Bible, the Old Testament is where it all starts!
  7. The adherents of practically all of the extant faiths lived at a time when rules, instructions, and laws were not written down, and “almost no ethical standards to be followed” were spelled out for them.

As a Jew, Jesus was a rabbi, and his disciples were also Jews.

‘The Bible’s Evolution’ is an interesting explanation provided by Ehrman.

Letters to convert communities are known by many names, such as Paul’s letters to the Thessalonians and the letters to the Galatians.

The Gospels were accounts about “the life, teachings, death, and resurrection of their Lord,” and they “documented the traditions connected with” Jesus’ life; they were also memoirs of the apostles who lived during Jesus’ time on earth.

A number of them are based on a Christian apostle’s interpretation “in light of the Jewish scriptures.which were widely used by Christians at the time.”.

The reading material that served as a foundation for research and introspection It is the stories of the apostles that are recorded in the Acts of the Apostles.

When I read about “Church Orders,” it was intriguing to see how the necessity for individuals in control became obvious and regulations were developed.

Aside from that, Ehrman analyzes early Christians who based on their own interpretations of the Bible came up with their own version of how things should be done.

His point concerning literacy rates in the ancient world is also well-made and worth mentioning.

Alternatively, and as Ehrman emphasizes, Literacy rates ranged between 85 and 90 percent.

As well as the origins of the various Bibles we are familiar with, such as the Latin Vulgate (Jerome’s translation was a Bible for the Western church, and he worked very hard to reconcile the variations; I consider him a saint simply for having managed to produce the Vulgate!) and the Greek KJV (Jerome’s translation was a Bible for the Eastern church, and he worked very hard to reconcile the variations; I consider him a saint simply for having managed to produce the , the Greek New Testament (made by a Spanish cardinal, Ximenes de Cisneros, in the first printed polyglot Bible) — In order to be the first one out of the gate, Erasmus published a defective Greek New Testament; and the seventeenth-century King James Version, which incorporates large portions of Erasmus’ erroneous edition!

In 1707, John Mill published an annotated version of the Greek New Testament, in which he noted “some thirty thousand instances” where the text differed among the extant materials.

Only the ones he mentioned in the published version were included in this list, and they did not include all of the variants he discovered.

He’s a jerk, you know?

I can see why you would say that.

Individuals sometimes attempt to alter their personal histories (think résumés!) in order to make themselves appear more attractive.

In an era where a Messiah was viewed as a “powerful warrior or celestial judge,” this was a significant development.

One that I did not learn during my history minor, but one that is important to remember whenever looking for the truth is to read a range of sources from a number of opinions.

Ehrman’s point, on the other hand, is understandable.

You’re putting the health of the community at danger?

You are interpreting the words in a work, whether it is fiction or non-fiction, in light of your own life experiences as you are reading it.

The Bible is a defective collection of history and stories – the history is written by the winners, not by the defeated.

There are no actual words from God in it; instead, it is a compilation of thoughts that are meant to inspire trust. A literal reading of the texts is not required by this faith. In the fundamental message, there is trust.

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