Why Was Jesus Nailed To The Cross

Why Was Jesus Crucified?

The tale is well-known among Christians: how one of Jesus’ closest companions, His disciple Judas, betrayed Him in exchange for a sack of silver pieces, and then orchestrated Jesus’ arrest in the Garden of Gethsemane. After being mocked, beaten, and tormented, Jesus was forced to carry His own cross to the summit of Golgotha, also known as Calvary, where He was nailed and hung to die in a terrible and humiliating death, similar to that of a regular criminal, as punishment. The guards mocked him, telling him to get off the cross.

I guess you aren’t all that fantastic after all.

But why was Jesus killed in the first place?

And, more importantly, how does His death offer significance to my own existence?

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Why Was Jesus Crucified?

There are a variety of possible explanations for Jesus’ crucifixion, ranging from those addressing practical, human, and political problems to those involving the divine. First and foremost, Jesus was crucified—that is, put to a cross to die—because it was the customary method by which the Roman government dealt with public executions of non-Romans. “Only slaves, the most heinous criminals, and those who were not Roman citizens were killed in this method,” according to the NIV Study Bible, which also notes that the convicts were chained to a pole or cross before having heavy wrought-iron nails hammered into their wrists and heel bones.

As for the reasons why the Roman authorities consented to crucify—or otherwise execute—Jesus, it appears to have been motivated by political considerations and public demand.

According to Luke’s Gospel, Pilate then summoned all of the religious leaders and members of the public together and declared, “You have brought me this man as one who is inciting the people to revolt.” I have examined him in your presence and have determined that there is no foundation for your allegations against him to be true.

  • As a result, I shall punish him first and then free him” (Luke 23:14-16).
  • A number of factors contributed to his decision to order the crucifixion.
  • In reality, Pilate “took water and washed his hands in front of the throng,” according to Matthew.
  • The obligation is entirely on you!'” (Matthew 27:24; Mark 10:24).
  • Last but not least, from a human standpoint, Jesus was killed because people did not accept that Jesus was God’s son, as the Bible teaches.
  • God’s answer is this: What was the purpose of this element of God’s plan?
  • Was it truly necessary for Him to be crucified or executed in the first place?

Another thing to keep in mind is that Jesus had to die in order to be raised from the dead. And, yes, the resurrection is the most important thing.

What Does the Bible Say about Jesus’ Crucifixion?

The tale of Jesus’ crucifixion and death is told in all four Gospel accounts: Matthew (27:32-56), Mark (15:21-41), Luke (23:26-49), and John (19:17-37). “They came to a spot named Golgotha (which literally translates as “the site of the skull”),” Matthew relates. They offered Jesus wine laced with gall to drink there, but after tasting it, he refused to take any more from the cup. After Jesus had been nailed to the cross, they divided his clothing by drawing lots for it. They sat down and kept a close eye on him from that position.

  • Throughout the day, he was crucified with two convicts, one on his right and the other on his left, who were the accounts detail.
  • “Darkness descended upon the entire region from midday to three o’clock in the afternoon,” Matthew’s narrative continued.
  • (Matthew 27:45-46; Mark 10:45-46).
  • They carried a sponge filled with wine vinegar to Jesus and placed it on a long pole to present it to him.
  • The ground trembled, the rocks cracked, and the tombs burst into flames.
  • All four reports are almost identical in terms of what transpired, albeit there are minor variances in tone, specifics, and what was stated in each story.
  • Nonetheless, the fundamentals of the tale are same in all three Gospels.

How Does Jesus’ Crucified Life Give Meaning to My Life?

According to John 1:29, Jesus is referred to be “the Lamb of God, who wipes away the sin of the world.” A variety of animals, mainly lambs, were offered to God throughout the Old Testament, including as a thank you, as a payment for sin, as an acknowledgement of His awesome might, and a variety of other reasons. We are, nevertheless, weighed down by our sins, and there is nothing we can do to earn a position in paradise. In addition, there is no sacrifice we can make that will be sufficient to do this.

  • Jesus, on the other hand, offered himself in our place as the sacrifice.
  • Priests give blood sacrifices to atone for the sins of the people on a daily basis.
  • “When this priest had completed his one sacrifice for sins for all time, he was seated at the right side of God, and he has been there ever since, waiting for his adversaries to be made his footstool.
  • In his epistle to the Romans, the apostle Paul describes how we may all be forgiven of our sins through the sacrifice of Jesus.
  • “Through the shedding of his blood, God offered Christ as a sacrifice of atonement, to be accepted only through trust in him.
  • The magnificent gift of eternal life is explained by Jesus himself to the people in John 3: “Just as Moses brought up the serpent out of the desert, so the Son of Man must be hoisted up, so everyone who believes in him may have eternal life in him” (NIV) (John 3:14-15).
  • Anyone who believes in him is not condemned, but anyone who does not believe already has their judgment passed against them because they have not believed in the name of God’s one and only Son (John 3:18).

He gave his life as a sacrifice for us.

We will be able to go on in the spiritual realm with the Father indefinitely.

Although His death was a tragic event, we believe that it was part of God’s plan, a piece in the larger puzzle of God’s design.

Then He was raised from the dead.

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Her novel, The Memory Garden, was nominated for the 2018 American Christian Fiction Writers Genesis Award, which she received for her work as a Christian novelist.

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Located inside our broader Holy Week and Easter resource collection, this page is focussed on the events leading up to and following the death and resurrection of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

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Why was Jesus crucified?

QuestionAnswer There is an earthly cause for Jesus’ death, as well as a heavenly motive for his death. Simply expressed, the worldly explanation for this is that mankind is a bad bunch of people. God is good, and this is the heavenly reason for this. The reason Jesus was crucified on this world was because mankind is bad. Men of evil plotted against Him, falsely accused Him, and assassinated Him. The officials of Israel had a variety of motives for wanting Jesus to be put to death on the cross.

  1. Because they were concerned that Jesus would garner an excessive following, the Roman authorities may descend on the nation, forcing them to lose their positions, they sought to prevent this from happening (John 11:48).
  2. And when He claimed to be the Son of God, they felt He was blaspheming (Luke 22:66–71).
  3. Because the Romans were in charge of carrying out Jesus’ crucifixion, he was crucified rather than stoned, hung, drowned, or otherwise punished.
  4. It was customary to affix the accusations against the condemned to the cross of the condemned.
  5. The Jewish leaders manufactured this claim in order to provoke the Roman governor into ordering Jesus’ execution.
  6. The divine cause for Jesus’ crucifixion is that God is good.
  7. Despite the fact that the act of crucifying Jesus was wicked, the crucifixion was nonetheless God’s intention to atone for sin on the part of mankind.

In the instance of the crucifixion, it was not a matter of evil getting out of hand.

The powers of darkness were given heavenly authorization to carry out their plans (Luke 22:53).

God exploited the bad desires of evil men to accomplish the greatest good possible: the provision of redemption for all of mankind via the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

There is nothing in the Old Testament prophesy that necessitates that the Messiah be crucified in order to save the world.

When Paul writes in Galatians 3:13, he is referring to the death of Christ and applying Deuteronomy 21:22–23.

John 19:37).

Leviticus 17:11).

John 19:36).

Every one of us has committed crimes, and we are all deserving of death; nonetheless, Christ died in our place.

In order to be just and the one who justifies those who have faith in Jesus, he did this in order to demonstrate his righteousness at the present time, because he had forbeared in leaving the sins committed previously unpunished—he did it to demonstrate his righteousness at the present time in order to be just and the one who justifies those who have faith in Jesus.” After all is said and done, the reason that Jesus was crucified is the explanation that each of us must come to comprehend and accept by faith: Jesus was killed to pay the penalty for my sin, allowing me to be forgiven and restored to right standing with God.

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Was Jesus really nailed to the cross?

The crucifixion of Jesus is undoubtedly one of the most well-known images to have emerged from the Christian tradition. The ceremony takes place on Good Friday, which is considered to be one of the holiest days in the Christian calendar. But what exactly was the crucifixion? And what was the reason for Jesus’ death in this manner? The crucifixion was a technique of punishment used by the Romans. Suspended from a massive cross, a victim would finally succumb to asphyxiation or weariness — it was a long, drawn-out, and excruciating process that took several hours.

Because, as King of the Jews, Jesus threatened Roman imperial dominance (Matt 27:37; Mark 15:26; Luke 23:38; John 19:19–22), the Gospels describe this as the reason for Jesus’ death.

In Christian tradition, it is thought that the limbs of the cross will be nailed to the wood of the cross, with dispute centered on whether nails would puncture the hands or the more structurally solid wrists.

In reality, the only archaeological evidence for the practice of nailing crucifixion victims comes from the grave of Jehohanan, a man who was crucified in the first century CE, and it is an ankle bone from his tomb.

Gospel accounts

It is possible that certain early Gospels, such as the Gospel of Thomas, did not include the tale of Jesus’s execution, preferring to concentrate on his teaching instead. However, one of the few things that all four of the canonical Gospels agree on is Jesus’ death via crucifixion. The events surrounding the crucifixion are depicted in significantly different ways in the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. There is no mention of Jesus being nailed or tied to the crucifixion in any of the four Gospels of the New Testament.

  1. Perhaps it is because of this text that the widespread belief that Jesus’ hands and feet were nailed to the crucifixion rather than chained to it has developed.
  2. Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons The Account of Peter, a non-canonical gospel written in the first or second centuries CE, tells in detail how the nails were taken from Jesus’ hands after he had died in verse 21.
  3. “And they were hearing a voice from the sky saying, ‘Have you made proclamation to the fallen-asleep?'” says the cross in verses 41-42.
  4. Several people have claimed to have discovered the real nails with which Jesus was crucified throughout the course of the last few years.

This obsession with the nails, which has persisted despite the fact that the earliest gospels make no mention of Jesus being nailed to the crucifixion, is a puzzle to me.

Depictions of the crucifixion

Given that crucifixion was a humiliating way to die, it isn’t unexpected that Christians needed some time to accept the picture of Christ on the cross. What is unexpected is that the first depiction of the crucifixion turns out to be a representation of a cross. However, rather than the religious icons with which we are acquainted — representations that commemorate Jesus’ crucifixion – this oldest image looks to be some late second century satirical graffiti that is directed against Christian believers.

  • Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons The Alexamenos Graffito, as the artwork is known, depicts a person with the head of a donkey standing on a cross, with the words “Alexamenos worships his God” written underneath.
  • The fact that the graffito was definitely not created by a Christian demonstrates that non-Christians were aware with certain fundamental parts of Christian thought as early as the second century.
  • This piece of carved jasper from the second or third century portrays a man on a cross, surrounded by magical symbols.
  • The British Museum is a place where you may learn about the history of the United Kingdom.
  • The crucified Christ is shown on the Constanza diamond, who is flanked by the apostles.
  • CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 International License It is believed by scholars that the Constanza gemstone, as it is sometimes called, goes back to the fourth century CE.
  • Tradition demands this prevalent image of Jesus’ death on the crucifixion since the evidence from antiquity does not give a definitive answer as to whether Jesus was nailed or tied to his cross.
  • As a vivid extension on the crucifixion, this stands out as a welcome addition to the Gospels’ relative reticence on the subject.
  • Emperor Constantine eventually put a halt to the practice of crucifixion as a means of death, not for ethical grounds, but out of reverence for Jesus Christ.

Faculty member at the University of Sheffield, Meredith J C Warren is a lecturer in Biblical and Religious Studies. The original version of this article appeared on The Conversation. See the source article for more information.

Was Jesus really nailed to the cross?

The crucifixion of Jesus is undoubtedly one of the most well-known images to have emerged from the Christian tradition. The ceremony takes place on Good Friday, which is considered to be one of the holiest days in the Christian calendar. But what exactly was the crucifixion? And what was the reason for Jesus’ death in this manner? The crucifixion was a technique of punishment used by the Romans. Suspended from a massive cross, a victim would finally succumb to asphyxiation or weariness — it was a long, drawn-out, and excruciating process that took several hours.

Because, as King of the Jews, Jesus threatened Roman imperial dominance (Matt 27:37; Mark 15:26; Luke 23:38; John 19:19–22), the Gospels describe this as the reason for Jesus’ death.

In Christian tradition, it is thought that the limbs of the cross will be nailed to the wood of the cross, with dispute centered on whether nails would puncture the hands or the more structurally solid wrists.

In reality, the only archaeological evidence for the practice of nailing crucifixion victims comes from the grave of Jehohanan, a man who was crucified in the first century CE, and it is an ankle bone from his tomb.

Gospel accounts

It is possible that certain early Gospels, such as the Gospel of Thomas, did not include the tale of Jesus’s execution, preferring to concentrate on his teaching instead. However, one of the few things that all four of the canonical Gospels agree on is Jesus’ death via crucifixion. The events surrounding the crucifixion are depicted in significantly different ways in the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. There is no mention of Jesus being nailed or tied to the crucifixion in any of the four Gospels of the New Testament.

  • Perhaps it is because of this text that the widespread belief that Jesus’ hands and feet were nailed to the crucifixion rather than chained to it has developed.
  • Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons The Account of Peter, a non-canonical gospel written in the first or second centuries CE, tells in detail how the nails were taken from Jesus’ hands after he had died in verse 21.
  • “And they were hearing a voice from the sky saying, ‘Have you made proclamation to the fallen-asleep?'” says the cross in verses 41-42.
  • Several people have claimed to have discovered the real nails with which Jesus was crucified throughout the course of the last few years.

This obsession with the nails, which has persisted despite the fact that the earliest gospels make no mention of Jesus being nailed to the crucifixion, is a puzzle to me.

Depictions of the crucifixion

Given that crucifixion was a humiliating way to die, it isn’t unexpected that Christians needed some time to accept the picture of Christ on the cross. What is unexpected is that the first depiction of the crucifixion turns out to be a representation of a cross. However, rather than the religious icons with which we are acquainted — representations that commemorate Jesus’ crucifixion – this oldest image looks to be some late second century satirical graffiti that is directed against Christian believers.

  1. Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons The Alexamenos Graffito, as the artwork is known, depicts a person with the head of a donkey standing on a cross, with the words “Alexamenos worships his God” written underneath.
  2. The fact that the graffito was definitely not created by a Christian demonstrates that non-Christians were aware with certain fundamental parts of Christian thought as early as the second century.
  3. This piece of carved jasper from the second or third century portrays a man on a cross, surrounded by magical symbols.
  4. The British Museum is a place where you may learn about the history of the United Kingdom.
  5. The crucified Christ is shown on the Constanza diamond, who is flanked by the apostles.
  6. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 International License It is believed by scholars that the Constanza gemstone, as it is sometimes called, goes back to the fourth century CE.
  7. Tradition demands this prevalent image of Jesus’ death on the crucifixion since the evidence from antiquity does not give a definitive answer as to whether Jesus was nailed or tied to his cross.
  8. The Crucifixion of Jesus Christ.
  9. It is only in Monty Python’s Life of Brian, which depicts several crucifixion victims, albeit not Jesus, who are chained to their crosses, that it is not assumed that nails were used in the crucifixion.

The cross, rather than the question of whether nails or ropes were used to hang Jesus from a cross, is the image that endures in art and tradition as the most powerful reminder of Christ’s death and resurrection.

Why Did They Crucify Jesus?

When I hear the various sweet-sounding clichés that are thrown about nowadays, one that I hear frequently is that Jesus was crucified because he was incredibly inclusive and gentle. It is reported that Jesus was crucified because he welcomed the outcasts. He was slain because he was hanging around with prostitutes and half-breds, among other things. He was slain because he was showing such bravery in his love, and his opponents couldn’t take it any longer. There is a lot of truth in these remarks.

However, this does not imply that the platitude is accurate, nor does it imply that it is harmless.

Jesus was executed because of his godlike behavior and his wild claims to deity, which is something that the gospel authors all across the world strive to downplay or embellish.

But Jesus remained deafeningly silent.

Nevertheless, I assure you that from this time forward, you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of Power and ascending on the clouds of sky.” Then the high priest tore his garments and cried out, “He has spoken blasphemy against the Most High.” What further witnesses do we require?

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“How do you feel about it?” They said, “He is deserving of death.” In Luke 15:2, the people expressed displeasure with Jesus for dining with sinners and tax collectors (Luke 15:2), but they executed him because he claimed to be God’s Son and the King of Israel.

Let us know whether you are the Son of God by coming down from the crucifixion.” Likewise, the top priests, together with the scribes and the elders, made fun of him, saying: “He rescued others, but he cannot save himself.” His title is “King of Israel,” and if he can come down from the cross today, we will accept him as our Messiah.

  • Because Jesus declared, “I am the Son of God.” Although Jesus’ teachings on Torah repeatedly infuriated Jewish rabbis, it was his self-identification that prompted them to murder him.
  • Rather of assuming that Jesus was most despised because he was so kind and forgiving, we should remember that the Jews stated unequivocally, “It is not for a good job that we are going to stone you, but for blasphemy, because you have declared yourself to be God” (John 10:33).
  • Yes.
  • Yes.
  • He did, in fact, do so.

The claims to Lordship, the posture of authority, the exalted titles, the exercise of Messiahship, the presumed right to forgive, the way in which Jesus placed himself at the center of Israel’s story, the delusions of grandeur, the acceptance of worship, and the audacity of man claiming to be God were the things that infuriated the establishment the most.

The reason he died was because he behaved and talked in the manner of the incarnation Son of God, and because he refused to deny that he was the incarnate Son of God when the world despised him for being that Son of God.

He is married and has two children (Charlotte).

Kevin and his wife, Trisha, have nine children: Ian, Jacob, Elizabeth, Paul, Mary, Benjamin, Tabitha, Andrew, and Susannah. Kevin and Trisha have nine children: Ian, Jacob, Elizabeth, Paul, Mary, Benjamin, Tabitha, Andrew, and Susannah.

Jesus is nailed to the Cross

Via Crucis, Scuola Veneta – Sec. XVIIICattedrale – PadovaELEVENTH STATIONJesus isnailed to the CrossV/. Adoramus te, Christe, et benedicimus tibi.R/. Quia per sanctam crucem tuam redemisti mundum.From the Gospel according toMatthew27:37-42 And over his head they put the charge against him, whichread, �This is Jesus the King of the Jews�. Then two robbers were crucifiedwith him, one on the right hand and one on the left. And those who passed byderided him, wagging their heads and saying, �You who would destroy the templeand build it in three days, save yourself! If you are the Son of God, comedown from the Cross�. So also the chief priests with the scribes and eldersmocked him, saying, �He saved others; he cannot save himself. He is the Kingof Israel; let him come down now from the Cross and we will believe in him�.MEDITATION Jesus is nailed to the Cross. The shroud of Turin gives us anidea of the unbelievable cruelty of this procedure. Jesus does not drink thenumbing gall offered to him: he deliberately takes upon himself all the painof the Crucifixion. His whole body is racked; the words of the Psalm have cometo pass: �But I am a worm and no man, scorned by men, rejected by the people�(Ps22:7). �As one from whom men hide their faces, he was despised.surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows� (Is53:3f.).Let us halt before this image of pain, before the suffering Son of God. Let uslook upon him at times of presumptuousness and pleasure, in order to learn torespect limits and to see the superficiality of all merely material goods. Letus look upon him at times of trial and tribulation, and realize that it isthen that we are closest to God. Let us try to see his face in the people wemight look down upon. As we stand before the condemned Lord, who did not usehis power to come down from the Cross, but endured its suffering to the end,another thought comes to mind. Ignatius of Antioch, a prisoner in chains forhis faith in the Lord, praised the Christians of Smyrna for their invinciblefaith: he says that they were, so to speak, nailed with flesh and blood to theCross of the Lord Jesus Christ (1:1). Let us nail ourselves to him, resistingthe temptation to stand apart, or to join others in mocking him.PRAYER Lord Jesus Christ, you let yourself be nailed to the Cross,accepting the terrible cruelty of this suffering, the destruction of your bodyand your dignity. You allowed yourself to be nailed fast; you did not try toescape or to lessen your suffering. May we never flee from what we are calledto do. Help us to remain faithful to you. Help us to unmask the false freedomwhich would distance us from you. Help us to accept your �binding� freedom,and, �bound� fast to you, to discover true freedom.All:Pater noster, qui es in c�lis:sanctificetur nomen tuum;adveniat regnum tuum;fiat voluntas tua, sicut in c�lo, et in terra.Panem nostrum cotidianum da nobis hodie;et dimitte nobis debita nostra,sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris;et ne nos inducas in tentationem;sed libera nos a malo.Sancta mater, istud agas,Crucifixi fige plagascordi meo valide.� Copyright 2005 – LibreriaEditrice Vaticana

Why Did Jesus Die?

According to EveryStudent.com The killing of Jesus Christ through crucifixion was reserved for the most heinous of offenders. In Jesus’ situation, it seems that almost everyone helped in some way. All of the Jewish religious authorities, the Gentile Roman authority, and an enraged crowd of people demanded his execution. Why? It all began in a little town in Israel, not far from the capital city of Jerusalem. Having reached the age of thirty, Jesus began to educate others about life and God. He drew a large number of people to him.

  1. He accepted not only the affluent and powerful, but also prostitutes, the impoverished, the sick, and others who were excluded in society.
  2. “He who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will be illuminated by the light of life,” Jesus says.
  3. As a result of what they witnessed.
  4. He started with a handful of fish and a few loaves of bread and worked his way up to feeding a 4,000-person hungry gathering.
  5. At sea, Jesus arose and ordered the wind and rain to cease, bringing about a brief respite from the storm.
  6. 3On several occasions, he was able to bring the dead back to life.

So Why Was Jesus Crucified?

As Jesus taught the masses, he was also critical of the religious authority in power at the time. They made a show of their authority, insisting on strict adherence to their stringent rituals, rules, and cultural customs. “They bind together huge loads that are difficult to carry and place them on people’s shoulders,” Jesus remarked of them. 4 “You hypocrites!” he said, in a direct challenge to their position. Isaiah accurately saw your future when he declared, “This nation respects me with their lips, but their hearts are distant from me; in vain do they worship me, teaching the laws of men as doctrines.” 5 In the case of the Sabbath, for example, they were very rigid.

  1. It was more limiting than it was soothing in its effects.
  2. In response, Jesus instructed the guy to take up his mat and walk.
  3. “It is the Sabbath, and it is not permissible for you to be carrying your mat,” the Pharisees told him when they spotted him.
  4. He did not take a break on the Sabbath.
  5. 6

Jesus Was Clear about His Deity.

Knowing Jesus, according to him, was to know God. 7To behold him was to behold God. 8Believing in him was the same as believing in God. 9To accept him was to accept God as well. 10To despise him was to despise God. 11And to honor him was to worship God, for he was the embodiment of holiness. Following Jesus’ popularity, the Jewish Pharisees and Sadducees determined that they needed to get rid of him in order to restore control over the people’s hearts and minds. They captured Jesus and took him before the high priest, who questioned Jesus, “Are you the Christ, the Son of the Blessed?” (Are you the Son of the Blessed?) I am,” Jesus said, and you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of Power, descending on the clouds of sky to meet you.

  1. And they all agreed that he was a murderer who deserved to die.
  2. This means that both Jewish and Gentile people took part in Jesus’ murder.
  3. He thought that Jesus should be freed from his imprisonment.
  4. “Crucify him!” they cried out in unison.
  5. The judgment was death by crucifixion, the form of torture and execution used by the Roman authorities.

Jesus Knew This Would Happen

Jesus was completely unsurprised by all of this. Jesus informed his followers several times previous to his crucifixion that he was going to be arrested, beaten, and crucified, and he was right. His predictions included the possibility of a resurrection three days after his burial. By physically returning to life, Jesus would be able to demonstrate what he had declared about his deity. The soldiers grabbed Jesus and beat him after making a wreath of long thorns and pressing it into his head to serve as a false crown for him.

  1. In many cases, forty lashes were enough to bring down a person.
  2. He died of gradual asphyxia and heart failure while hanging there.
  3. Death on the cross was not only a natural result of Jesus’ miracles and teachings; it was also a deliberate act.
  4. Jesus had previously demonstrated that he has complete control over nature, illness, and even death.
  5. Jesus might have walked away from the crucifixion at any point, given the circumstances.

Jesus made the decision to die. “No one can take my life away from me,” Jesus declared just before his arrest. “I choose to lay it down of my own own.” 14 The decision to do so was deliberate on his part. It had been arranged in advance. Intentional.

Why Did Jesus Allow His Crucifixion?

We operate in ways that are diametrically contrary to God’s methods to varied degrees. Take a short look at the news on any given day and you will see what I mean. Racism, murders, sexual abuse, falsehoods, greed, corruption, terrorism, and wars, to name a few examples of wrongdoing. As individuals, we have a proclivity for causing havoc in our own and other people’s lives. God views us as lost and blind, and he holds us accountable for our actions. Consider how appalled and heartbroken we are to learn that a 6-year-old child has been taken from her family and is being subjected to sexual exploitation.

  1. All of human sin, on the other hand, is an insult to a holy God.
  2. We don’t even live up to our own expectations, let alone those of another person.
  3. So, what would a God who is absolutely holy see?
  4. 15 God instructs the Israelites to sacrifice a lamb once a year for the remission of their sins in the Old Testament, which explains why they must do so once a year.
  5. However, this was just a momentary reprieve.
  6. When Jesus arrived, the prophet John the Baptist proclaimed about him, “Behold, the Lamb of God who wipes away the sins of the world.” (John 1:29) 16 Jesus came to earth to bear the penalty for humanity’s sin, namely for our sin, on the cross in our place.
  7. To save us from God’s wrath, condemnation, and punishment for our sin, Jesus came to earth as our Savior in order to save us from ourselves.
  8. It was Jesus who bore the penalty for our sins on our behalf.
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DaVinci’s Last Supper

You’ve probably seen the iconic artwork by Leonardo da Vinci depicting the “Last Supper,” in which Jesus sits at a long table with the disciples seated next to him on each side of him on either side of the table. The supper that Jesus shared with his followers the night before he was captured and killed was shown by Da Vinci in this painting. As part of that “Last Supper,” Jesus promised his followers that his blood would be shed “for the remission of sins” for all people. 17 On the cross, Jesus, who had done no sin, paid the penalty for our sin.

We weren’t deserving of him taking our position in the world.

The Bible tells us that “God demonstrates his love for us in this: while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” 18

Our Response to the Crucifixion of Jesus

What is it that he expects of us? In order to make amends and gain our forgiveness? No. We will never be able to repay Jesus for all he has done for us. What he demands of us is straightforward. to put their faith in him He urges us to embrace his dying on our behalf, as well as his total and unconditional forgiveness, as a gift from him. Surprisingly, many people do not want to go through with it. They desire to put up an effort to win their salvation. They must earn their way into paradise.

  1. In response to their rejection of everything Jesus has done for them, Jesus stated they will die in their sin and face judgment.
  2. Moreover, everlasting life and an intimate, personal contact with God are also available now, while we are living on the earth.
  3. Jesus was not simply absorbing the consequences of our wrongdoing.
  4. He was extending far more than just forgiveness to those who needed it.
  5. This is analogous to a wealthy billionaire not only canceling a debt owed to him, but also transferring ownership of his whole estate to the individual who was unable to pay the amount back in full.

It is entirely up to us whether or not we accept the gift of a connection with him that he is presenting to us. It was described by Jesus in the following words: “I am the only way, the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father except through me.” 21

His Offer to Us

Anyone who would invite Jesus into their lives and accept his free gift of forgiveness and eternal life will establish a relationship with him that will last for the rest of their lives. Following Jesus’ crucifixion, they buried him in a tomb and stationed a trained Roman guard of soldiers at the tomb to keep watch over him. Why? Jesus had stated on several occasions that he will rise from the dead three days after his his body. Everything he had declared about himself will be proven correct.

  1. After then, Jesus appeared physically to the disciples several times, first to a throng of 500 people, then to individuals.
  2. Each of them was murdered for it, in separate parts of the world from one another, because they were so sure of Jesus’ identity.
  3. “We have come to know and believe in the love that God has for us,” says the apostle John in his book of Revelation.
  4. Whoever lives in love is a part of God.
  5. Here’s how you can do it.
  6. Please accept my apologies.
  7. You have complete control over my life.
  8. Amen.” In the case of someone who has only recently asked Jesus into their lives, his crucifixion signifies that you have accepted his gift, that you have been forgiven, and that you have an eternal connection with him.

Footnotes: (1) John 8:12; (2) Matthew 9:35; (3) (3) 4:41 (Matthew 4:41) (4) Jesus said in Matthew 23:4 (5), Matt 15:9 (6), and John 5:18 (7) John 8:19 (eighth) John 12:45 (eighth) John 14:9 (ninth) (9) John 12:44 and 14:1 are two of the most important passages in the Bible (10) 9:37 (Matthew 9:37) (11) 15:23 (John 15:23) John 5:23 (12) (13) Mark 14:61,62 (KJV) (14) 10:18 (John 10:18) (15) Acts 10:43 (16) Romans 6:23 (17) John 1:29 (18) Matthew 26:28 (19) Romans 5:8 (20) Acts 10:43 (20) Paul writes in Romans 6:23 that (21) 14:6 (John 14:6) (22) (23), John 5:24 (24), John 17:25,26 (23) 1John 4:16,17 (24)

Opinion

During Holy Week in Guatemala, worshippers participate in the Jesus of Nazareth Merced procession, in which they carry a figure of Jesus Christ. Photo by Johann Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images. ) ) Christians throughout the world are commemorating Jesus’ death on Good Friday, followed by a celebration of his resurrection on Easter Sunday, as part of their religious traditions. However, despite the fact that the cross appears often in Christian artwork and Western culture as a whole, misconceptions and myths about its history, origins, and appearance continue to circulate.

  1. Myth number one: The cross on which Jesus died was a stake divided by a horizontal beam.
  2. In addition to emoji (which include both the two-beamLatin cross and theOrthodox cross, also known as the Suppedaneum cross, which has an additional bar towards the bottom), this variant of the cross may be found on anything from roadside monuments to church steeples.
  3. It is important to note that the Greek and Latin terms for “cross” (stauros” and “crux”) do not necessarily refer to the cross that most people are familiar with.
  4. In most historians’ estimations, Jesus’ cross was T-shaped, with the vertical section notched to allow the executioners to bind the victim to the crossbeam before raising it and setting it securely into the top of the cross.
  5. It is said to bore a better resemblance to the item on which Jesus died than the crosses that are more usually shown in Christian art.
  6. 2Jesus was nailed on the cross with nails driven through his hands and feet, which is incorrect.
  7. This includes classics such as Sandro Botticelli’s ” Mystic Crucifixion ” and Diego Velázquez’s ” Christ Crucified “, as well as lesser known works.
  8. In reality, the only time such nails are mentioned in the Gospels is in the book of John, in the tale of the doubting Thomas, who wants to see the marks of the nails on Jesus’ hands to ensure that he is indeed experiencing the risen Jesus (John 20:25).

However, while archaeologists have discovered physical evidence of nails being used to fasten the feet of crucifixion victims, it would have been impossible to nail the condemned to a cross using only nails because the bones in the hands and wrists would not have been able to support the weight of the body.

  1. Suffocation, rather than blood loss, would be the cause of death in this scenario.
  2. 3Jesus (or a bystander) was the one who carried the crucifixion to the cross of Calvary.
  3. Either man is seen bearing a big, wooden cross with both a vertical and a horizontal beam in Christian art (including renderings by Michelangelo, El Greco, and Titian), which is a common motif.
  4. According to historians of ancient execution procedures, such LaGrange College professor John Granger Cook, to the degree that the condemned carried their own crosses, they would have been handed only the horizontal component.

For nearly 1,000 years, the Christian church emphasized paradise rather than the Crucifixion, according to two authors writing in the UU World magazine; in Slate, scholar Larry Hurtado argued that “there was, in short, little to be gained in proclaiming a crucified savior in a setting in which crucifixion was a grisly reality,” noting that “some early Christians attempted to avoid reference to Jesus’ crucifixion.” Although it is true that crosses were relatively uncommon symbols for Christians to employ before to the middle of the fourth century, More than that, the earliest depictions of crosses depict them as delicate, gem-studded staffs rather than as robust implements of execution.

It wasn’t until the 6th century that depictions of Jesus’ crucifixion became increasingly common, with no regular occurrences before then.

“When they crucified Him, driving in the nails, they pierced His hands and feet; and those who crucified Him parted His garments among themselves,” wrote Christian thinker Justin Martyr in a long dialogue with a non-Christian interlocutor in the 2nd century, emphasizing the humiliation and suffering of Jesus’ execution and emphasizing the humiliation and suffering of Jesus’ execution.

The disappearance of the cross or crucifix from visual art may be difficult to explain; nevertheless, timed with the increase of pilgrimage to the Holy Land and the locations of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection, its reemergence may give useful hints.

Some people were even given the opportunity to receive a sliver of the sacred wood.

Myth No.

Some people are completely sold on this concept.

Many ancient faiths utilized symbols comparable to the cross (and Egyptian Christians even adopted the ankh, which is an Egyptian hieroglyph for “life”), but two intersecting lines are a straightforward and extremely common figure.

While it is easy to recognize parallels between religious artwork from different traditions, it is also rather simple to identify differences between them as well.

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