Woman Who Anointed Jesus Feet With Oil?

The Unnamed Woman With the Alabaster Jar

  1. As far as our perceptions of Bible women go, how did we go from sinner to whore?
  2. This harsh phrase is used solely to draw attention to the false dichotomy that has been given to Bible women, and it is not intended to imply that any woman should be subjected to this name.) Luke 7:36-39 describes a lady who approaches a house where Jesus is eating with her damaged and crying body.
  3. Using her hair to wipe the oil and tears off his feet, she anoints them with a kiss.
  4. The males in attendance are talking about her as if she isn’t even present.
  1. They are angered by the fact that a ″sinner″ is in their midst.
  2. With reference to the mystery woman’s character in our contemporary environment, it is simple to interpret her as ″promiscuous.″ Christians have historically had a proclivity to read Bible women’s non-specific sin as sexual immorality, and female promiscuity is frequently inferred from the text without any support from the text itself.
  3. A classic illustration of our desire to identify and humiliate Bible women is seen in the tale of Jesus’ anointing by an anonymous woman in the book of Luke.
  4. Sometimes Bible professors go beyond suggestion and assert categorically that the anonymous lady was unquestionably a prostitute—again, despite the absence of any specific scriptural proof to support their claim.
  5. Speakers frequently assert that no one would have touched the nameless woman, so exacerbating the controversy surrounding her anointing of Jesus.
  • A footnote in the NASB refers to her as ″immoral,″ and there is a great deal of discussion about her character.
  • On her shoulders have been heaped all sorts of presumptions concerning the source of her ″poor reputation.″ But what is the true story here?
  • Mary, whose brother Lazarus was ill, anointed the Lord with ointment and washed His feet with her hair, was the Mary who did all of this″ (John 11:2).
  • According to the commonly accepted chronology of Jesus’ career, the anointing of the apostles took place sometime after Jesus resurrected Lazarus from the dead but before the execution of Jesus.
  • Because Luke’s Gospel does not include a chronological account of Jesus’ life and career, it is plausible to assume that event occurred later in Jesus’ mission than previously believed.
  • The identical event is told in John’s Gospel, and the unidentified lady is identified as Mary, the sister of Martha and Lazarus, according to the Gospel of John.
  • According to some academics, the unidentified lady’s position as a sexually disgraced woman, a prostitute, is so unquestionable that the unnamed woman in Luke 7 must be a distinct woman from the Mary who appears in John’s comparable account.

This results in two conflicting parallel gospel stories, which would imply the following: 1.On two different occasions, Jesus was invited to a Pharisee’s home for supper by his host.2.On both instances, Jesus was invited by a Pharisee who went by the name of Simon.A lady entered during both meals and anointed Jesus by pouring oil on his feet, which was the first of two occasions.4.

  1. In Luke’s narrative, the woman who anointed Jesus with oil is a sexually disgraced prostitute, but the lady who anointed Jesus with oil in John’s account, which is an altogether different event, is a revered disciple of Jesus.
  2. It’s not out of the question that two women anointed Jesus with oil, according to some scholars.
  3. However, making such an assumption is implausible.
  • In Luke’s tale, the nameless lady is thought to be a prostitute, however in John’s version, she is identified as Mary.
  • However, if these two verses do really relate to the same lady, Mary, we must reexamine our preconceived notions about the woman who anointed Jesus’ feet with oil.
  • Examine Mary in further detail….
  • The story of Lazarus’ death and resurrection includes a confrontation between Mary and Jesus, who was angry that he had not come to help her brother.
  • She then went back to her place of grieving.
  • He was extremely upset by the fact that she didn’t grasp who Jesus truly was, and he grieved as a result of it.
  • Then he requested that he be transported to Lazarus, who he then revived from the grave.
  • That moment was missed by Mary, who had been seated at the feet of the Master and had been lauded for choosing the better choice.
  1. But then she witnessed the miracle of Lazarus’ resurrection, something she will never forget.
  2. Mary answered by kneeling at Jesus’ feet once more, this time with a greater comprehension of who he actually was than she had previously.
  3. She performed a great act of faith by breaking a pricey container of perfume and anointing Jesus with it.
  4. She sobbed at his feet, which was a magnificent display of humility on her part.
  5. She washed his feet with her own hair, which was a wonderful act of remorse on her part.
  6. Crowds came after hearing about Jesus’ actions in regard to Lazarus.

When Jesus allowed such a ″sinful lady″ to come close to him, Simon, the Pharisee, became embarrassingly ashamed.The reason why Mary is referred to as ″sinful″ in Luke’s story is not explained.Jesus, on the other hand, challenged Simon about his preconceived notions about Mary.

  • As part of his encouragement, Jesus told Mary that she should preserve the remaining oil in her possession until the day of his burial, with the assurance that she would be present to anoint him once more.
  • During the time when Jesus was carried off the crucifixion and put in a tomb, ″Mary Magdalene and another Mary, who was sitting across the grave, were present″ (Matthew 27:61).
  • Mary was most likely holding the same alabaster jar that she had used to anoint Jesus at Simon’s house when he appeared.
  • She was poised and ready to anoint her savior once more.
  • To have been among the first ladies to learn of his resurrection was an incredible honor.
  • Not only was the believer who anointed Jesus before his execution a nameless woman with no prior criminal record, but she also had a history of sexual transgression.

Her name was Mary, and she was a devout disciple of Jesus.It is not honest to cast another woman in that part since we are having difficulty reconciling two different versions of the same woman.The nameless lady in Luke’s account did not appear out of nowhere with a jar of oil, intending to spontaneously pour it on the Teacher who would later be identified as the Messiah.No, she had a specific objective in mind: to anoint her savior.

  • Mary’s tale pushes us to look at Scripture with new, unbiased eyes and to reassess traditional Christian teaching regarding women in light of her experience.
  • In the same way as Mary did, women can gain knowledge at the foot of the Messiah.
  • We may participate in his ministry in the same way that Mary did.
  • And when we fall short and miss the actual nature of Jesus, we may come to him without feeling guilty.
  • And, like Mary, we will come to terms with our situation and discover hope.
  • This is the third installment of a series of articles examining what Christians have been taught about women in the Bible.

Read part 1, Rahab the Righteous, and part 2, Deborah the Judge and Jael the Just, before continuing on to part 3.Read Female and Male in Four Anointing Stories for additional information on this subject.

Understanding the significance of Jesus being anointed by oil

  1. Those of you who have been reading through the Gospels may be familiar with the accounts of Jesus being anointed with oil.
  2. Reading the narratives in the separate books may easily lead one to believe that they all refer to the same event, but deeper examination reveals that there are three different instances when this occurred that have been documented.
  3. Interestingly, two of the situations in which Jesus is anointed with oil occur in the days leading up to His crucifixion.
  4. Are there any special reasons why he was anointed at this particular time?

The two occasions

  1. When you look closely at the accounts of Jesus being anointed with oil before entering Jerusalem, you will see that there are two distinct occurrences mentioned.
  2. We learn about this occurrence in the book of John, which took place six days before Passover.
  3. As a result, six days before the Passover, Jesus traveled to Bethany, where Lazarus was recuperating after being resurrected from the dead by Jesus.
  4. As a result, they hosted a dinner for him there.
  1. Martha was the one who served, and Lazarus was one of the others who sat at the table with him.
  2. Mary, in response, took a pound of costly ointment made from pure nard and anointed the feet of Jesus, wiping his feet with her hair as she did so.
  3. The scent flooded the room, filling it with a pleasant smell.
  4. Then there came Judas Iscariot, one of his followers (and the man who was going to betray him), who said, ″Why was this ointment not sold for three hundred denarii and distributed to the poor?″ His motivation for saying this was not because he cared for the impoverished, but rather because, as the criminal in control of the moneybag, he was free to take whatever was placed in it as he pleased.
  5. As Jesus said, ″Leave her alone so that she may preserve it until the day of my burial.″ ″You always have the poor with you, but you don’t always have me,″ says the author.
  • John 12:1-8 is a biblical passage.
  • According to Mark’s version, the anointing with oil takes place four days later, only two days before the Passover holiday is celebrated.
  • At this point in time, the action takes place at the home of Simon the leper.
  • It was now two days before Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread, which was approaching quickly.
  • As he was reclining at the table at Simon the leper’s house in Bethany, a woman approached him and broke an alabaster flask of expensive pure nard ointment and poured it over his head.
  • The chief priests and the scribes were scrambling to figure out how to arrest him and kill him without causing an uproar among the people, because they were concerned that an uproar would result from the people.
  • But Jesus told them to ″leave her alone.″ What is it about you that makes her feel uncomfortable?

She has done something very wonderful for me.Due to the fact that you constantly have the poor with you, you have the opportunity to do good for them whenever you wish.However, you will not always have me at your disposal.She has done everything she could; she has anointed my corpse in preparation for burial before she passed away.And honestly, I say to you, wherever the gospel is preached throughout the world, what she has accomplished will be remembered in her honor.″ Mark 14:1-9 is a biblical passage.

So what’s happening

  1. We can observe that the same pure nard perfume is being used in both instances (see footnote), but the application is different in each instance.
  2. Both of these rituals include rubbing oil into the soles of Jesus’ feet, and both involve pouring oil over the top of his head.
  3. It’s a subtle, but crucial, distinction.
  4. Some of those in attendance were dissatisfied with the fact that luxury perfume costing more than a year’s salary was being squandered rather than sold and distributed to the impoverished.
  1. As a result, they were quite critical of her.
  2. Following her response, Jesus instructed them to leave her alone and declared that she had performed a lovely act for him.
  3. You will always have the poor with you, and you will be able to aid them whenever you desire, but you will not always have Me with you.
  4. She did the best she could, putting perfume on Jesus’ corpse the night before his burial to prepare him for his burial.
  5. When Jesus was rubbed on his feet or had oil poured on his head containing this pure nard, his defense was that the person doing it was preparing him for his burial, which was true in both instances.

Understanding the culture

  1. There is something going on here that is more clear to the Hebrews than it is to the rest of the world.
  2. Providing water in a dish for guests to wash their feet after walking through the dusty byways of Israel was considered welcoming in that culture.
  3. You would add a few drops of perfume to the water to give it a lovely scent, but you would be careful not to add too much because you were told not to squander any of the perfume according to the Torah.
  4. The rabbis had determined that while you are celebrating someone coming to your house, it is OK to use perfume, but that it is not permissible to use 100% nard.
  1. Why?
  2. Because this was considered a waste, and if you were wasting resources, you were in violation of a commandment of the Torah, according to tradition.
  3. What does Jesus say in both cases to defend himself?
  4. He claims that they are not putting pure nard on My feet and pouring it on My head in celebration of Me, but rather that they are doing it as an expression of sadness in preparation for My burial.
  5. As a result, He defends them by stating that this is not an occasion for celebration and joy.
  • The fact that this is an act of grief complies with the law, and because it is an act of grieving, As a Master of Haggadah, Jesus was described as a teacher who used parables and other stories to convey his message.
  • As with all of Jesus’ stories, this one contains facts about kingdom people, and as a result, we will recognize ourselves in it.

Choosing the Passover lamb

  1. The lambs for Passover were picked six days in advance.
  2. Consequently, they were able to be brought in, frequently into the family home, and examined for a period of five days.
  3. These animals were thoroughly inspected to ensure that they were free of blemishes, particularly on their lower bodies and feet (which are often harmed or marked on the steep slopes).
  4. At this time, they would take the anointing oil and rub it into the ankles and feet, after which they would be subjected to additional inspection for a further five days.
  1. Jesus arrives at someone’s house in Bethany six days before the Passover, and He is anointed for burial by rubbing pure nard on His feet and ankles, as is customary at the time.
  2. That was His first anointing, which took place just before His crucifixion.
  3. The second anointing takes place two days before the festival of Passover.
  4. The Passover lamb was anointed on their heads for the second time, signaling that they were free of illness and blemish.
  5. This is in contrast to the first time, when they were on their feet only six days prior to this.
  • The anointing of Jesus’ head took place two days before He was crucified, and it served as a symbol that He was healthy and free of illness or defect.
  • The first anointing of the Passover lambs took place on the feet six days before Passover; the second anointing took place on the head two days before Passover; and finally, the Passover lambs were slain on Passover (which is Nissan 14) starting at the ninth hour, beginning with the feet.
  • Following His second anointing, we are told that Jesus and the twelve disciples travel to Jerusalem from Bethany the following day in order to partake in the Passover supper with the people.
  • This was followed by His arrest, trial, and crucifixion the next day, when Jesus died in the ninth hour, about 3 p.m., the same day that the Passover lambs were slaughtered, according to tradition.
See also:  Who Was Jesus Sister

Footnotes

Brief synopsis of the three anointings

  1. Early in Jesus’ career, an unidentified lady at the home of Simon, a wealthy Pharisee, anointed His feet with oil and cleaned His feet with her hair. This happened at the beginning of Jesus’ mission. On the ninth day of Nisan, according to Luke 7:36-38, Mary of Bethany anointed Jesus’ feet with oil and wiped His feet with her hair. A woman anointed Jesus’ head at the home of Simon the Leper in Bethany two days before the Passover, on the 13th day of Nisan (Matthew 26:1-16
  2. Mark 14:1-11)
  3. Jesus rode into Jerusalem the next day, on the 10th of Nisan, the day on which the sacrificial lambs were to be chosen (Exodus 12:3), and there for all to see and judge His perfection (Jn 12:1-3)
  4. Jesus was
  1. Spikenard, also known as nard, nardin, and muskroot, is a family of fragrant, amber-colored essential oils extracted from flowering plants, the identity of which is difficult to determine.
  2. Since ancient times, the oil has been utilized as a perfume, as a medicinal, and in religious contexts throughout a vast expanse of area, extending from India to western Europe.
  3. While it is not known which plants were used in the production of historic spikenard, several candidates have been suggested, including Nardostachys jatamansi from Asia (which is the modern definition of ″spikenard″), lavender from the Middle East, Alpine spikenard from Europe, and possibly lemongrass.
  4. It is likely that different plants were used in different places and at different times.
  1. The spikenard is mentioned multiple times in the Bible, both in the Old Testament and in the New Testament, and it is used to symbolise Saint Joseph in Catholic iconography.
  2. The spikenard has been incorporated in Pope Francis’ coat of arms in order to convey this message.

John 12:3 Then Mary took about a pint of expensive perfume, made of pure nard, and she anointed Jesus’ feet and wiped them with her hair. And the house was filled with the fragrance of the perfume.

  1. (3) After that, Mary obtained a pound of spikenard ointment.
  2. – Here, too, St.
  3. John is the only one who names the figure whom St.
  4. Matthew and St.
  1. Mark refer to as ″a lady,″ and she is true to the previous character as shown in St.
  2. Luke’s account (Luke 10:40; Luke 10:42).
  3. We can also see from this paragraph that she packed a ″pound″ of ointment with her on her journey.
  4. According to the other tales, it was a ″alabaster box″ in shape.
  5. This pound was the Greek litra, which was translated into Latin as ″libra,″ which meant ″pound of twelve ounces.″ See Mark 14:3 for further information on the ″ointment of spikenard.″ It is possible that it refers to ″Nard Pistik,″ or Pistik ointment, because the term Pistik is a local name.
  • As a result, the fact that this strange term appears exclusively in these two chapters suggests that this is the most likely interpretation.
  • And she anointed Jesus’ feet with oil, wiping his feet with her hair while she did so.
  • – She anointed His head, according to both St.
  • Matthew and St.
  • Mark, according to the Bible.
  • According to tradition (see also Note on Luke 7:46 and Psalm 23:5), but St.
  • John recalls that the gesture of love went above and beyond common regard in its depth of appreciation and reverence, and anointed the feet with her own hair, and wiped them with her own hair….

Verse three.- To this end, Mary obtained a pound (the synoptists Matthew and Mark refer to it as ″an alabaster,″ which refers to a flask made of the expensive spar, which was specially suitable to the storage of liquid perfume, and which was hermetically sealed before it was broken for immediate use).Despite the fact that Matthew and Mark state that she did not save any of the precious fluid for another occasion, she did make an ointment (which was sometimes mixed with more ordinary oil) of pure (or possibly pistie) nard (which is inconsistent with her reserving any of the precious fluid for another occasion).Mark used an odd term,, which comes from a later period of Greek history.Even if this ″nard″ was used for perfuming wine, the derivation of from a word that means ″potable″ does not make sense in terms of meaning.The Authorized Version also translates it as ″spikenard″ in Mark 14:3, as it does here (see also Song of Solomon 1:12 and Song 4:13, 14, where Hebrew o equates with oo in English).

  1. However, the one location in Aristotle where the term was assumed to be found is now thought to be, which means trustworthy or untainted, rather than, which means authentic.
  2. It is probable that the term had a specific geographical meaning in the area and belonged to a particular proper name, and that it is thus untranslatable.
  3. This is quite valuable.
  • Mark (Mark 14:3) and Matthew (Matthew 26:7) both use the term to refer to Jesus.
  • Interestingly, John appears to have combined the concepts of both terms in his Each of the synoptists mentions a fact that John does not mention – that Mary broke the alabaster box and poured the costly unguent on his head in great abundance, as if hers had been the royal or high-priestly anointing (cf.
  • Psalm 133); but John demonstrates that this was not the only thing she did.
  • She anointed Jesus’ feet with oil and cleaned his feet with her hair, and the entire house was filled with the scent of the ointment once she finished.
  • The anointing of the head of the true High Priest, according to Thoma, was entirely the work of God, quoting Philo’s commentary on Leviticus 21:10, etc., ″The head of the Logos is anointed with oil, i.e.
  • his innermost essence gleams with dazzling light;″ and adding that, just as the feet of the high priest were washed with water from recent defilement of the world’s dust, so God’ An analogy of such profundity appears to us to be at odds with the simplicity of the tale, which appears to be entirely natural in its structure.
  • The scented nard dripped down to the Savior’s feet and the skirts of his clothing, where it accumulated.
  • The crucial deed is further told as Mary wiped away the excess perfume from his feet with the strands of her unbound hair, a gesture that is still remembered today.
  1. Because the loosening of a woman’s hair was considered a sign of remarkable self-abandonment, this simple act declared her self-humiliation and worship of her unlimited love.
  2. Many erroneous assumptions have been taken from this, many of which are completely unneeded.
  3. Adding a fascinating aspect, indicating the sensitive eye-witness of the action, ″and the house was filled with the smell of the ointment;″ and the entire house of God has been fragrant ever since with the fragrance of her eternal and prophetic deed, as recorded by John.
  4. Commentaries that run in parallel.
  5. Greek Then there’s (oun)ConjunctionStrong’s 3767: Consequently, then.
  6. Evidently, a basic term; unquestionably, or in accordance with Mary n noun – nominative feminine singularStrong’s 3137:Or Mariam of Hebrew origin; Mariam, the name of six Christian females; Mariam, the name of six Christian females.

take a look at this (labousa) Participle of the Aorist Verb Singular – Nominative – FeminineStrong’s 2983: (a) I get, obtain, (b) I take, seize hold of.around one pint (litran) Strong’s 3046: Noun – Accusative Feminine SingularStrong’s 3046: Noun – Accusative Feminine Singular A Roman pound is equal to around twelve ounces.The weight of a pound is of Latin origin.

  • a lot of money Adjective – Genitive Feminine SingularStrong’s 4186:Very valuable, extremely expensive, extremely valuable.
  • From the standpoint of polus and time, this is incredibly beneficial.
  • cologne, perfume (myrou) anointing-oil, ointmentStrong’s 3464: anointing oil, ointment ‘Myrrh,’ which is a fragrant oil, is most likely of foreign origin.
  • constructed entirely of pure (pistiks) materials Strong’s 4101:Genuine, pure (as in ointment), and dependable.
  • From the Latin pistis, which means ″trustworthy,″ or ″true.″ nard, nard, nard, nard (nardou) STRONG’s 3487: Spikenard, a perfume created initially from a plant originating in the Himalayas, is a noun that is genitive feminine singular in form.
  • It is of foreign origin; it is referred to as ″nard.″ she anointed (leipsen)Verb – Aorist Indicative Active – 3rd Person SingularStrong’s 218 is as follows: Anointing can be done for a variety of reasons, including festivals, tribute, therapeutic purposes, and anointing the dead.

To lubricate.Jesus’ (Isou) name is Isou (Jesus).Noun – Masculine Genitive Form SingularStrong’s 2424 is as follows: Jesus, the name of our Lord, and two other Israelites are descended from the Hebrew language.feet In the Strong’s 4228, the foot is used as an accusative masculine plural noun.

  • ‘Foot’ is a fundamental term.
  • and as well as (kai) ConjunctionStrong’s 2532 is as follows: And, in addition, specifically.
  • wipedἐξέμαξεν (exemaxen) (exemaxen) Verb – Aorist Indicative Active – 3rd Person SingularStrong’s 1591:To wipe, wipe (off) thoroughly.
  • From ek and the base of massaomai; to knead out, i.e.
  • to wipe dry.
  • In the Strong’s 4228, the foot is used as an accusative masculine plural noun.

‘Foot’ is a fundamental term.withτοὺς (tous) (tous) Article – Accusative Masculine PluralStrong’s 3588:The, the definite article.Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.herαὐτῆς (autēs) Personal / Possessive Pronoun – Genitive Feminine 3rd Person SingularStrong’s 846: He, she, it, they, them, same.From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

hair.Noun – Dative Feminine PluralStrong’s 2359: Noun – Dative Feminine Plural Hair is a term used to describe the appearance of a person’s hair (of the head or of animals).Hair, trichos, and other genitive cases of uncertain derivation; trichos, etc.in addition to (de)conjunction Strong’s 1161 (Strong’s 1161): A primary particle; however, and, and so on.the (the) (the) (the) Strong’s 3588:the, the definite article in nominative feminine singular.This includes all of the inflections of the feminine he as well as the neuter to; the definite article; and the.

  • in the hudson valley (oikia) Noun – Nominative Feminine SingularStrong’s 3614: Noun – Nominative Feminine Singular From the Greek word oikos, which means ″home,″ however it is most commonly used to refer to a place of living.
  • eplrth (eplrth) is an abbreviation for eplrth.
  • The Aorist Indicative Form of the Verb 3rd Person Passive Voice From pleres; to fill completely, i.e.
  • to cram or level up, or to provide, fulfill, accomplish, finish or verify with a number of other words (ek) PrepositionStrong’s 1537: From out, out from amid, from, implying that anything is coming from the inside out.
  • Origin, from, and forth are all denoted by the basic preposition ″the, the definite article,″ says Strong’s 3588 in the definite article form: ″the, the definite article.″ including the feminine he and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.fragrance (osms); and the definite article Strong’s 3744: A scent, odor, or flavor.
  • The word ozo means ″fragrance of the″ in Japanese (tou) Article – SingularStrong’s 3588: Genitive Neuter SingularStrong’s 3588: The article is capitalized like the definite article.

This includes all of the inflections of the feminine he as well as the neuter to; the definite article; and the word ″perfume″ (myrou) Noun – Genitive Neuter SingularStrong’s 3464: noun – genitive neuter singular Anointing oil, anointing ointment ‘Myrrh,’ which is a fragrant oil, is most likely of foreign origin.Return to the previous page Herself House was anointed with costly dry feet filled with fragrance and full great hair.Jesus Mary Nard Odor Odour Oil Ointment Opportunity Perfume Perfumed Pound Poured Precious Pure Smell Spikenard Weight Wiped Jesus Mary Nard Odor Odour Oil Ointment Opportunity Continue to Next Page Herself House was anointed with costly dry feet filled with fragrance and full great hair.Jesus Mary Nard Odor Odour Oil Ointment Opportunity Perfume Perfumed Pound Poured Precious Pure Smell Spikenard Weight Wiped Jesus Mary Nard Odor Odour Oil Ointment Opportunity Links John 12:3 (New International Version) John 12:3 New Living Translation John 12:3 (New International Version) John 12:3 (New American Standard Bible) John 12:3 King James Version www.BibleApps.com/John/12:3 Biblia del Evangelio 12:3 Paralela Chinese Version of John 12:3 French translation of John 12:3.Revelations 12:3 (Catholic Bible) Gospels of the New Testament: John 12:3 (KJV) As a result, Mary purchased a pound of ointment (Jhn Jo Jn)

The Women Who Anointed Jesus

The title ″the ladies″ (plural) refers to the four different ways in which the four gospels describe the account of Jesus’ anointing of the apostles. Let’s take a look at each of the four stories.

The gospel of John
  • Living in the Story, which is included in this week’s readings, focuses on John’s method of recounting the story in chapter 12: Mary of Bethany is the lady in question, and she is the sister of Martha and Lazarus.
  • Mary anointed Jesus’ feet with fine nard, ″a costly perfume,″ and then cleaned them with her hair, a provocatively personal deed.
  • The anointing acted as a catalyst for Judas’ treachery, propelling the story forward to that point.
  • According to John’s narrative, the story is set immediately after the death of Lazarus, which is described in chapter 11. Included in his account is Jesus’ interaction with this same Mary, as well as her sister Martha’s powerful statement of resurrection faith.
  • Because the tale takes place right before Jesus’ crucifixion, John’s Jesus specifically states that the anointing has something to do with ″the day of his burial.″
  • The narrative continues with the following strange tidbit of information:

…the chief priests also intended to put Lazarus to death, because it was because of him that many Jews were deserting and coming to believe in Jesus, according to the Scriptures.

The gospel of Luke
  • There is another narrative about Mary and Martha that Luke gives us, but it is not a story about anointing. Take, for example, Luke 10:38-42, where Jesus gently chastised Martha for her ″worries and diversions,″ while the master complimented Mary for ″sitting at his feet and listening,″ and promised them that such a decision ″will not be taken away from her.″ However, when Luke narrates the narrative of Jesus’ anointing, he makes no mention of Mary of Bethany or her role in the event. Instead, this woman is a sinner who has broken into the home of Simon the Pharisee to seek refuge. It is not clear where the narrative takes place, however it does not appear to take place in Bethany.
  • The nameless lady brought an alabaster container of ointment, which she mixed with the anointing of her own tears before bringing it to the altar.
  • In the same way as John did, she dried his feet with her hair, but she also kissed Jesus’ feet, making her account much more personal than John’s.
  • By the way, Luke gives us a glimpse inside Simon’s thoughts: ″If this guy were to be a prophet, he would know what type of woman she is — a sinner.″
  • In response to the occurrence, a parable about a creditor who forgives his debts is triggered. ″So, who do you think would be more in love? What is more important: being forgiven a huge debt or being forgiven a minor debt?″
  • Like many parables, the answer raises further questions: is it the mourning widow or the judgemental guy in this narrative who owes the ″larger debt″?
  • who is the ″bigger debtor″ in this story?
  • After the lady has confessed her sins, Jesus speaks words of forgiveness and blessing to her: ″Your sins are forgiven.″ Your faith has saved you
  • you may now depart in peace.″
  • In contrast to the other three gospels, Luke situates the event early in Jesus’ career on the earth. His depiction of additional female companions who accompanied Jesus and provided for him as he traveled and taught follows immediately after.
See also:  How To Hear Jesus Voice?
The gospel of Mark
  • In Mark’s tale, an anonymous lady came to Simon’s house to anoint Jesus’ feet, but in this version, Simon is referred to as ″the leper.″ Taking place in Bethany, at the conclusion of Jesus’ mission, the story begins with a lady bringing ″an alabaster jar of extremely expensive ointment of nard.″
  • It is the lady who anoints Jesus’ head in Mark’s account
  • however, Mark does not refer to her as ″a sinner.″
  • Mark does not specifically identify Judas as the one who was enraged, but rather ″those who were there″ were the ones who expressed displeasure with the action’s wastefulness.
  • Jesus makes a direct connection between her anointing and his own burial.
  • And then there are these well-known grace words from Jesus:

Truly, I tell you, wherever the good news is spread across the world, the story of what she has accomplished will be shared in her honor.

The gospel of Matthew
  • When a lady from Bethany comes to the house of Simon the leper, the Gospel of Matthew follows Mark’s account pretty closely: ″She presented him with an alabaster jar containing a very expensive ointment,″ she says.
  • When the lady anointed Jesus’ head, the ones who complained ″the waste″ were really Jesus’ own followers
  • Jesus rebuked them, saying, ″Why are you bothering the woman?″ The assistance she has provided me has been excellent.″
  • This anointing was connected to Jesus’ burial
  • the blessing was repeated in the Gospel of Matthew: ″wherever the good news is broadcast throughout the entire globe, what she has done will be remembered in remembrance of her.″
  • Following Mark’s example, Matthew immediately transitioned into the tale of Judas’ intention to betray Jesus.

As we read through the Bible as part of our Living in the Story initiative, we frequently notice these types of contrasts.

Different versions of the same story are not to be taken as contradictions.
  1. They are also not illustrations of distinct geographical perspectives.
  2. (This is the story of the famous four persons who stood on four corners and described the same accident.) For example, the well-known blind guys who describe the elephant from various angles (truck, tail, legs, and so on).
  3. Each of the four gospels reveals theological disagreements and a wide range of interpretations supplied by knowledgeable, serious scholars of Scripture who are contemplating the timeless mystery of the birth of Christ.
  4. Theological viewpoints such as these are comparable to the experience of the Church in our own day.
  1. As an example, have a look at the theological and Christological differences that exist between Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox; Southern and American Baptists; United Methodists and Pentecostals.
  2. This is a broad range that is totally comprehensible.)
One More Thing
  1. It seems to me that some Christians claim that our society’s acceptance of poverty and homelessness is justified by referencing Jesus’ comments from this short story: ″You always have the poor with you…″ 12:8 (John 12:8 NASB) (also Mark 14:7 and Matthew 26:11) They see these comments as an endorsement of the current state of poverty.
  2. They claim that poverty is unavoidable, that it is a natural element of the world’s structure, and that it is an insurmountable reality.
  3. Some even argue that Jesus’ comments demonstrate that poverty is God’s will since he said it is.
It’s a bizarre perspective.
  1. Part of this view is derived from a long-standing tradition that has its roots in a warped prosperity gospel, which is discussed more below.
  2. According to this line of thinking, ″God helps those who assist themselves,″ and a person’s poverty merely ″proves″ that they are lazy and have a lack of will strength and character.
  3. In American Christianity, the argument is frequently made that charity is the obligation of the Church and of individuals, rather than the responsibility of the state or the government.
  4. However, this approach ignores the cultural structures and governmental policies that are often responsible for the creation and perpetuation of poverty.
  1. This approach emphasizes the importance of individuals while downplaying the importance of group power and accountability.
  2. We have done significant harm to the real message of the Bible because we have read the Bible from the standpoint of community rather than from the perspective of individual rights and privileges as we have done in the contemporary day.

These women in our story are poor and yet their gift to Jesus is an opulent gesture.
  • Traditionally, it has been characterized as ″wasteful,″ ″frivolous,″ and ″senseless.″ However, in God’s economy, abundant astonishing grace is never a waste of time or resources. It is with wild abandon that the ladies pour out their anointing. They sanctify the moment with their generous love. They worship Jesus with their extravagant display of generosity.
  • It is the act of giving that brings about grace. It is to the act of giving that we have been called. We have no influence over how the donation is accepted.
  • We have no way of knowing how the donation will be used.
  • We must not make the assumption that someone is deserving of our consideration.
  1. We are just obligated to contribute.
  2. To show grace in abundance is to be generous.
  3. In the same way as God does.
  4. It is God who causes his sun to rise in both places: on the bad and on the good, and on the righteous and on the unjust.
  1. 5:45 (Matthew 5:45) In this manner, our contributions to God – and now to others in Christ’s name – should mirror something of God’s own rich and luxurious method of gift-giving.
  2. Indeed, I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of them, you have now done the same thing to me as well.
  3. Matthew 25:40 (KJV) Week 32’s readings from Living in the Story are now available.
  4. 1 Kings 1-11; 2 Chronicles 1-9; 3 Kings 1-11 Scripture: Psalm 1; Psalm 48; Psalm 49 1 Timothy 12:1 John 12:1 Charlotte currently resides in Paris, Texas, where she blogs.
  5. It was while working on her PhD degree at Brite Divinity School in Ft.
  • Worth that she came up with the idea for Living in the Story.
  • She is ordained in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).
  • Charlotte also maintains a blog at CharlotteVaughanCoyle.com, where she writes about the intersections of faith, politics, and culture.
  • View all of Charlotte Vaughan Coyle’s blog entries.

Which Woman Anointed Our Lord Jesus Christ With Oil? – Interesting Facts – Resources

In the Holy Gospels, there are different accounts of women who anointed our Lord Jesus Christ with oil. The first one mentioned is in Luke 7:36-50. The second is mentioned in John 12:1-8. The third is mentioned in Mark 14:3-9 also recorded in Matthew 26:6-13. +When we look closely into these three accounts, we find that they were actually three separate events that occurred on three separate days in three different places by three different women.

BIBLICAL REFERENCE Luke 7:36-50 John 12:1-8 Matthew 26:6-13, Mark 14:3-9
PLACE OF EVENT House of Simon the Pharisee, GALILEE Bethany, most likely at Lazarus’ home JUDEA Bethany, house of Simon the Leper JUDEA
NAME OF WOMAN ″a woman in the city who was a sinner″ (verse 37) Mary, the sister of Lazarus (John 12:1-3) ″a woman″ (Matthew 26:7, Mark 14:3)
DAY OF EVENT 1 st year of our Lord Jesus Christ’s ministry because in Luke 8:1- ″SOON AFTERWARDS he went on through cities and villages, proclaiming and bringing the good news of the kingdom of God. The twelve were with him″ (NRSV) AND at that time our Lord had not yet chosen the 72 apostles as in Luke 10. Six days before the Passover; Saturday prior our Lord’s crucifixion and resurrection from the dead (John 12:1) Wednesday; two days (from Tuesday evening till sunset on Wednesday) prior to the Passover and our Lord’s crucifixion (Compare Matthew 26:1-2; Mark 14:1-2)
DETAILS OF ANOINTING a) stood at His feet behind Him weepingb) washed His feet with her tears c) wiped them with the hair of her head d) kissed His feet e) anointed them with the fragrant oil (verse 38) a) took a pound of very costly oil of spikenard b) anointed the feet of Jesusc) wiped His feet with her hair (verse 3) a) came to Him having an alabaster flask of very costly fragrant oil b) she poured it on His head as He sat at the table(Matthew 26:7; Mark 14:3)
PERSON WHO CRITICIZED AND THEIR CRITICISM Simon the Pharisee: ″This man, if He were a prophet, would know who and what manner of woman this is who is touching Him, for she is a sinner″ (verse 39). Judas Iscariot: ″Why was this fragrant oil not sold for three hundred denarii and given to the poor?″ (verse 5) Disciples (in Matthew); ″some″ (in Mark): ″Why was this fragrant oil wasted? For it might have been sold for more than three hundred denarii and given to the poor.’ And they criticized her sharply″ (Mark 14:4-5; cf. Matthew 26:8-9).
RESULT OF ANOINTING ″Your sins are forgiven.Your faith has saved you. Go in peace″ (verses 48-50) ″she has kept this for the day of My burial″ (verse 7) Note: put on His feet ″She has come beforehand to anoint My body for burial. Assuredly, I say to you, wherever this gospel is preached in the whole world, what this woman has done will also be told as a memorial to her″ (Mark 14:8-9; cf. Matthew 26:12-13) Note: put on His head

Who was the woman who poured the oil over Jesus’ feet?

  1. This was done by two women in the Bible, according to the answer.
  2. We’re not sure who the first one was, but we know what it was: Luke 7:36-38 (KJV) And one of the Pharisees expressed a wish for him to join him in his meal.
  3. And he went into the house of a Pharisee and sat down to a meal with him.
  4. And, behold, a sinner from the city came to Jesus’ feet behind him, crying, and started to wash his feet with tears, wiping them with the hairs of her head, kissing his feet, and anointing them with the ointment that she had brought with her from the temple.
  1. Many people consider this to be Mary Magdalene, however there is no particular Biblical evidence to support this claim..
  2. Mary, the sister of Lazarus and Martha, was the second, and she did this a few days before Jesus’ death: ″ John 12:2–3 (KJV) At the inn, they prepared him a meal, and Martha served it; nevertheless, Lazarus was among those who sat at the table with him.
  3. It was at that point that Mary took one pound of expensive spikenard oil and anointed the feet of Jesus, wiping his feet with her hair; and the house was filled with the scent of spikenard oil as a result of her actions.
  4. Pastor Brad, you raise an excellent point.

Jesus Anointed at Bethany (Mark 14:3-9) Analysis

  1. 3 And when he was in Bethany, at the house of Simon the leper, he was eating dinner when a lady approached him, carrying an alabaster box containing a costly ointment of spikenard; she broke the box open and poured the ointment on his head.
  2. Moreover, there were those who were enraged and said, ″Why was such a waste of ointment created?″ 5 After all, it could have been sold for more than three hundred pence and the proceeds distributed to the less fortunate.
  3. They also made disparaging remarks about her.
  4. 6 And Jesus answered to them, ″Leave her alone; why are you bothering her?″ She has done me a favor by doing this for me.
  1. Seventh, ye always have the poor with you, and you may do good to them whenever you choose; but ye do not always have me with you.
  2. 8 She has done what she could: she has arrived ahead of time to anoint my body before it is laid to rest.
  3. 9 I swear unto you that wherever this gospel is taught throughout the entire globe, this also will be mentioned as a memorial to her in the same way.

​Jesus, the Anointed One​

It is one of the most fascinating chapters in Mark’s passion tale to see Jesus being anointed with oil by an anonymous woman.What motivates her to go through with it?What do Jesus’ words on the poor and needy reveal about his final thoughts for them?Other gospels claim that this woman is Mary, Simon’s sister, but the identity of this woman is uncertain (which would make sense, if they were in his house).What was the source of the priceless oil she was given, and what was the original plan for it?Jesus’ anointing is accomplished in line with the traditional anointing of kings, which is acceptable if one thinks that Jesus was the king of the Jews, as is often believed.

Jesus entered Jerusalem in regal splendor, and he would later be insulted as a king in the days leading up to his death.Although Jesus himself offers an alternate reading at the conclusion of the chapter, when he notices that Mary is anointing his corpse before ″the burying,″ he does not elaborate more.At the very least, this would have been seen as a prediction of Jesus’ execution by Mark’s audience.Researchers believe the worth of this oil, 300 denarii, was comparable to the amount earned by a well-paid laborer over the course of a year’s work in the Roman Empire.

  • When it appears that Jesus’ followers (were they just the apostles present, or were there others?) have learned their lessons about the poor, they complain bitterly that the oil has been wasted when it could have been sold and the proceeds used to help those in need.
  • This appears to be a reference to the widow from the end of chapter 12 who appears to have donated the last of her own funds to the Temple.
  • But what these people don’t know is that it isn’t about the poor at all; rather, it is all about Jesus: he is at the center of all attention, is the main attraction, and is the entire reason they are there.
  • If it’s all about Jesus, then spending money on something that would normally be considered frivolous is not out of line.
  • This is in stark contrast to the attitude demonstrated toward the impoverished, which has been exploited by numerous Christian leaders to explain their own horrible actions.
  • Granted, it is certainly impossible to totally eradicate poverty from society; yet, what kind of justification is there for treating the poor in such a purely utilitarian manner?
  • While it is true that Jesus only expects to be on the earth for a limited amount of time, what justification is there for refusing to assist needy people whose lives are wretched due to no fault of their own?
See also:  Lyrics For What A Friend We Have In Jesus

Luke 7:46 You did not anoint My head with oil, but she has anointed My feet with perfume.

New International Version (New International Version) Even if you did not apply oil on my head, she has sprayed perfume all on my feet.New Living Translation (New Living Translation) You did not provide me the courtesy of anointing my head with olive oil, but she has anointed my feet with a precious scent that you overlooked.Version standardized in English Your lack of oil on my head, however, has resulted in her rubbing lotion into the soles of my feet.Berean Study Bible (also known as the Berean Study Bible) Despite the fact that you did not anoint My head with oil, she has anointed My feet with fragrance.The Literal Bible of the Bereans However, it was she who anointed My feet with fragrant oil and not you who applied the oil to my head.The King James Version of the Bible My head was not anointed with oil by thee; but, this lady hath anointed my feet with ointment by thee.

New The King James Version (KJV) is a translation of the King James Bible.You did not anoint my head with oil, but this lady has anointed my feet with a fragrant oil that you did not apply.The New American Standard Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.You did not anoint My head with oil, but she did anoint My feet with perfume, which you did not do either.

  • NASB (National Association of School Boards) 1995 ″Although you did not anoint My head with oil, she did anoint My feet with perfume,″ says the priest.
  • ″You did not anoint My head with oil, but she anointed My feet with perfume,″ says the NASB in 1977.
  • The Bible with an amplification system Despite the fact that you did not anoint my head with oil, she did so with perfume.
  • The Christian Standard Bible is a translation of the Bible in the Christian tradition.
  • Your olive oil on my head was in vain; but, she has anointed the soles of my feet with perfume.
  • Holman The Christian Standard Bible is a translation of the Bible in the Christian tradition.
  • Even if you didn’t anoint my head with olive oil, she has coated my feet with a fragrant oil that smells lovely.
  • The American Standard Version is the version used in the United States.
  • My head was not anointed with oil by thee, but my feet have been anointed with ointment by my mother.

The Aramaic Bible translated into plain English In contrast to the oil on my head, ″this one has coated my feet with oil of ointment,″ says the narrator of the story.Version in the Present Tense of the English Language She has put costly perfume on my feet, despite the fact that you did not even pour olive oil on my head.The Bible of Douay-Rheims It was you who did not anoint my head with oil; nevertheless, it was she who anointed my feet with ointment.Translation of the Good News You didn’t give any olive oil for my hair, but she did, and she used it to scent my feet.The International Standard Version (ISO) is a formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized Despite the fact that you did not anoint my head with oil, this lady has anointed my feet with perfume.You did not anoint my head with oil, but this lady anointed my feet with oil, according to the literal Standard Version.

The New American Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.It wasn’t you who anointed my head with oil, but it was someone else who anointed my feet with ointment.NET Bible is an abbreviation for Networked Information Technology.Despite the fact that you did not anoint my head with oil, she has anointed the soles of my feet with fragrant oil.

Revised Standard Version (New Revised Standard Version) Your lack of oil on my head, however, has resulted in her rubbing lotion into the soles of my feet.The New Heart English Bible is a translation of the New Heart Bible.Your lack of oil on my head, however, has resulted in her rubbing lotion into the soles of my feet.Weymouth The New Testament is a collection of writings that were written during the years of ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad You did not even dab any oil on my head, yet she has lavished perfume on my toes and heels.

  • The English Bible for the Whole World Despite the fact that you did not anoint my head with oil, she did so with ointment on my feet.
  • Translation of Young’s Literal Translation using oil Additional Translations: Thou didst not anoint my head, but this lady with the ointment anointed my feet; Context Jesus is anointed by a sinful woman…
  • 45 However, even though you did not kiss Me upon my arrival, she has not stopped kissing My feet since I came.

46 Despite the fact that you did not anoint Myhead with oil, she did so with perfume on Myfeet.47As a result, I can tell you that she has loved a great deal since her numerous sins have been forgiven.″However, he who has been forgiven little, loves little,″ says the author.

… References to Other Sources 2 Samuel 12:20 is a verse from the book of Samuel.Then David sprang up from the ground, bathed himself and anointed himself, changed his clothing, and went into the temple of the LORD to worship there for three hours.After that, he returned to his home, where he was served food at his request, which he dutifully consumed.The fifth verse of Psalm 23:5 Before me, in the midst of my adversaries, you arrange a table for me.My cup is overflowing as you anoint my head with oil.

  • The wine that gladdens a man’s heart, the oil that makes his face shine, and the food that fills his stomach are all found in Psalm 104:15.
  • Ecclesiastes 9:8 (Ecclesiastes 9:8) Keep your clothes as white as possible, and don’t forget to apply oil to your hair on a regular basis.
  • Daniel 10:3 (NIV) I abstained from consuming fatty foods, and neither meat nor alcohol entered my lips over the three-week period.
  • I also did not massage myself with oil.
  • ″Therefore, I tell you, because her many sins have been forgiven, she has loved much, but he who has been forgiven little loves little,″ says Jesus in Luke 7:47.
  • ″He who has been forgiven little loves little,″ says Jesus in Luke 7:47.
  • The Scriptures are a treasure trove.
  • You did not anoint the top of my head with oil, but this lady has anointed the soles of my feet with ointment.
  • The third chapter of Ruth is a proverbial proverbial proverbial proverbial proverbial proverbial proverbial proverbial proverbial proverbial proverbial proverbial proverbial Take care to wash yourself and anoint yourself, and put on your clothes, and bring yourself down to the floor; but do not make your presence known until after the guy has finished eating and drinking, which may take some time.
  • 2 Samuel 14:2 (NIV) And he went to Tekoah and brought back a wise woman, and he said to her, ″I implore thee, pretend to be a mourner, and put on mourning clothes now, and anoint not thyself with oil, but be like a lady who has mourned for the deceased for a long time:″ The fifth verse of Psalm 23:5 In the midst of my adversaries, thou preparest a banquet before me; thou anointest my head with oil, and my cup overfloweth.
  • (46) Thou didst not anoint the top of my head with oil.
  • – In addition, albeit less popular than other politeness gestures such as kissing and washing one’s feet, this was nonetheless considered appropriate for an honored visitor.

For someone who had traveled to a feast in Syria under the scorching sun, it carried with it a sense of comfort and refreshment, which made it a suitable form of spiritual reality to which they could relate.See Psalm 23:5, Psalm 45:7, and Ecclesiastes 9:8 for examples of this use.Partly because the use of oil or chrism became more directly symbolic in the ritual of the Christian Church—as in baptism, confirmation, extreme unction, and the coronation of kings—and partly because its necessity was not felt in other climates, the practice has fallen out of favor as a part of everyday life in the United States and elsewhere.

  • Take note of the difference between the less expensive olive ″oil,″ which was routinely used, and the more expensive ″ointment.″ Verse 46.
  • – ″I am the Lord’s servant.″ My head was not anointed with oil by thee; but, this lady hath anointed my feet with ointment by thee.
  • ″But she has anointed not my head, for she shrank, poor soul!
  • from doing this; rather, she has anointed my feet,″ she says.
  • ″It never entered thy thoughts to pay me the homage – and yet I had helped thee, too, a little – of pouring oil on my head″ (this was by no means an unusual mark of respect in the case of an honored guest; to one who, under the scorching sun of Palestine, had walked, Furthermore, she did not use ordinary oil, but rather a rare, scented ointment instead.
  • The reception you received, my Pharisee friend, was harsh and devoid of affection.

You consider the simple admission of the carpenter’s Son to thy table to be sufficient honor; you see no need for these further gestures of kindness for thy Guest – the water for the feet, the kiss for the face, and the oil for the head.Perhaps it would have been better for the huge world in Jerusalem to recognize you as the friend of the Nazareth Teacher, as the one Pharisee who cherished the honor due to the Galilean Reformer.″ Greek Parallel Commentaries.Parallel Commentaries You did not anoint (leipsas) any of the candidates.The Aorist Indicative Form of the Verb 2nd Person Active tense SingularStrong’s 218 is as follows: Anointing can be done for a variety of reasons, including festivals, tribute, therapeutic purposes, and anointing the dead.To lubricate.

o o o o o o o o o o (mou) Personal / Obsessive Orientation Noun – Genitive pronoun 1st Person Pronoun SingularStrong’s 1473:I, the first-person pronoun, is a good example of this.a first-person main pronoun that indicates the first person I.head (kephaln) is a noun that means ″head.″ Noun – Accusative Feminine Form of a Noun SingularStrong’s 2776 is as follows: From the root kapto, which means ″head,″ either literally or symbolically.when combined with oil, (elai) Olive oil, oil is a noun that is in the dative neuter singular in Strong’s 1637.Olive oil is a neutral version of the same as elaia.However, (de)ConjunctionStrong’s 1161 is as follows: A main particle; although, and, and so on.She (haut) is a female pronoun.

In the Nominative Feminine, the possessive pronoun is used to refer to one’s own possession.3679:This; he, she, it.has been anointed (leipsen) by SingularStrong.The Aorist Indicative Form of the Verb 3rd Person Pronoun – Active SingularStrong’s 218 is as follows: Anointing can be done for a variety of reasons, including festivals, tribute, therapeutic purposes, and anointing the dead.

  • To lubricate.
  • My apologies for the inconvenience (mou) Possessive Personal Pronoun – Genitive Form 1st Person Pronoun SingularStrong’s 1473:I, the first-person pronoun, is a good example of this.
  • a first-person main pronoun that indicates the first person The feet (I.feet) (podas) Noun – Accusative Masculine Form of the word It’s the foot, according to PluralStrong’s 4228.

A main term; a ‘foot’ that smells like perfume.(myr) is a Greek word that means ″myr″ (myria).Dative of a noun Neuter SingularStrong’s 3464:Anointing-oil, ointment is a neutral SingularStrong.’Myrrh,’ which is a fragrant oil, is most likely of foreign origin.PreviousAnoint Anointed Feet Head Kiss Kissing Moment Myrh Oil Ointment Perfume Poured Tenderly PreviousAnoint Anointed Feet Head Kiss Kissing Moment Myrh Oil Ointment Perfume Poured Tenderly Jump to NextAnoint Anointed Feet Head Kiss Kissing Moment Myrh Oil Ointment Perfume Poured TenderlyAnoint Anointed Feet Head Kiss Kissing Moment Myrh Oil Ointment Perfume Poured Tenderly Links Luke 7:46 NIVLuke 7:46 NLTLuke 7:46 ESVLuke 7:46 NASBLuke 7:46 KJVLuke 7:46 NASBLuke 7:46 KJVLuke 7:46 NIVLuke 7:46 NLTLuke 7:46 NLTLuke 7:46 NLTLuke 7:46 NLTLuke 7:46 NLTLuke 7:46 NLTL BibleApps.com Luke 7:46 Biblia Paralela (Parallel Bible) Chinese Version of Luke 7:46 French translation of Luke 7:46 Luke 7:46 Catholic Bible (Luke 7:46) Gospels of the New Testament: Luke 7:46 (NIV) There was no oil on my head, as you had said (Luke Lu Lk)

Anointing of Jesus – Wikipedia

A new International Version has been published However, she has sprayed perfume on the soles of my feet, which you didn’t do.Translation into Living Language Her rare perfume has been applied to my feet instead of the courtesy of anointing my head with olive oil, which you had neglected to do.the standard version of the english language Your lack of oil on my head, however, has resulted in her application of ointment to the soles of my feet.’Berean Study Bible’ is a biblical text that was written by the Bereans.Despite the fact that you did not anoint My head with oil, she has anointed My feet with perfume.A literal translation of the Berean Scriptures However, it was she who anointed My feet with fragrant oil and not you who applied the oil.

The King James Bible (also known as the King James Version) is a book written by the English author James I.My head was not anointed with oil by thee; however, this woman has anointed my feet with ointment by her hands and nails.New The King James Version (KJV) is a translation of the Bible that was written in the 16th century.However, while you did not anoint my head with oil, this lady has anointed my feet with a fragrant oil.

  • American Standard Bible (also known as the N.A.S.
  • Bible) Despite the fact that you did not anoint My head with oil, she did anoint My feet with perfume.
  • 1996, National Association of Schools and Businesses (NASB).
  • ″Although you did not anoint My head with oil, she did anoint My feet with perfume,″ says the prophet.
  • 1977 New American Standard Bible ″You did not anoint My head with oil, but she anointed My feet with perfume,″ says the prophet J

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.